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AALL Spectrum

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AALL Spectrum

ISSN: 1089-86891

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Spectrum is the professional magazine for the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and is included in association membership. This publication “provides informative and engaging articles of interest to AALL members. The magazine informs readers about the ever-changing, multifaceted world of legal information professionals on areas including the transformation of law, career and leadership development, accessibility, education, information technology, and best practices. The magazine also keeps members apprised of Association events and activities.”2

Target audience: Members of AALL are the target audience: members are law librarians in a variety of settings, including academic law school libraries, private firms libraries, judicial and government libraries, and public law libraries for counties and states, as well as other legal information professionals.3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. This is an informal publication of AALL, primarily for association news and short practical pieces that would be of interest to practicing law librarians.6 Though it is not a scholarly journal, it is very well respected and has a high profile in its field.

Medium: Spectrum is a print publication sent free to all AALL members.7 The archives are available online back to mid-1998 at the Spectrum website.8

Content: Spectrum includes articles on subjects of interest to law librarians, especially practical pieces on marketing the library and management tips. The scholarly journal for AALL is titled Law Library Journal;  Spectrum publishes informational pieces more informally written but still of practical use to law librarians.9

Frequency of publication: Spectrum is published six times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/editorial-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Spectrum includes a mix of trend or feature stories, news briefs, regular columns, and opinion pieces about issues that affect legal information and law librarianship as well as Association events and activities.11

Submission and review process: The publishing guidelines indicate that “Spectrum prefers a thorough, detailed proposal letter that fully outlines the article topic.”12

Regarding article length, they note that “Feature articles should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words. News and department articles are typically between 800 and 1,200 words. Shorter or longer articles will be considered. “13

After submitting a query letter, the author should submit the requested article electronically, with any graphics in a separate file. “All submissions will be edited for clarity, grammar, and length.” “Whenever possible, the author will be contacted by either the AALL Spectrum editorial director or AALL publications manager to discuss questions of intention and interpretation.”14

Editorial tone: Reviewing the articles themselves, it appears that Spectrum attempts to include articles that will be of interest to firm, academic, and government librarians rather than focusing on just one type of library. The submission guidelines request “authoritative, well-researched articles about legal information and the profession.  Articles that inform, inspire, provoke, influence, or help improve practices are welcome additions to AALL Spectrum. Each submission should be an original, educational piece.”15

Style guide used: Spectrum follows The Chicago Manual of Style Seventeenth Edition and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition for style and usage, as well as an AALL Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

AALL Spectrum is the best place to engage in the informal professional conversation surrounding law librarianship. Though it is not as high profile or scholarly as Law Library Journal, it may be more widely read, and will help any law librarian make a name for him or herself. The quality of writing is very high, as are the editorial standards. However, it is not appropriate for professors seeking tenure to boost publications, as it is not a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Spectrum is sent free to all AALL members. The archives for this publication are available online at the AALL website,17 and Ulrich’s Periodical Directory indicates that they are also searchable on various LIS databases (including EBSCOhost, H.W. Wilson products, and Thomson Gale databases).18 It is possible the articles will reach non-law librarian readers through these sources.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The main circulation of this magazine is within the United States, but AALL does have some international members. Unfortunately, international demographics were not available on the Spectrum site, advertising materials, AALL Salary Survey, or AALL member information.19 Spectrum is written in American English, and is primarily interested in legal librarianship relevant to the United States.20 If international subjects are covered, the legal systems will require more explanation. An example of international coverage is “Beyond the Spectrum,” by Shaikh Mohamed Noordin, available for download.21

Reader characteristics: AALL reports over 4,000 members, roughly half of whom work in an academic or law school setting. The most populated Special Interest Sections of AALL members are Academic Law Libraries and Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals.22  All librarians in AALL are either law librarians or are interested in the organization of legal information.  This publication is run by, written by, and edited by law librarians, and as such tends to reflect the dominant views of the profession. It’s analytical; fairly negative towards vendors, but strives to be fair; focuses primarily on academic and firm librarian concerns (such as training law students or new attorneys) and to a lesser extent of government librarianship.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed. However, specialized information from non-law library disciplines or terms specific to certain jobs (such as cataloging or database administration) require explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in publishing in Spectrum are advised to list their qualifications in their cover letters, as this audience respects degrees and library experience. Though the publication is focused entirely on law librarianship, general subjects of interest to LIS professionals will overlap in this field — for instance, information on Web 2.0 is of great interest to law librarians, and recent articles have dealt with how Second Life can be used in libraries. It is best, even with general topics, to make it evident how the subject could be useful to a law librarian.24

Last updated: March 24, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 21, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521387398626/111034
  2. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/spectrum/policy-spectrum.html
  3. “AALL Spectrum,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/
  4. “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 21, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399332352226/111034
  5. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  6. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  7. “AALL Spectrum.”
  8. “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/spectrum_issue/
  9. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  10. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  11. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  12. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  13. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  14. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  15. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  16. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  17. “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive.”
  18. “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 21, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399332352226/111034
  19. “Meet Our Members,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/meet-our-members/
  20. “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 21, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399332352226/111034
  21. Noordin, Shaikh Mohamed. “Perspective: Beyond the Spectrum.” Spectrum, 10, no. 6 (2006): 12-13, 17, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/_mediavault/2017/11/pub_sp0604_Persp.pdf (accessed March 24, 2019).
  22. “By the Numbers,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/
  23. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  24. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
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Public Library Quarterly (PLQ)

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitlePublic Library Quarterly (PLQ)

ISSN: 0161-6846 (print), 1541-1540 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wplq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission:Public Library Quarterly (PLQ) is addressed to leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends who believe that change is imperative if public libraries are to fulfill their service missions in the twenty-first century.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) “leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends,” especially those working in public libraries.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles undergo editorial screening and peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: PLQ focuses on how public library directors and operating officers affect change. It examines best practices and service improvement models, management case studies, library mythologies that impede development, planning and outcomes, marketing and fundraising, budget and financial management, new technology in practices, and programs for children.4 “Every issue of  Public Library Quarterly contains informative articles written by the directors and staffs of leading public libraries, news of current public library events, and book reviews covering issues of interest to those in public library work.”5

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: PLQ publishes original research, scholarship, and analyses of current issues in public libraries, from theoretical and practical perspectives. The journal “addresses the major administrative challenges and opportunities that face public libraries, providing insight and assistance to all public library workers.” Furthermore, the journal publishes surveys “that can be developed and used as national benchmarks for such administrative concerns as salaries, usage standards, and budget breakdowns.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online via Editorial Manager, a portal that manages the submission, revision, review, and publication process for authors, editors, and reviewers.8 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and peer review.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: PLQ uses the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

PLQ is a long-standing, high-quality LIS journal that publishes scholarship on all aspects of public libraries from around the world. As such, it is a a good fit for LIS authors whose scholarship is focused on public libraries or who study these libraries’ connections with other information organizations or in the realm of public policy. The journal is both practical and scholarly; many articles are written by public library directors or staff members, but the journal also looks to publish research and surveys in this domain. There is a sense that authors are highly experienced in the realm of public libraries, but this does not necessarily exclude graduate student authors with solid scholarship and novel approaches to the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article’s homepage lists number of views, citations, and Altmetric score.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLQ is published in English for a worldwide audience. Editorial board members are from universities, libraries, and information organizations in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Wales, Ireland, and Taiwan.10 Authors should consider readers from around the globe and explain jargon or regional usages.

Reader characteristics: Readers are public library directors and managers, staff members, trustees, and friends, as well as LIS researchers, scholars, professionals, and graduate students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter, but since this journal has a worldwide reach, authors should be careful to explain particular terms and practices.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

PLQ reaches a worldwide audience of public library directors, librarians, staff members, scholars, researchers, and graduate students. Readers are interested in how current events, policy, trends, and changes in the public library landscape will affect their institutions and how other libraries’ experiences and practices may inform their own practices. Readers look for evidence of positive leadership in and responses to a climate of change in the public library realm. Readers expect both theory- and practice-based articles, as well as larger scale surveys and research results.

Last updated: April 30, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wplq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission show=instructions&journalCode=wplq20.
  6. “Journal Information,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wplq20.
  7. “Instructions for Authors.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Aims and Scope.”
  10. “Editorial Board,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wplq20.
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Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Libraries Journal

ISSN: 2475-8116

Website: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: MLJ is a “peer reviewed, independently published, open access scholarly journal that focuses on innovative marketing activities libraries are engaged in.”1

The journal’s aim is “to publish research and practical examples of library marketing campaigns, library marketing research, public relations campaigns, SWOT analysis, segmentation research, assessment of marketing activities, and tools used for marketing.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals from public, special and academic libraries who work in marketing positions.3

Publisher: MLJ is published independently.

Peer reviewed? Yes. All articles are subjected to a double blind peer review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Two types of articles are published: research-driven work that provides original scholarship, and practical information focusing on best practices and advice.5

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles of 20-25 pages in length and practical articles of 8-10 pages in length. Additionally, practical articles (as columns) under one of the following subjects:

  • Advocacy: articles that focus on developing relationships with stakeholders to help raise awareness and loyalty for library services and resources. This may relate to communicating with government, administration, and the greater community
  • Branding: articles that illustrate how libraries develop their visual identity for their services and resources.
  • From the Trenches: articles that show outcomes of a particular marketing initiative or campaign.
  • Marketing Campaigns: case studies of a marketing campaign and the desired outcomes and objectives sought.
  • Technology: software/apps and web-based technology tools that can be used as part of a marketing campaign.7

Submission and review process: The reviewing process for manuscripts will begin after the call for proposals deadline. Some manuscripts may require substantive revision before they are ready for publication. Once a manuscript has been formally accepted, authors are required to submit a complete electronic copy of the final version, including all figures, charts, tables, appendices, and illustrations.8

Editorial tone: Professional / scholarly.

Style guide used: APA, 6th edition.9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have written about LIS marketing and increasing visibility for libraries, this journal may be a viable publication. Some of the latest articles published are about creating a ‘brand’ for libraries and tips and tricks on video marketing.

Keep in mind that MLJ does not only publish traditional, scholarly articles, but also practical articles on advocacy, branding, case studies of marketing campaigns, technology tools, SWOT analyses and “from the trenches”-type material.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: MLJ is open access, and therefore available for any and all global readers, for free.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Articles are published in English. MLJ states that they are global in scope.10

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely LIS professionals or students who work in or are interested in marketing aspects of librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering the specificity of the journal’s content matter, LIS knowledge may be varied, but strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are interested in a variety of articles, and are seeking out the latest research and information pertaining to LIS marketing. If you have written a scholarly article, a SWOT analysis or have researched a hot topic marketing issue, MLJ readers will be eager to learn about it.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Home,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/
  2. “Home.”
  3. “About,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/about.html
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Home.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 23, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “About.”
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Political Librarian, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Political Librarian

ISSN: 2471-3155

Website: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/ and http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Political Librarian “is dedicated to expanding the discussion of, promoting research on, and helping to re-envision locally focused advocacy, policy, and funding issues for libraries.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, scholars, practitioners, and graduate students, as well as those outside of the LIS discipline, who are interested libraries and tax and public policy.

Publisher: The Political Librarian is organized and published by EveryLibrary.2 It is hosted by the Washington University in St. Louis Open Scholarship site.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Not all articles are peer reviewed, but there is a section in most issues for those that are.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content:The Political Librarian publishes peer-reviewed articles, white papers, and editorials that focus on how funding issues, tax implications, budgeting, and broader economic policy affect libraries on the local level.4 Articles range from focused examinations, such as library budgeting strategies, to broader issues, such as tax reform and trickle-down economics.5 The journal is “at the intersection of local libraries, public policy and tax policy.”6

Frequency of publication: Two volumes each year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: PolicesFinal Manuscript Preparation Guidelines, and Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian.

Types of contributions accepted: The Political Librarian publishes opinions/first drafts, white papers, and peer-reviewed articles. The journal seeks a variety of perspectives, new voices, and lines of inquiry, and does not limit “contributors to just those working in the field of library and information science.” The journal invites “submissions from researchers, practitioners, community members, or others dedicated to furthering the discussion, promoting research, and helping to re-envision tax policy and public policy on the extremely local level.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts though the journal’s online portal. Initial submissions do not have strict guidelines to follow.8 However, accepted manuscripts need to follow the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.9

Editorial tone: The tone is professional. Clear guidelines are provided by the editorial team.10

Style guide used: The journal’s reference and citation style is explained in the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Political Librarian is a new journal (first published in 2015) that has a very particular focus: it is a “dedicated space where practitioners, researchers, and users [can] publish on frontline advocacy experiences, campaign strategy and research, and/or about tax and public policies impacting libraries on the local level.” The journal is a resource for examinations of the impact of tax and public policy locally and how policy affects library services and community outcomes and for new models of library funding and resources to educate stakeholders.12 LIS authors–professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students–who write about the intersection of libraries with tax and public policy will find a good fit with this journal.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available, but the number of downloads appears on each article’s title page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Political Librarian is written in English. The audience is mostly located in the United States, as US tax and public policy are primarily discussed.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students, as well as those outside the LIS community, who are interested in how tax and public policy affects libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a strong academic and practical understand of LIS subject matter, but there may be readers outside of the discipline for whom jargon or idiosyncratic terms should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should understand that readers have a particular interest in libraries and in public and tax policy, and they look for articles that both explain how libraries can survive and thrive in the current environment and how to advocate now for positive changes in the future. Readers also look for local analyses and examinations that may have implications on a broader scale.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


 

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Journal Home,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/.
  2.  The Political Librarian, everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/.
  3. “Browse Journals and Peer-Reviewed Series,” Washington University Open Scholarship, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/peer_review_list.html.
  4. “Journal Home.”
  5. “Most Popular Papers,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/topdownloads.html
  6. “Volume 1, Issue 1 (2015),” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/vol1/iss1/.
  7. “Aims & Scope,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/aimsandscope.html.
  8. “Policies,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/policies.html.
  9. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/styleguide.html.
  10. “Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian,” everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/editorial-team-guidelines-political-librarian/.
  11. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.”
  12. Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, and Rachel Korman, “The Political Librarian: Foundations,” The Political Librarian 1, no. 1(2015): 7, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=pollib.
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Library Management (LM)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

ISSN: 0143-51241

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”2

Target audience:Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”8

Content: “The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright”9

Frequency of publication: Nine times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews, 3000 to 6000 words in Microsoft Word format.11 See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Management topics.

Submission and review process: The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Authors are asked to create an account through ScholarOne Manuscripts and submit their manuscripts there. As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly.13 Also, while the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas,” many articles have a practical tone when addressing individual libraries.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Management is a highly informative publication which explores topics pertaining to libraries all over the world. For instance, in volume 39, issue 3/4, the topics covered include the economic crisis as it pertains to public libraries in Greece, agricultural libraries in Northern India, and a SWOT analysis of Jamaican academic libraries.16 The journal should also be of particular interest to Chinese authors, due to its annual Chinese supplement.17

LIS authors, whether professional librarians or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into current issues in library management and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, however, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English and published in the UK but is international in scope.19 The editor lives in Australia, while the editorial board members live in various countries throughout the world, including the UK, Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and South Africa.20

To ensure international voices have an opportunity to be heard, Emerald offers an editing service, Peerwith, which offers help with “language editing and translation.”21

Also, the aforementioned annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”22 with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”23

Reader characteristics: Most readers are senior managers and academics. Due to the journal’s international scope, its audience will have diverse cultural experiences. However, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because of this publication’s primary focus on LIS managers, readers are likely to have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LM’s audience is a knowledgeable, diverse, and academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough, and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience. Ideally, authors should hold LIS managerial positions themselves to enhance their credibility in the eyes of their readers.

Last updated: March 3, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  2. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  4. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  5. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  6. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  7.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  8. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  10. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  13.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  14. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Steve O’Connor, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Management 39, no. 3/4 (2018).
  17.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  18. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  19. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  20. “Editorial Team,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  21. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  22. “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  23.  “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  24.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  25.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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No Shelf Required

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: No Shelf Required

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.noshelfrequired.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: NSR started as a blog run by Sue Polanka, an academic librarian at Wright State University. For librarians from all fields, it quickly became a go-to source for new information on ebooks in libraries–a burgeoning concept at the time. Sue and the current editor, Mirela Roncevic, joined forces on all sorts of writing endeavors and the blog eventually grew into its own site with regular columnists and contributors from all over the world.1

From NSR’s About page: “In 2016, NSR expanded its mission to inspire professionals inside the book industry to do more with ebooks and econtent and embarked on groundbreaking projects that challenge what we think is possible with ebooks.”2

Target audience: Publishers, writers, editors, LIS students and professionals.3

Publisher: Currently, NSR’s editor is Mirela Roncevic.4

Peer reviewed? Unknown.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: NSR features articles on all sorts of topics–academic libraries, apps, ebook readers, piracy and many more. They have recently expanded to include reviews and opinion pieces from writers in all areas of digital content.5

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/

Types of contributions accepted: Reviews and opinion pieces, news posts.6

Submission and review process: Send proposals to Editorial Director, Mirela Roncevic at mirelaronevic@gmail.com. Review process unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, but casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Given the breadth of information and the scope of topics that are covered, NSR could be a great fit for all sorts of LIS authors. Published pieces are written “by industry insiders of all walks of life: writers, editors, librarians, educators, publishers, vendors, independent authors, and tech entrepreneurs, to name a few. Some creatively draw our attention to the issues, while others offer perspectives on what various statistics tell us about the state of the larger book industry.”7

Authors covering topics regarding ebooks and the digital or technological aspects of the LIS fields may particularly be interested in looking more into NSR.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Readers and writers are primarily in the United States, though they feature contributors from all over the world.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though NSR began as a blog out of Wright State University in Ohio, its audience is found all over North America, with an additional global presence. Articles are published in English, but the website offers Google translation on all pages.8

Reader characteristics: NSR readers are students and professionals in many different areas–LIS, publishing, education and more.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers of NSR may have a library science background, but given the wide range of readers and topics covered, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

NSR strives to publish the latest news and information on the ever growing fields of ebooks and epublishing. Readers interested in these fields are advocates for improving technology and tech usage in the LIS fields and beyond. NSR has a fantastic, comprehensive list of articles and essays related to emerging trends and issues in the ebook/epublishing fields for researchers and inquiring minds. To see if their work would be a good fit, potential authors should check out Learn with NSR to read some the latest publishings.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Home,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Write for NSR,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/
  6. “Write for NSR.”
  7. “Write for NSR.”
  8. “About.”
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Facet Publishing

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Facet Publishing

Website: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Facet Publishing is “the commercial and publishing and bookselling arm of CILIP: the Library and Information Association,” with a focus on global business and attention to detail.1

Target audience: LIS professionals.

Owner: CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.

Types of books published: LIS professional books, textbooks, series and ebooks.

Medium: Print and electronic, though not all titles are available in both formats.

Topics covered: Over thirty LIS subjects are published by Facet, ranging from academic libraries to website & intranet management.2

Number of titles published per year: Exact number unknown, though Facet’s ‘Recently published’ page lists thirty books published between April 2017 and January 2018.3

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php

Types of submissions accepted: Facets asks potential authors to “think carefully about the intended market, the competition and the unique selling points”4 before sending in a proposal. They are looking for “a mixture of content: practice oriented books for working professionals, textbooks that particularly dovetail with the iSchools curriculum and emerging developments and thinking in research for a scholarly audience.”5 Book proposals should contain sections regarding the book’s content, market, and competition, as well as information about yourself.

The content:

  • “A synopsis of the book, including a detailed outline of the work with intended chapter headings, together with a description of each chapter and its estimated length
  • An estimate of the total length of the book
  • A rationale describing why the book is needed, what it hopes to achieve and how, and any new ideas and developments you intend to cover, or new approaches that you intend to use. Notes on additional features such as case studies, checklists, diagrams, photographs, software, etc.
  • Sample material (one or two chapters), if possible
  • An estimated date of manuscript completion”6

The market:

  • “Who is the intended reader?
  • How large do you estimate the potential readership to be?
  • A description of the potential readers (e.g., students, practising library and information professionals/managers, policy makers) with specific details about why they need this book:
    • what sectors/organizations they are working in
    • the required level of professional expertise
    • courses
  • Are there any potential secondary audiences and markets? (e.g., museums, archives, publishers, record managers)
  • Is there international potential? Where? Why?”7

The competition: “Does this book fill a gap in the market? What evidence is there for this gap? Provide a list of any competing books with price, publisher, year of publication, and any other useful information, together with a comment as to how your book differs, what makes it superior and how it will compete.”8

Yourself: “Details of yourself, your experience, related activities, and any other previous publications (whether articles, reports or books).”9

Submission and review process: All proposals should be submitted to the Commissioning Editor. If a proposal is accepted, the author and commissioning editors will work together on a realistic schedule for the book’s publication.10 Facet prides themselves on timeliness and detail, and are quick to market new publications.11

Editorial tone: None listed, but consider that Facet publishes for students and professionals already well versed in the LIS field.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Facet publishes across a wide array of LIS topics, making them a publisher to strongly consider no matter what your subject field may be. Potential authors should keep in mind that Facet requests very detailed information from each book proposal, so authors should have a clear idea of their marketability and relevance. Authors should be sure to carefully read the book submission guidelines to ensure that all questions have been addressed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s readers

Publication circulation: Based in the United Kingdom, but Facet has agents and representatives around the world.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Facet is the bookseller for CILIP, a library and science information association in the U.K., though they emphasize that their publications extend into the international LIS world. They have representatives and agents in countries all over the world, making publications available to a world wide audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Facet publications are information professionals, though there may be a secondary audience in fields such as archives and museums. Facet’s bestselling publications include titles such as Managing Records: A handbook of principles and practice and Practical Cataloging, so it can be assumed that their readers have more than a casual knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics and professionals with a strong knowledge or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Facet publishes for an audience in and outside of the United Kingdom. Their works range from LIS textbooks to simple ‘No-nonsense’ guides about topics such as archives and legal issues in Web 2.0, showing that Facet’s readers vary in their knowledge on contemporary LIS topics. This span in readership could make Facet a viable publisher for potential authors across many different subjects.

Last updated: February 26, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/
  2. “Home,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/index.php/a>
  3. “Recently published,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/category.php?category_code=38
  4. “Book proposal guidelines,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php
  5. “Write for us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/write_for_us.php
  6. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  7. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  8. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  9. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  10. “The publishing process,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February, 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/Guidance_for_Existing_Authors/04%20The%20publishing%20process%20Jan%202012.pdf
  11. “About us.”
  12. “About Us.”
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New Review of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: New Review of Academic Librarianship

ISSN1361-4533 (print), 1740-7834 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/racl20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: The New Review of Academic Librarianship is an international journal that works to establish “the relevance and applicability of theory and/or research for the academic library practitioner.” The journal’s intent is “disseminate developments and encourage discussion on the future role of academic libraries and their services.”1

Target audience: The target audience is academic librarians and information professionals from around the world.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: The New Review of Academic Librarianship publishes a comprehensive range of topics in the realm of academic libraries and their services, including scholarly communication and institutional repositories, learning and research support, information literacy, technological advances, physical space, monitoring and evaluation, collection management, conservation and preservation, collaboration, electronic content, and national and international higher education library policy.6 The journal regularly publishes special issues; past themes include Supporting Researchers: Sustainable Innovation in Strategy and Services7 and Librarian as Communicator.8

Frequency of publication: Four times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: Original research articles, literature review articles,10 and scholarly perspectives “based on theory and research that advance the understanding of the development of high quality academic library and information management practices.”[1o. “Aims and Scope.”]

Submission and review process: New Review of Academic Librarianship uses ScholarOne Manuscripts for submissions.11 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and anonymous peer review.12 Taylor & Francis provides a website for authors that gives an overview of the publishing process and help with submitting manuscripts.13

Editorial tone: The tone of the writing in the New Review of Academic Librarianship is academic yet less formal than one might expect in a scholarly journal. Since the journal is intended for an international readership, authors are instructed to adopt “a straightforward writing style…avoiding over-long or complex sentence structures.”14

Style guide used: APA (6th edition); Taylor & Francis provides a reference guide as well.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The New Review of Academic Librarianship is a prestigious LIS journal with an international scope and a focus on research and practice in academic libraries. Submissions reflect advanced and original research and high-level scholarship. LIS authors are encouraged to submit manuscripts that “significantly contribute to the knowledge base of academic librarians.” Futhermore, the journal welcomes perspectives “from academic library practitioners, educationalists involved with academic libraries and others with relevant knowledge and interest.”16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although published in the United Kingdom, the New Review of Academic Librarianship is intended for an international readership, including both English-speaking and non-English-speaking countries, especially in Europe. The journal is published in English; however, given its intended international audience, the publishers stress the importance of using a straightforward writing style.17

Reader characteristics: The readers targeted are most likely librarians and information specialists associated with colleges and universities. While the specific practices at institutions of higher education may differ in the various nations where the journal is read, the librarians are most likely highly educated individuals providing educational and research support for faculty and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is safe to assume that the readers of this journal are well versed in LIS issues. However, an author should remember that the readers are academic librarians and will not necessarily be familiar with the details or practices of other types of libraries. Furthermore, an author writing for the New Review of Academic Librarianship should consider that the experiences of academic librarians in other countries might differ significantly from those in their own countries, and so provide some context and explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting to the New Review of Academic Librarianship should understand that the readership is international in scope and focused on theory and practice in academic libraries and information services targeted to faculty and students in colleges and universities. They should keep in mind regional and cultural considerations that may need to be explicated for readers from different regions. The readership expects high-level scholarship and research, as well as analyses that emphasize how LIS scholarship can be implemented in practices and services in academic libraries.

 

Last updated: February 10, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=racl20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Journal Information,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=racl20.
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Journal Information.”
  6. “Aims and Scope.”
  7. Wendy White, “Libraries and Research: Five Key Themes for Sustainable Innovation in Strategy and Services,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 23, nos. 2-3: 85-88, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2017.1355637.
  8. Helen Fallon, “Librarian as Communicator: Case Studies and International Perspectives,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 22, nos. 2-3: 107-111, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2016.1216216.
  9. “Journal Information.”
  10. Jo Alcock, “Literature Reviews and Academic Librarianship: The Review Editor’s Perspective,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 22, no. 4: 351-354, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2016.1246291.
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=racl20&page=instructions.
  12. “Aims and Scope.”
  13. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed February 10, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” Taylor & Francis Author Services, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  16. “Aims and Scope.”
  17. “Instructions for Authors.”
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Journal of Library Administration (JLA)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library Administration (JLA)

ISSN: 0193-0826 (Print) and 1540-3564 (Online)1.

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjla20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, JLA “informs readers on research, current developments, and trends related to the leadership and management of libraries.”2. It keeps managers in the information profession informed of the latest trends in management, technology, and budgeting solutions.3.

Target audience: Individuals holding management positions within the library profession.4.

Publisher: Routledge.5.

Peer reviewed? Yes.6.

Type: JLA can be classified as a hybrid publication because articles deal with both the latest trends in technology and management as well as research on historical perspectives and future projections. However, it is primarily a scholarly journal7, since it is peer-reviewed and all articles have abstracts and detailed notes.8.

Medium: Print and online.9.

Content: Includes articles discussing the trends in management and the developments in digital technology, as well as research papers on diverse subjects relating to leadership in various areas of the library profession, such as project management and strategic planning.10.

Frequency of publication: 8 issues per year.11.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on “leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, and more to promote organizational success.”12.

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the editor for the peer-review process. No simultaneous submissions or previously published work is accepted.13.

Editorial tone: Scholarly but readable.14.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).15.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Library Administration contains a lot of useful information for current leaders in the Library and Information Science profession. Not only does it disseminate practical information that promotes efficient management practices, it also publishes articles that range from discussions of theoretical perspectives about technological trends and their effect on the profession to historically fundamental issues of library management. Malcolm Getz’s article “Open-Access Scholarly Publishing in Economic Perspective,” for example, discusses digital versus paper publication and the consequences for financial management.16. LIS professionals who can contribute insightful new outlooks on management issues should be encouraged as well. JLA sometimes publishes special issues that cover a specific theme, so queries—while not required—should be sent first.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A review of the publication shows that while the issues presented within its pages may be considered globally appropriate, most of the research done for these articles is U.S. based. In Volume 46, issue 2, for example, Joseph J. Branin’s “Shaping Our Space: Envisioning the New Research Library” uses Ohio State University’s central research library as the model for its findings,17 while in volume 45, issue 3/4, Lesley Mutinta Moyo and Ellysa Stern Cahoy’s “Library Use in the E-learning Environment: A Profile of Penn State’s World Campus Faculty and Students” uses findings from research conducted at Penn State University in Pennsylvania.18.

The journal is an English publication geared towards LIS professionals in the United States19, but the issues discussed are relevant to librarians in other parts of the world. The authors use scholarly language that is free of cultural predilections to make it accessible to LIS professionals worldwide.20.Although most of the research is U.S. based, the challenges explored are applicable to most libraries across the globe, such as the use of web-based library resources.

Reader characteristics: Although no specific characteristics are available, we may safely assume that readers of the publication are more than likely educated, LIS professionals or MLIS students and graduates. It is likely that a majority of the subscribers of the Journal of Library Administration are LIS professionals since almost all articles cover library or archival type issues. Judging from the title, it is safe to surmise that a percentage of its library and information science audience holds managerial positions. Readers of the Journal of Library Administration are presumably enthusiastic supporters library advancement and champions of library issues, as a majority are professionals in the field. The publication is patently progressive, with articles that promote the aggressive use of technologies in libraries which advocate change. Readers of the journal, as well as the authors of these articles, also encourage using management practices in other fields.21.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS topics and issues is critical to understanding this publication. Readers are most likely familiar with LIS jargon because if they are not already working in the field, they are probably MLIS students or, at the very least, have great interest in the subject matter.22.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the Journal of Library Administration is a specialized publication, the majority of its readers are likely LIS professionals in leading positions within their institutions. Authors should remember that the journal’s subscribers are familiar with LIS jargon, topics, and issues. This audience is not interested in technical services but is partial to articles about management problems and solutions. Authors must submit formal or scholarly pieces and should consider using headings and subheadings to focus readers’ attention on topics and resolutions.

Last updated: January 27, 2018


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. “Journal information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wjla20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  3.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  4. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  5.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  6.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  7. Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  8. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjla20#.U77vALGdROg
  9.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  11.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  13.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  15.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  16. Malcolm Getz, “Open-Access Scholarly Publishing in Economic Perspective,” Journal of Library Administration 42, no. 1 (2005): 1-39, accessed January 27, 2018, doi: 10.1300/J111v42n01-01
  17. Joseph J. Branin, “Shaping our Space: Envisioning the New Research Library,” Journal of Library Administration 46, no. 2 (2007): 27-53, accessed January 27, 2018, doi: 10.1300/J111v46n02_04
  18. Lesley Mutinta Moyo and Ellysa Stern Cahoy, “Library Use in the E-Learning Environment: A Profile of Penn State’s World Campus Faculty and Students,” Journal of Library Administration 46, no. 3/4 (2006): 339-359, accessed January 27, 2018, doi: 10.1300/J111v45n03_01
  19.  Journal of Library Administration, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  20. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  21. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 27, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

ISSN: 2379-95281

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.2 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”3 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”4

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.5

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: LIS professional news.8

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.9

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Active Librarian, Michael J. Carlozzi, accessed March 18, 2018, http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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