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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.1 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”2 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”3

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.4

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.8

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope9

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”1

Target audience: Academic library staff2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.5 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”10 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.11

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .12

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”13

Editorial tone: Academic14, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.15

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”17 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,19 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”20

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”21 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”22 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”24

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”25

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  7.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  9. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  11. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  13. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  14. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  18. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  19. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  21. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  22. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  24. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  25. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Library Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”1

Target audience: “Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”7

Content: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”8

Included in every subscription is an annual Chinese supplement.9

Frequency of publication: 9 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 3000 and 6000 words in length.11

The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

Emerald publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that your submission is complete.14

As per the Author Guidelines: “Each paper is reviewed by the Editor and, if it (is) judged suitable for publication, is evaluated using a double-blind peer review process.”15

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. There is a strong international component to the selection of articles in each issue. While the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas”, there is a practical tone in the sharing of issues concerning individual libraries.16

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.17

References should be written in Harvard style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a highly informative publication in the field of library management. The articles in this journal explore a wide range of issues in various types of libraries worldwide. In the current issue alone (Volume 36 Issue 4/5), articles topics include: e-reserves in a Manila library; social welfare information management in Nigerian libraries; academic library leadership; and promotion and tenure for academic librarians.19

LIS authors, whether professional librarians, or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into  current issues in library management, and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

International authors also have an excellent opportunity to publish research on issues important to their particular geographical area.20 Of particular interest to Chinese authors is the annual Chinese supplement — an excellent avenue for publication.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English23, yet is international in scope. While the editor and book review editor are located in Australia, the editorial advisory board comprise professionals worldwide; including, the U.K., Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand and South Africa.24

Emerald offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, that offers “expert Language Editing services for non-native English-speaking authors, and…discounts to authors planning to submit to Emerald’s journal(s).”25

The annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”26, with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”27

Reader characteristics: Readers are senior managers and academics from across the globe. As this journal has an international scope, the audience will have diverse cultural experiences. Despite this, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior managers and academics.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a knowledgeable, diverse, academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience.

Last updated: June 24, 2015


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  10. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  15. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  19. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  22. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Editorial Team. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  27. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  28. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  29. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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Strategic Library

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Strategic Library

Website: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Strategic Library assists administrators and managers in all types of libraries as they deal with day-to-day and strategic challenges”1 by focusing on “innovation, best practices, and emerging trends in the complex and rapidly evolving library landscape.”2

Target audience: LIS managers and administrators.3

Publisher: LibraryWorks, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: As per their website, Strategic Library offers “in-depth articles, written by highly regarded professionals in the field, (that) focus on leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, (and) funding.8

An “Editorial Forecast” is accessible through their website that includes topics to “spark ideas”9 for possible submission. Broad topic areas include: Collections/Circulation, Community Leadership, Emerging Technologies, Fundraising/Budgeting, Legal Issues, and Strategic Planning.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly, from January to October.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/Write-for-Strategic-Library

Types of contributions accepted: Strategic Library encourages and welcomes submissions from librarians in management positions who have stories to tell and expertise to share.12

Editors offer these basic guidelines:

  • Draw story ideas from personal experience and expertise. Use the Editorial Forecast as a guide.
  • Organize thoughts by preparing an outline.
  • Write around 2500 words.
  • Focus on strategic planning through trends and solutions.
  • Include charts, graphs, photos, and links.
  • Put footnotes, references, and a brief bio at the end.13

A sample outline is also available to guide the author.14

Submission and review process: Articles should be sent in a Word file to the publisher, madavidson@charter.net15

According to the writer’s guidleines: “Once received, the article will be edited and formatted for Strategic Library style and clarity. It will be returned to the author for review and for answers to any questions posed in the text during editing. Once in a final version, the article will be assigned to an issue.”16

Editorial tone: Informal, yet professional. Editors are looking for professional stories that “cover concepts, strategies, and technologies”17 that are important to the writers and their colleagues.18

Style guide used: While no specific style guide is mentioned, editors prefer submissions to be in Microsoft Word document format. “Footnotes, references, and further readings should be formatted as endnotes in any standard style.”19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers a forum for a variety of writers with an interest and experience in current best practices in the library landscape. A recent issue (Issue 17, May 15, 2015) features articles written by public librarians, academic librarians, a private consultant, and representatives of a technology integration company.20

Examples of possible topics for the potential author are:

  • Has your library completed a five-year strategic plan in a new format?
  • Does that plan include renovations, new construction, or consolidations?
  • Have you embarked on an outreach program to the communities you serve?
  • How are you positioning next year’s library fundraising campaign based on what you learned last time?21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the website, subscribers number approximately 8,000, “although that number is an estimate since many of (their) subscriptions are institutional.”22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a North American publication written in English.23 Because the majority of the readership spans North America, regional colloquialisms should be avoided.

Reader characteristics: Readers are “executive decision makers at all types of libraries: academic, public, and specialty.”24 As such, readers are “experienced managers who are looking for the latest strategies and best practices on a range of topics to help them plan for the future.”25

Strategic Library strives to offer a forum for the sharing of information and experience among the decision makers in LIS settings.26 Authoritative, instructive and innovative ideas and practice will appeal to this particular audience.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These are experienced LIS professionals who will understand LIS jargon and expect authoritative writing on the subject of library management.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This audience is looking for ways to improve service in innovative, cost-effective ways. Authors who would like to share successes can effectively communicate by using a first-person narrative of their own experiences. Case studies or others’ experiences with best practices are another option for the potential author to explore. Above all, the author must remember that these are motivated, experienced LIS professionals eager for current knowledge in the field of library management.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  2. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  3. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  4. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). About Us. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775992
  5. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  6. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  7. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  8. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  9. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  10. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Editorial Forecast. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Editorial-Forecast.pdf
  11. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  12. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  13. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  14. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Outline. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Outline.pdf
  15. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  16. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  17. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  18. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  19. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  20. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Issue 17. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://user-94545020520.cld.bz/SL-May15-1#9/z
  21. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  22. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  23. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Contact. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775945
  24. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  25. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  26. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  27. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
Continue Reading

Electronic Green Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Electronic Green Journal

Website: http://escholarship.org/uc/uclalib_egj

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The main goal of the EGJ is to assist in international scholarly communication about environmental issues. In order to meet this goal, the journal strives to serve as an open and active forum of communication about environmental issues, as well as an educational environmental resource, including both practical and scholarly articles, bibliographies, reviews, editorial comments, and announcements.”1

Target audience: Electronic Green Journal is geared toward information consultants, environmentalists, ecologists, regional planners, publishers, booksellers, educators, librarians, students, and others interested in environmental issues.2

Publisher: University of California at Los Angeles Library3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: Environmental Studies and LIS, scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: International environmental information7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions may not be previously published or simultaneously submitted to another publication. Scholarly manuscripts from all fields and countries related to environmental issues are accepted. No specific information is given as to length of manuscripts.9 Book reviews of up to 600 words are also accepted.10

Submission and review process: Authors must register with the website first. Manuscripts are to be written in English and submitted online. Specific requirements for manuscript submission including abstract and formatting instructions can be found at http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines. Before submitting a manuscript, potential authors should ensure it complies with preparation checklist on the Submission Guidelines page. All feature articles are reviewed by experts in the particular field. If necessary, articles will be edited by journal staff.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly12

Style guide used: The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition. Authors are advised to consult the Purdue Online Writing Lab for additional assistance.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an interdisciplinary publication with a broad readership that includes librarians and students. LIS authors whose research encompasses environmental concerns and who wish to reach a global audience should consider submitting to this journal.14

Authors interested in writing book reviews are invited to choose from a selection of titles and produce a review of no more than 600 words.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated. As the Electronic Green Journal has been an open-access publication since 1994, it likely serves a fairly large international audience.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As an open-access online journal written in American English, Electronic Green Journal serves a diverse, well-educated, and professional  international community interested in environmental topics.17

Reader characteristics: This journal serves the global community and is written for information consultants, environmentalists, librarians, educators, students and all who are interested in “worldwide environmental topics.” According to the website, environmental issues cross disciplines and borders, so readers will likely be progressive and liberal, and come from a variety of backgrounds.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since readers come from a variety of disciplines, authors are well-advised to include descriptions of any specific LIS terms and subject.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

By publishing in the Electronic Green Journal, authors may expect to reach a politically liberal, professionally diverse, and international audience interested in environmental issues.20

Last updated: April 22, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  2. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  3. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  4. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  5. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  6. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  7. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  8. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  9. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  10. “Guide for Reviewers,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=guidelinesforreviewers
  11. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  13. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  14. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  15. “Guide for Reviewers,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=guidelinesforreviewers
  16. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  17. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  18.  “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  19. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  20. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
Continue Reading

New Review of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The New Review of Academic Librarianship (This journal replaced and continued The British Journal of Academic Librarianship.)1

Website: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713687299~db=all

Purpose, objective, or mission: The New Review of Academic Librarianship is a journal which publishes information pertinent to providing library and information services in academic library settings.2

Target audience: Librarians and other information professionals working in or with college and university libraries.3 While published in Great Britain4, the New Review is intended for an international audience.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis5

Peer reviewed? Yes, submissions undergo editorial screening and anonymous peer-review.6

Type: LIS scholarly7: although the journal emphasizes content that addresses the current concerns of practicing librarians, the articles are primarily research based, rather than experiential or anecdotal.8 This publication is geared towards academic libraries.9

Medium: Available in both print and electronic versions.10

Content: The array of topics suggested on their website is indeed comprehensive, ranging from traditional library issues (e.g., collection management, information literacy) to administrative concerns (financial or human resources management, marketing) to strategic matters (developments in building design, or international policy trends). Not surprisingly, technology issues are prominent in the published texts. While some do include a brief editorial, most issues consist exclusively of full-length articles.11

Frequency of publication: Three times per year. 12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t713687299~tab=submit~mode=paper_submission_instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their website, “Particular interests at present are: institutional repositories and the place of the library; new developments in library space planning and utilization; electronic content procurement, management and use; the future role of the librarian; new areas of collaboration and resource sharing; cross-sectoral initiatives.”13 Papers should not have been published previously, or submitted elsewhere simultaneously.14

Submission and review process: Authors are encouraged to register with ScholarOne Manuscripts and use this service to submit their work. Per the website, “An abstract of no more than 100 words outlining the scope of the paper and its main results or conclusions should precede the main text. The text should be typed with double-spacing, one inch margins, and be no longer than 7,000 words (excluding references), with numbered pages.”15

Editorial tone: The tone of the writing in the New Review is less formal than one would perhaps expect in a scholarly journal. Since the journal is intended for an international readership, authors are instructed to adopt “a straightforward writing style…avoiding over-long or complex sentence structures.”16

Style guide used: MLA with additional specific Taylor & Francis guidelines.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The New Review of Academic Librarianship is one of the more prestigious LIS journals in Great Britain. An article published in this publication would serve well in advancing ones tenure application. However, it is probably not the title in which to start ones publishing career; submissions are limited to full-length articles, and most of the works that are published are based on extensive research.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Taylor & Francis website contained no information on the journal’€™s circulation.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although published in the United Kingdom, The New Review is intended for an international readership, including both English-speaking and non-English speaking countries, especially in Europe. The journal is published in English; however, given its intended international audience, the publishers stress the importance of using a straightforward writing style. Furthermore, when writing for an international audience, authors must be careful not to assume that their readers will recognize the same imagery or cultural references that a North American audience would. Also, writers should avoid excessive “Americanisms” in their use of English, as that would cause their article to appear out-of-place among other writings that use British diction.18

Reader characteristics: The readers targeted are most likely librarians and information specialists associated with colleges and universities. While the specific practices at institutions of higher education may differ in the various nations where the journal is read, it is still probable that the librarians are highly educated individuals providing educational and research support for faculty and students.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Again, it would be safe to assume that the readers of this journal are well versed in LIS issues, However, an author should remember that the readers are specifically academic librarians, and will not necessarily be familiar with the details or practices of other types of librarianship.20 Furthermore, an author writing for the New Review should also consider that the experiences of academic librarians in other countries might differ significantly from those in the United States.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Given that the readers of the New Review are spread among the academic systems of several countries, it is important that any author writing for this publication should become familiar with the variations in the work of librarians in different countries. While it would be unreasonable to expect a writer to fully understand every nuance of every nation’€™s system, it is important that they be able to look beyond the practices of North America, and that they be able to present their research in a way that allows readers to integrate it with their environments.

Last updated: October 31, 2014


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The New Review of Academic Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402489312655/168264
  2. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Aims & scope. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=racl20#.U5hJKyjcBOg
  3. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Aims & scope. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=racl20#.U5hJKyjcBOg
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The New Review of Academic Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402489312655/168264
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The New Review of Academic Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402489312655/168264
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The New Review of Academic Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402489312655/168264
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The New Review of Academic Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402489312655/168264
  8. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
  9. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Aims & scope. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=racl20#.U5hJKyjcBOg
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The New Review of Academic Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402489312655/168264
  11. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
  12. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The New Review of Academic Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402489312655/168264
  13. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
  14. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
  15. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
  16. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
  17. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
  18. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
  19. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Aims & scope. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=racl20#.U5hJKyjcBOg
  20. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Aims & scope. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=racl20#.U5hJKyjcBOg
  21. Taylor & Francis Online. (2013). Instructions for authors. New Review of Academic Librarianship. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?page=instructions&journalCode=racl20#.U5hH-SjcBOg
Continue Reading

AIIP Connections

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AIIP Connections

Website: http://www.aiip.org/AIIPConnections

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the publication’€™s website, AIIP Connections is the “€œquarterly publication written by and for the members of the Association of Independent Information Professionals (AIIP).”1 The AIIP website indicates that the AIIP was created to “€œadvance the knowledge and understanding of the information profession.”2

Target audience: Independent information professionals3

Publisher: Association of Independent Information Professionals (AIIP).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional.6

Medium: Online. Current issues are available to the public, but only members can access back issues.7

Content: The publication consists of feature articles, member profiles, AIIP Committee profiles, and book/product reviews. Feature articles generally consist of marketing tips, business planning, research techniques, specialist research, social networking tools/tips, ethics, and micro business management.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Writer guidelines can be found at http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf. Contact Editor-in-Chief Phyllis Smith at ConnectionsEditor@aiip.org for more information.

Types of contributions accepted: The publication accepts original works which have not been published elsewhere and must not contain any material protected by copyright, unless proper permission has been received. Feature articles must be between 1200 to 1600 words.10

Submission and review process: The publication advises to submit article ideas to the Editor for feedback prior to drafting an article. The publication deadlines are the first of February, May, August, and November.11

Editorial tone: Neutral tone where a “friendly style of writing is preferred.”€ The tone is more professionally driven, as opposed to a formal scholarly approach.12

Style guide used: No particular style is indicated. The submission guidelines provide a short list of style guidelines including use of heading/subheadings (yes), length of paragraphs (short preferred), footnotes (no), and inclusion of personal information at end of article (yes).13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

AIIP Connections provides an excellent forum for the LIS author who has interest in exploring a career as an independent information professional (or are already engaged in the practice thereto). This publication could also serve LIS authors who have specialized knowledge in research techniques which would cater to the needs of the independent information professional. While LIS authors may have specialized research knowledge on research techniques, potential works should be written with a focus on how such research techniques may impact on independent information professionals from a practical perspective.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: From the Writer Guidelines: “Each issue of AIIP Connections is distributed as a download to over 500 independent professional business owners in more than 20 countries around the world.”14 

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International. Publication reports distributed in more than 20 countries around the world.15 English, with US English spelling preferred.16

Reader characteristics: Publication reports distribution to over 500 independent information professionals in more than 20 different countries. Readers consist primarily of independent information professionals engaged as specialized business owners. Readers share a collaborative approach in “€œsharing ideas, experiences, and observations” as independent information professionals.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers will have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter; however LIS authors should not assume all readers will be familiar with specific LIS related jargon.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should be aware that the readers are primarily professionals who are engaged as entrepreneurs in the information field. Readers will expect articles specifically tailored to this field. While articles should be professionally written, readers will expect an approach which has practical applications or implications. LIS authors with specific knowledge in emerging techniques in the acquisition/management/distribution of information could use this publication as a forum if specifically tailored to the independent information professional.

Last updated: April 20, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  2. Association of Independent Information Professionals. (2014). About AIIP. Retrieved from http://aiip.org/about
  3. Association of Independent Information Professionals. (2014). About AIIP. Retrieved from http://aiip.org/about
  4. Association of Independent Information Professionals. (2014). Discover AIIP Connections. Retrieved from http://aiip.org/discover/aiip-connections
  5. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  6. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  7. Association of Independent Information Professionals. (2014). AIIP Connections. Retrieved from http://aiip.org/content/aiip-connections
  8. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  9. Association of Independent Information Professionals. (2014). Discover AIIP Connections. Retrieved from http://aiip.org/discover/aiip-connections
  10. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  11. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  12. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  13. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  14. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  15. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  16. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  17. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
  18. AIIP Connections. (2011). AIIP Connections writer guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.aiip.org/sites/default/files/aiip-connections/aiip-connections-guidelines.pdf
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Journal of Library Administration (JLA)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library Administration (JLA)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjla20

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, JLA “informs readers on research, current developments, and trends related to the leadership and management of libraries.”1 It keeps the information professional in a position of management in the library field informed about the latest trends in management, technology, and budgeting solutions.2

Target audience: Individuals in a position of management within the library profession.3

Publisher: Routledge.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: JLA may be classified as a hybrid publication because articles deal with both the latest trends in technology and management as well as research dealing with historical perspectives and future projections. However, it is primarily considered to be a scholarly journal6 since it is peer-reviewed and all the articles have abstracts and detailed notes.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: Includes articles discussing the trends in management and the developments in digital technology, research papers on diverse subjects relating to leadership in various areas of the library profession, such as project management and strategic planning.9

Frequency of publication: 8 issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on “leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, and more to promote organizational success.”11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the editor for the peer-review process. No simultaneous submissions or previously published work accepted.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly but readable.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Library Administration contains a lot of information that useful to current leaders in the Library and Information Science profession. Not only does it disseminate practical information that promote efficient management practices, it also publishes articles that range from discussions of theoretical perspectives about technological trends and its effect on the profession to historically fundamental issues of library management. Malcolm Getz’s article, Open-Access Scholarly Publishing in Economic Perspective, for example, discusses digital versus paper publication and the consequences for financial management.15 LIS professionals who can contribute insightful new outlooks on management issues should be encouraged as well. JLA sometimes publishes special issues that cover a specific theme so queries should be sent first, although it is not required by the journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A review of the publication shows that while the issues presented within its pages may be considered globally appropriate, most of the research done for these articles are U.S. based. In volume 46, issue 2, for example, Joseph J. Branin’s Shaping Our Space: Envisioning the New Research Library, uses Ohio State University’s central research library as the model for its findings,16 while in volume 45, issue 3/4, Lesley Mutinta Moyo and Ellysa Stern Cahoy’s Library Use in the E-learning Environment: A Profile of Penn State’s World Campus Faculty and Students uses findings from research conducted at Penn State University in Pennsylvania.17

The journal is an English publication geared towards LIS professionals in the United States18 but the issues discussed are relevant to librarians in other parts of the world. Besides being printed in English, authors use language that is scholarly and is free of cultural predilections to make it accessible to LIS professionals worldwide.19 Although most of the research is U.S. based, the challenges explored are applicable to most libraries across the globe, such as the use of web-based library resources.

Reader characteristics: Although no specific characteristics are available, we may safely assume that readers of the publication are more than likely educated, LIS professionals or MLIS students and graduates. It is likely that a majority of the subscribers of the Journal of Library Administration are LIS professionals since almost all articles cover library or archival type issues. Judging from the title, it is safe to surmise that a percentage of its library and information science audience is also in managerial positions. Readers of the Journal of Library Administration are presumably enthusiastic supporters of the advancement of the library and champions of library issues as a majority are professionals in the field. The publication is patently progressive, with articles that promote the aggressive use of technologies in libraries and that advocate change. Readers of the journal, as well as the authors of these articles, also encourage the use of management practices in other fields to the library profession.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS topics and issues are critical if one is to understand the matters discussed in this publication. Readers are most likely familiar with LIS jargon because, if they are not already working in the field, they are probably MLIS students or, at the very least, have great interest in the subject matter.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the Journal of Library Administration is a specialized publication, a majority of its readers are most likely LIS professionals in leading positions within their institutions. Authors must keep in mind the scholarly nature of the journal and that its subscribers are familiar with LIS jargon, topics, and issues. This audience is not interested in technical services but are partial to articles about management problems and solutions. Authors must submit pieces that are formal or scholarly and might benefit from using headings and subheadings to focus the attention of readers to the work’s topics and resolutions.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  2. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  3. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Administration. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Administration. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Administration. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  7. Informa UK Limited. (2014). List of issues. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjla20#.U77vALGdROg
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Administration. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  9. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Administration. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  11. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  12. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  13. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  14. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  15. Getz, M. (2005). Open-access scholarly publishing in economic perspective. Journal of Library Administration42(1), 1-39. doi: 10.1300/J111v42n01-01
  16. Branin, J.J. (2007). Shaping our space: Envisioning the new research library. Journal of Library Administration, 46(2), 27-53. doi: 10.1300/J111v46n02_04
  17. Moyo, L.M. & Cahoy, E.S. (2006). Library use in the e-learning environment: A profile of Penn State’s world campus faculty and students. Journal of Library Administration, 46(3/4), 339-359. doi: 10.1300/J111v45n03_01
  18. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Administration. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405022099503/83292
  19. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjla20&page=instructions#.U77vELGdROg
  20. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
  21. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Library Administration. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjla20#.U77vGLGdROg
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San Francisco Business Times

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: San Francisco Business Times

Website: http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/

Purpose, objective, or mission: San Francisco Business Times is a publication focused on the business community and business news in San Francisco and the Bay Area.1

Target audience: This publication is aimed at businesses, corporations, and executives in the San Francisco Bay Area. They tend to publish rankings and lists of prominent corporations, so are very popular with marketing personnel.

Publisher: American City Business Journals, Inc.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication; local business journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: San Francisco Business Times publishes articles on businesses and business news in the San Francisco Area. They also compile a book of lists (ranking companies in various sectors by size and prominence) which is heavily used by marketing professionals.3

Frequency of publication: Weekly.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.bizjournals.com/about-us/help (Scroll down to “Can you accept press releases, news tips or story ideas?”)

Types of contributions accepted: “You can send press releases, news about your company, news about your local industry or a news tip.”5

Submission and review process: You can fill out the form found on the Contact page, or use email, mail, fax, or telephone. “If you’re not certain of the person to contact, send it in care of the Editor. Please remember to include the name of a contact person and a business phone number.”6

Editorial tone: The San Francisco Business Times uses a traditional newspaper structure, leading with the most interesting information and following with more detail. The articles are generally short, punchy, and to the point.

Style guide used: Not listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors could contact the editors to pitch ideas for stories about how libraries benefit the business community. There could be potential to highlight special libraries or public libraries: for example, a case study on how a special library’s research and information services supported a company, or a story about how public libraries support job skill development or entrepreneurship. In addition, any writer seeking better exposure in the business community may want to post comments on the site.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 16,687 paid subscribers, with 527,723 unique monthly visitors to the website.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: It is available nationwide through its website, but the target audience is Northern California, Bay Area. The cultural make-up of readership is as diverse as the city itself, but the newspaper does not go out of its way to cover cross-cultural issues, except as they relate to business opportunities.

Reader characteristics: Readers are educated: 99% have attended college, with 22% obtaining a master’s degree and 12% holding a doctorate. 78% of readers influence decisions at their company.8

The readers of the SF Business Times are generally people doing business in the Bay Area (or looking to expand into the Bay Area). The businesses they work in are a mix, judging from the news coverage in the paper itself. There are articles on restaurants, office space, new construction, major retailers, employers relocating, and profiles of major local employers, and businesses that serve all these demographics.

This paper is businesslike in tone and subject matter. The people reading it may have a cross-section of political leanings, personal beliefs and values, etc, but they are not interested in exploring them in this format. Any commentary outside of introducing business resources should be kept to a minimum, as it may alienate the readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This audience is not knowledgeable about LIS subject matter, beyond what you would learn as part of a regular college education. Any library-oriented terminology should be explained. However, this would be a wonderful forum for marketing library resources to business people. People look to this newspaper for business opportunities, and new information resources would be a natural outgrowth of that.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of the San Francisco Business Times are primarily interested in expanding their businesses; that is their motivation for reading this publication. Any writing that would help them with this goal would be well received. Authors should strive to write in a clear, businesslike tone, and to impart as much information as possible.

Last updated: November 3, 2016


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “San Francisco Business Times,” Bizjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016, http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/
  2. “About Us,” Bizjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016, http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/about-us/
  3. “San Francisco Business Times Book of Lists,” Bizjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016,   http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/research/bol-marketing/
  4. “Subscribe Now,” Bizjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016, https://secure.bizjournals.com/subscribe/selectTerm?market=sanfrancisco&iana=csnav&csrc=6311
  5. “Help,” Bizjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016, http://www.bizjournals.com/about-us/help
  6. Help.”
  7. “Market Map,” Thebusinessjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016, http://www.thebusinessjournals.com/audience/interactive-map/
  8. “Print and Digital Subscriber Profile,” Bizjournalsmediakit.com, accessed November 3, 2016, http://www.bizjournalsmediakit.com/predownload.aspx?id=bf8ba41f-dbee-4cf3-8cf1-645d94b9377f&at=1#page=1
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Marketingprofs.com

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: MarketingProfs

Website: http://www.marketingprofs.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: MarketingProfs provides marketing information for business professionals or other individuals interested in marketing their products or services. Information is provided through articles, online seminars, reports, workshops, and other online tools.1

Target audience: Marketing, business professionals, small business owners, and entrepreneurs.2

Publisher: MarketingProfs LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian website and newsletter for business professionals and others interested in marketing.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: Articles and opinion pieces about marketing, as well as summaries of research findings.7

Frequency of publication: Website updated regularly, newsletter MarketingProfs Today published daily.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.marketingprofs.com/write-for-us

Types of contributions accepted: How-to marketing articles, opinion pieces, and market-related research findings.9

Submission and review process: From their website, “We will inform you whether your article has been accepted for publication; expect to hear from us at the latest within a week of our having received your email. If we choose not to accept your article, you may or may not hear from us, depending on how crowded our inbox is. Articles accepted for publication will be edited for clarity and brevity and to conform to MarketingProfs’ house style. We will likely change your title, too, so you might want to suggest some alternatives.”10

Editorial tone: “Fresh and approachable.”11

Style guide used: None indicated, although they do advise against using certain language: “…don’t use “leverage” as a verb. Since we’re on the subject of what not to use… avoid ‘incentivize.’ Also avoid ‘when it comes to,’ because we’ll end up interpreting it as a sign of lazy writing.”12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication would have potential for a writer with a background or interest in marketing. Most librarians have experience in marketing, if not formal training, to ensure their libraries survive and thrive. For example, an author could write about their experience and how it can be applied outside the library.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 515,000 unique website visitors each month.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: MarketingProfs has a global reach, though 67% of users reside in North America.14 Authors should be aware of the corporate culture, as many readers are employed at businesses and large organizations. Marketing language and jargon might be used and understood among the readers of this publication.

Reader characteristics: Readers are marketing professionals. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, marketing professionals usually have a bachelor’€™s or master’€™s degree in business with an emphasis on marketing. Most of these professionals would also have strong computer and technological skills, and people in this field are “€œcreative, highly motivated, resistant to stress, flexible, and decisive.”15 Considering that the site is designed for a very specific audience, it can be assumed that the readers will share similar professional interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will likely not be familiar or have knowledge of library and information science subject matter, unless the reader works in a library.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

An author should write very professional level articles that address new and exciting ideas in marketing. An article on marketing library services may be well received, but only if the article contains marketing approaches that can be applied to other types of organizations and businesses. Another type of article that might be well received is an article on technology in the library, and the use of technology to market the library effectively. Many of the articles published in MarketingProfs are technology oriented.

Last updated: October 11, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “MarketingProfs,” MarketingProfs.com, accessed October 11, 2016,  http://www.marketingprofs.com
  2. MarketingProfs.”
  3. MarketingProfs.”
  4. “Write for MarketingProfs,” MarketingProfs.com, accessed October 11, 2016,  http://www.marketingprofs.com/write-for-us
  5. MarketingProfs.”
  6. “What is MarketingProfs?,” MarketingProfs.com, accessed October 11, 2016, http://www.marketingprofs.com/about/
  7. Write for MarketingProfs.”
  8. Write for MarketingProfs.”
  9. Write for MarketingProfs.”
  10. Write for MarketingProfs.”
  11. Write for MarketingProfs.”
  12. Write for MarketingProfs.”
  13. “Our Audience,” Services.MarketingProfs.com, accessed October 11, 2016, http://services.marketingprofs.com/our-audience/
  14. Our Audience.”
  15. “Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers,” BLS.gov, accessed October 11, 2016, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertising-promotions-and-marketing-managers.htm
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