Wiki Tags Archives: Management and leadership

School Library Connection

 

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Connection 

ISSN: 2380-98411

Website: https://schoollibraryconnection.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “School Library Connection (SLC) is an extensive learning resource center for school library professionals. As the combined evolution of School Library Monthly and Library Media Connection magazines, SLC maintains their commitment to providing those in the school library field with practical insights and inspiration while also advancing the scope and mission of its predecessors.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals working in school libraries and educators.3

Publisher: Libraries Unlimited.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Articles on “Organization & Management, Instructional Leadership, and Perspectives & Partners.” Reviews are also featured in a searchable database.8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly (print); continuously (online.)9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_SubmissionGuidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: Queries for proposed articles should be addressed to the appropriate editor found on their submissions page. Articles on day-to-day operations and best practices of school librarianship should be discussed with the Organization & Management editor. Articles on instructional practice should be discussed with the Instructional Leadership editor. Articles on school libraries in the broader context of education should be discussed with the Perspectives & Partners editor. Experienced and new writers are welcomed.10

Reviews are also accepted in the form of “concise descriptions and evaluations of the contents, quality, and curricular applications of books and other media available for school library purchase.”11

Submission and review process: Authors must send a query to the appropriate editor to develop their idea and article before submission. The final article must then be sent to that same editor.12 There is an editorial calendar available to guide author submissions.13 Articles are typically published four months after the article deadlines.14

All book and material reviews should be emailed to the reviews editor.15

Editorial tone: Informative and conversational.16

Style guide used: An in-house guide based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th Edition.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Excellent opportunity for LIS professionals involved with school libraries, with the ability to convey they first hand experiences with an active voice and in a clear, conversational style. Talented first-time authors are welcomed, so this would be a great place to start building a writing portfolio for a respected and widely-read publication. While not a peer-reviewed publication that would support tenure, work in this magazine reaches a very large audience and will increase the visibility of any contributing author.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has over 5,000 readers. The website reports an average of 4,250 visitors.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is based in North America, with a corresponding readership.19 Readers would be familiar with LIS jargon, gained through practice or education, and the issues facing school libraries. Given the practical focus of the publication, readers most likely approach their work with a positive attitude, interested in bettering themselves and the service they provide.20

Reader characteristics: Readers will have experience with libraries, especially school libraries, and the majority work directly with students.21 The 2019 editorial calendar indicates audience interest in OER, collection development, primary resources, collaborating with other school departments, makerspaces, cultural competence, and political literacy, all within the K-12 school library context.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While a reader may have obtained their LIS knowledge through an undergraduate program for media specialists or through a LIS graduate program, depending on their position, it can be assumed all will have a clear understanding of the working of the school library and the responsibilities of the LIS professionals in K-12 libraries. Acronyms and terms common in education and school librarianship would be acceptable to use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication expect articles that support their efforts to improve the LIS services they provide. They want information from colleagues about their successes and efforts they can replicate in their own libraries. To be successful writers will need to meet their collaborating editor’s expectations and submit articles written in an active voice, from personal experience or observation.

Last updated: July 5, 2019


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “School Library Connection,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed July 5, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1562358591408/826729
  2. Libraries Unlimited, “About,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/About
  3. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com.
  8. Libraries Unlimited, “About.”
  9. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  10. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/About/Write
  11. Libraries Unlimited, “Reviews+,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/Home/reviews?tab=5
  12. Libraries Unlimited, “Writing for School Library Connection Frequently Asked Questions,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_FAQ.pdf
  13. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
  14. Libraries Unlimited, “Writing for School Library Connection Frequently Asked Questions.”
  15. Libraries Unlimited, “Reviews+.”
  16. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  17. Libraries Unlimited, “Article Submission Guidelines,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2o19, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/documents/SchoolLibraryConnection_SubmissionGuidelines.pdf
  18. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection Media Kit 2018-2019,” School Library Connection, accessed July 5, 2019, https://schoollibraryconnection.com/assets/mediaserver/SLC/1981/1981090.pdf
  19. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection Media Kit 2018-2019.”
  20. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  21. Libraries Unlimited, “School Library Connection.”
  22. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
  23. Libraries Unlimited, “Write for Us.”
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AIIP Blog

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AIIP Blog (formerly AIIP Connections until March 2019)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://blog.aiip.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Association of Independent Information Professionals created the AIIP blog in order “to showcase our members’ expertise, to highlight AIIP’s generous culture of knowledge-sharing, and to inspire the info-entrepreneurs of tomorrow.”1 The blog serves as a resource for independent business owners who provide information-related services.2

Target audience: Independent (not-employed) information professionals, individuals considering becoming independent information professionals, businesses or individuals seeking the services of independent information professionals, and business or individuals who work in any field of the information profession.3

Publisher: Association of Independent Information Professionals (AIIP).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Blog posts on professional development and business management tend to be the most sought-after pieces. Other common content topics include AIIP news, getting started in the profession, case studies and success stories, tips and strategies on growing IIP businesses, tech trends, and professional development tips.8

Frequency of publication: Continuously.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://blog.aiip.org/contribute/

Types of contributions accepted: Original posts of 500-750 words in length on any specific topic within the subjects of research, information management and technology, marketing and communications, training and consulting, and writing and editing.10

Submission and review process: Content should be submitted in Google Docs or Microsoft Word format via email. The blog editors may make minor revisions without notification before posting.11

Editorial tone: Concise writing free of complex vocabulary is preferred. The use of bullet-points to make content more “scannable” to online readers is encouraged. The submissions guidelines page offers some helpful notes and resources on making online writing appealing and easy to read.12

Style guide used: No particular style is indicated. Read the submissions guidelines thoroughly for notes on preferred style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The AIIP Blog provides an excellent forum for the LIS author who has interest in exploring a career as an independent information professional (or who is already engaged in the practice). This publication could also serve LIS authors who have specialized knowledge in research techniques which would cater to the needs of the independent information professional. While LIS authors may have specialized research knowledge on research techniques, potential works should be written with a focus on how such research techniques may impact on independent information professionals from a practical perspective.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available. However, the blog links to many social media platforms that may increase readership of any particular post.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The subject matter and readership of the blog is international in scope. Simple, clear, and concise English should be used to make material accessible to the wide audience.14

Reader characteristics: Readers consist primarily of independent information professionals engaged as specialized business owners. Readers share a collaborative approach in €œsharing ideas, experiences, and observations as independent information professionals.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers will have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter; however,  authors should refrain from using overly technical and elaborate language, and err on the side of simple explanation.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should be aware that the readers are primarily professionals who are engaged as entrepreneurs in the information field. Readers will expect articles specifically tailored to this field. While articles should be professionally written, readers will expect an approach which has practical applications or implications. LIS authors with specific knowledge in emerging techniques in the acquisition/management/distribution of information could use this publication as a forum if specifically tailored to the independent information professional.

Last updated: July 5, 2019


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org/about/.
  2. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Who We Are,” AIIP, accessed July 5, 2019, https://www.aiip.org/Discover/WhoWeAre/
  3. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  4. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  5. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org/contribute/
  6. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  7. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “A Go-To Resources for the Independent Info Pro.”
  8. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  9. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “AIIP Blog,” AIIP Blog, accessed July 5, 2019, https://blog.aiip.org
  10. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  11. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  12. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  13. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  14. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  15. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
  16. Association of Independent Information Professionals, “Contribute.”
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In the Library with the Lead Pipe

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: In the Library with the Lead Pipe

ISSN: 1944-61951

Website: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website’s About page: “Lead Pipe believes libraries and library workers can change the world for the better. We improve libraries, professional organizations, and their communities of practice by exploring new ideas, starting conversations, documenting our concerns, and arguing for solutions.”2

Target audience: Educators, administrators, library support staff, technologists, and community members.3

Per co-founder Brett Bonfield: “We do our best to reach beyond librarians, administrators, etc. and also engage people who care about the same things that we care about, such as publishing, reading, knowledge, intellectual freedom . . . all the intersections between librarians and other fields, professions, avocations. We do this by trying to avoid jargon and by telling good stories, and we also do it by interviewing non-librarians and by asking non-librarians to write for us or serve as peer reviewers.”4

Publisher: The editorial staff of In the Library with the Lead Pipe5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 by at least one external and one internal reviewer7

Type: An LIS scholarly publication that crosses over into the professional and trade publication category.8

Medium: Online.9

Content: The goals of Lead Pipe are to start conversations and to propose solutions to LIS problems and concerns. The content includes essays by the editorial board and articles by guest authors, including “educators, administrators, library support staff, technologists, and community members.”10 Articles range from advice to LIS students, to notes from LIS professionals in the workplace, to favorite books and commentary on current LIS-related news items such as retaining LGBTQ staff and library use of social media.11

Frequency of publication: Monthly.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Constructive criticisms and commentary from people experiencing the library from the inside as librarians, administrators, and support staff, as well as community members who interact with libraries. The goal is to provide perspective from all aspects of the library community. The editors encourage article proposals from LIS students and those new to the profession.13

Examples of material published include:

  • Original research with a discussion of its consequences and an argument for action.
  • Articles arguing for a particular approach, strategy or development in librarianship, with practical examples of how it might be achieved.
  • Transformative works with additional explanatory or interpretive content. For example, a transcription of an interview or panel discussion, with a substantial introduction explaining the importance of the subject to librarianship and a discussion of related literature.14

Submission and review process: Prospective authors are asked to submit a 200-word abstract, a link or attachment to writing samples, and a current resume or CV using the email address listed on the submissions page. Authors may also submit a completed article, from 2000-5000 words, with citations as necessary.15

A staff member will respond to submissions within three weeks to indicate whether an article is appropriate to Lead Pipe publication goals in terms of content and style.16

According to Lead Pipe author instructions, “The author does the hard work of actually writing the article. Articles may have multiple authors, but in this case one author must be designated as the primary point of contact for the Editorial Board. Authors are also responsible for identifying an external reviewer. The external reviewer should have some professional connection to or knowledge of the article’s topic, and is expected to provide expert review and constructive feedback. The external reviewer does not necessarily have to be librarian. Authors may work with someone they already know or reach out to the professional community. The Editorial Board is happy to offer guidance in identifying and contacting an appropriate reviewer if needed.”17

Per co-founder Brett Bonfield, “Our goal is to make sure the article is factually accurate, well written, well edited, and interesting.”18

The process from selection to publication takes at least six weeks, with Lead Pipe editors requesting feedback and drafts from the author as necessary. This is a highly collaborative process where editors work closely with writers to produce the most fabulous writing possible for the site. Prospective authors should consult the Guest Author Instructions, Framework for Guest Author Proposals, and Peer Review Guidelines before submitting.19

Editorial tone: Informal and engaging; informative yet relaxed. The articles are peer-reviewed, but speak to the entire community of people who work in and use the library. They are thoughtful, positive articles that pose challenging questions and educate readers on diverse aspects of the LIS world.20

Style guide used:  The Lead Pipe includes an in-house style guide in its submission guidelines. Authors may use any citation style, as long as it is consistently applied within an article. The editors encourage use of the first-person for many articles, and request that authors avoid use of the passive voice.21 See the site’s detailed Style Guide for more information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an extremely LIS-student-friendly publication open to a great variety of topics within the field.22 The site has a registered ISSN number and although it has been awarded titles such as “€œBest General Blog”€ in 2012 from the Salem Press Library Blog Awards, the editors “feel that this rich peer review process sets us apart from scholarly blogs and puts us in the realm of “journal.”23 Many writers have referenced the site through other publications.24

The editors “encourage creative thinking, envelope-pushing, and constructive criticism,”25€œ while “articles indulging in non-constructive criticism will not be accepted.”26

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not specified. According to a survey performed by Arthur Hendricks of 67 university library professionals, 3 of those 67 (4.5%) mentioned In the Library with the Lead Pipe as a blog that they regularly read.27

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Currently all members of the editorial board work in the United States,28 and articles are written in American English.29 However, given that Lead Pipe is an internationally recognized, well-respected, yet informal journal that was previously a popular peer-reviewed blog, a more global readership may be assumed.

The publication style guide requests that authors “. . . incorporate a global perspective in the context and arguments of articles (e.g., by considering what the broad international profession should do, not just what the American Library Association or U.S.-based librarians should do). It is acceptable for an article’s focus to be on one geographic region, but this should be made clear in the article, and avoid phrases like “across the country” without mentioning which country.”30

Reader characteristics: Editors take pride in having diverse skills and interests, and bring all of that knowledge to the website, making it an interesting site to read even by those outside the profession. Lead Pipe is directed towards people involved in libraries in any capacity, from librarians to support staff and community members.31

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.32

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The journal is one of the longer standing open source, peer-edited and -reviewed LIS sites, dating back to 2008. It is read and referenced by librarians internationally, and provides good information and topics of conversation for librarians and those interested in the LIS community. It is an informally written site but still presents scholarly articles along with editorials and opinion pieces, and would be a good platform for LIS students who wish to network and share ideas and concerns through writing articles for a community of peers.

Per editor Brett Bonfield: “We think of ourselves as a journal and we publish “articles,” not posts, and those articles are indexed by EBSCO for its library database products. We’re not aggressive about it or anything–we were delighted by the Salem Press blog award, for instance–but it’s a distinction that has meaning for us. We love a lot of LIS blogs and we love a lot of LIS journals, we just think we have a bit more in common with the journals than the blogs.”33

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 33 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “In the Library with the Lead Pipe,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523475745273/672658
  2. “About,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019 http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/
  3. “About,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/
  4. B. Bonfield, personal communication, March 17, 2013
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  7. “Lead Pipe Publication Process,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/lead-pipe-publication-process/
  8. “About.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. “About.”
  11. “Archives,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/archives/
  12. “Archives.”
  13. “About.”
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/
  16. “Submission Guidelines.”
  17. Lead Pipe Publication Process.”
  18. Bonfield, personal communication.
  19. Lead Pipe Publication Process.”
  20. “About.”
  21. “Style Guide,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed May 3, 2017, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/style-guide/
  22. “Archives.”
  23. Ellie Collier, “And the Survey Says . . .,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, September 5, 2012, accessed May 3, 2017, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2012/survey-says/
  24. “Awards and Good Words,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed May 3, 2017,  http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/awards-good-words/
  25. “About.”
  26. “About.”
  27. Arthur Hendricks, “Bloggership, or is publishing a blog scholarship? A survey of academic librarians,” Library Hi Tech 28, no. 3 (Summer 2010): 470-477, https://doi.org/10.1108/07378831011076701.
  28. “Editorial Board,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019,  http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/editorial-board/
  29. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  30. “Style Guide.”
  31. “Style Guide.”
  32. “About.”
  33. Bonfield, personal communication.
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American Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Libraries

ISSN: 0002-9769 (Print) and 2163-5129 (Online)1

Website: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: American Libraries is “the flagship publication of the American Library Association,” dedicated to publishing news “about all matters of import to libraries and librarians.”2 Per the Editorial Policy, part of the ALA Policy Manual section 10.2: the editor is charged with “a particular responsibility to convey to the membership and other readers full and accurate information about the activities, purposes, and goals of the Association.”3

Target audience: ALA members, the majority of whom are professional librarians in the United States.4

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news magazine.7

Medium: American Libraries is a print publication, with occasional digital supplements. American Libraries Online is the online edition.8

Content: American Libraries “features articles on professional concerns and developments, along with news of the Association, library-related legislation, and libraries around the country and the world. Expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.” 9

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published 6 times per year, with a digital-only July/August issue and occasional digital supplements.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: American Libraries solicits contributions of 600-1,500-word articles, including book reviews, features and opinion pieces on topics of general interest to members of the American Library Association. Letters to the editor are also accepted.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted via email to americanlibraries@ala.org. Hard copies may be mailed to American Libraries, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611. After submission, there may be “editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that in their opinion support the article’s focus. Editors will make every possible effort to review copy with the author prior to publication, especially regarding any proposed substantive changes.” Authors should hear back about their manuscripts within 4-8 weeks.12

Editorial tone: “Informal, but informative. Factual articles must be inviting and readable, with all statements backed by responsible research and interviews with several expert sources.” The editor encourages the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues.”13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.).14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This 100+-year-old magazine is a well-respected publication with a wide audience. It would not be scholarly enough in tone to carry much weight for someone building up publications for tenure, but it is a credible, professional publication that provides a forum for practical information sharing among members of the LIS community. American Libraries publishes feature stories and opinion pieces as well as letters to the editor, and occasionally opportunities for columnists arise. Strong writers with appropriate story ideas should be encouraged to submit work here, whether they are LIS practitioners, educators, or students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 62,000 member organizations, individual members, and paid subscribers.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A geographic breakdown could not be found, though American Libraries does offer rates for the US, Canada, and International subscriptions.16 It is probably safe to assume that the majority of ALA members reside and work in the United States. American Libraries is published in English, and readers are likely to be completely comfortable communicating in English. However, overuse of regionalisms should be avoided to appeal to the diverse and widespread American audience.17

Reader characteristics: Because readers are usually members of the ALA, the vast majority work in a variety of libraries and have a high level of education.18 As librarians, these readers are likely to be interested in library topics and sympathetic to library issues. However, it is not safe to assume that readers are homogeneous in terms of how they believe problems should be solved. Letters to the editor and point-of-view pieces indicate that readers can be highly opinionated. The editorial policy states that the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.”19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to know a lot about general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors would want to avoid highly specialized topics and language. For example, public librarians may not be familiar with (or interested in) the particular jargon and issues of military librarians, and technology specialists may not be familiar with the jargon of catalogers.[19. American Libraries, “About.”

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because this is a professional rather than a scholarly publication, appropriate submissions would be practical rather than theoretical. Possibilities might include current topics in librarianship, or unique twists on topics of general interest to the broad LIS community such as management, advocacy, and general-interest technologies. American Libraries readers have in common a professional or personal interest in libraries, but the audience is large, and readers’ specialized interests will be quite diverse. For this magazine, general library topics would be appropriate — articles on things like library technology, marketing, or management, the kinds of topics that would be relevant to all librarians, no matter what kinds of libraries they worked in.

Authors could assume that American Libraries readers would understand general library language and that basic terms would not need to be explained (the editors of American Libraries, for example, assume that readers will understand ALA’s common acronyms, such as ACRL). However, authors should try to avoid the kinds of topics or jargon that might be related to a specific library environment or aspect of librarianship, such as academic libraries or cataloging. Articles on highly specific topics or for particular ALA subgroups would be better directed toward the publications of the related ALA divisions, such as College and Research Libraries News or Children and Libraries.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “American Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561931025099/41722
  2. American Library Association, “About,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/about/
  3. American Libraries, “About.”
  4. American Libraries, “Advertising,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/advertising-2/
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Libraries, “About.”
  9. American Libraries, “Submissions,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/ 
  10. American Libraries, “About.”
  11. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  12. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  13. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  14. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  15. American Libraries, “Advertising.”
  16. American Libraries, “Subscriptions,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/subscriptions/
  17. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  18. American Libraries, “About.”
  19. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
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Marketing Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Library Services

ISSN: 0896-39081

Website: www.MarketingLibraryServices.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Marketing Library Services (MLS) emerged in 1987 and is the longest-running publication that regularly delivers how-to articles and case studies for marketers in all types of libraries. They’re written by practitioners from around the world and curated by a respected expert who has 25+ years in the field. These detailed, vetted articles deliver more value than the brief ideas and advice offered via social media.2

Target audience: Information professionals in any type of library who need to learn to do better marketing, promotion, and advocacy.3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: MLS covers strategies and tactics for all marketing-related topics: advocacy, outreach, branding, segmentation, social media, funding initiatives, long-term campaigns, assessment, ROI, partnerships, promotional materials, program publicity, communications, PR, advertising, etc. Subscribers will also benefit from interviews with marketing masters, conference coverage, book reviews, and news.8

Frequency of publication: Six times a year (January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December).9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: The editor of Marketing Library Services, Kathy Dempsey, does not accept blind submissions; instead, it is preferable to email her first (see Editor below) with an article idea, so that she can see if it fits in with upcoming issues, or whether or not something similar has already been published. In a personal correspondence she asserts that if the topic is something useful to Marketing Library Services readership, she will send the author a desired length and deadline. Writers will be sent guidelines, and all graphics (photos, charts, etc.) must be in color and high resolution.10

The site itself says very little about submissions. Editorial communications should be directed to the editor, Kathy Dempsey, at kdempsey@infotoday.com.11

Types of contributions accepted: From a correspondence with the editor: “Marketing Library Services covers a wide range of marketing-related topics, including these: advocacy, outreach, programming, fundraising, event planning, dealing with the media, getting votes for library issues, proving your value, making good promotional materials, community promotion, online promotion, winning related awards, studying demographics for target marketing, innovations, surveys and focus groups, strategic communication, etc. And, of course, true marketing (plans for full campaigns).” Also, “in addition to the case studies, Marketing Library Services carries news, reviews of books and videos, conference coverage, and links to library articles and culture.” 12

Submission and review process: Authors first should send correspondence to Kathy Dempsey stating their idea. Because Marketing Library Services is published often, timely articles are strongly recommended. Also, authors must have been directly involved in the projects they are writing about, and must write in the first person. Ms. Dempsey states that authors’ specific titles do not matter.13

Editorial tone: Marketing Library Services should not be written in third-person or academic tones. The newsletter’s tone is conversational, professional, and should inspire readers. According to the editor, “Articles should be written as if you’€™re sitting down with a colleague and explaining your project over lunch.”14

The editor will correspond with the author about this after the author’s idea has been accepted.15

Style guide used: Associated Press.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Marketing Library Services is a very good resource for LIS authors interested in writing on community outreach and marketing of library services. Many topics can fall under this umbrella, so it is important for potential authors to be creative and open in how they frame their content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Marketing Library Services has 700 subscribers. Most of these are in North America, but some are in Europe and in other English-speaking countries.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the content of the newsletter is in English and about a broad topic (marketing), the geographic location of the newsletter’s readership is assumed to reside across the United States. There are some readers from outside the United States, but because marketing can be culturally specific, those readers are likely already doing the work of cultural translation. English is used entirely throughout Marketing Library Services and, for the most part, readers are American or from Europe.18 Because of this spread, colloquialisms should be avoided (as in most professional writing).

Reader characteristics: According to Kathy Dempsey, the editor, most of the readership is comprised of librarians who market for their organization, while others are managers and directors. She also states that some are professors specializing in marketing. Because Marketing Library Services readership is comprised of professionals directly involved in marketing, it may be safely assumed that jargon specific to marketing is fine. As well, because this is a trade journal, readers will be interested in practical information. Kathy Dempsey states from a personal correspondence that, “MLS is written for a wide horizontal market that covers all types of libraries: public, academic, special (medical, gov’€™t, etc.), corporate, and to a lesser extent, K-12 school. It welcomes article queries from all of these librarians. What they all have in common is the need to promote their services. Many case studies about how one lib accomplished a goal can be used as models to doing similar things in other types of libraries. Articles on projects that have this ability to be widely replicated are especially valuable.”19

Readers of Marketing Library Services work in many types of libraries, so it may be safely assumed that they all value libraries’ continuing prosperity. That said, this does not mean that their values are identical. However, the newsletter’s tone is conversational, not argumentative. Articles written arguing strongly for one thing or another probably will not fit in Marketing Library Services.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Marketing Library Services is a newsletter informing LIS professionals the best practices and valuable ideas regarding LIS marketing. Professionals reading this newsletter are looking for good ideas and solidly practical plans and instances of good marketing. Marketing Library Services is not a dry tome of theoretical research written in an hermetic tone. Nonetheless, most of the readers are deeply engaged with marketing their organization, and are working professionals whose time and attention is valuable. Writers should consider their readers as interested colleagues who are deeply interested in successful programs and campaigns, and how they may learn from writers’ experiences and implement similar strategies in their own organizations.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Proquest, “MLS: Marketing Library Services,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521418800307/153039
  2. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Marketing Library Services,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/
  3. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  8. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  9. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  10. Dempsey, K., 27 June 2019, personal communication.
  11. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Subscription & Editorial Info,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/mls-subs.shtml
  12. Dempsey, personal communication.
  13. Dempsey, personal communication.
  14. Dempsey, personal communication.
  15. Dempsey, personal communication.
  16. Dempsey, personal communication.
  17. Dempsey, personal communication.
  18. Dempsey, personal communication.
  19. Dempsey, personal communication.
  20. Dempsey, personal communication.

    Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this newsletter have a high degree of LIS subject matter. Marketing Library Services caters to the LIS profession, so references to library specific trends, ideas, and concepts will be well received and will not require a high degree of explanation. However, because the readership is broadly based across the LIS professional spectrum some terms and knowledge specific to one group may not be appropriate for all readers.[21. Dempsey, personal communication.

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Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Journal (LJ)

ISSN: 0363-02771

Website: http://www.libraryjournal.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This journal is produced as a trade publication with the intent to provide library news and related information. Although the emphasis of the journal is on public libraries, the journal contains information pertinent to a wide variety of professionals in the library world. Library Journal also provides reviews of books, ebooks, audiobooks, DVDs/videos, and other media annual to assist library professionals in purchasing for their institution. The mission of the journal is to provide feature articles and news stories which inform library professionals about current issues in a readable style.2

Target audience: The target audience is composed of librarians in public, academic, and special libraries, as well as library administrators, staff, and directors.3

Publisher:  Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news. Library Journal is a non-research-oriented LIS professional news journal that includes advertising, bibliographies, illustrations, and book reviews.6

Medium: Library Journal is a print publication with free online content. Online archives are free, though they do not necessarily contain everything that is in the print edition.7 You can also subscribe to LJ’s RSS feeds and follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.8 The online version of Library Journal also includes blogs, podcasts and message boards, links to affiliated newsletters, and tools to assist in collection development and other areas of library administration.9

Content: Library Journal content includes news, reviews, LJ bestsellers, commentary, departments, info-tech, special reports, letters to the editor, upcoming events, classified ads, and photos.10 Library Journal evaluates over 8,000 books annually and also provides reviews of library-related equipment and materials.11

Frequency of publication: The print publication is issued 12 times a year.12 Online content is updated continuously.13 Reviews are also welcomed, though review contributors are expected to regularly write, rather than simply submitting one review.14

Submission and review process: Submissions to the Features and Columns sections should be 2 to 4 pages in a magazine, or 1800 to 2700 words. Finalized drafts can be sent as an attachment along with a query describing the coverage and approach of the article as well as the writer’€™s connection to the subject and his or her expertise. The query can be a paragraph or several paragraphs in length. Response to queries may take between 4 to 6 weeks. LJ also accepts opinion pieces and rants about topics and concerns in the library profession for its “BackTalk” . Pieces should be in the range of 900 words. Be sure to email the appropriate editor for the type of content being submitted.15

Book reviewer guidelines for contracted and unpaid review writers can be found here.16

Editorial tone: As this publication is aimed at the general librarian population, the tone of articles should be objective as well as thought-provoking while providing topical and useful information. Articles should be written in an “accessible and readable style.”17

Style guide used: No particular style guide is indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A trusted and respected publication for the library community, Library Journal certainly has the potential for an LIS author to reach a wide audience. Since the journal reaches out to public, academic, and special libraries, there are a multitude of articles that could possibly be written for this publication.

Library Journal is open to ideas for articles and columns, and also encourages “opinion pieces and rants.”18 Library Journal prefers an approach that is widely accessible by its readers.19 There is therefore great potential for newer writers who are not necessarily comfortable with a more scholarly voice. There is also a market here for librarians to offer insight and advice on practical issues facing contemporary libraries. This is a wonderful opportunity for librarians (including those who may not consider themselves to be professional authors) to share their real-world experience with others.

Library Journal Reviews+ is a popular selection tool used in public and academic libraries, and an ongoing opportunity exists here to publish reviews in a wide range of disciplines. Reviewers are not required to have previously published reviews.20 This would be an excellent opportunity for library students with graduate degrees in other areas to review books in their specialty and begin to publish in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Library Journal is distributed to 43,000 print subscribers, and its online equivalent registers over 91,000 monthly visits. The publication is also popular on social media, with over half a million followers across various social media platforms, on which journal content is shared.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LJ is printed in English, and most articles focus on topics affecting libraries in the United States. A scan of recent article titles reveals an editorial comfort with acronyms specific to the American context, such as CIA, ALA, and NYPL.22 However, authors should remain sensitive to the possibility of diverse readership, since cultural diversity and international issues are embraced by the publication, as demonstrated by recent articles on Indigenous Academic Libraries, Spanish-language collection development, and inclusion in scholarly publishing.23

Reader characteristics: Because the audience largely consists of librarians and library staff, readers are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship.24 The readership is large,25 however, and likely diverse in their particular perspectives on library issues.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter:  Library Journal is read by people all across the library profession, so a working knowledge of library terms can be assumed, but authors should be aware that members of their audience may not have MLIS degrees.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Library Journal include library directors, administrators, and staff in all types of libraries. An article written for this publication has the potential to reach and influence people across the library field, nationally and even internationally. Authors should remain aware that their readers are familiar with both the current highest standards of librarianship, yet also the practical difficulties that come with working in the field. It is recommended to aim for a broad reach, even when writing about an issue specific to one kind of library, so that readers from all types of libraries can gather ideas or inspiration from each article.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521665093762/48829
  2. Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=About-Us.
  3. Library Journals, “About Us.”
  4. Media Source, Inc., “Media Source Inc.,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://mediasourceinc.com/
  5. Library Journal, “Submissions,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news.
  6. Library Journal, “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com
  7. Library Journal, “Reviews+,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=Reviews%2B
  8. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  9. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  10. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  11. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://media.libraryjournal.com/library-journal/.
  12. Library Journal, “Subscribe to Library Journal, accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=subscribe.
  13. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”

    About the publication’s submission guidelines

    Location of submission guidelines: For articles: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news. For reviews: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ

    Types of contributions accepted: Feature articles that are broad in scope and/or offer useful information and ideas. The journal also accepts news pieces, announcements, photos of library-related news and events, letters to the editor, and opinion pieces.[14. Library Journal, “Submissions.”

  14. Library Journal, “Review for LJ,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ.
  15. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  16. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  17. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  18. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  19. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  20. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  21. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  22. Library Journal, “News,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=News
  23. Library Journal, “News.”
  24. Library Journal, “About Us.”
  25. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  26. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
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College & Research Libraries News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Research Libraries News

ISSN: 0099-0086 (Print) and 2150-6698 (Online)1

Website: http://crln.acrl.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: C&RL News “provides articles on the latest trends and practices affecting academic and research libraries and serves as the official newsmagazine and publication of record of the Association of College and Research Libraries.”2

Target audience: Members of the ACRL.3

Publisher: Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news magazine.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Per their website, “College & Research Libraries News (C&RL News) publishes articles, reports, and essays written by practitioners addressing philosophy and techniques of day-to-day management of academic library services and collections. C&RL News provides current information relating to issues, activities, and personalities of the higher education and academic and research library field. Information literacy, scholarly communication, technology, professional education, preservation, government actions that affect libraries, acquisitions, grants to libraries, product updates, and the business of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) are covered in C&RL News.”8

Frequency of publication: 11 monthly issues.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, essays, and reports.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted to the editor via email. Only original manuscripts that have not been published will be accepted, however, exception may be given to previous items published in other institutional newsletters. Submission length depends on type: “News notes may be 150-350 words; essays for “The Way I See It” should be 750-1,000 words; feature articles (Scholarly Communication, ACRL Techconnect, and Internet Resources) should be no more than 2,000 words.” Footnotes, charts and tables should be minimal; graphics should be included with submission. The author is responsible for obtaining permission for the use of any graphics. Please provide a brief caption and credit (if needed) for all images.11 Authors should consult past issues and the author guidelines for instructions on writing for specific columns.

Editorial tone: Practical, accurate, informative, and informal. Even humorous essays are welcomed.12

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing with C&RL News provides a strong foundation for both an author’s portfolio, in addition to allowing the author to be involved in a LIS association. Authors are not required to become ACRL members to publish with C&RL News; however, ACRL offers a variety of publication tools and resources, including wikis and other forums for information sharing that is important to the professional development of librarians, and LIS authors. C&RL News provides new LIS authors the potential to build their writing portfolio within a supportive, field-specific environment.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The largest division of the ALA, the ACRL claims a membership of over 10,000.15 Since these members receive automatic subscriptions to the C&RL News, this would be a certain count towards the circulation. However, nonmembers can also subscribe to the publication, and the latest circulation total notes the total circulation count at 14,000. Aside from members and nonmember single subscriptions, there may also be subscriptions by other libraries or related groups (educators) that may have an interest in receiving this publication.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, the publication is geared towards academic and research libraries in America. However, the subscription information provides rates specific to subscriptions to Canada, Postal Union of the Americas and Spain (PUAS) countries, and all other countries.17 The publication is printed in English and serves as the official news outlet for a US-based organization, so cultural considerations do not seem to expand beyond the U.S. However, some columns may include international websites and stories on librarianship in other countries18 which demonstrate an awareness of how library trends and practices in other countries can affect U.S. librarianship.

Reader characteristics: The audience of C&RL News is comprised of members of the ACRL, who are professional librarians, staff, administrators, directors, educators in LIS, and students. Nearly all members report affiliation with universities or colleges, with almost half belonging to large research or doctoral-granting universities. The smallest reported group of subscribers is those affiliated with two-year or technical colleges, who comprise 11% of the current membership.19 Readers are used to the publication’s inclusion of more personal insights into individual experiences and humorous anecdotes, and are therefore likely to be open to new perspectives.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As the ACRL is a professional association of academic librarians and individuals with interest in academic librarianship, an advanced and specific knowledge of LIS subject matter can be assumed. Readers will not want definitions and descriptions of issues that they are familiar with; this audience expects to be informed on the current news, trends, and practices in academic and research libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication’s readers are involved in their libraries, their institutions, the academic library community, and the academic community itself. Though not a scholarly publication, informal research exploring best practices and methods for improving services is a sure way to maintain readers’ attention. From archives to community college public services, any essay on a specific topic within the academic library field could offer readers the opportunity to apply the author’s findings to their own institutions. However, authors should keep in mind that readers have diverse experiences. Staff members at technical colleges may be more interested in new resources on serving local communities, whereas administrators at research universities may have a greater interest in international trends. Whatever the chosen topic, authors should be sure to write from experience and with the confidence of expertise.

Last updated: June 29, 2019.


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “College & Research Libraries News,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561866753201/119300
  2. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/pages/view/about
  3. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5.  Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  6. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  7. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0.
  8. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  9. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies.”
  10. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions.”
  11. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  12. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  13. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  14. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  15. American Library Association, “About ACRL,” Association of College & Research Libraries, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl.
  16. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2018-2019 Media Planning Guide, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/ACRL_MediaKit19.pdf.
  17. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies.”
  18. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Past Issues,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/issue/archive.
  19. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2018-2019 Media Planning Guide.
  20. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions.”
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Library Worklife

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Worklife

ISSN: 1550-35341

Website: http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The purpose of this newsletter is to inform those working in the library field about Human Resource (HR) related issues such as career advancement, pay equity, recruitment, work/life balance, and certification.2

Target audience: Members of the target audience include members of American Library Association-Allied Professional Association (ALA-APA). 3

Publisher: American Library Association-Allied Professional Association (ALA-APA).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news journal.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: The newsletter covers ALA-APA news, career advancement, certification, HR law, HR practice, career advancement salaries and pay equity, recruitment, spotlight, support staff, and work/life balance.8

Frequency of publication: Issued the second Tuesday of each month.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/call-for-submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: The newsletter accepts shorter length articles, anywhere from 200 to 1200 words. Longer articles may be submitted upon previous arrangement. Articles may be based on news, trends, research, scholarly articles, noteworthy events, and individual profiles.10

“Factual articles must be inviting and readable, with all statements backed by responsible research and interviews.”11

The website has a specific section, Write for Library Worklife that lists upcoming themes and suggested topics to consider writing about.12

Submission and review process: Submissions are accepted by e-mail to bcalvin@ala.org and/or info@ala-apa.org, with the article pasted in plain text in the body of the email, or as a MS Word attachment. Articles are reviewed by the editors and they make the decision whether or not an article should be published. They may also choose to make changes if the article is accepted.13

The submission guidelines also include a list of topics to consider writing about and an Editorial Calendar with writing deadlines and distribution days per monthly issue.14

Writers are encouraged to commit to submitting three articles for a twelve-month period; one-time submissions are also accepted.15

Editorial tone: The tone of the articles is informative, and can even be humorous in the right situation. They can also be written in either first person or third person.16

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style; however the submission guidelines advise against the use of extensive footnotes.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newsletter offers opportunities for those interested in writing about the details involved in the working life of librarians, especially authors willing to share their success or concerns on the publication topic. As a part of ALA it has the potential to reach a wide audience. Authors interested in writing for this publication are best served by reading past issues of the publication to gain a clear understanding for their focus.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Submission guidelines note that Library Worklife is received by thousands of ALA institutional members and individual subscribers.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As a part of the ALA-APA this journal is North American based as is its readership. The headquarters for the journal are located in Chicago, Illinois.19 Library Worklife is written in English,20 however authors need to avoid specific or regional references.

Reader characteristics: The readers are mostly part of the ALA-APA, which is an organization which endeavors “to enable the certification of individuals in specializations beyond the initial professional degree.”21 This mission was broadened after the organization’s foundation to include advocacy for the “mutual professional interests of librarians and other library workers€.”22 The readers of this journal work in all types of library environments. They are concerned with employment issues such as pay rates and human resources issues rather than advice on day to day issues that face librarians.23 One issue that readers are likely to have a strong opinion about is that of pay equity. According to the website, one of the main goals of ALA-APA is “direct support of comparable worth and pay equity initiatives, and other activities designed to improve the salaries and status of librarians and other library workers.”24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since this is a publication put out by ALA, with a large number of subscribers who are ALA members, the readers would likely have a thorough understanding of LIS subject matter as well as jargon.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers are largely associated with ALA-APA. One of the important issues for such readers is the fair treatment of library workers and the status of library workers within the public’s eye. This would be a helpful issue to keep in mind when considering article ideas. The most important characteristic of the readers to remember is that they are interested primarily in the pay equity and the status of librarians in the workplace. The articles these readers would have the most interest in reading would have these issues as a central theme.

Last updated: June 24, 2019


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Library Worklife,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/
  2. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Library Worklife.”
  3. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Library Worklife.”
  4. ProQuest, “Library Worklife,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1407435724102/575494
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “LW FAQ,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/lw-frequently-asked-questions/
  9.  American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “LW FAQ.”
  10. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/call-for-submissions/
  11. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  12. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association. n.d. “Write for Library Worklife,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/newsletter/write-for-library-worklife/
  13. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  14. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  15. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  16. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  17. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  18. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  19. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  20. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  21. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “About ALA-APA,” accessed June 24, 2019, http://ala-apa.org/about-ala-apa/.
  22. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “About ALA-APA.”
  23. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
  24. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “About ALA-APA.”
  25. American Library Association-Allied Professional Association, “Call for Submissions.”
Continue Reading

Southern California Association of Law Libraries Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Southern California Association of Law Libraries (SCALL) Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://scallnet.org/newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The SCALL Newsletter is the official association newsletter of the Southern California Association of Law Libraries, which aims to keep members up-to-date with goings on in the society.1

Target audience: Law librarians and other information professionals working in the legal industry in the Southern California area, especially those who are members of SCALL.2

Publisher: Southern California Association of Law Libraries, a division of the greater organization, American Association of Law Libraries (AALL).3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Professional LIS newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: SCALL Newsletter contains many reviews and discussions of programs and conferences, both those sponsored by SCALL and others of interest in the community. It also publishes articles about new technologies or issues in the legal profession.7

Frequency of publication: Five times per year. The issues are September/October, November/December, January/February, March/April, and May/June.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://scallnet.org/newsletter/

Types of contributions accepted: The publication is interested in a broad range of articles and submissions, as long as they are of interest to the law library community.9

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted to the newsletter editor via email. Deadlines for submission are published on the website and are also included in each issue along with current editor’s contact information.10

Editorial tone: Though not specifically stated, the tone seems to be informal. Many of the articles are divided into shorter sections, so the reader can quickly and easily decipher the most important points or see an outline of the ideas presented in a conference.11

Style guide used: There is no mention of a specific style guide requirement however, none of the articles in recently archived issues contained bibliographies or footnotes.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is useful for information professionals in the legal industry, especially those who are based in Southern California. It provides up-to-date information on events held by the SCALL as well as discussions of other local law conferences and programs. Also, this newsletter is very effective in keeping the members of SCALL informed as to what is taking place within the association, especially with regards to its officers and upcoming events.

This publication seems to be very receptive to author contributions. Most likely those who are members of the association would be especially welcomed to contribute. It seems that it would be a promising publication for an information professional who may not yet be comfortable writing academic research papers, but who is interested in discussing a presentation or conference he or she attended.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This newsletter is a benefit of SCALL membership and according to their call for advertisers, there are over 400 SCALL members.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of this publication are primarily in the Southern California area. Many of the events discussed in the newsletter are specific to this locale.14 However, there is a separate division, San Diego Area Law Libraries, or SANDALL, for the San Diego area members of AALL, so SCALL may be said to include only Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Because this is not an international publication, authors do not have to be concerned with language or cultural discrepancies. As the readers are concentrated in a limited area and work in a specific field, it is likely that they will have a similar understanding of library issues and the words used to describe them.15

Reader characteristics: Individual characteristics of SCALL members are not available, but members of SCALL work in academic, professional, private, state, and county law libraries.16 It can be assumed that the statistics for SCALL readers are close to those of the wider association, American Association of Law Libraries (AALL). According to the AALL 2018-2019 Media Kit, the most common workplaces for members are private or corporate law libraries (35%). A  smaller, but still significant portion, 13.9 percent, work in government or other types of law libraries. The highest percentage of members (36%) are still in law school. 17 Information professionals who are likely to read SCALL Newsletter are interested in the legal field, and judging by the scope of the articles, they seem to have an interest in technology as well.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It can be assumed that readers of the SCALL newsletter are very familiar with LIS related subjects. According to the information about AALL, which all SCALL members are a part of, 38% of readers work in positions that involve high-level decision making and direction of law library services.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important characteristic of this audience is their common interest in the legal profession. Because this is not a scholarly publication and it is intended to spread news and share information, potential authors should keep in mind that their pieces can be more casual in nature but should still be informative and thought-provoking in their viewpoints. Writers should remember that readers of this publication are interested in law libraries and the specific technological issues and advancements that affect their work. While many readers have years of experience working with legal materials, electronic resources are being introduced frequently which change the way many SCALL members are doing their jobs. These changes in the field present opportunities for authors to explain new developments, discuss up-and-coming technologies, and educate the readers.

Last updated: June 24, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, Newsletter,” accessed June 24, 2019, https://scallnet.org/newsletter/
  2. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  3. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  4. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  5. ProQuest, “SCALL Newsletter,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 24, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406774838598/217965
  6. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  7. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, SCALL Newsletter 43 no. 3 (March/April 2016), http://scallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/SCALL_newsletter2016MarApr-1.pdf.
  8. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  9. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  10. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  11. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, SCALL Newsletter 46 no. 5 (May/June 2019), https://scallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/SCALL_newsletter2019MayJun.pdf.
  12. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  13. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  14. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, SCALL Newsletter 46 no. 2 (November/December 2018), https://scallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/SCALL_newsletter2018NovDec.pdf
  15. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “Newsletter.”
  16. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, “SCALL,” accessed June 24, 2019, https://scallnet.org.
  17. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Media Kit,” AALL Spectrum, accessed June 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/AALL-Media-Kit-_2018-2019_FINAL_070318.pdf
  18. Southern California Association of Law Libraries, SCALL Newsletter 41 no. 5 (July/August 2014), https://scallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  19. American Association of Law Libraries. “AALL Media Kit.”
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Knowledge Quest

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Knowledge Quest

ISSN: 1094-9046 (Print) and 2163-5234 (Online)1

Website: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Knowledge Quest supports the American Association of School Librarians’ mission to empower leaders “to transform teaching and learning.”2 The journal is devoted to offering substantive information to assist building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school libraries and school library services.3

Target audience: “Building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school library programs and services.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: Per their site, “Articles address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.”9 Emerging trends, literacy, co-teaching, leadership, and makerspaces are some encouraged topics.10

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly, September through June.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/ (Scroll down to the link to the PDF Author Guidelines.)

Types of contributions accepted: Knowledge Quest seeks “original, unpublished manuscripts that address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.” The editors are not interested in “basic primers” on the role of school librarians or press releases and vendor news.12 Articles should be 2500 words or less.13

Submission and review process: Articles may be emailed to the editor14 or through an online submission form.15 “Unsolicited manuscripts undergo blind review by the Knowledge Quest editorial advisory board. The process takes approximately 3-4 weeks. When the review is completed, the author will be notified of the outcome.”16

Editorial tone: Professional. Through well-written articles, the journal provides information in a helpful and supportive manner.17

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.).18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although this publication has numerous readers, over half of its readership is comprised of elementary school, middle school, and high school librarians.19 The fact that its content does not apply to all aspects of library science limits the reader base and therefore, the scope of articles covered. Professionals working in school libraries are encouraged to submit their work for review. Knowledge Quest desires to be part of the library community and provide support for members of this community through its articles and reviews. Publishing in this journal represents the authors’ dedication to the school library community.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is distributed to 7,000 members and and additional 150 readers. The online component reports over 1,200 visits per day.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This magazine is a publication of the American Association of School Librarians. The material provided in the magazine is designed to support the curriculum in United States public and private schools. The print version of the magazine can be shipped anywhere, but the typical readers reside and work in the United States. Readers can also access the journal via the online component KQ Web and this website can be accessed world wide over the internet.22 This magazine is presented in English and uses terminology relevant to elementary and secondary school librarians. As a publication of the AASL, the magazine has the same vision statement as the organization. This vision statement highlights the magazine’s and the association’s goal to support and embrace cultural and ethnic diversity.23

Reader characteristics: The readers of the magazine are comprised of professionals and supervisors working in library media centers. Readers can be expected to embrace and be familiar with the ethics and values present in school library programs today. By subscribing to the magazine, readers are demonstrating their stance as advocates of literacy and supporters of intellectual freedom. Media specialists are closely related to teachers as they are active members of the learning community. These individuals are well aware of the resources available to them and are always working towards learning new ways to use these resources in better and more productive ways. Most of the readers work in elementary and secondary school libraries both public and nonpublic schools, and will be interested in issues and programs such as library funding, student achievement, student internet use, literacy, intellectual freedom, and technology that effect or involve the readers. Knowledge Quest is interested in producing a quality publication that presents ideas in a friendly and inclusive manner.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With 87% of readers reporting possession of a Master’s degree, it is probable that many have LIS degrees. Readers can be expected to know about school curriculum and are knowledgeable about the technologies and issues relevant to school media centers today.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since Knowledge Quest is a publication of the AASL, the readers expect that the publication will have the same guidelines and requirements characterized by an AASL publication. The readers expect the magazine to publish works which are balanced, relevant to the field, accurate, and up-to-date on issues pertinent to school libraries. 78% of readers report that Knowledge Quest is “essential professional reading,” so authors should expect to produce content that meets that description. 26

Last updated: June 21, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Knowledge Quest,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 19, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560951075174/52980
  2. American Library Association, “About AASL,” accessed June 19, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/about
  3. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ,” accessed June 19,  2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/about-kq/
  4. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/KQ_mediakit_201920_WEB.pdf
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  10. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  11. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  12. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  13. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines,” accessed June 20, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/Author%20Guidelines%20REVISED.pdf
  14. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  15. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  16. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  17. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  18. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  19. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  20. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  21. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  22. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  23. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  24. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  25. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  26. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
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