Wiki Tags Archives: Management and leadership

Public Library Quarterly (PLQ)

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitlePublic Library Quarterly (PLQ)

ISSN: 0161-6846 (print), 1541-1540 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wplq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission:Public Library Quarterly (PLQ) is addressed to leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends who believe that change is imperative if public libraries are to fulfill their service missions in the twenty-first century.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) “leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends,” especially those working in public libraries.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles undergo editorial screening and peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: PLQ focuses on how public library directors and operating officers affect change. It examines best practices and service improvement models, management case studies, library mythologies that impede development, planning and outcomes, marketing and fundraising, budget and financial management, new technology in practices, and programs for children.4 “Every issue of  Public Library Quarterly contains informative articles written by the directors and staffs of leading public libraries, news of current public library events, and book reviews covering issues of interest to those in public library work.”5

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: PLQ publishes original research, scholarship, and analyses of current issues in public libraries, from theoretical and practical perspectives. The journal “addresses the major administrative challenges and opportunities that face public libraries, providing insight and assistance to all public library workers.” Furthermore, the journal publishes surveys “that can be developed and used as national benchmarks for such administrative concerns as salaries, usage standards, and budget breakdowns.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online via Editorial Manager, a portal that manages the submission, revision, review, and publication process for authors, editors, and reviewers.8 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and peer review.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: PLQ uses the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

PLQ is a long-standing, high-quality LIS journal that publishes scholarship on all aspects of public libraries from around the world. As such, it is a a good fit for LIS authors whose scholarship is focused on public libraries or who study these libraries’ connections with other information organizations or in the realm of public policy. The journal is both practical and scholarly; many articles are written by public library directors or staff members, but the journal also looks to publish research and surveys in this domain. There is a sense that authors are highly experienced in the realm of public libraries, but this does not necessarily exclude graduate student authors with solid scholarship and novel approaches to the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article’s homepage lists number of views, citations, and Altmetric score.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLQ is published in English for a worldwide audience. Editorial board members are from universities, libraries, and information organizations in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Wales, Ireland, and Taiwan.10 Authors should consider readers from around the globe and explain jargon or regional usages.

Reader characteristics: Readers are public library directors and managers, staff members, trustees, and friends, as well as LIS researchers, scholars, professionals, and graduate students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter, but since this journal has a worldwide reach, authors should be careful to explain particular terms and practices.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

PLQ reaches a worldwide audience of public library directors, librarians, staff members, scholars, researchers, and graduate students. Readers are interested in how current events, policy, trends, and changes in the public library landscape will affect their institutions and how other libraries’ experiences and practices may inform their own practices. Readers look for evidence of positive leadership in and responses to a climate of change in the public library realm. Readers expect both theory- and practice-based articles, as well as larger scale surveys and research results.

Last updated: April 30, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wplq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission show=instructions&journalCode=wplq20.
  6. “Journal Information,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wplq20.
  7. “Instructions for Authors.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Aims and Scope.”
  10. “Editorial Board,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wplq20.
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Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Libraries Journal

ISSN: 2475-8116

Website: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: MLJ is a “peer reviewed, independently published, open access scholarly journal that focuses on innovative marketing activities libraries are engaged in.”1

The journal’s aim is “to publish research and practical examples of library marketing campaigns, library marketing research, public relations campaigns, SWOT analysis, segmentation research, assessment of marketing activities, and tools used for marketing.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals from public, special and academic libraries who work in marketing positions.3

Publisher: MLJ is published independently.

Peer reviewed? Yes. All articles are subjected to a double blind peer review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Two types of articles are published: research-driven work that provides original scholarship, and practical information focusing on best practices and advice.5

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles of 20-25 pages in length and practical articles of 8-10 pages in length. Additionally, practical articles (as columns) under one of the following subjects:

  • Advocacy: articles that focus on developing relationships with stakeholders to help raise awareness and loyalty for library services and resources. This may relate to communicating with government, administration, and the greater community
  • Branding: articles that illustrate how libraries develop their visual identity for their services and resources.
  • From the Trenches: articles that show outcomes of a particular marketing initiative or campaign.
  • Marketing Campaigns: case studies of a marketing campaign and the desired outcomes and objectives sought.
  • Technology: software/apps and web-based technology tools that can be used as part of a marketing campaign.7

Submission and review process: The reviewing process for manuscripts will begin after the call for proposals deadline. Some manuscripts may require substantive revision before they are ready for publication. Once a manuscript has been formally accepted, authors are required to submit a complete electronic copy of the final version, including all figures, charts, tables, appendices, and illustrations.8

Editorial tone: Professional / scholarly.

Style guide used: APA, 6th edition.9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have written about LIS marketing and increasing visibility for libraries, this journal may be a viable publication. Some of the latest articles published are about creating a ‘brand’ for libraries and tips and tricks on video marketing.

Keep in mind that MLJ does not only publish traditional, scholarly articles, but also practical articles on advocacy, branding, case studies of marketing campaigns, technology tools, SWOT analyses and “from the trenches”-type material.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: MLJ is open access, and therefore available for any and all global readers, for free.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Articles are published in English. MLJ states that they are global in scope.10

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely LIS professionals or students who work in or are interested in marketing aspects of librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering the specificity of the journal’s content matter, LIS knowledge may be varied, but strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are interested in a variety of articles, and are seeking out the latest research and information pertaining to LIS marketing. If you have written a scholarly article, a SWOT analysis or have researched a hot topic marketing issue, MLJ readers will be eager to learn about it.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Home,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/
  2. “Home.”
  3. “About,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/about.html
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Home.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 23, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “About.”
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Political Librarian, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Political Librarian

ISSN: 2471-3155

Website: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/ and http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Political Librarian “is dedicated to expanding the discussion of, promoting research on, and helping to re-envision locally focused advocacy, policy, and funding issues for libraries.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, scholars, practitioners, and graduate students, as well as those outside of the LIS discipline, who are interested libraries and tax and public policy.

Publisher: The Political Librarian is organized and published by EveryLibrary.2 It is hosted by the Washington University in St. Louis Open Scholarship site.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Not all articles are peer reviewed, but there is a section in most issues for those that are.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content:The Political Librarian publishes peer-reviewed articles, white papers, and editorials that focus on how funding issues, tax implications, budgeting, and broader economic policy affect libraries on the local level.4 Articles range from focused examinations, such as library budgeting strategies, to broader issues, such as tax reform and trickle-down economics.5 The journal is “at the intersection of local libraries, public policy and tax policy.”6

Frequency of publication: Two volumes each year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: PolicesFinal Manuscript Preparation Guidelines, and Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian.

Types of contributions accepted: The Political Librarian publishes opinions/first drafts, white papers, and peer-reviewed articles. The journal seeks a variety of perspectives, new voices, and lines of inquiry, and does not limit “contributors to just those working in the field of library and information science.” The journal invites “submissions from researchers, practitioners, community members, or others dedicated to furthering the discussion, promoting research, and helping to re-envision tax policy and public policy on the extremely local level.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts though the journal’s online portal. Initial submissions do not have strict guidelines to follow.8 However, accepted manuscripts need to follow the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.9

Editorial tone: The tone is professional. Clear guidelines are provided by the editorial team.10

Style guide used: The journal’s reference and citation style is explained in the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Political Librarian is a new journal (first published in 2015) that has a very particular focus: it is a “dedicated space where practitioners, researchers, and users [can] publish on frontline advocacy experiences, campaign strategy and research, and/or about tax and public policies impacting libraries on the local level.” The journal is a resource for examinations of the impact of tax and public policy locally and how policy affects library services and community outcomes and for new models of library funding and resources to educate stakeholders.12 LIS authors–professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students–who write about the intersection of libraries with tax and public policy will find a good fit with this journal.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available, but the number of downloads appears on each article’s title page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Political Librarian is written in English. The audience is mostly located in the United States, as US tax and public policy are primarily discussed.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students, as well as those outside the LIS community, who are interested in how tax and public policy affects libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a strong academic and practical understand of LIS subject matter, but there may be readers outside of the discipline for whom jargon or idiosyncratic terms should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should understand that readers have a particular interest in libraries and in public and tax policy, and they look for articles that both explain how libraries can survive and thrive in the current environment and how to advocate now for positive changes in the future. Readers also look for local analyses and examinations that may have implications on a broader scale.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


 

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Journal Home,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/.
  2.  The Political Librarian, everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/.
  3. “Browse Journals and Peer-Reviewed Series,” Washington University Open Scholarship, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/peer_review_list.html.
  4. “Journal Home.”
  5. “Most Popular Papers,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/topdownloads.html
  6. “Volume 1, Issue 1 (2015),” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/vol1/iss1/.
  7. “Aims & Scope,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/aimsandscope.html.
  8. “Policies,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/policies.html.
  9. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/styleguide.html.
  10. “Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian,” everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/editorial-team-guidelines-political-librarian/.
  11. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.”
  12. Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, and Rachel Korman, “The Political Librarian: Foundations,” The Political Librarian 1, no. 1(2015): 7, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=pollib.
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Journal of Radical Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Radical Librarianship

ISSN: 2399-956X

Website: http://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Radical Librarianship “is an open access journal publishing high quality, rigorously reviewed and innovative scholarly work in the field of radical librarianship….The scope of the journal is any work that contributes to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”1

Target audience: Librarians and library and information science (LIS) practitioners, managers, scholars, and students who are interested in “radical librarianship,” loosely defined for the purposes of the journal as “the ethical roots of librarianship.”2

Publisher: The journal is self-published by the editors.3 Its platform and workflow are supported by OJS/PKP.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, the journal has a policy for manuscripts to undergo either open or double-blind review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online and open access.

Content: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes LIS articles on a broad range of topics but emphasizes that articles should contribute “to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”6 Sections include Research Articles, Editorials and Commentary, and Reviews. The journal’s Announcements page issues calls for proposals and papers on specified topics; a 2018 call was for proposals offering a “structural critique of race and power in LIS.” 7

Frequency of publication: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is published on a continual basis: articles are published as soon as they are ready under the year’s volume number.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes research and scholarly articles that offer critical analyses of “the influence of neoliberal policy on the profession.”9 With this basis in critical LIS theory and practice, the journal covers many “traditional” topics, such as information literacy, digital rights, cataloging, and technology, but also brings nondominant discourses to the field, with topics including including politics and social justice; anti-racist theory, critical race analysis, anti-colonial studies; equity, diversity, and inclusion; gender variance, queer theory, and phenomenology; the political economy of information and knowledge; critical pedagogy; and sustainability and environmentalism.10 The editors will also consider nontextual formats.11

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online and must ensure compliance with the Submission Preparation Checklist. “Prospective authors are welcome to send outlines or drafts to the editor in advance of making a formal submission. Submissions can be sent throughout the year. Revisions may be required before a decision is made to accept or reject the paper.”12 The journal gives authors and reviewers the option of open or double-blind peer review. The authors and reviewers must all agree to an open review; if not, the manuscript undergoes double-blind review.13

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly but appropriate for the topic and type of submission.

Style guide used: “Manuscripts should be prepared according to any consistent bibliographic style.”14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Radical Librarianship is a fairly new journal (first published in 2015) that is based in the UK but has an international scope and seeks contributions from “library and information workers, researchers, and academics from anywhere in the world.”15 LIS authors, including graduate students, who are writing critically about LIS theory, research, and practices, especially in ways that engage in nondominant discourses, consider a progressive point of view, and disrupt neoliberal library policy, will find encouraging and supportive editors and a high-quality, relevant journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is based in the UK and North America and is written in English, but the journal’s scope is international and the editors hope to find “editors and authors from beyond the English-speaking world” as the journal grows and evolves.16 Authors should consider an international audience for their articles and explain jargon or region-specific practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and LIS professionals, scholars, researchers, and students from around the world in all types of libraries and information organizations. Further, readers may be members of the Radical Librarianship Collective, which is an organization “building solidarity for those critical of the marketization of libraries and commodification of information.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid academic and practical knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should keep in mind that readers expect authors to approach LIS scholarship with a consideration of critical, radical, and nonhegemonic analyses. Readers will expect traditional LIS topics to be analysed and critiqued from new, radical, or nondominant points of view, and they expect writing on newer topics crucial to the profession’s progressive advancement and a disruption of its neoliberal and market-based practices.

Last updated: April 20, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about.
  2. Stuart Lawson, “Editorial,” Journal of Radical Librarianship 1 (2015): 1, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/article/view/1.
  3. “About the Journal” lists the editors and their subject areas.
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. “About the Journal.”
  7. “Announcements,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/announcement.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  10. “About the Journal.”
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions.
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About the Journal.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  16. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  17. “Home,” Radical Librarians Collective, accessed April 20, 2018, https://rlc.radicallibrarianship.org/.
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Society of American Archivists (SAA)

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Society of American Archivists

Website: https://saa.archivists.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: SAA is North America’s oldest and largest professional association for archives and archivists. Their mission is to promote “the value and diversity of archives and archivists.” Their core values include “advancing the public standing of archivists,” “fostering a culture of creativity and experimentation across the association” and a commitment to “social responsibility and the public good.”1

Target audience: Students and professional archivists in North America.

Owner: Society of American Archivists.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.

Types of books published: Guides and guidelines, reference books, book series, essay collections.

Medium: Print and electronic.

Topics covered: Trends in archiving practices, ethics, case studies, contemporary issues pertaining to archives, archivists, and allied professions.

Number of titles published per year: An exact number is unknown, but SAA has published over 150 books since the 1970s.2

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesforbookproposals

Types of submissions accepted: Book proposals.

Submission and review process: Potential authors should first submit a prospectus to the Publications Editor.

Be sure to address the following:

  • “the theme, purpose and scope of the publication;
  • the estimated format and length of the publication;
  • whether the topic and approach are better suited to print or online format
  • an annotated outline or table of contents;
  • the intended audience and the potential market;
  • the prospective value to the archival profession;
  • the relationship of the proposed publication to the literature in the field;
  • the possibility of co-sponsorship with another organization;
  • the possibility of outside financial support;
  • graphics and illustrations the publication might use;
  • co-authors or contributors in the case of an edited work; and
  • the anticipated schedule for preparation of the publication.”3

The Publications Editor reviews the prospectus and sends it to the Publications Board, Director of Publishing and, if necessary, subject specialists. Depending on the author’s writing experience, two or more sample chapters and a detailed table of contents may be requested.4

Once a prospectus is accepted by the Publications Board, a member of the Board is assigned to the project as a liaison to the author and to oversee the project until the manuscript is finished and submitted.5

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.6

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing with SAA focuses primarily on the archiving field, so it may not be a good fit for many LIS authors. However, there is some crossover in resources and initiatives with allied professions (libraries, museums, and historians). For example, SAA publishes a few books that have broader audiences (i.e. Exhibits in Archives and Special Collections Libraries and Archives in Libraries: What Librarians and Archivists Need to Know to Work Together). They occasionally partner with other allied professional associations to develop resources, such as the American Library Association.

Their Guidelines for Book Proposals states that they seek to “nurture new voices,” but keep in mind that the prospectus requires a lot of initial book information to be prepared by the author, including a defined audience and market.7

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: SAA has 6,200 members.8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SAA primarily serves archivists and students within North America.

Reader characteristics: Readers of SAA publications are archivist students or professionals with a working knowledge in the field. Currently featured titles on their online store, including Moving Image and Sound Collections for Archivists and Navigating Legal Issues in Archives, indicate that many newly published SAA releases discuss contemporary issues in the field.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers may have less knowledge on general LIS subject matter than readers of other LIS book publishers in the field, with SAA serving primarily to archives and archivists.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

SAA’s website states that their publications are “largely driven by members. Members write articles, chapters and books which are then vetted by members on the Editorial Board and Publications Board, who strive to maintain SAA’s commitment to furthering best practices in the field.”10 Potential authors can expect their publications to be read by professionals, and experts, in the field.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/aboutsaa
  2. “Book Publishing with SAA,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing
  3. “Guidelines for Book Proposals,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesforbookproposals
  4. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  5. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  6. “Guidelines for Manuscript Submissions,” www.SAA.org, accessed March 2, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesformanuscriptsubmissions
  7. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  8. “Who We Are.”
  9. “SAA Bookstore.”
  10. “Publications,” SAA.org, accessed February 27, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/node/20534
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International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleInternational Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

ISSN: 2474-3542

Websitehttp://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol

Purpose, objective, or mission: The International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL) “is a peer­-reviewed open access journal dedicated to publishing articles on as broad an array of topics as possible from all aspects of librarianship in all types of libraries.”1

Target audience: IJoL‘s primary audience is members of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA) that provides a forum for discussion and development among Chinese American librarians and information professionals.2 However, as an international and open-access journal, IJoL‘s scope and reach is worldwide.

Publisher: IJoL is published by CALA, an affiliate of the ALA.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Articles deemed suitable by the editors are double-blind peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: “IJoL publishes original research papers, practical developments, reviews, and commentaries of value to professional practice in librarianship in general. It encourages communication on librarianship within and among relevant professional and academic communities.”5 Regular columns include Featured Articles, Reports from the Field, LIS Education around the World, Commentaries, Reviews, and News.

Frequency of publication: Twice each year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: IJoL accepts Featured Articles, which are original research or comprehensive, in-depth analyses; Reports from the Field, which “describe the implementation and assessment of innovative practices in libraries of all types” and report on distinguished Chinese librarians; Reviews of books, articles, or conference papers; and Commentaries offering perspectives on current topics.7 The journal publishes on all topics related to libraries and librarianship, including “academic, research, public, school and special libraries” and other information institutions; it is focused on, but not limited to, “major development of Chinese librarianship throughout the world.”8

Submission and review process: IJoL uses the Open Journal Systems9 online portal for submissions and offers guidelines and a submission checklist, which authors should follow to ensure that processing and publishing is not delayed.10 Each section has its own policies, so authors should check that their submissions meet these requirements as well. The editor sends suitable articles to two referees for blind review, and articles may be accepted as is, with revisions, or declined.11

Editorial tone: The tone is overall scholarly but also appropriate to each column and topic.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

IJoL‘s first issue was in 2016, so it is a very new scholarly journal. It is the official journal of CALA, which was established in the 1970s.13 In the first editorial, Editor-in-Chief Guoying Liu introduces the journal as “a forum for librarians and other researchers from Canada, China, the UK, the US and other countries to share their research, best practices and perspectives in international librarianship, international collaboration and academic exchange, library spaces and services, library technology and innovation, and other aspects of information science and studies.”14 This journal is a great fit for scholars, professionals, and students whose work or research focuses on Chinese librarianship, but the journal publishes on all topics of library and information science, including all types of libraries and information institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: IJoL statistics show that there are 131 registered users and 113 registered readers in 2018.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: IJoL readership is most likely Chinese and Chinese American librarians and information professionals. However, this is an English-language international journal that publishes on all LIS topics, and its readership is similarly international. Authors should keep in mind this international readership and explain regionalisms and particular terms and practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and information professionals, scholars, and students interested in Chinese librarianship and information communities, as well as broader topics and current trends affecting LIS professionals throughout the world. The editors of IJoL are from universities and libraries in the United States, China, and Canada.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a strong understanding of LIS subject matter; however, writers should explain regional or particular terms, concepts, and practices for an international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that the readership for this journal is global but there is a particular interest in Chinese librarianship throughout the United States, Canada, and China. Readers of the journal are LIS scholars, professionals, and graduate students who are interested in developments particular to Chinese user populations and research and practices that can be extended to a similarly global population. As a new, open-access journal, LIS authors can peruse what types of articles are being published and editorials that explain the journal’s direction.17

Last updated: April 6, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Membership,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/membership.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Submissions,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/submissions.
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “About This Publishing System,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/aboutThisPublishingSystem.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Editorial Policies.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/about.
  14. Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Message from Editor-in-Chief,” International Journal of Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2016.vol1.1.17.
  15. “Statistics,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/statistics?statisticsYear=2018.
  16. “Editorial Team,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialTeam.
  17.  Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Celebrating One Year Anniversary and Introducing the Third Issue,” International Journal of Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 1-2, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2017.vol2.2.54.
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International Information & Library Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: International Information & Library Review

ISSN: Print ISSN: 1057-2317, Online ISSN: 1095-9297

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ulbr20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The overall mission of the International Information & Library Review is the provision of knowledge that will assist in the success of libraries and information-related institutions around the world.”1

Target audience: The target audience for International Information & Library Review is “library and information professionals and paraprofessionals in public, academic, special, government, and corporate environments” from around the world.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All papers in International Information & Library Review have undergone editorial screening and peer review.”4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: With a global perspective and articles written by scholars and professionals from many different countries and institutions, the International Information & Library Review “focuses on three broad areas: policy and ethical issues, including digital values, around the world; the ways in which information technologies and policies are used to help in decision-making, problem solving and improving the quality of people’s lives; and designing and implementing information systems and services in libraries and other organizations around the world.”5

Besides original articles, regular columns include Digital Trends and the Global Library Community, Advances in Library Data and Access, The Library Workforce, Perspectives on Public Services, Global Postcards: Research, Projects, and Experiences from the Field, and Digital Heritage: Spotlight on Europe.6

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors and Invitation for Column Contributions.

Types of contributions accepted: International Information & Library Review publishes “current and anecdotal information” with an emphasis on “research, current developments, and trends related to library and information leadership and management; marketing, advancement, and development; collaborative projects and insights; scholarly communication and publication; collection development and management; technology and digitization; public and technical services; physical and virtual environments, and organizational behavior.”8 Besides original articles, the journal welcomes proposals and articles for its regular columns.9

Submission and review process: International Information & Library Review uses an online submission system for manuscript management and the peer-review process.10 The Taylor & Francis Authors Services website offers an overview of the publishing process and detailed instructions for authors.11 The journal uses Editorial Manager for the peer-review process, with detailed guidelines for authors.12

Editorial tone: The overall editorial tone is scholarly, especially for the original articles. Each column has its own guidelines and topics, so authors should read these and sample articles carefully if submitting an article or proposal to a particular column.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.14 Taylor & Francis provides a document outlining APA style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

International Information & Library Review is a well-established, highly regarded journal in the worldwide library and information science (LIS) community. LIS scholars and professionals who are conducting original research that appeals to a worldwide audience and who can contribute to the journal’s regular columns are a good fit for this journal. The journal’s authorship is from within and beyond the LIS community: “Contributions to the journal have come from staff or members of many different international organizations, including the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL, and from library and information scientists in academia, government, industry, and other organizations.”16 The journal does not court student authors, and contributors seem to be well-established professionals in LIS and related organizations, but column editors do invite proposals, which may be a way for LIS students to explore publishing in this high-level journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International Information & Library Review has a worldwide scope and reach. Its audience includes “information scientists, librarians and other scholars and practitioners all over the world.”17 The journal is written in English for an international audience. Regional terms and practices should be explained.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS scholars, professionals, and practitioners from around the world, as well as stakeholders in international organizations, such as the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL,18 who may not be in the LIS field but who are interested in international information-sharing practices and standards.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Overall, readers will have an advanced understanding of LIS subject matter, but because readers are from all over the world and sometimes from outside of the field, jargon, regionalisms, and novel practices should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting to the International Information & Library Review are writing for an international readership. Readers expect “timely articles on research and development in international and comparative librarianship, information sciences, information policy and information ethics, digital values and digital libraries.”19 They are interested in how LIS practice and theory are evolving around the world–on the international stage and in particular regions–and how this might have an impact on their own policies and practices.

Last updated: April 2, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ulbr20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Invitation for Column Contributions,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/iilr-columns.
  6. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  7. “Journal Information,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=ulbr20.
  8. “Aims and Scope.”
  9. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ulbr20&page=instructions.
  11. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Editorial Manager: Tutorial for Authors,” version 14.1-Q4/2017, www.ariessys.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.ariessys.com/wp-content/uploads/EM-Author-English.pdf.
  13. See “Invitation for Column Contributions,” for links to each column’s guidelines.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” tandf.co.uk, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandf.co.uk//journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  16. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  17. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  18.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  19.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
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Technical Services Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Technical Services Quarterly

ISSN: 0731-7131 (print), 1555-3337 (online)

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wtsq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Technical Services Quarterly is “dedicated to providing a forum for the presentation of current developments and future trends concerning the technical operations of libraries and information centers.” Its purpose is to keep readers informed of developments and research and “practical implementation of systems and applications of traditional and non-traditional technical services and the public operations they influence and sustain.”1

Target audience: LIS professionals, particularly those who are involved with the technical operations of libraries and information centers.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.2

Peer reviewed? Yes.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content: Technical Services Quarterly publishes original articles on research, theory, and implementation of all aspects of technical services in library and information centers. Regular columns include Technical Services Report, Tech Services on the Web, Reviews (of software and books), and Trending Tech Services.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: Technical Services Quarterly “accepts original research, theoretical, and implementation articles pertaining to technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies, cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management.”7 The journal advises authors to include a literature review and provides a link to guidelines.8

Submission and review process: Technical Services Quarterly uses Routledge’s Submission Portal to manage manuscripts. Manuscripts “undergo editorial screening and peer review by anonymous reviewers.”9 Taylor & Francis provides an Author Services website that gives a helpful overview of the publishing process.10

Editorial tone: This is a scholarly journal dealing with technical aspects of LIS geared toward professional technical operations of a library. As such, articles are technical and scholarly in tone. LIS-specific terms are used with the underlying assumption that the reader is familiar with them. While the language and tone are technical and scholarly, articles must also be interesting and readable.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Technical Services Quarterly is geared towards LIS professionals, especially those whose interests lie in the technical operations of libraries. For authors and researchers whose manuscripts are geared toward current and future trends in collection methods, technical services, OCLC, metadata, document delivery, among other subjects, this journal is ideal for submission. Articles have addressed interlibrary loan, ebook cataloging and management, low-cost textbooks, and technology-specific studies and reviews; there is a wide variety of librarian roles represented.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a print and online journal published in the United States. Although it does have appeal for international librarians due to its technical nature, Technical Services Quarterly is geared toward American libraries and uses American English. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.12

Reader characteristics: This journal is geared toward LIS professionals in the technical field who are interested in the latest trends.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are most likely to be LIS professionals and, given the technical nature of this journal, will be highly knowledgeable of LIS terminology and practice.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Technical Services Quarterly are LIS professionals who are highly interested in the latest technical information and research. Readers are interested in cutting-edge technology and how it is being implemented in libraries and information centers. Writers who follow trends and understand how the technology of libraries is evolving would be the best bet for this journal.

Last updated: March 21, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Instructions for Authors,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions.
  4. “Journal Information,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wtsq20.
  5. “Aims and Scope.”
  6. “Journal Information.”
  7. “Aims and Scope.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors.”
  10. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed March 21, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  11. “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. “Editorial Board,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wtsq20.
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Teacher Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Teacher Librarian: The Journal for School Library Professionals

ISSN: 1481-1782

Website: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Teacher Librarian “is one of the leading journals designed specifically for librarians working with K-12 students” as well as classroom teachers and administrators. “The name Teacher Librarian reflects the journal’s focus on the essential role of the school librarian, or ‘teacher-librarian,’ as educator, a partner and collaborator with classroom teachers, school administrators, and others.”1

Target audience: Librarians and other information professionals, classroom teachers, and administrators working in K-12 schools.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, as appropriate to the article.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Teacher Librarian publishes several major articles in each issue which deal with major topics of current interest as well as articles addressing the very foundation of teacher-librarianship.”6 Articles address a broad spectrum of topics, including Future Ready Libraries, inquiry, equity, leadership, open educational resources, cultural responsiveness, project-based learning, advocacy, digital citizenship, STEM and STEAM, and school library design.7 Regular sections include app and website reviews; advocacy; technology and PC issues; education and library product reviews; library resources management; reviews of new books, videos, and software for children and young adults; and Internet resources.8

Frequency of publication: Five times per year: February, April, June, October, and December.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Teacher Librarian accepts articles on a broad range of topics; among the most popular are “learning commons, digital and multiple literacies, reading, professional collaboration, professional development, teaching and curriculum ideas, and makerspaces” in the context of the K-12 school library. Authors may submit proposals for articles to the editors.10 The journal accepts manuscripts that are based on research, personal experience, and practice; the column Tips & Tactics features “information that can be easily transferred to practice on a daily basis.”11

Submission and review process: Submit manuscripts as an email attachment, preferably in Word, to the editors. As appropriate, proposed articles are blind reviewed “by at least two members of the Teacher Librarian peer review board, all of whom are either scholars or recognized professionals.” The editors make the final decisions on manuscripts and reserve the right “to edit for brevity, clarity and consistency of style.”12

Editorial tone: The tone of the articles ranges from scholarly, but not overly formal, to casual and informative, depending on the article type.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an especially good journal for LIS students interested in K-12 school librarianship and the current topics that affect the field. The journal publishes both research- and practice-based articles, under a wide range of topics that are of interest to those working in the schools, so LIS writers have a choice on the type of articles they would like to submit, as long as the guidelines are followed. Potential writers can also submit proposals to the editors to make sure the topic falls within the journal’s scope.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Teacher Librarian has about 2,750 subscribers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of Teacher Librarian are mostly located in the United States and Canada, and the journal focuses on North American school libraries, although many of the issues discussed can apply to school libraries in other regions. The advisory board is made up of professionals from a range of school types from the United States, Canada, and Australia.15 Authors should not have any problems using cultural references or jargon common in schools, although regional terms and usages may need explanation.

Reader characteristics: This journal is designed specifically for library professionals, school administrators, and classroom teachers working with children and young adults in the K-12 schools. Readers expect both research-based articles and articles that have clear guidelines for immediate, practical implementation in school libraries. Readers also expect helpful reviews on new materials and articles that explore up-and-coming trends in the field of school librarianship. Teacher Librarian does not look like a “typical” scholarly journal in that it is colorful and features photos and graphics.

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this journal range from librarians with MLIS degrees, to library professionals without a master’s, to school administrators and classroom teachers.16 Some readers may be less familiar with library jargon, and so explanations may be warranted. Most readers will be familiar with the terminology and concepts of K-12 education.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Teacher Librarian are library professionals who are working with K-12 students. These professionals are looking for articles that present strategies to better manage library resources for students, or articles that review education- and library-related materials. The readers need to be kept up to date on the latest happenings in information technology, as well as resources that can be found on the Internet. Collection development is a large part of the duties of the teacher librarian, so reliable reviews of new books and other media is of great interest. Articles on collaboration, leadership, advocacy, management, or any aspect of information technology in the K-12 schools would also appeal to this group.

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/.
  2. “About.”
  3. Frontpiece, Teacher Librarian 45, no. 3 (February 2018): 6.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/.
  5. “Subscribe,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/subscribe/.
  6. “About.”
  7. “2018 Media Kit,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/TELI2018-mediakit_web.pdf.
  8. “About.”
  9. “Subscribe.”
  10. “Submissions,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Author Guidelines.”
  13. “Author Guidelines.”
  14.  “2018 Media Kit.”
  15. “Advisory Board,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/advisory-board/.
  16. “About.”
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Serials Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Serials Librarian: From the Printed Page to the Digital Age

ISSN: 0361-526X (print), 1541-1095 (online)

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wser20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Serials Librarian “is an international journal focusing on the management of electronic and print serials and other subscription resources (ebooks, monographic series, databases).”1

Target audience: Librarians, library staff members, LIS students, and non-LIS professionals  involved in the “serials/scholarly resources information chain.”2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content: The Serials Librarian publishes theoretical and practical articles and case studies addressing “the full life cycle of scholarly resources, ranging from publishing and purchase to usage analysis and deselection.” Articles can range from fundamental to tertiary topics, such as “peer review, cataloging, resource discovery or consortial developments.”5 Besides Articles and Case Studies, regular sections include Spotlight on Serials Standards, Uncommon Conversations, The Business of Serials, and Gleanings from the Whirl. The Voices of the Future section features articles by LIS graduate students or recent graduates. North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) conference proceedings are published every other year as a single volume.6

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: The Serials Librarian provides “a forum for discussion and innovation throughout the serials/scholarly resources information chain, and accepts contributions from librarians, publishers, database creators, subscription agents, technology providers and others who provide content to library users.” It publishes practical and theoretical research and scholarship on a wide range of topics that focus on the “management of electronic and print serials and other subscription resources (ebooks, monographic series, databases).”7 As indicated by the regular sections, the journal publishes a wide range of types of articles on all aspects of serials management.

Submission and review process: The Serials Librarian uses ScholarOne Manuscripts to manage submissions and the peer review process.8 Taylor & Francis provides an Author Services website with instructions for submitting manuscripts and an overview of the process.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly, but sometimes less formal depending on the section.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Serials Librarian is an international journal with strong academic content — research, case studies, and reports from all types of libraries from all over the world.  The journal welcomes LIS authors and librarians but also non-LIS contributors who provide expertise on serials and subscription resources from a different perspective.11 This journal is for LIS authors who have conducted research or scholarship in serials management and who can communicate both the particulars of their work and its broader impact on serials management worldwide, from the library to the producer. Of note, this is a high-level journal that offers LIS graduate students and recent graduates the opportunity to publish their work in the Voices of the Future section.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No data available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Serials Librarian is an English-language journal published in the United States. It is international in scope and reach. Editorial board members are from libraries, universities, and serials-related businesses from around the world.12

Reader characteristics: Readers of The Serials Librarian will likely have advanced degrees and an active interest in all matters related to serials management. Subscribers are often members of NASIG or other special interest groups focusing on the promotion and effective management of serials. Subscribers value well-researched and well-written articles that will help them in their work.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the specific nature and focus of The Serials Librarian, readers will probably have a general knowledge of LIS subject matter with extensive, in-depth knowledge of serials collection and management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As well-educated librarians and other professionals with specific interest in serials, readers will expect writing from authors with solid experience and knowledgeable in this field. Readers are also interested in the future of serials and subscriptions and in novel perspectives, as evidenced by the regular Voices of the Future section.

Last updated: March 14, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” The Serials Librarian, accessed March 12, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wser20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Journal Information,” The Serials Librarian, accessed March 12, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wser20.
  5. “Aims and Scope.”
  6. See the tables of contents, “List of Issues,” The Serials Librarian, accessed March 12, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wser20.
  7. “Aims and Scope.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors,” The Serials Librarian, accessed March 12, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=wser20.
  9. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed March 12, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  10. “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. “Aims and Scope.”
  12. “Editorial Board,” The Serials Librarian, accessed March 12, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wser20.
  13. Homepage, nasig.org, accessed March 12, 2018, http://www.nasig.org/.
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