Wiki Tags Archives: Management and leadership

Library Leadership and Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Leadership and Management (formerly Library Administration and Management)

ISSN: 1945-8851 (Print) and 1945-886X (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “Library Leadership & Management (LL&M) is the official journal of the Library Leadership and Management Association. LL&M focuses on assisting library administrators and managers at all levels as they deal with day-to-day challenges. In-depth articles address a wide variety of management issues and highlight examples of successful management methods used in libraries. Features include interviews with prominent practitioners in libraries and related fields, and columns with practical advice on managing libraries.”2

Website: http://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm

Target audience: The publication is directed toward library administrators and managers in all sectors, including public, special and academic libraries.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Hybrid journal: “LL&M offers both formal peer review and editorial review options depending on the author’s preference.”5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Research-based articles, interviews, new developments and success stories related to managing libraries. Specific topics relate to management, leadership, and administration.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Per guidelines, “Recognizing the LLAMA is a diverse organization, Library Leadership & Management (LL&M) welcomes articles that correspond to the interests of the membership. This includes manuscripts that relate to leadership, management, and administration, as well as manuscripts that mirror the topical interests of the sections and discussion groups.”10

“The journal accepts both longer, in-depth manuscripts of 4,000 to 6,000 words and briefer practice-based articles of 1,000 to 2,500 words. Manuscripts longer than 6,000 words should be discussed with the Editor(s) prior to submission as there may be interest in converting it into a series of articles.”11

Submission and review process: Article submission is through their online portal. Review process depends on author’s preference: editorial or peer review.12

Editorial tone: Informative.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style and Random House Webster’s College Dictionary are listed as resources for writers.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Authors able to write on the topics associated with library administration and management would be a good fit for this publication. Recent articles focused on job satisfaction and employee turnover, diversity, innovative space planning, award winners, and customer satisfaction.15 The editors will consider articles presented at conferences, making this publication a possibility for LIS graduate students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is an online publication with Open Access Policy providing unrestricted access to published content indicating a larger audience beyond the LLAMA membership.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although headquartered in Chicago as part of the American Library Association,17 LLAMA and its membership is national in scope. The articles are domestic in nature, and the LLAMA Board of Directors all are from U.S. institutions.18 The publication is printed in English.19 Despite the fact that many LLAMA members manage libraries in ethnically diverse communities, the articles in the journal focus on general management issues that all administrators face, such as strategic planning, fundraising, library boards, and internet ethics, not community-specific issues.20

Reader characteristics: The commonality of LLAMA members is that they are at a managerial level within a library organization. It can be assumed that the majority of LLAMA members have been in the library business for a number of years, however no demographics are available. Unless they are a one-person operation (which could be the case for a school librarian), they hold supervisory roles within their organizations. Their interests are based on financial, human resource, building, and legal and ethical issues as they affect the success of their particular organizations. They are concerned with strategic planning, disaster planning, and facility planning.21 In looking over the editorials from recent issues, the overall value that can be attached to this journal would be one of empowerment. The content seeks to provide library managers with the tools needed to develop successful organizations out of preparedness rather than reactionary responses to a crisis.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Despite the fact that these are library managers, they may or may not have MLIS degrees, as some library managers followed business, not library, career tracks.23 Recent articles did not contain overly technical topics or LIS jargon, veering more toward business concepts.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The audience is more specific than €™American Libraries€™, which is directed toward all library personnel. In contrast, LL&M is designed for library managers and administrators. This could be an opportunity or a challenge for a writer. Things such as negotiating with a vendor, ergonomic work stations, and staff development are matters of concern to nearly any organization manager. Topics such as working with a library board, dealing with book challenges, and internet filters are problems that are specific to library management. But both categories have a place in this publication and therefore open up a host of possibilities for articles. However, these readers, as organization managers, most likely have very limited time to pursue professional reading. Authors for the journal need to be on top of the issues at the forefront of the managers’€™ daily lives in order to offer something new to say that is of value.

Last updated: June 12, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest. 2019. “Library Leadership and Management.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560362802779/67509
  2. Library Leadership and Management Association. 2019. Library Leadership & Management. Retrieved from https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm
  3. Library Leadership and Management Association, Library Leadership & Management.
  4. Library Leadership and Management Association, Library Leadership & Management.
  5. Library Leadership and Management Association. 2019. Information for Authors. Retrieved from https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/information/authors
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. Library Leadership and Management Association, Information for Authors.
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. Library Leadership and Management Association. 2019. Submissions. Retrieved from https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. Library Leadership and Management Association, Submissions.
  12. Library Leadership and Management Association, Submissions.
  13. Library Leadership and Management Association, Submissions.
  14. Library Leadership and Management Association, Submissions.
  15. Library Leadership and Management Association. 2019. Archives. Retrieved from https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/issue/archive
  16. Library Leadership and Management Association, Archives.
  17. Library Leadership and Management Association, Library Leadership & Management.
  18. Library Leadership and Management Association. 2019. About LLAMA. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/llama/about
  19. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  20. Library Leadership and Management Association, Archives.
  21. Library Leadership and Management Association, About LLAMA.
  22. American Library Association, Archives.
  23. Library Leadership and Management Association, About LLAMA.
  24. Library Leadership and Management Association, Archives.
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Information Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Outlook

ISSN: 1091-0808 (Print) and 1938-3819 (Online)1

Website: https://www.sla.org/access-membership-3/io/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Information Outlook is the official publication of the Special Libraries Association (SLA). The SLA “promotes and strengthens its members through learning, networking, and community building initiatives.”2

Target audience: Information Outlook is targeted towards their membership of information professionals, specifically those working in special libraries.

Publisher: Special Libraries Association (SLA).3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, the publication contains “articles on timely topics such as data curation, digital asset management, bibliometrics, and value co-creation; columns about technology, copyright law, and other issues of perpetual interest; and interviews with SLA members, offering a close-up look at information professionals in different disciplines, work environments, and countries.”7

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/

Types of contributions accepted: From the “Write for IO,” “Although written primarily by SLA members, articles in Information Outlook also are contributed by futurists, attorneys, academicians, technology professionals, human resources specialists, communications experts–anyone with knowledge or ideas about how information professionals can better serve their clients.”9

Submission and review process: Interested authors should send a query email to the current editor with an outline of your topic along with your qualifications. The editor will forward your query to the advisory council for review. The guidelines encourage illustrated article of approximately 2,000 words in length.10

Editorial tone: Written in an active voice following the SLA style guide provided in the submission guidelines.11

Style guide used: Current edition of Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information Outlook is an excellent forum for LIS authors writing on topics of interest to special libraries. Since there is such a wide variety of special library types, there are a number of topics that can be addressed. Despite differences among particular types of special libraries, many experiences and situations can be generalized and made applicable to all of Information Outlook readers.13

Although this is not a scholarly journal, Information Outlook is a highly respected journal, and LIS authors would benefit from having their work published by the SLA.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 4,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Special Libraries Association has 49 regional chapters. The majority are located in the United States, but there are also chapters in Canada, Africa, the Arabian Gulf, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean. In addition to the regional chapters, SLA boasts members in 75 countries.15 Information Outlook is published in English, but circulates to members in other countries as well (as listed above). Issues pertaining to special librarians will be of general interest to all readers, but there may be some regional/cultural specifics that might not be applicable to readers in different countries.16

Reader characteristics: The readers of Information Outlook are individuals who typically hold a library degree. Many have master’s degrees in subject specialties as well. There is gender diversity in the audience, and they range in age, typically from late 20s upwards. They may be brand new to the profession or they may be upper management with many years of experience. All readers of Information Outlook are special librarians, and therefore they have a common mission and values, and much in common within the profession. However, they work in settings that are incredibly varied, both in size and type. Readers might work alone or in large organizations, and might specialize in institutions such as government, medical, legal, and academic libraries.17 The readers of Information Outlook care specifically about issues pertaining to special libraries. According to the publication’s website, its readers are interested in articles about “administration, organization, marketing, and operations.” They value information that will help their organizations stay successful and stay informed of the latest developments and technologies.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Information Outlook are extremely knowledgeable about issues relating to library and information science. They will be at different stages of their careers, of course, with some readers having more experience and expertise than others, but writers can assume a basic level of knowledge and can expect readers to understand LIS jargon.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Outlook‘s readers are hungry for the latest information about issues that impact special libraries. They want to read articles that have practical application in their day-to-day lives and careers. As stated on SLA’s website, “readers want to read articles about new techniques, new ideas, new trends…They’re interested in growing their organizations and in planning their careers…They want to know how to confront problems and how to avoid them.” The profession is comprised of individuals who “strategically use information…to advance the mission of the organization…through the development, deployment, and management of information resources and services.”20

Potential authors can reach this audience effectively by providing case studies and real-world examples, and by focusing on what is new and innovative in the field. Most special librarians are technologically savvy and interested in cutting-edge applications that will help them accomplish their professional goals and serve their patrons. They will also likely have limited time to devote to professional reading, and will only devote that time to articles and reviews that are relevant and timely. Therefore, authors will be best served by submitting writing that is direct and to the point.

Last updated: June 9, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest. 2019. “Information Outlook.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  2. Special Libraries Association. 2019. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  3. ProQuest. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/
  8. Special Libraries Association. 2019. 2019 Editorial and Advertising Calendar. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/editorial-calendar/
  9. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Write for Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  10. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  11. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  12. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  13. Special Libraries Association. 2019. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  14. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Association Finances. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/association-finances/
  15. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Chapters. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/get-involved/chapters/
  16. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  17. Special Libraries Association, About SLA.
  18. Special Libraries Association, Editorial and Advertising Calendar.
  19. Special Libraries Association. 2016. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  20. Special Libraries Association, About SLA.
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Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

ISSN:1911-9593

Website: http://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Partnership is the journal of The Partnership organization, which is “Canada’s national network of provincial and territorial library associations.” The journal “promotes the exchange of ideas about libraries, librarianship, and information science among practitioners across all library sectors.”1

Target audience: Canadian librarians and library workers and LIS professionals, archivists, scholars, researchers, and students. Although the journal is published by The Partnership, a network of Canadian library associations with more than 7,000 people, it is an open-access journal, so its audience is not limited to members.2

Publisher: The Partnership: The Provincial and Territorial Library Associations of Canada (Ontario, Canada).3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts submitted to the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.5

Content: Regular sections in Partnership include Editor’s Comments, Innovations in Practice, Theory and Research, Features, Book Reviews, and News and Announcements.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Partnership accepts “original, unpublished manuscripts in French or English on a broad range of topics relevant to library and information science practitioners in all library sectors.” The editors “encourage submissions which consider the Canadian context, but this is not a necessary condition for acceptance to the journal.”8 Each section has its own editorial guidelines in terms of topic, word count, tone, and approach.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the journal’s website.10 Manuscripts for the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo a double-blind peer-review process, usually within two months of submission.11

Editorial tone: The tone depends on the section; it is overall scholarly but not overly formal.

Style guide used: APA (6th edition), with a modified style for online articles and documents.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This open-access journal appears to be an excellent opportunity for Canadian LIS authors, as it is written for the Canadian LIS community. LIS authors outside of Canada are not excluded by the guidelines, but they should ensure their work meets the needs of the Canadian readers.13 The many sections–theory, pedagogy, practice, professional development, reviews, and library news–cover a huge variety of content and offer writers many opportunities for submitting work that ranges from scholarly to practical to reflective.14  There are a few must-read articles and editorials for authors submitting to Partnership, especially “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership15 and editorials reflecting on the journal’s past and future.16 Furthermore, the journal “provides a chance for librarians and library workers to be editors and reviewers.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to a past announcement, in 2017 the journal received over 45,000 views. They have 1500 readers registered with their website.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  This is a Canadian bilingual publication (English and French) for librarians and information professionals of Canada. Authors would need to ensure their work meets their needs and explains any cultural or language differences.

Reader characteristics: Overall, Partnership has a very broad spectrum of readers in the Canadian library and information professions: librarians, library works, scholars, researchers, practitioners, and students. It can be safely assumed the readers are interested in promoting successful libraries and acquiring knowledge to allow them to succeed in their own work. The authors and content of the publication suggests that the majority of readers are working in all types of libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The journal works to connect members of the Canadian library community,19 and the journal’s sections are variously academic, reflective, and newsy. Readers probably have a range of LIS knowledge, from the practical to the academic.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should first take into consider how their work is broadly or specifically related to libraries and library scholarship in Canada. Furthermore, readers come to this journal to read on a a wide range of current topics in the library profession: research, pedagogy, professional development, and current news and profiles. Readers work at every level of the Canadian library profession and in all types of libraries.

Last updated: April 8, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “What is The Partnership?” ThePartnership.ca, accessed February 19, 2018, http://www.thepartnership.ca/web/PARTNERSHIP/About/PARTNERSHIP/About.aspx?hkey=57981e1d-6cc7-4b09-822e-ebdfd7f2e3b2.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Submissions,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/submissions.
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Information for Authors,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/information/authors#.WouLFRPwZUM.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “Editorial Policies.”
  15. See David Fox, “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership,Partnership 8, no. 1 (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v8i1.2692.
  16. See Robin Bergart, Leanne Olson, and Nathalie Soini, “Editorial: Charting the Course of Partnership,Partnership 12, no. 1 (2017): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v12i1.3976, and Jennifer Richard, “Celebrating 10 Years of Canadian Librarianship through the Partnership Journal,” Partnership 11, no. 1 (2016): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i1.3682.
  17. “Journal History,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/history#.WouedhPwZUM.
  18. “Top Viewed Articles,” Partnership, December 06, 2017, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/announcement/view/128.
  19. “Journal History.”
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AALL Spectrum

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AALL Spectrum

ISSN: 1089-86891

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Spectrum is the professional magazine for the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and is included in association membership. This publication “provides informative and engaging articles of interest to AALL members. The magazine informs readers about the ever-changing, multifaceted world of legal information professionals on areas including the transformation of law, career and leadership development, accessibility, education, information technology, and best practices. The magazine also keeps members apprised of Association events and activities.”2

Target audience: Members of AALL are the target audience: members are law librarians in a variety of settings, including academic law school libraries, private firms libraries, judicial and government libraries, and public law libraries for counties and states, as well as other legal information professionals.3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. This is an informal publication of AALL, primarily for association news and short practical pieces that would be of interest to practicing law librarians.6 Though it is not a scholarly journal, it is very well respected and has a high profile in its field.

Medium: Spectrum is a print publication sent free to all AALL members.7 The archives are available online back to mid-1998 at the Spectrum website.8

Content: Spectrum includes articles on subjects of interest to law librarians, especially practical pieces on marketing the library and management tips. The scholarly journal for AALL is titled Law Library Journal;  Spectrum publishes informational pieces more informally written but still of practical use to law librarians.9

Frequency of publication: Spectrum is published six times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/editorial-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Spectrum includes a mix of trend or feature stories, news briefs, regular columns, and opinion pieces about issues that affect legal information and law librarianship as well as Association events and activities.11

Submission and review process: The publishing guidelines indicate that “Spectrum prefers a thorough, detailed proposal letter that fully outlines the article topic.”12

Regarding article length, they note that “Feature articles should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words. News and department articles are typically between 800 and 1,200 words. Shorter or longer articles will be considered. “13

After submitting a query letter, the author should submit the requested article electronically, with any graphics in a separate file. “All submissions will be edited for clarity, grammar, and length.” “Whenever possible, the author will be contacted by either the AALL Spectrum editorial director or AALL publications manager to discuss questions of intention and interpretation.”14

Editorial tone: Reviewing the articles themselves, it appears that Spectrum attempts to include articles that will be of interest to firm, academic, and government librarians rather than focusing on just one type of library. The submission guidelines request “authoritative, well-researched articles about legal information and the profession.  Articles that inform, inspire, provoke, influence, or help improve practices are welcome additions to AALL Spectrum. Each submission should be an original, educational piece.”15

Style guide used: Spectrum follows The Chicago Manual of Style Seventeenth Edition and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition for style and usage, as well as an AALL Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

AALL Spectrum is the best place to engage in the informal professional conversation surrounding law librarianship. Though it is not as high profile or scholarly as Law Library Journal, it may be more widely read, and will help any law librarian make a name for him or herself. The quality of writing is very high, as are the editorial standards. However, it is not appropriate for professors seeking tenure to boost publications, as it is not a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Spectrum is sent free to all AALL members. The archives for this publication are available online at the AALL website,17 and Ulrich’s Periodical Directory indicates that they are also searchable on various LIS databases (including EBSCOhost, H.W. Wilson products, and Thomson Gale databases).18 It is possible the articles will reach non-law librarian readers through these sources.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The main circulation of this magazine is within the United States, but AALL does have some international members. Unfortunately, international demographics were not available on the Spectrum site, advertising materials, AALL Salary Survey, or AALL member information.19 Spectrum is written in American English, and is primarily interested in legal librarianship relevant to the United States.20 If international subjects are covered, the legal systems will require more explanation. An example of international coverage is “Beyond the Spectrum,” by Shaikh Mohamed Noordin, available for download.21

Reader characteristics: AALL reports over 4,000 members, roughly half of whom work in an academic or law school setting. The most populated Special Interest Sections of AALL members are Academic Law Libraries and Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals.22  All librarians in AALL are either law librarians or are interested in the organization of legal information.  This publication is run by, written by, and edited by law librarians, and as such tends to reflect the dominant views of the profession. It’s analytical; fairly negative towards vendors, but strives to be fair; focuses primarily on academic and firm librarian concerns (such as training law students or new attorneys) and to a lesser extent of government librarianship.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed. However, specialized information from non-law library disciplines or terms specific to certain jobs (such as cataloging or database administration) require explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in publishing in Spectrum are advised to list their qualifications in their cover letters, as this audience respects degrees and library experience. Though the publication is focused entirely on law librarianship, general subjects of interest to LIS professionals will overlap in this field — for instance, information on Web 2.0 is of great interest to law librarians, and recent articles have dealt with how Second Life can be used in libraries. It is best, even with general topics, to make it evident how the subject could be useful to a law librarian.24

Last updated: March 24, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest. 2019. “AALL Spectrum.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521387398626/111034
  2. American Association of Law Libraries. 2019. AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/spectrum/policy-spectrum.html
  3. American Association of Law Libraries. 2019. AALL Spectrum. Retrieved from https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  6. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  7. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum.
  8. American Association of Law Libraries. 2019. AALL Spectrum Issues Archive. Retrieved from https://www.aallnet.org/spectrum_issue/
  9. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  10. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  11. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  12. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  13. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  14. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  15. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  16. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  17. American Association of Law Libraries,  AALL Spectrum Issues Archive.
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Association of Law Libraries. 2019. Meet Our Members. Retrieved from https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/meet-our-members/
  20. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  21. Noordin, Shaikh Mohamed. 2006. “Perspective: Beyond the Spectrum.” Spectrum 10, no. 6: 12-13, 17, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/_mediavault/2017/11/pub_sp0604_Persp.pdf
  22. American Association of Law Libraries. 2019. By the Numbers. Retrieved from https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/
  23. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
  24. American Association of Law Libraries, AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.
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Public Library Quarterly (PLQ)

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitlePublic Library Quarterly (PLQ)

ISSN: 0161-6846 (print), 1541-1540 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wplq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission:Public Library Quarterly (PLQ) is addressed to leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends who believe that change is imperative if public libraries are to fulfill their service missions in the twenty-first century.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) “leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends,” especially those working in public libraries.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles undergo editorial screening and peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: PLQ focuses on how public library directors and operating officers affect change. It examines best practices and service improvement models, management case studies, library mythologies that impede development, planning and outcomes, marketing and fundraising, budget and financial management, new technology in practices, and programs for children.4 “Every issue of  Public Library Quarterly contains informative articles written by the directors and staffs of leading public libraries, news of current public library events, and book reviews covering issues of interest to those in public library work.”5

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: PLQ publishes original research, scholarship, and analyses of current issues in public libraries, from theoretical and practical perspectives. The journal “addresses the major administrative challenges and opportunities that face public libraries, providing insight and assistance to all public library workers.” Furthermore, the journal publishes surveys “that can be developed and used as national benchmarks for such administrative concerns as salaries, usage standards, and budget breakdowns.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online via Editorial Manager, a portal that manages the submission, revision, review, and publication process for authors, editors, and reviewers.8 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and peer review.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: PLQ uses the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

PLQ is a long-standing, high-quality LIS journal that publishes scholarship on all aspects of public libraries from around the world. As such, it is a a good fit for LIS authors whose scholarship is focused on public libraries or who study these libraries’ connections with other information organizations or in the realm of public policy. The journal is both practical and scholarly; many articles are written by public library directors or staff members, but the journal also looks to publish research and surveys in this domain. There is a sense that authors are highly experienced in the realm of public libraries, but this does not necessarily exclude graduate student authors with solid scholarship and novel approaches to the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article’s homepage lists number of views, citations, and Altmetric score.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLQ is published in English for a worldwide audience. Editorial board members are from universities, libraries, and information organizations in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Wales, Ireland, and Taiwan.10 Authors should consider readers from around the globe and explain jargon or regional usages.

Reader characteristics: Readers are public library directors and managers, staff members, trustees, and friends, as well as LIS researchers, scholars, professionals, and graduate students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter, but since this journal has a worldwide reach, authors should be careful to explain particular terms and practices.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

PLQ reaches a worldwide audience of public library directors, librarians, staff members, scholars, researchers, and graduate students. Readers are interested in how current events, policy, trends, and changes in the public library landscape will affect their institutions and how other libraries’ experiences and practices may inform their own practices. Readers look for evidence of positive leadership in and responses to a climate of change in the public library realm. Readers expect both theory- and practice-based articles, as well as larger scale surveys and research results.

Last updated: April 30, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wplq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission show=instructions&journalCode=wplq20.
  6. “Journal Information,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wplq20.
  7. “Instructions for Authors.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Aims and Scope.”
  10. “Editorial Board,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wplq20.
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Marketing Libraries Journal (MLJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Libraries Journal

ISSN: 2475-8116

Website: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: MLJ is a “peer reviewed, independently published, open access scholarly journal that focuses on innovative marketing activities libraries are engaged in.”1

The journal’s aim is “to publish research and practical examples of library marketing campaigns, library marketing research, public relations campaigns, SWOT analysis, segmentation research, assessment of marketing activities, and tools used for marketing.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals from public, special and academic libraries who work in marketing positions.3

Publisher: MLJ is published independently.

Peer reviewed? Yes. All articles are subjected to a double blind peer review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Two types of articles are published: research-driven work that provides original scholarship, and practical information focusing on best practices and advice.5

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles of 20-25 pages in length and practical articles of 8-10 pages in length. Additionally, practical articles (as columns) under one of the following subjects:

  • Advocacy: articles that focus on developing relationships with stakeholders to help raise awareness and loyalty for library services and resources. This may relate to communicating with government, administration, and the greater community
  • Branding: articles that illustrate how libraries develop their visual identity for their services and resources.
  • From the Trenches: articles that show outcomes of a particular marketing initiative or campaign.
  • Marketing Campaigns: case studies of a marketing campaign and the desired outcomes and objectives sought.
  • Technology: software/apps and web-based technology tools that can be used as part of a marketing campaign.7

Submission and review process: The reviewing process for manuscripts will begin after the call for proposals deadline. Some manuscripts may require substantive revision before they are ready for publication. Once a manuscript has been formally accepted, authors are required to submit a complete electronic copy of the final version, including all figures, charts, tables, appendices, and illustrations.8

Editorial tone: Professional / scholarly.

Style guide used: APA, 6th edition.9

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have written about LIS marketing and increasing visibility for libraries, this journal may be a viable publication. Some of the latest articles published are about creating a ‘brand’ for libraries and tips and tricks on video marketing.

Keep in mind that MLJ does not only publish traditional, scholarly articles, but also practical articles on advocacy, branding, case studies of marketing campaigns, technology tools, SWOT analyses and “from the trenches”-type material.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: MLJ is open access, and therefore available for any and all global readers, for free.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Articles are published in English. MLJ states that they are global in scope.10

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely LIS professionals or students who work in or are interested in marketing aspects of librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering the specificity of the journal’s content matter, LIS knowledge may be varied, but strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are interested in a variety of articles, and are seeking out the latest research and information pertaining to LIS marketing. If you have written a scholarly article, a SWOT analysis or have researched a hot topic marketing issue, MLJ readers will be eager to learn about it.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Home,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/
  2. “Home.”
  3. “About,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 11, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/about.html
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Home.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Author Guidelines,” Journal.MarketingLibraries.org, accessed April 23, 2018, http://journal.marketinglibraries.org/authorguidelines.html
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “About.”
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Political Librarian, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Political Librarian

ISSN: 2471-3155

Website: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/ and http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Political Librarian “is dedicated to expanding the discussion of, promoting research on, and helping to re-envision locally focused advocacy, policy, and funding issues for libraries.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, scholars, practitioners, and graduate students, as well as those outside of the LIS discipline, who are interested libraries and tax and public policy.

Publisher: The Political Librarian is organized and published by EveryLibrary.2 It is hosted by the Washington University in St. Louis Open Scholarship site.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Not all articles are peer reviewed, but there is a section in most issues for those that are.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content:The Political Librarian publishes peer-reviewed articles, white papers, and editorials that focus on how funding issues, tax implications, budgeting, and broader economic policy affect libraries on the local level.4 Articles range from focused examinations, such as library budgeting strategies, to broader issues, such as tax reform and trickle-down economics.5 The journal is “at the intersection of local libraries, public policy and tax policy.”6

Frequency of publication: Two volumes each year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: PolicesFinal Manuscript Preparation Guidelines, and Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian.

Types of contributions accepted: The Political Librarian publishes opinions/first drafts, white papers, and peer-reviewed articles. The journal seeks a variety of perspectives, new voices, and lines of inquiry, and does not limit “contributors to just those working in the field of library and information science.” The journal invites “submissions from researchers, practitioners, community members, or others dedicated to furthering the discussion, promoting research, and helping to re-envision tax policy and public policy on the extremely local level.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts though the journal’s online portal. Initial submissions do not have strict guidelines to follow.8 However, accepted manuscripts need to follow the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.9

Editorial tone: The tone is professional. Clear guidelines are provided by the editorial team.10

Style guide used: The journal’s reference and citation style is explained in the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Political Librarian is a new journal (first published in 2015) that has a very particular focus: it is a “dedicated space where practitioners, researchers, and users [can] publish on frontline advocacy experiences, campaign strategy and research, and/or about tax and public policies impacting libraries on the local level.” The journal is a resource for examinations of the impact of tax and public policy locally and how policy affects library services and community outcomes and for new models of library funding and resources to educate stakeholders.12 LIS authors–professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students–who write about the intersection of libraries with tax and public policy will find a good fit with this journal.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available, but the number of downloads appears on each article’s title page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Political Librarian is written in English. The audience is mostly located in the United States, as US tax and public policy are primarily discussed.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students, as well as those outside the LIS community, who are interested in how tax and public policy affects libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a strong academic and practical understand of LIS subject matter, but there may be readers outside of the discipline for whom jargon or idiosyncratic terms should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should understand that readers have a particular interest in libraries and in public and tax policy, and they look for articles that both explain how libraries can survive and thrive in the current environment and how to advocate now for positive changes in the future. Readers also look for local analyses and examinations that may have implications on a broader scale.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


 

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Journal Home,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/.
  2.  The Political Librarian, everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/.
  3. “Browse Journals and Peer-Reviewed Series,” Washington University Open Scholarship, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/peer_review_list.html.
  4. “Journal Home.”
  5. “Most Popular Papers,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/topdownloads.html
  6. “Volume 1, Issue 1 (2015),” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/vol1/iss1/.
  7. “Aims & Scope,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/aimsandscope.html.
  8. “Policies,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/policies.html.
  9. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/styleguide.html.
  10. “Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian,” everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/editorial-team-guidelines-political-librarian/.
  11. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.”
  12. Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, and Rachel Korman, “The Political Librarian: Foundations,” The Political Librarian 1, no. 1(2015): 7, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=pollib.
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Journal of Radical Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Radical Librarianship

ISSN: 2399-956X

Website: http://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Radical Librarianship “is an open access journal publishing high quality, rigorously reviewed and innovative scholarly work in the field of radical librarianship….The scope of the journal is any work that contributes to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”1

Target audience: Librarians and library and information science (LIS) practitioners, managers, scholars, and students who are interested in “radical librarianship,” loosely defined for the purposes of the journal as “the ethical roots of librarianship.”2

Publisher: The journal is self-published by the editors.3 Its platform and workflow are supported by OJS/PKP.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, the journal has a policy for manuscripts to undergo either open or double-blind review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online and open access.

Content: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes LIS articles on a broad range of topics but emphasizes that articles should contribute “to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”6 Sections include Research Articles, Editorials and Commentary, and Reviews. The journal’s Announcements page issues calls for proposals and papers on specified topics; a 2018 call was for proposals offering a “structural critique of race and power in LIS.” 7

Frequency of publication: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is published on a continual basis: articles are published as soon as they are ready under the year’s volume number.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes research and scholarly articles that offer critical analyses of “the influence of neoliberal policy on the profession.”9 With this basis in critical LIS theory and practice, the journal covers many “traditional” topics, such as information literacy, digital rights, cataloging, and technology, but also brings nondominant discourses to the field, with topics including including politics and social justice; anti-racist theory, critical race analysis, anti-colonial studies; equity, diversity, and inclusion; gender variance, queer theory, and phenomenology; the political economy of information and knowledge; critical pedagogy; and sustainability and environmentalism.10 The editors will also consider nontextual formats.11

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online and must ensure compliance with the Submission Preparation Checklist. “Prospective authors are welcome to send outlines or drafts to the editor in advance of making a formal submission. Submissions can be sent throughout the year. Revisions may be required before a decision is made to accept or reject the paper.”12 The journal gives authors and reviewers the option of open or double-blind peer review. The authors and reviewers must all agree to an open review; if not, the manuscript undergoes double-blind review.13

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly but appropriate for the topic and type of submission.

Style guide used: “Manuscripts should be prepared according to any consistent bibliographic style.”14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Radical Librarianship is a fairly new journal (first published in 2015) that is based in the UK but has an international scope and seeks contributions from “library and information workers, researchers, and academics from anywhere in the world.”15 LIS authors, including graduate students, who are writing critically about LIS theory, research, and practices, especially in ways that engage in nondominant discourses, consider a progressive point of view, and disrupt neoliberal library policy, will find encouraging and supportive editors and a high-quality, relevant journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is based in the UK and North America and is written in English, but the journal’s scope is international and the editors hope to find “editors and authors from beyond the English-speaking world” as the journal grows and evolves.16 Authors should consider an international audience for their articles and explain jargon or region-specific practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and LIS professionals, scholars, researchers, and students from around the world in all types of libraries and information organizations. Further, readers may be members of the Radical Librarianship Collective, which is an organization “building solidarity for those critical of the marketization of libraries and commodification of information.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid academic and practical knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should keep in mind that readers expect authors to approach LIS scholarship with a consideration of critical, radical, and nonhegemonic analyses. Readers will expect traditional LIS topics to be analysed and critiqued from new, radical, or nondominant points of view, and they expect writing on newer topics crucial to the profession’s progressive advancement and a disruption of its neoliberal and market-based practices.

Last updated: April 20, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about.
  2. Stuart Lawson, “Editorial,” Journal of Radical Librarianship 1 (2015): 1, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/article/view/1.
  3. “About the Journal” lists the editors and their subject areas.
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. “About the Journal.”
  7. “Announcements,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/announcement.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  10. “About the Journal.”
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions.
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About the Journal.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  16. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  17. “Home,” Radical Librarians Collective, accessed April 20, 2018, https://rlc.radicallibrarianship.org/.
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Society of American Archivists (SAA)

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Society of American Archivists

Website: https://saa.archivists.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: SAA is North America’s oldest and largest professional association for archives and archivists. Their mission is to promote “the value and diversity of archives and archivists.” Their core values include “advancing the public standing of archivists,” “fostering a culture of creativity and experimentation across the association” and a commitment to “social responsibility and the public good.”1

Target audience: Students and professional archivists in North America.

Owner: Society of American Archivists.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.

Types of books published: Guides and guidelines, reference books, book series, essay collections.

Medium: Print and electronic.

Topics covered: Trends in archiving practices, ethics, case studies, contemporary issues pertaining to archives, archivists, and allied professions.

Number of titles published per year: An exact number is unknown, but SAA has published over 150 books since the 1970s.2

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesforbookproposals

Types of submissions accepted: Book proposals.

Submission and review process: Potential authors should first submit a prospectus to the Publications Editor.

Be sure to address the following:

  • “the theme, purpose and scope of the publication;
  • the estimated format and length of the publication;
  • whether the topic and approach are better suited to print or online format
  • an annotated outline or table of contents;
  • the intended audience and the potential market;
  • the prospective value to the archival profession;
  • the relationship of the proposed publication to the literature in the field;
  • the possibility of co-sponsorship with another organization;
  • the possibility of outside financial support;
  • graphics and illustrations the publication might use;
  • co-authors or contributors in the case of an edited work; and
  • the anticipated schedule for preparation of the publication.”3

The Publications Editor reviews the prospectus and sends it to the Publications Board, Director of Publishing and, if necessary, subject specialists. Depending on the author’s writing experience, two or more sample chapters and a detailed table of contents may be requested.4

Once a prospectus is accepted by the Publications Board, a member of the Board is assigned to the project as a liaison to the author and to oversee the project until the manuscript is finished and submitted.5

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.6

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing with SAA focuses primarily on the archiving field, so it may not be a good fit for many LIS authors. However, there is some crossover in resources and initiatives with allied professions (libraries, museums, and historians). For example, SAA publishes a few books that have broader audiences (i.e. Exhibits in Archives and Special Collections Libraries and Archives in Libraries: What Librarians and Archivists Need to Know to Work Together). They occasionally partner with other allied professional associations to develop resources, such as the American Library Association.

Their Guidelines for Book Proposals states that they seek to “nurture new voices,” but keep in mind that the prospectus requires a lot of initial book information to be prepared by the author, including a defined audience and market.7

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: SAA has 6,200 members.8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SAA primarily serves archivists and students within North America.

Reader characteristics: Readers of SAA publications are archivist students or professionals with a working knowledge in the field. Currently featured titles on their online store, including Moving Image and Sound Collections for Archivists and Navigating Legal Issues in Archives, indicate that many newly published SAA releases discuss contemporary issues in the field.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers may have less knowledge on general LIS subject matter than readers of other LIS book publishers in the field, with SAA serving primarily to archives and archivists.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

SAA’s website states that their publications are “largely driven by members. Members write articles, chapters and books which are then vetted by members on the Editorial Board and Publications Board, who strive to maintain SAA’s commitment to furthering best practices in the field.”10 Potential authors can expect their publications to be read by professionals, and experts, in the field.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/aboutsaa
  2. “Book Publishing with SAA,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing
  3. “Guidelines for Book Proposals,” SAA.org, accessed February 26, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesforbookproposals
  4. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  5. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  6. “Guidelines for Manuscript Submissions,” www.SAA.org, accessed March 2, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/book-publishing/guidelinesformanuscriptsubmissions
  7. “Guidelines for Book Proposals.”
  8. “Who We Are.”
  9. “SAA Bookstore.”
  10. “Publications,” SAA.org, accessed February 27, 2018, https://www2.archivists.org/node/20534
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International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleInternational Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

ISSN: 2474-3542

Websitehttp://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol

Purpose, objective, or mission: The International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL) “is a peer­-reviewed open access journal dedicated to publishing articles on as broad an array of topics as possible from all aspects of librarianship in all types of libraries.”1

Target audience: IJoL‘s primary audience is members of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA) that provides a forum for discussion and development among Chinese American librarians and information professionals.2 However, as an international and open-access journal, IJoL‘s scope and reach is worldwide.

Publisher: IJoL is published by CALA, an affiliate of the ALA.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Articles deemed suitable by the editors are double-blind peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: “IJoL publishes original research papers, practical developments, reviews, and commentaries of value to professional practice in librarianship in general. It encourages communication on librarianship within and among relevant professional and academic communities.”5 Regular columns include Featured Articles, Reports from the Field, LIS Education around the World, Commentaries, Reviews, and News.

Frequency of publication: Twice each year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: IJoL accepts Featured Articles, which are original research or comprehensive, in-depth analyses; Reports from the Field, which “describe the implementation and assessment of innovative practices in libraries of all types” and report on distinguished Chinese librarians; Reviews of books, articles, or conference papers; and Commentaries offering perspectives on current topics.7 The journal publishes on all topics related to libraries and librarianship, including “academic, research, public, school and special libraries” and other information institutions; it is focused on, but not limited to, “major development of Chinese librarianship throughout the world.”8

Submission and review process: IJoL uses the Open Journal Systems9 online portal for submissions and offers guidelines and a submission checklist, which authors should follow to ensure that processing and publishing is not delayed.10 Each section has its own policies, so authors should check that their submissions meet these requirements as well. The editor sends suitable articles to two referees for blind review, and articles may be accepted as is, with revisions, or declined.11

Editorial tone: The tone is overall scholarly but also appropriate to each column and topic.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

IJoL‘s first issue was in 2016, so it is a very new scholarly journal. It is the official journal of CALA, which was established in the 1970s.13 In the first editorial, Editor-in-Chief Guoying Liu introduces the journal as “a forum for librarians and other researchers from Canada, China, the UK, the US and other countries to share their research, best practices and perspectives in international librarianship, international collaboration and academic exchange, library spaces and services, library technology and innovation, and other aspects of information science and studies.”14 This journal is a great fit for scholars, professionals, and students whose work or research focuses on Chinese librarianship, but the journal publishes on all topics of library and information science, including all types of libraries and information institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: IJoL statistics show that there are 131 registered users and 113 registered readers in 2018.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: IJoL readership is most likely Chinese and Chinese American librarians and information professionals. However, this is an English-language international journal that publishes on all LIS topics, and its readership is similarly international. Authors should keep in mind this international readership and explain regionalisms and particular terms and practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and information professionals, scholars, and students interested in Chinese librarianship and information communities, as well as broader topics and current trends affecting LIS professionals throughout the world. The editors of IJoL are from universities and libraries in the United States, China, and Canada.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a strong understanding of LIS subject matter; however, writers should explain regional or particular terms, concepts, and practices for an international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that the readership for this journal is global but there is a particular interest in Chinese librarianship throughout the United States, Canada, and China. Readers of the journal are LIS scholars, professionals, and graduate students who are interested in developments particular to Chinese user populations and research and practices that can be extended to a similarly global population. As a new, open-access journal, LIS authors can peruse what types of articles are being published and editorials that explain the journal’s direction.17

Last updated: April 6, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Membership,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/membership.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Submissions,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/submissions.
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “About This Publishing System,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/aboutThisPublishingSystem.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Editorial Policies.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/about.
  14. Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Message from Editor-in-Chief,” International Journal of Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2016.vol1.1.17.
  15. “Statistics,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/statistics?statisticsYear=2018.
  16. “Editorial Team,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialTeam.
  17.  Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Celebrating One Year Anniversary and Introducing the Third Issue,” International Journal of Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 1-2, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2017.vol2.2.54.
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