Wiki Tags Archives: LGBTQ

Journal of New Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of New Librarianship

ISSN: 2471-3880

Website: http://newlibs.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of New Librarianship editors acknowledge the “need to offer quality literature in our field in an open, independently produced journal. Beyond that, we believe that the library is meant to set an example for academia. Free and open access to information and innovation is crucial to the future of our institutions and profession. By providing an outlet that mixes both traditional and disruptive forms of scholarly and professional communication, we can change the way our profession shares and leads.”1

Target audience: The Journal of New Librarianship aims to reach all library and information science (LIS) professionals, practitioners, scholars, teachers, and graduate students, as well as those who are interested in the LIS field.

Publisher: The journal is “independently produced.” It uses the Scholastic academic journal management system.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, blind review. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and other content that is not peer-reviewed.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: The Journal of New Librarianship is a new journal, first published in 2016. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles, essays, editorials, book reviews, and columns4 on all topics in the field of LIS and seeks both “traditional and disruptive” forms of communication.5  The Columns section publishes “short pieces on topics of timely interest to information professionals covering innovations and issues for the next generation of librarians.”6

Frequency of publication: Articles are published on a rolling basis on the website; these are collected into two issues each year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Submissions may include, but are not limited to: Solicited articles; Scholarly Articles; Essays; Experience and opinion pieces; Media (i.e., podcasts, video, etc) relevant to innovative practices in librarianship; Book reviews; Technology reviews; Letters to the Editor on topics relevant to the field; Data sets; Manifestos; Extended scholarship (Greater than 15,000 words); and Interviews.”8 “We want lengthy treatises on intersectionality and library practice just as much as we want data analysis and recorded interviews with people doing awesome teen programming or video projects on the transformation of a library’s physical space and the perceived impact. All aspects of librarianship – by any name – are within the intended scope of the journal.”9

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit their articles stripped of identifying information so they are ready for peer review. They ask for a cover letter that explains “the origin of the project, whether it has been presented and if so where, and affirmation of its originality, veracity, and the author’s right to include all submitted material, data, and media.” Further, the cover letter should explain if the article has time constraints, for example, if it should be published immediately or during a particular conference. Finally, during the online submission process, authors are asked to list potential peer reviewers who are appropriate or those who should be avoided, and these suggestions should be explained in the cover letter. The editors ask authors to contact them with “preliminary pitches,” and they “encourage ideas for content in any and all forms.”10

Editorial tone: The editors encourage “submissions that we have no idea how to categorize,” so the tone should be appropriate to the piece: scholarly, conversational, casual, experimental, and so on.11

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of New Librarianship is an interesting, high-quality, experimental journal that aims to set an example in academia for free and open access to information, scholarship, and ideas.13 This is a great publication for LIS authors who want to publish traditional academic scholarship or who have novel explorations in theory or practice, timely observations, or experimental pieces, including multimedia, to contribute. LIS graduate students are encouraged to submit work and to volunteer as a part of the journal’s editorial team.14 This is an exciting new journal that is breaking new ground in the discipline’s publishing practices.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal that is produced in the United States. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.15 The journal welcomes non-English-language content and will provide translation assistance.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians in all types of libraries and institutions and LIS professionals, scholars, and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ will have both an academic and practical knowledge and understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are members of the LIS community who are looking for novel, interesting, relevant, timely, and experimental work in the LIS field. The editors, and presumably the readers, “share a steadfast commitment to recognizing and discussing intersectionality –how social categories like race, class, and gender create overlapping and situational systems of discrimination and privilege.”17 Readers of this journal look for innovative models and practices in libraries and in LIS scholarship.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/about.
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “For Authors,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/for-authors.
  4. “Issues,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/issues.
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue of the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 100, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/3/1.
  7. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue,” 100.
  8. “For Authors.”
  9.  “Policies & FAQS,” Journal of New Librarianship Blog, December 29, 2016, http://www.newlibs.org/post/55.
  10. “For Authors.”
  11. “Policies & FAQS.”
  12. “For Authors.”
  13. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: Welcome to the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/2016/1/weiter.1.
  14. “Policies & FAQS.”
  15. “Editorial Board,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/editorial-board.
  16. “For Authors.”
  17. “Policies & FAQs.”
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Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

ISSN: 1944-9682

Website: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ULJ “addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.” The journal was formerly titled Urban Academic Librarian.1

Target audience: ULJ’s audience includes librarians, LIS students, and other professionals working in urban libraries, those serving diverse and urban populations, and those interested in these and related fields.

Publisher: ULJ is published by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY)2 and is sponsored by the Office of Library Services at CUNY Central.3 The journal is hosted by CUNY Academic Works.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: ULJ publishes research, theory, and practice articles addressing “all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.”7 The journal has a regular book review section. Furthermore, the journal publishes Selected Proceedings from the 2017 LACUNY Institute, which regularly appear in one issue of each volume.8

Frequency of publication: ULJ “is published online on a rolling basis, and will be collected into issues twice per year.” 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: ULJ “welcomes articles dealing with academic, research, public, school, and special libraries in an urban setting”10 The journal’s scope is broad, as it invites manuscripts on “areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources.” Further, the editors invite recommendations for columns or special issues.11 The website lists the most popular articles, according to full-text download statistics.12

Submission and review process: ULJ accepts submissions via the journal’s website.13 Authors can submit manuscripts at any time. Manuscripts that the editors determine to be in the journal’s scope are sent to at least two reviewers for double-blind peer review, and authors receive reviewers’ comments. The editors strive to make decisions on manuscripts, including peer review, within sixty days of receipt.

Editorial tone: Articles exhibit a formal, academic style.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ULJ is a long-established leading journal, and its peer-review process, emphasis on research, and scholarly tone make it a viable option for LIS professionals and scholars with experience in urban libraries or whose research focuses on theories and practices in urban and diverse settings. It may not be suitable for beginning or student authors, but those with workable ideas should not be discouraged from submitting.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available for ULJ. LACUNY, the journal’s publisher, has about 150 members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LACUNY members are City University of New York faculty and staff, as well as library employees from affiliated institutions.16 ULJ editorial board members are mostly from CUNY campuses. However, the journal’s reach and relevance are broad because it is an open-access journal and its articles are of interest to LIS professionals throughout the United States and in other countries. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Overall, readers have master’s degrees in educational technology, computer science, and library science, and are associated with urban academic libraries. The journal is also relevant to librarians, library staff members, and other LIS professionals in a variety of libraries in urban settings or with diverse populations. Academic librarians and practitioners in other types of libraries, including school, public, and special, contribute to the journal, showing that the interest in urban libraries is emphasized more than the library type.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will possess considerable knowledge about LIS topics and subjects, with many readers knowledgeable about the inner workings of academic libraries. However, specialized jargon should be avoided or explained, in order to appeal to a wide range of librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

ULJ is a scholarly journal that publishes theoretical, practical, and heavily researched articles. Readers are from academic, public, school, and special libraries serving urban and diverse populations. Topics including services to immigrants, services to students, affordability and open educational resources, libraries as community spaces, advocacy, and the urban library setting are all suitable.

Last updated: March 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About This Journal,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/about.html.
  2. “Publications,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Publications.
  3. “About This Journal.”
  4. CUNY Academic Works, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/.
  5. “About This Journal.”
  6. “About This Journal.”
  7. “About This Journal.”
  8. For example, Urban Library Journal 23, no. 2 (2017), https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/vol23/iss2/.
  9. “About This Journal.”
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html.
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Most Popular Papers,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/topdownloads.html.
  13. “Submit Article,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=https%3A%2F%2Facademicworks.cuny.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dulj&context=ulj.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Paid Members,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Paid-Members.
  16. “Join Us,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Membership.
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Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (JRLYA)

ISSN: 2157-39801

Website: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The official research journal of the Young Adult Library Services Association, JRLYA‘€™s purpose is to “€enhance the development of theory, research, and practices to support young adult library services.”2

As part of the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA™,€ a subspecialty of the ALA), JRLYA‘€™s mandate is part of YALSA’€™s National Research Agenda. The 2017-2021 Research Agenda reexamines how libraries can continue to meet the “changing needs” and “information practices” of teens.3

Target audience: “€The primary audience for Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults includes academics, public librarians, school library media specialists, and secondary school educators who advocate for young adults and strive to support their developmental and educational needs.”€4

Publisher: Young Adult Library Services Association5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS Scholarly.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: From the YALSA website: JRLYA “€promotes and publishes high quality original research concerning the informational and developmental needs of young adults; the management, implementation, and evaluation of library services for young adults; and other critical issues relevant to librarians who work with young adults.”9 Articles in the journal also include literary and cultural analysis of writing for young adults.€10

Frequency of publication: Irregularly.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Original, research-based manuscripts. From the Author Guidelines: “€œManuscripts may be based on original qualitative or quantitative research, an innovative conceptual framework, or a substantial literature review that opens new areas of inquiry and investigation.”€12 You may also submit manuscripts from other disciplines focused on “enriching theory, research and practice in young adult library services.”13

Submission and review process: Send the submission as an email attachment (.doc, .txt. or .rft) to Dr. Denise E. Agosto: yalsaresearch@gmail.com. Submissions should be between 4,000 and 7,000 words double spaced.14

The editor will acknowledge all submissions, and the review process generally takes 10 to 12 weeks. The review process includes an initial assessment by the editor: if the submission reflects the journal’€s mission statement and is considered for inclusion, it’€s sent to at least two reviewers for a double-blind review process, where the next step is determined. The manuscript will then be a) accepted for publication, b) accepted pending revisions, c) sent back for major revisions and resubmission, d) rejected, or e) deemed not appropriate for the journal, with other journals suggested.15

Editorial tone: While the articles are stringently peer reviewed and of professional quality, they are extremely readable in tone, friendly, engaging, and concise, and deliver excellent information to the reader.16

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (15th Edition), for overall formatting. Random House Webster’€™s College Dictionary for spelling & usage. See the Author Guidelines for specifics.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors with even a modicum of interest in working with teens should take a look at this journal and consider submitting an article for publication. It is extremely helpful that, even if your paper is rejected by JRLYA, the editors will suggest alternate publications for you to submit to.

Writing topics cover every aspect of YA/librarianship you can think of. A 2013 article discussed biracial identity in adolescent books, with the author delving into her own ethnic and racial identity to set the tone.18 Another article was about the popular X-Men characters, focusing specifically on  X-Women’€™s sexual objectivity.19 You’€ll find this article alongside a more research-oriented study on South Korean adolescent immigrants,20 or issues in juvenile detention center libraries.21 A more recent article focuses on the ongoing debate surrounding multiculturalism in books, specifically, “Who is or is not
allowed to create multicultural literature?” 22

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is purely online23 and is geared towards anyone interested in YA library services and studies.24€ Written in American English,25with references to all sorts of young adult literature and pop culture subjects.26

Reader characteristics: JRLYA is intended for LIS researchers, faculty, students, and professional librarians interested in young adult library services.27

Per the Author Guidelines, the journal asks authors to consider the following style points when submitting for publication:

  • Choose terms that reflect YALSA’€™s philosophy.
  • Avoid sexist language.
  • Articles should be of a scholarly, research-based nature.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely very familiar with LIS subject matter. However, the journal doesn’t just cater to professional librarians, per their website: “The scope of the journal includes all aspects of library services to young adults at every level and for all types of libraries.”29€€ So, if including LIS jargon in your submission, make sure it’s explained or easily inferred within the context.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Esteemed authors such as Anthony Bernier, Carol C. Kuhlthau, and Virginia Walter have written for and commended the efforts of JRLYA.30€€ Readers can connect with YALSA on Facebook, Twitter, various blogs, and via a special wiki YALSA maintains to facilitate research and discussion of all things young adult. This is a wonderful publication, to read or write for; it is helpful and respectful of authors and takes its content very seriously, while never being dull or stuffy. In short, JRLYA is a great source of YA information.

Last updated: February 5, 2018


References

Show 30 footnotes

  1. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  2.  “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  3. “YALSA National Research Agenda,” American Library Association, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.ala.org/yalsa/guidelines/research/researchagenda
  4. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  5. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  6.  The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  7. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  8. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  9. Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, American Library Association, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.ala.org/yalsa/products&publications/yalsapubs/jrlya/journal
  10. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  11. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  12. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  13. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  14. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  15. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  16. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  17. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  18. Sarah Hannah Gomez, “This, That, Both, Neither: The Badging of Biracial Identity in Young Adult Realism,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults 3 (April 2013), accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2013/04/this-that-both-neither-the-badging-of-biracial-identity-in-young-adult-realism/
  19. Suzanne M. Stauffer, “Taking a Dip in the Crazy Pool: The Evolution of X-Women from Heroic Subject to Sexual Object,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults 3 (April 2013), accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2013/04/taking-a-dip-in-the-crazy-pool-the-evolution-of-x-women-from-heroic-subject-to-sexual-object/
  20. Joung Hwa Koo, “Recent South Korean Immigrant Adolescents’ Every Day Life Information Seeking when Isolated from Peers: A Pilot Study,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults 2, no. 3 (2012), accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2012/09/recent-south-korean-immigrant-adolescents-everyday-life-information-seeking-when-isolated-from-peers-a-pilot-study/
  21. Jeanie Austin, “Critical Issues in Juvenile Detention Center Libraries,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults (2012), accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/2012/07/critical-issues-in-juvenile-detention-center-libraries/
  22.  Taraneh Matloob Haghanikar, “Patterns in Multicultural Young Adults Novels about Persian Culture,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Matloob-Haghanikar_Patterns-in-Multicultural-YA-Novels.pdf(2017), accessed February 5, 2018, 
  23. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  24. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  25. The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 1, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404854519497/751217
  26. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  27. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  28. “Author Guidelines,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018,  http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/author-guidelines/
  29. “About JRLYA,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/about/
  30. “All Volumes,” The Journal of Research on Libraries and Young Adults, accessed February 1, 2018, http://www.yalsa.ala.org/jrlya/all-volumes/
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Library Juice Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Library Juice Press

Website: http://libraryjuicepress.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Juice Press is an imprint of Litwin Books, “specializing in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science.” They publish topics such as “library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and in general anything that can be placed under the rubric of ‘critical studies in librarianship.'”1

Target audience: Professional librarians and students of library science.”2

Owner: Litwin Books, LLC. 3

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. “Manuscripts submitted to us undergo a peer-review process to ensure their quality according to academic or professional standards, depending on the title.”4

Types of books published: LIS-specific books with a critical edge. Sample titles include:5

  • Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership
  • Queer Library Alliance: Global Reflections and Imaginings
  • Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom
  • Where are the Librarians of Color? The Experiences of People of Color in Academica

Medium: Print.

Topics covered: Library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and any topics under the rubric of “critical studies in librarianship.” 6

Number of titles published per year: Approximately five.7

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://libraryjuicepress.com/authors.php 8

Types of submissions accepted: The publisher accepts book proposals and full manuscripts on topics that are within its editorial scope.9 

Submission and review process: The Authors page provides specific submission and manuscript formatting requirements, but the publisher’s formal review process is not outlined. More information can be found in the recorded webinar.10

Editorial tone: Academic.11

Style guide usedChicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Library Juice Press titles focus on theoretical investigations into library activism, social justice, feminist pedagogy, as well as practically oriented books like So You Want to Be a Librarian. The publisher produces serious, in-depth works with alternative perspectives.

A related and worthwhile opportunity to submit writing that is not book-length is Library Juice’s annual paper contest (2,000 to 10,000 words), which is designed “to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition.”13 The contest is open to librarians, library students, academics, and others. “Acceptable paper topics cover the full range of topics in the field of library and information studies, loosely defined. Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not essentially be the report of a study.”14

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published): Publishing since 2006, Library Juice Press has approximately 30 frontlist and backlist titles.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: While the publisher is based in California and books are published in English, recent Library Juice Press titles focus on international perspectives—i.e., academic librarian labor activism in Canada, and librarianship in the context of the Cuban revolution.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are interested in content that addresses: social responsibility; information as a public good; intellectual freedom and civil liberties; print culture, web culture, visual culture, and the meaning of literacy; information policy and ethics; and the state of the library profession (issues of identity, work life, and deprofessionalization).17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are “professional librarians and students of library science” who likely have a very strong knowledge of or strong interest in specific LIS subject areas.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Library Juice Press originated as a webzine and blog, covering “topics of interest to passionate librarians from a political left perspective that is linked to the fundamental values of the profession.”18 LIS authors seeking to publish works that are politically oriented or rooted outside the cultural mainstream may potentially find an audience through Library Juice Press.

Last updated: January 29, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Litwin Books, LLC, http://litwinbooks.com/about.php.
  2. Litwin Books, LLC, accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com.
  3. “Litwin Books, LLC.”
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Our Books,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 21, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/books.php.
  6. “About Us.”
  7. “Catalog,” Library Juice Press,  accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com/catalog.php.
  8. “Authors,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 21, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/authors.php.
  9. “Authors.”
  10. “Authors.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Litwin Books Submission Guidelines,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com/litwin-books-submission-guidelines.pdf.
  13. “Library Juice Annual Paper Contest,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 15, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/contest.php.
  14. “Library Juice Annual Paper Contest.”
  15. “Our Books.”
  16. “Our Books.”
  17. “Library Juice Blog,” last modified August 30, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/blog/.
  18. “Library Juice Blog.”
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Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleJournal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS)

ISSN: 2572-1364

Website: http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS) “aims to showcase innovative research that queries and critiques current and prevailing paradigms in library and information studies, in theory and practice through critical approaches and perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences. JCLIS is committed to supplying a platform for the publication of rigorous inter-/multi-/trans-disciplinary research that might be otherwise marginalized from dominant discourses.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) and archival science scholars, practitioners, and students, especially those interested in critical and multidisciplinary research, theory, and practice.

Publisher: Library Juice Press.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: Each issue of JCLIS is focused on a theme.4 JCLIS announces themes and deadlines for upcoming issues on its Announcements page.5 The inaugural issue examined why a journal that focuses on critical LIS studies is necessary, and the editors reviewed each article to illustrate the new journal’s scope and purpose.6 The second issue focuses on critical archival studies.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Within the scope of each issue’s theme, the journal welcomes research articles, literature reviews, interviews, perspectives, and book or exhibition reviews.9

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts on the JCLIS online submission system, which requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages to ensure that the review process is anonymous and that manuscripts are appropriately formatted. Authors must also ensure that manuscripts comply with each item of the Submission Preparation Checklist.10

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The editors of JCLIS encourage submissions from “senior and junior faculty, students, activists, and practitioners working in areas of research and practice at the intersection of critical theory and library and information studies.”12 Potential authors should read the announcements of upcoming issues to guide their submissions or to explore if their work might fit in any of the themes.13 Graduate students may find that JCLIS is quite receptive to their work, and it could prove to be an excellent opportunity for current students and recent graduates.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal published in the United States. JCLISprovides immediate open access to its published content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.14

Reader characteristics: The journal’s readers are LIS and archival science professionals, scholars, practitioners, and students. According to the inaugural issue’s Editors’ Note, JCLIS “is a community of scholars and practitioners who share interests and investments in the vitality of critical perspectives and approaches within and with respect to our institutions, organizations, and educational programs. As such, JCLIS requires and relies upon the critical observations of librarians, archivists, museum professionals, educators, and researchers, as well as their critical imaginations and re-imaginings.”15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong understanding, in theory and practice, of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

JCLIS describes its authors and readers as a community. Readers value critical analyses of LIS and new explorations and theorizations of how LIS research can critique current paradigms and support nondominant discourses.16 The journal’s readers expect new, interesting, and perhaps unexpected examinations of LIS in the context of “critical approaches and perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences.”17

Last updated: April 8, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about.
  2. “Contact,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about/contact.
  3. “About the Journal.”
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “Announcements,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/announcement.
  6. Andrew J. Lau, Alycia Sellie, and Ronald E. Day, “Why Is the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies Needed Today?” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies 1, no. 1 (2017), https://doi.org/10.24242/jclis.v1i1.48.
  7. Michelle Caswell, Ricardo Punzalan, and T-Kay Sangwand, “Critical Archival Studies: An Introduction,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies 1, no. 2 (2017), https://doi.org/10.24242/jclis.v1i2.50.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. “Submissions,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about/submissions.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Announcements.”
  14. “About the Journal.”
  15. Lau, Sellie, and Day, “Why Is the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies Needed Today?” 6.
  16. “About the Journal.”
  17. “About the Journal.”
Continue Reading

Briefings

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Briefings

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.cla-net.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=261

Purpose, objective, or mission: Briefings is an online newsletter of the California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group, providing information relevant to those who serve children and young adults in the library community.1

Target audience: Members of the California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group, as well as other interested professionals.2

Publisher: The California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news with the prime purpose of educating its members.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: Issues of Briefings typically consist of articles about current events in the organization including professional conferences or programs, information about services and programs at California libraries, reminders about scholarships, events, awards and interviews with children’s authors.7

From the Youth Services Interest Group’s Mission Statement, Briefings “features information on interesting and insightful programs and activities for children, tweens, and teens. It also provides readers with information on CLA and other activities affecting libraries throughout the state.”8

Frequency of publication: Briefings now publishes four times per year (as of 2012), in January, May, and August and October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Each newsletter offers a call for submissions. 10

Types of contributions accepted: Upcoming topics are announced in each issue of the newsletter and in the members’ discussion list. The newsletter generally accepts any articles concerning children’s or young adult services, individual experiences at conferences, or sharing information about programs attended.11

Submission and review process: In most cases, articles are about 500 words. Contributors are usually CLA members but it is not required. Authors are asked to meet specific deadlines, usually two weeks before publication. Authors can send submissions to the editors via email.12

Editorial tone: Informational.13

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A good place to increase visibility in the California LIS community and network with other LIS professionals, especially for CLA members and first time writers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As an online-only publication, no circulation figures are available, according to the editor. The California Library Association has “nearly 3000 Individual, Business, and Institutional members. Individual members include librarians, library employees, library students, friends group members, trustees, retirees as well as members of the general public who wish to support California libraries. CLA Business members represent a wide range of library-supporting businesses, whereas Institutional members include library institutions and systems who support the association’s advocacy programs.”14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As a state professional organization, most members either reside or work in the state of California, or have a vested interest in issues affecting libraries in California.15 Briefings is published in the English language. California is a culturally diverse state, however, and the CLA and the Youth Services Interest Group reflect this diversity with attention paid to issues affecting Latino, African-American, Asian, and gay and lesbian communities, among others.16

Reader characteristics: In the absence of any officially gathered demographic data, information was gleaned from individual issues of Briefings, as well as anecdotal evidence from its past editors. It appears that contributors to the publication are overwhelmingly female,17 and past coeditor Julie Zeoli notes, “It has been my observation that there is a growing trend of young people taking young adult librarian positions.”18 From the large numbers of “20-somethings” she’s met at professional gatherings and conferences, we can surmise that the readership of Briefings is trending younger. Zeoli also notes that their readership seems to be overwhelmingly public librarians, as opposed to school librarians.19 The publication favors state and regional issues faced its membership.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As members of the CLA, we can assume that most readers have MLIS degrees or are working on MLIS degrees, and have a general knowledge base of LIS issues, and youth services specifically. Also, both the CLA and the Youth Services Interest Group have continuing education as one of its goals, and providing a place for the exchange of new ideas and technology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The characteristic with the largest impact on potential contributors to Briefings, of course, is that they usually will be CLA and Youth Services Interest Group members to contribute. With an audience of mainly public librarians, issues of concern to public libraries would probably take precedent over those concerned specifically with school libraries. And with an audience of many young librarians, the audience may be particularly interested in articles sharing information about how other libraries do things, as well as ones with a hip and trendy voice.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  2. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  3. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  4. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  5. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  6. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  7. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  8. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  9. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  10. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  11. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  12. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  13. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  14. California Library Association (CLA). (2016). History. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=29
  15. California Library Association (CLA). (2016). History. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=29
  16. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  17. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  18. J. Zeoli (personal communication, February 21, 2014)
  19. J. Zeoli (personal communication, February 21, 2014)
  20. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  21. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
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ALAN Review, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The ALAN Review

ISSN: 0882-2840 (Print) and 1547-741X (Online)1

Website: http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The ALAN Review, sponsored by the Assembly on Literature for Adolescents (ALAN), a special-interest group of the National Council of Teachers of English, specializes on articles and reviews of literature for adolescents and those teaching literature to adolescents.2

Target audience: Mostly K-12 teachers who use the Review to research titles appropriate for young adults, and librarians, authors, and publishers focusing in the YA area.3

Publisher: Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the National Council of Teachers of English.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly/professional publication focusing on news and reviews of young adult (YA)/adolescent literature. Not affiliated with a specific LIS resource, other than NCTE – but provides information to librarians on how to instruct adolescents in reading literature, and provides book reviews that librarians will find helpful in the workplace.6

Medium: ALAN members get a print copy of each Review with membership.7 Back issues can be found on the DLA website, free of charge.8 (Virginia Tech’s Digital Library and Archives (DLA) project provides many scholarly journals in a digital format to get around the high cost of producing print journals.9)

Content: Reviews of young adult/adolescent literature, and articles on the same, as well as articles on the teaching of literature. This can consist of research papers and studies, literature surveys and critiques, author profiles, comp lit studies, and articles on ways to teach literature to YA/adolescents.10

Frequency of publication: Published three times per year: Fall, Winter, and Spring.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Located in the journal itself. You can check the DLA for back issues.12 Calls for manuscripts can also be found on the ALAN Review home  page.13

Types of contributions accepted: Author reviews and interviews, book reviews, articles on adolescent literature and teaching adolescent literature. The Review has also begun accepting vignettes from librarians and teachers focusing on their experiences and interactions presenting YA material to other teachers, students, parents, etc.14

From Vol. 38 No. 1 (Fall 2010) online: “€œA manuscript submitted for consideration should deal specifically with literature for adolescents and/or the teaching of that literature.”15

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be emailed to alan-review@uconn.edu, with “ALAN manuscript submission” in the subject line, in MS Word, APA format. Authors should submit a manuscript without reference to the author(s), a title pages with names and biographies, and a brief statement of the originality of the article.16

A blind review is done by the editor and at least three members of the editorial-review board. Authors can expect to hear the results in 8 weeks. Articles are judged on: the contribution to the field of adolescent lit; clarity and cohesiveness; and scholarly rigor.17

Editorial tone: The articles are scholarly, and present a thesis, outline the study or observation methods, and present findings, often with charts and graphs and a lots of references. However, the tone is conversational, open, and friendly. The submission guidelines specifically note that research papers and studies should be treated as articles, not formal reports.18

Style guide used: The ALAN Review prefers the use of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Anyone who has read and enjoyed a YA book will most likely think of something that would be appropriate to publish in The ALAN Review. This is a respected, peer-reviewed publication geared towards the very community that LIS students seek to work with. Authors write to their like-minded peers. They are passionate about sharing their experiences in hopes that others can learn from them. The Review is a wonderful outlet for interesting, involved, scholarly articles, reviews or interviews, or for just sharing a story about getting YA novels out to the public-a library event, book club, new way of teaching an old title, a study on readers of YA novels or focus on the reading patterns of a specific subculture (minority students, girls, boys, rural readers, LGBTQ youth)-this is the place for these types of submissions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Review is distributed to all members of the ALAN group, part of the NCTE.20 Ulrich’s currently lists its circulation at around 2,500.21 In 2013, the online catalog received over 271,000 unique visitors.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Review is part of the National Council of Teachers of English, out of Campbell, OH. English is the primary language; however, ALAN has members in all 50 states and internationally, and covers reviews of all sorts of books for adolescents.23 From the submission guidelines: “Stereotyping on the basis of sex, race, age, etc., should be avoided, as should gender-specific terms such as ‘€œchairman.'”24

Reader characteristics: Members of the ALAN are highly interested in youth and young adult literature. Most people receiving this journal through ALAN or NCTE are classroom English teachers in middle or high school, or librarians, researches, authors, publishers specializing in YA literature.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are not expected to be familiar with LIS terminology, although most likely they will as some subscribers are librarians and most are educators. Subscribers to the journal are primarily part of NCTE, teachers in middle and high school as this is a journal for adolescent literature.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is the place to send your manuscript, article, review or story if you’€™re an LIS student with any interest in the YA world. The Alan Review readers are a highly specialized group of professionals teaching and providing reference services to young adults. Sharing your manuscript could potentially influence classrooms around the country—new books to read, new teaching methods, studies and conclusions – this is the place to publish to get your name and ideas out, and to connect with other teaching and library professionals.

Last updated: November 6, 2014


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  The ALAN Review, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/475341233
  2. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  3. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  4. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  5. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  6. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  7. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). Join ALAN. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/join-alan
  8. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  9. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). History of DLA and SCP. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/about/index.html
  10. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  11. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  12. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  13. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  14. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  15. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/ALAN/
  16. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  17. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  18. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  19. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  20. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). Join ALAN. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/join-alan
  21. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALAN Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401814141318/86397
  22. Virginia Tech Digital Library and Archives. (2014). The ALAN Review Online Access Data. Retrieved from http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/stats/ejournals/ALAN-current.html
  23. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALAN Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401814141318/86397
  24. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review author guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/page/alan-review-author-guidelines
  25. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
  26. Assembly on Literature for Adolescents of the NCTE. (2014). The ALAN Review. Retrieved from http://www.alan-ya.org/the-alan-review/
Continue Reading

Young Adult Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Young Adult Library Services (YALS)

ISSN: 1541-4302 (Print) and 2374-7706 (Online)1

Website: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/

Purpose, objective, or mission: It is the official journal of Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) and from their site, “…act[s] as a showcase for best practices, provide[s] news from related fields such as youth development, and will spotlight significant events of the organization…”2

Target audience: Librarians and library staff who serve youths, ages 12 through 18.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and limited online content.7

Content: Showcases best practices, news from related professions, reviews of professional literature, and spotlights YALSA events.8 Each issue may contain articles on important topics such as: intellectual freedom, collaboration, adolescent literacy, youth development, and leadership. There may also be interviews, speeches, or bibliographic essays.9

Frequency of publication: Four times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: News of current interest to the profession, articles on best practices, news from related professions, and reviews of professional literature. Interviews are also accepted. Manuscripts submitted should not be under consideration or accepted elsewhere.11

Submission and review process: Contact editor for specifics concerning submission and style guidelines. In general simultaneous submission or previously published work not accepted.12

Editorial tone: There is no stated tone for article submissions, and articles can range from academic to reports on field practice. A wide variety of styles is acceptable as long as the submission conforms to the themes and types of articles YALSA is interested in for their readers.13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and specific YALS defined style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is eminently suitable to anyone who has an interest in writing articles geared towards librarians serving young adults (aka “teenagers,” adolescents,” “youth”). It would be an excellent resume builder to have been published in the YALSA journal. The guidelines are direct and exact. Getting published in this journal might be difficult for a novice, but the attempt would be worth it.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: YALS reaches YALSA membership, approximately  5,000 librarians and educators.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: YALSA is centered in Chicago, IL, and the main geographic location served is the United States. However, they do outreach programs in other countries and some members are international, so the journal has a limited international scope as well. Cultural considerations do not generally enter into the journal’€™s authorship. Most authors appear to be writing solely for American librarians who serve young adults. These articles can be applicable to most any other developed country’€™s librarians serving youth (ages 12-18), however, even more than with young adult services in the U.S., there is a dearth of research and scholarship on developing nation’s youth services.16

Reader characteristics: Readers range in location, age, and gender. They are spread all over the U.S. in both public and school libraries. The vast majority of readers have MLIS degrees and work as Young Adult Specialists or youth generalists in public library librarians or School Library Media Technicians. Some readers are para-professionals or library assistants at these locations and do not have the MLIS degree. All the librarians who read YALS, however, are highly interested in services to young adults (ages 12-18) as that is the target issue for this particular journal. Some interests they all share are collection development for YA literature, programming, methods of incorporating library use into school curricula, intellectual freedom, subscription databases, and hot topic issues having to do with youth services. Since the librarians targeted by this journal work with young adults (ages 12-18), their needs tend to be a trifle more progressive than some fields. The world of youth services is constantly expanding and evolving due to YA reliance on the internet and technology. In order to keep up with the clientele they serve, the readers are going to be looking for innovative articles which will offer the ideas, experiences, and opinions of their colleagues.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that most of the readers have MLIS degrees, contributors can assume that readers will be familiar with the profession’s vocabulary, particularly that pertaining to young adult services.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important thing to keep in mind when writing for YALS is that the readership is going to be interested primarily in topics having to do with youth librarianship. They are not going to be interested in esoteric topics on archives, law libraries, etc. Some articles on cataloging or subscription databases would be acceptable, but primarily articles should be geared toward advancing, managing and delivering excellent library and information services to young people.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Young Adult Library Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 18, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1165334034
  2. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). About YALS. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/about_yals/
  3. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). About YALS. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/about_yals/
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406648872693/442511
  5. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406648872693/442511
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406648872693/442511
  8. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/submissions/
  9. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406648872693/442511
  11. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  12. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  13. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  14. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  15. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Advertising. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/advertising/
  16. American Library Association. (2016). About YALSA. Young Adult Library Services Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/yalsa/aboutyalsa
  17. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). About YALS. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/about_yals/
  18. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). About YALS. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/about_yals/
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Bitch Media

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bitch Media

ISSN: 1524-5314 (Print) and 2162-5352 (Online)1

Website: https://bitchmedia.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “Bitch Media’s mission is to provide and encourage an engaged, thoughtful feminist response to mainstream media and popular culture.”2

“Bitch seeks to be a fresh, revitalizing voice in contemporary feminism, one that welcomes complex arguments and refuses to ignore the contradictory and often uncomfortable realities of life in an unequivocally gendered world.”3

“Bitch looks at the media and its products through a lens that takes into account the historical and cultural representation of gender in pop culture.”4

Target audience: Largely women, but meant for anyone who is interested in a modern feminist discussion on media and popular culture. According to the website, Bitch has a diverse audience and is “uniquely situated to draw in young readers who are at a critical moment in their lives—a moment when they are discovering feminism and activism, finding answers to who they are, and questioning the definitions of gender, sexuality, power and agency prescribed by the mainstream media.”5

Publisher: Bitch Media.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: Lay publication, with emphasis on politically and socially minded individuals.8

Medium: Print magazine, a website which publishes daily online articles, and a podcast.9

Content: Commentary on and critiques of TV, movies, magazines, advertising, and more; interviews and profiles of feminist pop culture makers; book, film, and music reviews.10

Frequency of publication: The print magazine is published quarterly.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “We are looking for discussion-provoking critical essays that are well researched with evidence to back up claims, timely statistics, and connections between one’s personal experience and larger social forces. Interviews with feminist culture-makers are welcome, as are book, film, and music reviews and nuanced analyses of particularly horrifying and/or inspiring examples of pop culture. First-person essays are great, but please read our print magazine and website to get a sense of how our contributors strike a happy balance between the personal “I” and the larger subject matter at hand.”12

Bitch accepts nonfiction pieces only, and does not accept fiction, poetry, “personal essays, experimental lyric essays, or anything that reads like a dissertation.”13 Each issue has a theme, but the themes are meant to serve as jumping-off points rather than rigid guidelines. Be sure to check the website for upcoming topics, but the editors encourage pitches for articles that would suit the magazine but don’t fit an upcoming theme.14

Potential contributors are encouraged to consider which section of the magazine would best fit their idea before submitting a pitch. Features are “2,000 to 2,500 words of meaty critiques, essays, and articles on pop culture from a feminist perspective.” These pieces should be filled with “personal insight and wit,” and may vary in format, such as interviews, reported pieces, critical essays, or even timelines, charts, and comics.15 Dispatches are “1,000-1,500 word columns on film, television, language, activism, advertising, publishing, and more, with pieces taking the form of reviews, critical essays, Q&As, and activist profiles.”16 Department of Everything is “a new section with fun, short pieces that still carry the heft of feminist critique in an accessible format.”17

Submission and review process: Both finished work and query letters are accepted. If sending only a query, include clips and/or writing samples. Submissions, query letters, and pitches are accepted through their link to Submittable.18

Editorial tone: Serious, and seriously tongue-in-cheek. This is not a scholarly publication and sarcasm is rampant, but Bitch remains a very thoughtful and provocative media organization.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and information science is a field that is historically dominated by women, and perhaps due to that, it is a profession filled with preconceived notions and attitudes about women as librarians (think severe, hair-buns, glasses, and sensible shoes). Bitch is an excellent forum to discuss how we as librarians (both male and female) are seen in popular culture, what that image represents, and if that image affects how the populace sees us. It would be a good forum to discuss how gender, sexuality, and feminism play a role in our profession, as well as an outlet to discuss how other LIS issues are affected by or are affecting popular culture and the media. LIS authors with a background or interest in women’s studies or literature might be interested in writing feature articles, though an interdisciplinary perspective is key.

Bitch began as a zine, and has grown into an independent, nonprofit, feminist media organization.19 But that independent spirit, snarky attitude and distrust of the status quo have remained. The magazine endeavors to be a “tool kit” that engages readers in analysis that promotes activism and social change, and LIS authors with an interest in social justice, critiques of mainstream culture, and independent thinking would be at home here. Come with a strong opinion, say it well and say it with wit.20

This organization recognizes the value of libraries as places of critical inquiry, and supports a Bitch Community Lending Library that houses a diverse selection of 2,000 feminist materials to the community in the magazine’s home of Portland, Oregon. The library hosts monthly in-person and online book discussions.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print magazine has 80,000 readers, while the website receives nearly 5 million unique visitors each year.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Bitch subscribers reside in 46 countries and all 50 states, with 78% of readers living in urban areas or college towns.23 This magazine focuses on popular culture and media images almost exclusively in the United States. Bitch will repeatedly refer to people, places, ads, and events that will only make sense to a person who has an idea of the major figures or subjects in American popular culture.

Reader characteristics: The majority of Bitch’s readers are between the ages of 25 and 44. They are well educated, tech savvy, and have Internet access. Bitch readers are also civic-minded and politically aware, with 85% having voted within the last year, and 51% having contacted their elected officials in the past year. They overwhelmingly identified identified as politically liberal, progressive, or radical.  They donate to causes and campaigns that are important to them. They read in their spare time, with 63% reading more than 10 hours a week. They are vocally and financially supportive of music, theater, and the arts. They are well-traveled: 48% traveled overseas in the past three years, and 92% traveled domestically in the last year. Bitch readers are conscientious consumers: 82% go out of their way to shop at independent retailers, 84% purchase environmentally friendly products and services, and 44% independently research a company’s mission or labor practices before buying its products.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Little to none. The odds are good that the reader has spent time in libraries of some kind (academic, school, and public), and shares values the library upholds, such as intellectual freedom and equal access to information.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This organizations’s readership is large, and while readers are largely unfamiliar with LIS topics, virtually any LIS subject relating to feminism (e.g., gender prejudices within LCSH subject headings) would be welcomed here. This audience wants something that is thought-provoking, well written, and entertaining. They want to discuss thematic figures of women, femininity and gender within pop culture and society as a whole.25

Readers are overwhelmingly well-educated, socially and politically progressive women who live in urban areas. Do not assume there will be a great deal of knowledge or even interest in many library issues or concerns, but there will be an interest in how librarianship as a profession and threats against freedom of information affect the position of women and minorities in American society. Persuasive and thoughtful writing is more important than citations, statistics, or user studies (though referring to any of these will help solidify the author’s argument). Remember that these readers don’t just read about a topic, they do something about it. This is an audience whose members just might write to their legislators about a library issue or volunteer at their local library, if those issues resonate with them. This is a great audience to reach, not only because it shares LIS values but because it has the potential to be an advocate for LIS issues.

Last updated: September 23, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Bitch, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1192562806
  2. “About Us,” BitchMedia.org, accessed September 23, 2018, https://bitchmedia.org/about-us
  3. About Us
  4. About Us
  5. About Us
  6. About Us
  7. “Contributors’ Guidelines,” BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/writers-guidelines
  8. About Us
  9. About Us
  10. About Us
  11. About Us
  12. Contributors’ Guidelines
  13. Contributors’ Guidelines
  14. Contributors’ Guidelines
  15. Contributors’ Guidelines
  16. Contributors’ Guidelines
  17. Contributors’ Guidelines
  18. Contributors’ Guidelines
  19. About Us
  20. About Us
  21. “Bitch Community Lending Library,” BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016, https://bitchmedia.org/library
  22. “Get that Life: How I Co-founded Bitch Media,” Cosmopolitan.com, accessed September 7, 2016, http://www.cosmopolitan.com/career/a57736/andi-zeisler-bitch-media-get-that-life/
  23. “Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit,” BitchMedia.org, accessed September 7, 2016,  https://bitchmedia.org/sites/default/files/Bitch-Media-Sponsorship-Kit.pdf
  24. Bitch Media Sponsorship Kit
  25. About Us
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Voice of Youth Advocates

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://www.voyamagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Focuses on library services to/with young adults (aka “teenagers” “adolescents,” typically youth of middle and high school ages). VOYA‘s policy is based on the following principles: specialize in young adult library service; intellectual freedom and equal access; and youth advocacy and youth participation.1

Target audience: Public librarians, school librarians and educators serving youth ages 12 to 18, paraprofessionals serving youth, publishers, authors of young adult books, and other young adult advocates.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional journal.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The journal includes book reviews on fiction, nonfiction, and genre titles, as well as articles about YA services, programming, space design, and lists of award winners.7

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly publication.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Literary analysis, author interviews, or practical project ideas, new YA space redesigns or makeover profiles (a regular column) are accepted. Submissions are also accepted for the “VOYA Get With the Program” column.9

Submission and review process: Short articles should be between 800 to 1,700 words and up to 3,500 words for longer pieces. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Information for specific column requirements is available on the website. Authors should query the editor before submitting manuscripts, to ensure the piece is suitable for the journal.10

Editorial tone: VOYA solicits articles written in an approachable style for practitioners serving YA users. The goal is to publish articles by authors who express enthusiasm in working with YA and who can speak from experience about YA services.11

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VOYA is a well-respected journal in the field of library and information services for young adults. The journal is written in an approachable style which may not meet tenure requirements for academic faculty. Also, this journal is intended for public and school librarians who work with YA and not academic librarians. Those interested in tenure may not want to submit manuscripts for publication to this journal.

The journal welcomes articles about new, progressive, informative, and controversial issues as they relate to youth culture. Authors who have experience in working with YAs and who can demonstrate enthusiasm for working with them through their writing are encouraged to submit manuscripts. VOYA‘s wide range of readers provides authors with a large audience which will provide them wide recognition in the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: VOYA has 7,000 subscribers. According to the last reader’€™s survey, each subscriber circulates the journal to two colleagues which means that the journal experiences a readership of 21,000 people.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published within the United States,13 but there is a possibility that there are subscribers outside of the country. The journal is printed in English.14 Due to wide readership, it is important that language remain clear of local jargon. This also means that all acronyms should be spelled out. Cultural consideration should also be taken into account. Pop culture references should be explained so that all readers will understand. This is very important for this journal since it focuses on young adults, who are very interested in pop culture.15

Reader characteristics: There is no statistical breakdown on the readers of this journal. However, the journal does say that the readers of this journal are public and school librarians, educators, authors of young adult books, publishers, and other youth advocates. The common interest among this group is young adults. However, they may not all be interested in this age group in the same way. School librarians may be more interested in the book review section and have marginal interest in programming, which public librarians are keen on. Publishers and authors might also be interested in the book review sections and the interviews with authors. The journal does not profess itself to be liberal or conservative, however, it does value intellectual freedom, young adults, literature for this group, and advocacy for YA resources. All of which lean more towards a progressive attitude. The journal often features articles about controversial topics, books, or authors.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the breadth of professions represented in this readership community, it is suggested that authors avoid using LIS specific jargon which may not be understood or interesting to lay readers.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal are a very diverse group in terms of language, geographic location, profession, and educational attainment. Authors should consider writing articles about new and interesting topics in the field of library services. However, the topics should not be scholarly in tone or esoteric. Authors should remember that the readers have different backgrounds and interests in young people.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  2. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  7. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  9. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  10. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  11. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  12. VOYA. (2016). AdvertisersRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/advertisers/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  14. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  15. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  16. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  17. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
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