Wiki Tags Archives: Law

Law Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Law Library Journal

ISSN: 0023-92831

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Since 1908, LLJ has provided up-to-date information on law, legal materials, and law librarianship.2

Target audience: “Law librarians and others who work with legal materials.”3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries (AALL)4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Sample article topics “include law library collections and their acquisition and organization; services to patrons and instruction in legal research; law library administration; the effects of developing technology on law libraries; law library design and construction; substantive law as it applies to libraries; and the history of law libraries and legal materials.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Information appropriate to law librarianship, case studies, descriptive or historical narratives, commentaries, reports on research projects, articles memorializing deceased members of the association.10

Submission and review process: As is standard practice for scholarly journals, LLJ only accepts unpublished manuscripts which are not being considered for publication elsewhere. The editor works closely with authors throughout the review process and keeps the latter informed of the expected production schedule. Additionally, the journal encourages potential authors to submit queries before submitting articles for consideration.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly, although many articles have adapted an engaging narrative style, which is as readable as it is informative.12

Style guide used: The Bluebook, which illustrates how to format footnotes and references is used in conjunction with The Chicago Manual of Style.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Law Library Journal is an excellent choice for students working in law libraries, lawyers, judges, paralegals, law students, as well as anyone interested in law libraries in general, including the history of these valuable institutions. Although the subject matter of this publication is relatively specialized, authors who combine research with engaging narrative to frame in-depth articles on law libraries will feel right at home with LLJ.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Circulates to nearly 4500 members and subscribers.” 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because Law Library Journal is published by the American Association of Law Libraries, the bulk of its audience is comprised of English-speakers, particularly those who live in the U.S. and/or are interested in U.S. law libraries.16 However, the journal also publishes research which describes the role of law in other countries, particularly European countries which have influenced the U.S.17

Reader characteristics: LLJ readers are primarily law librarians or others who work with legal materials and resources. They may work in law firms, law libraries, law schools, public libraries with law sections, etc.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with both LIS and legal jargon.

Additionally, since the bulk of LLJ’s readers are AALL members, it’s worth examining the general knowledge base of the AALL. AALL members belong to a variety of committees, including the Citation Formats Committee,18 Fair Business Practices Implementation Task Force,19 and Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Law Library Journal‘s readers are very familiar with legal procedure, courts, and librarianship. While the articles in this journal are written in an easy-to-understand style, readers expect authors to accurately portray the nuances of U.S. law, the history of libraries in general, etc. Thus, although the topics portrayed within the journal are broader than the title suggests, thorough knowledge of U.S. law and its history is suggested before submitting to this publication.

Last updated: February 23, 2018


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  2.  Law Library Journal, American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/
  3.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  4. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  5. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  6. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  7.  Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  8.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  9. Law Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519398843811/48759
  10. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  11. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  12. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  13. “Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/law-library-journal/llj-policy/
  14.  James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  15. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries
    Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  16. James E. Duggan, ed. “American Association of Law Libraries Law Library Journal Author’s Guide,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  17.  James E. Duggan, ed. “Introduction,” Entire issue, Law Library Journal 109, no. 4 (2017).
  18. “Citations Formats Committee,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/citation-formats-committee/
  19.  “Fair Business Practices Implementation Task Force,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/fair-business-practices-implementation-task-force/
  20. “Recruitment to Law Librarianship Committee,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed February, 23, 2018, https://www.aallnet.org/report/recruitment-to-law-librarianship-committee/
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The University of Chicago Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: The University of Chicago Press Books

Website: http://press.uchicago.edu

Purpose, objective, or mission: Founded in 1890, the mission of the Press is “the obligation to disseminate scholarship of the highest standard and to publish serious works that promote education, foster public understanding, and enrich cultural life.”1

Target audience: Both scholars and casual audiences, in the United States and abroad. 2

Owner: The University of Chicago Press.

Are published books peer reviewed? Unknown, but all book proposals are to be sent to appropriate editors for a lengthy review process. Prospective authors are encouraged to consult William Germano’s book Getting It Published for more information on the publication process.

Types of books published: The Press leans toward being a civilian publication, and their Book Submissions page states that they generally do not publish work outside of their stated subject fields.3

Medium: Print and electronic, released simultaneously.4

Topics covered: Mostly liberal arts and social sciences, though they are well known for The Chicago Manual of Style and writing guides. Consult the list of acquisitions editors for a complete list of accepted book topics.

Number of titles published per year: Unknown, but the Press is a rather large publishing house, with more than 5,000 books currently in print.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/books_submissions.html

Types of submissions accepted: Book proposals only on accepted subjects. The Press has a separate division for journals.

Types of submissions the publisher is not interested in:

  • Unrevised dissertations
  • Festschriften
  • Works of original fiction

Submission and review process: After determining the appropriate editor, send a letter of introduction, curriculum vitae, table of contents and a prospectus.6 Do not send a complete manuscript unless you are asked to do so. After your submission has been received, it may take up to a month to hear back from an editor.7

Editorial tone: Unknown.

Style guide used: Unknown, though keep in mind that the Press publishes The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

The Press publishes across a wide array of subjects, including books about both library science and publishing. Glance over the list of currently published LIS books on their website to get a better sense of what the Press is looking for. Prospective authors penning writing guides, or writing about literary, media, cultural studies or education are encouraged to contact an appropriate editor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: This is a relatively large publishing house, having published more than 11,000 works since its foundation in 1890.8 It’s editors have worked to “build a broad but coherent publishing program engaged with authors and readers around the world.”9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Press publishes books that appeal to a vast, international audience: books about Chicago and surrounding areas, translations of foreign language texts and significant non scholarly works are just a sampling of their publications.10 If published by the Press, their marketing department ensures that publicity and promotions will be conducted in the United States as well as from satellite offices in the United Kingdom, Australia and Japan.11

Reader characteristics: Scholars and casual readers with specific interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A majority of the LIS books published by the Press are historical in nature, including a world history of libraries and account of medieval books of early modern England.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of books published by the Press can generally be considered knowledgeable and, potentially, subject experts. The Press also distributes dozens of other publications from the likes of the American Meteorological Society, Association of University Presses, Amsterdam University Press and many others from all over the world.12 Considering that many of these, like the Press, are affiliated with a university, potential authors may want to keep in mind that the general readership leans in a scholarly direction.

Last updated: February 14, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About,” Press.UChicago.edu, Accessed February 8, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/press/about.html
  2. “About.”
  3. “Book Submissions,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 9, 2019, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoservices/book_submissions.html
  4. “Marketing Information,” Press.UChicago.edu/InfoServices/Auth_Resources, accessed February 9, 2019, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/auth_resources.html
  5. “About.”
  6. “Book Submissions.”
  7. “Submissions FAQ,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 9, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/submissions-faq.html
  8. “About.”
  9. “About.”
  10. “About.”
  11. “Marketing Information for Authors,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 11, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/auth_resources.html
  12. “Major publishers marketed & distributed by the University of Chicago Press,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 14, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/books/publishers.html
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Federal Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ederalederal Librarian

ISSN: 1940-3534(Print) and 0273-1061 (Online)1

Website: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Federal Librarian is the official newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Libraries Round Table (FAFLRT).2 Federal and Armed Forces Libraries represent a wide variety of library types: research, law, school, and public. Librarians working for the U.S. federal government have opportunities that span the library field, from direct services to the public, to in-depth research support for America’€™s military and civilian services.

The Round Table has developed a successful series of programs to inform new and incoming library professionals about careers in federal libraries, and to assist established federal librarians grow their careers. FAFLRT also sponsors awards and recognition for outstanding federal librarians.3

From their site: FAFLRT’s mission is “to promote library and information service and the library and information profession in the federal and armed forces communities; to promote appropriate utilization of federal and armed forces library and information resources and facilities; and to provide an environment for the stimulation of research and development relating to the planning, development, and operation of federal and armed forces libraries.”4

Target audience: Members of the Federal and Armed Forces Round Table. “FAFLRT membership is open to all individual ALA Members interested in issues affecting Federal or Armed Forces libraries.”5

Publisher: American Library Association.6

Peer reviewed? No.7

Type: LIS professional and trade publication.8

Medium: Online.9

Content: Federal Librarian “presents recent developments and events of interest to Federal and Armed Forces library community, including news and reports on international, federal, DoD, state and local government issues.”10

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing

Types of contributions accepted: Federal Librarian includes a mix of current events, trends or issues affecting member libraries, tributes, feature articles, award recipients and a message from the FAFLRT president.12

Submission and review process: Send contributions to:

Anne Harrison, interim editor
6200 Wilson Blvd. Apt. 1107
Falls Church, VA 22044
telephone:  202-707-4834
E-mail: harrisonanne57@yahoo.com

The review process is not outlined.13

Editorial tone: Reviewing the latest issue (Vol. 31 #4, 2014) provides a selection of items ranging from an accounting of closures at base libraries, to a lively description of the first “Library Con” held at the JBER Library, to a tribute to a retiring librarian. Articles are written in an informal tone.14

Style guide used: None specified.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Federal Librarian offers the LIS author interested in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries a forum for informal professional discussions of issues and events that are important to this community. As one of the current strategic goals of the FAFLRT is to “establish new and continue existing liaison relationships with relevant ALA committees and round tables”16, one can assume that this journal would also be open to writers from various areas of librarianship to build connections with the FAFLRT through its newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Federal Librarian subscription base is approximately 600.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership of the Federal Librarian covers a wide range of LIS professionals in Federal and Armed Forces Libraries, from all over the U.S. These libraries run the gamut from public, school, military academic or special.18 Bearing in mind the wide variety of issues that are of interest to the reader, but also the overriding cultural umbrella of membership in the FAFLRT, potential authors should tailor their submissions to this group. Articles are written in American English.19

Reader characteristics: Demographics are not given for the readers of Federal Librarian. However, because subscription is included in membership to FAFLRT, readers are among 600 federal and military LIS professionals.20 Readers have a vested interest in matters concerning library and information services in the federal and armed forces communities.21

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Federal Librarian work and live in Federal and Armed Forces communities.22 Authors who also belong to this community would have an interested and supportive audience for their writing. Because the issues examined in the Federal Librarian encourage professional development of their LIS peers, the potential impact on the published author’s career is great. This is a special community who, with their shared interests, would be a knowledgeable and interested audience for the potential author.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Federal Librarian, American Library Association, accessed March 21, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1701525525
  2. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  3.  American Library Association. (2016). Initiatives and Projects. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/initiatives
  4.  American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  5.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  8.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  9.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  10. American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  11.  ProQuest. (2016). Federal Librarian. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427486804547/480570
  12.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  13.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  14.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/newsletters/2014_vol.31_4_Federal_Librarian.pdf
  15.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters#mailing
  16. American Library Association. (2016). About FAFLRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/about-faflrt
  17.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  18. Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  19.  American Library Association. (2016). Federal Librarian, the Newsletter of the Federal and Armed Forces Librarian Round Table. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/newsletters
  20. Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  21.  Dority, K. (2016). Military Librarianship. Libgig. Retrieved from http://www.libgig.com/careerprofiles/military-librarianship/
  22.  American Library Association. (2016). FAFLRT brochure. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/faflrt/sites/ala.org.faflrt/files/content/faflrtbrochure-2009.pdf
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Journal of Archival Organization

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Archival Organization (JAO) (includes Library & Archival Security)

ISSN: 1533-2756 (Print) and 1533-2756 (Online).1

Website: https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/loi/wjao20

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The Journal of Archival Organization is an international, peer-reviewed journal encompassing all aspects of the arrangement, description, and provision of access to all forms of archival materials.”2

Target audience: Librarians, students, employees of museums and government agencies, as well as anyone interested in archival materials.3

Publisher: Routledge.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Per their website, “JAO addresses a broad range of issues of interest to the profession including archival management and staffing, archival technologies, the arrangement and description of records collection, collection growth and access, diversity and gender, grant-funding, and institutional support. Articles addressing academic, public and special/corporate libraries, museums and governmental agencies are all welcome.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjao20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Book/resources reviews, as well as articles in the following sections: Creating Architopia: Reflections on Archival Management, Archives and the Law, and Technology Matters in Archives.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are required to be accompanied by a brief abstract (maximum of 100 words) and a statement saying the manuscript is unpublished and is not currently being considered for publication elsewhere. To submit their manuscripts, authors are required to create an account through the site’s Editorial Manager. To ensure all manuscripts are original, the journal uses CrossCheck software.11

As for the review process, all articles undergo “rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and anonymous double-blind review.”12

Editorial tone: LIS scholarly.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Journal of Archival Organization provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to emerging archival technologies, the digitization of archives, cataloging, as well as numerous other topics related to archival materials.15 Additionally, this journal incorporates Library & Archival Security,16 which holds the distinction of being “the only journal that stresses legal and organizational issues and incidents in libraries, archives, and other information centers.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the U.S.18 However, authors should be mindful that the journal has an international reach, with many articles focusing on issues outside the U.S.19

Reader characteristics: Since the journal encompasses professional organizations outside libraries (e.g., museums and government agencies), the audience will be professionally varied. The majority of readers, though, will be LIS professionals working in archives or libraries. Since this journal covers articles on grant-funding and institutional support, readers may hold managerial or supervisory positions in their institutions.20

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have specialized knowledge of LIS subject matter, particularly MARC, AACR2, Encoded Archival Description, and other rules/standards related to cataloging, archiving, and metadata.21 This characteristic implies that most readers will have graduate and post-graduate degrees. However, authors should keep in mind that some readers may be affiliated with government agencies and museums. Thus, authors should explain LIS jargon where necessary.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

JAO readers want cutting-edge information pertaining to archives.23 They expect articles to be organized, well-researched, methodical, and objective. Additionally, all content should be scholarly but accessible to ensure it reaches as many members as possible of this publication’s broad audience.

Last updated: March 14, 2018


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wjao20
  2.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
  3.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
  4. Journal of Archival OrganizationUlrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 13, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520988095063/434856
  5. Journal of Archival OrganizationUlrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 13, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520988095063/434856
  6. Journal of Archival OrganizationUlrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 13, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520988095063/434856
  7. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wjao20
  8.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
  9. Journal of Archival OrganizationUlrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 13, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520988095063/434856
  10.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjao20&page=instructions
  12.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
  13.  Journal of Archival OrganizationUlrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 13, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520988095063/434856
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjao20&page=instructions
  15.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjao20&page=instructions
  16. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wlas20
  17.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlas20&page=instructions
  18.  Journal of Archival OrganizationUlrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 13, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520988095063/434856
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
  20.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
  21.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjao20&page=instructions
  22.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
  23. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 13, 2018, https://www-tandfonline-com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjao20
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DttP or Documents to the People

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Dttp or Documents to the People

ISSN: 0091-20851

Website: http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP

Purpose, objective, or mission: The official publication of the Government Documents Round Table (GODORT) of the American Library Association (ALA). This publication disseminates information to ALA and GODORT members about government information and activities on a local, state, national, and international level, and provides information on the professional activities of GODORT.2

Target audience: ALA and GODORT members as well as individuals interested in the global and national environments, and government information and activities.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news magazine.6

Medium: Print and online (as a pdf)7

Content: From their site, they publish articles on government information and government activities at local, state, national, and international, and intergovernmental levels, and documents the professional activities of GODORT.8

Of particular interest to students, DttP publishes a Student Papers Issue, “designed to showcase the talents and interests of current library school students.”9 Faculty members nominate and forward student papers focusing on government information in all levels of librarianship to the current editor.10

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors12

Types of contributions accepted: Accepts full-length articles (prefer 1,500-3,000 words in length), news items, letters and other information intended for publication encompassing subjects within DttP‘s scope.13

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted via email to the Co-Lead Editors at dttp.editor@gmail.com, and reviewed for acceptance by editorial staff. Email attachments preferred, in MS Word.14

Editorial tone: The Instructions for Authors ask for articles written “in a grammatically correct, simple, readable style.”15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed. The website lists more detailed instructions for formatting in the Instructions for Authors document, linked on the Information for Authors page (above).16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Within the scope of this publication’s focus there is considerable potential for LIS authors interested in writing to increase their visibility. While this publication is not peer-reviewed they offer informative works covering a variety of topics. While it may seem that government documents is a narrow field with limited audience, a previous issue contained these articles: Remembering the Forgotten Internment-Attempts at Redress for the Japanese Latin American Internees of World War II, Inventing Nature-The History and Impact of Plants as Intellectual Property, and By the Authority Vested in Me-The Healthy Marriage Initiative and the Federal Government’™s Historical Love Affair with Marriage.17

The Student Papers Issue in particular would be an ideal place for students to have work submitted. 2012 editor Greg Curtis notes, of this year’s student papers issue, “The breadth of topics reaffirms that government information sources cover most, if not all, current research areas. The articles presented here are about government information, but they also are about relevant topics that the reader might find in other journals and periodicals across the intellectual spectrum.”18 DttP‘s December 2012 Student Papers Issue included articles titled Delicate Balance: National Security, Government Transparency, and Free Speech and Historical Data Recovery through Crowdsourcing.19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 1,350 (per DttP advertising info page).20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because DttP covers local, state, national, and international government information, it is safe to assume that a majority of its subscribers are U.S. LIS professionals and its circulation is limited to the United States. Additionally, DttP is sent to subscribing ALA/GODORT members on an annual basis.21 Because it deals primarily with information that affect the United States, DttP is published in English. And like most trade and scholarly journals published in English in the United States, the articles are free of all colloquialisms and accessible to the country’s diverse population. Although most articles deal with issues within the LIS field, they are written in language that is comprehensible to the layperson, informal, and straightforward.22

Reader characteristics: GODORT does not have any demographic information specified on their circulation information but, because they stress the subject scope of DttP, we might assume that most subscribers are LIS professionals within a law library or government setting and also include LIS students and laypersons interested in government records. The majority of DttP readers are ALA/GODORT members and are likely to be LIS professionals.23 The scope of the magazine being what it is, most subscribers are probably documents librarians or librarians with an interest in government information. According to the ALA website, GODORT works to “provide a nexus for initiating and supportng programs to increase the availability, use and bibliographic control of documents.”24 Readers of DttP, GODORT’s official publication, most likely support equal access and oppose restrictions of any kind to government documents and, as most of them are probably librarians, are advocates of the free exchange of ideas.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers are most likely ALA/GODORT members, the DttP audience is probably knowledgeable about general LIS issues and topics. They would be especially familiar with subject matters that involve government information use and dissemination, as well as national efforts to restrict as well as to promote access to these types of information.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

A majority of the readers of DttP are GODORT members that are documents librarians or interested in local, state, national, and international government information, however, this publication is also available to non-GODORT or ALA members and, because it is a trade and not a scholarly publication, it is also made accessible to non-LIS professionals. Authors who want to contribute to the journal should opt for an informal yet informative tone and avoid discussing specialized LIS issues that the layperson would not immediately understand, such as bibliographic organization. Although it does pay attention to LIS issues, the primary focus of the journal is on documenting government information and the professional activities of GODORT.26

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  DTTP, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521727649444/60865
  2. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
  3. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
  4. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  5. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  6. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  7. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  8. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
  9. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Student Papers Issue. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Student_Papers_Issue
  10. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Student Papers Issue. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Student_Papers_Issue
  11. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  12. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  13. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  14. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  15. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  16. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  17. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Full Text. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Full_Text
  18. Curtis, G. (2012). Editor’s Corner. DttP, 40(4) 6. Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/images/7/72/DttP_40n4.pdf
  19. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Full Text. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Full_Text
  20. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Advertising Rates. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Advertising_Rates
  21. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Subscription Information. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Subscription_Information
  22. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  23. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Subscription Information. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Subscription_Information
  24. American Library Association. (2016). GODORT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/godort/
  25. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
  26. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
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Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

ISSN: 1550-83661

Website: http://www.asis.org/bulletin.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Since 1937, the American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) has been the society for information professionals leading the search for new and better theories, techniques, and technologies to improve access to information. Their bulletin is a “news magazine packed with developments and issues affecting the field, pragmatic management reports, opinion, and news of people and events in the information science community.”2

Target audience: ASIS&T members and interested information science practitioners, including students.3

Publisher: American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T)4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Opinion pieces and quality, brief, timely articles on association activities and topics such as information technology applications, information policy, user behavior, information description or other information science topics.8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/submit.html

Types of contributions accepted: Short articles (2,000 – 5,000 words) with no footnotes or formulas included. Subject matter includes information architecture, user behavior, information policy, and information technology applications. You do not have to be an ASIS&T member to submit articles for consideration.10

Submission and review process: Suggestions should be emailed to the editor at bulletin@asis.org. There is no review process, so all decisions about publication are at the discretion of the editor. Editor promises quick response and additional guidelines (beyond those posted on the website) if requested.11

Editorial tone: Informative. The newsletter is ASIS&T’s primary means of maintaining regular contact with members regarding activates and updates, and is written with information practitioners in mind. The tone is informational but reader friendly.12

Style guide used: None indicated. Detailed article instructions are available from the editor upon request.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This bulletin has great potential for librarians interested in information architecture and technology. The bulletin also has a frequent student column which is a great indication that library science students could submit work.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 4,000 members (publication membership benefit).15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: North American association and members likely residents of North America. ASIS&T is based in Silver Spring, Maryland.16 English language publication.17

Reader characteristics: The members, the audience, is comprised of “information specialists from such fields as computer science, linguistics, management, librarianship, engineering, law, medicine, chemistry, and education.”18  It is safe to assume a shared interest in improving their work and supporting their colleagues. An emphasis on the efforts of the association’s mission and developing a solid network of information professionals.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many will have considerable knowledge of LIS issues and terminology; however due to the diversity of workplaces writers cannot assume the audience consists of just librarians or that they can refer to LIS subject matter casually.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will expect articles published here to be meaningful to them, and to add to their knowledge of their organization or their work. Practical experience and informed opinions will be needed by authors interesting in submitting an article.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T), accessed March 22, 2018, http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/
  2. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/bulletin.html
  3. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin of the Association for Information Science and Technology. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/bulletin.html
  4. ProQuest. (2016). American Society for Information Science and Technology Bulletin (Online). Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410734898546/62059
  5. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin for the Association for Information Science and Technology: Purpose and Scope. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/purpose_scope.html
  6. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin for the Association for Information Science and Technology: Purpose and Scope. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/purpose_scope.html
  7. ProQuest. (2016). American Society for Information Science and Technology Bulletin (Online). Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410734898546/62059
  8. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin for the Association for Information Science and Technology: Purpose and Scope. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/purpose_scope.html
  9. ProQuest. (2016). American Society for Information Science and Technology Bulletin (Online). Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410734898546/62059
  10. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin for the Association for Information Science and Technology: How to Submit Materials, Suggestions, and Ideas. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/submit.html
  11. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin for the Association for Information Science and Technology: How to Submit Materials, Suggestions, and Ideas. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/submit.html
  12. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin for the Association for Information Science and Technology: Index. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/index.html
  13. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin for the Association for Information Science and Technology: How to Submit Materials, Suggestions, and Ideas. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/submit.html
  14. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Bulletin for the Association for Information Science and Technology: Index. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/index.html
  15. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). About ASIS&T. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/about.html
  16. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). About ASIS&T. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/about.html
  17. ProQuest. (2016). American Society for Information Science and Technology Bulletin (Online). Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410734898546/62059
  18. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). About ASIS&T. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/about.html
  19. Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T). (2016). Mission and Vision. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/missionvision.html
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Bayline

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bayline

ISSN: N/A

Website: To read posts: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/. For information: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/bayline/ and for Archives: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/issues/.

Purpose, objective, or mission: Bayline is the “official bulletin of the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter” of the Special Libraries Association (or the SLA), according to their website. It presents information of interest to librarians in special libraries throughout the Bay Area.1

Target audience: The target audience is comprised of members of Special Libraries Association, an association for libraries who are not in traditional settings. These libraries can be at museums, corporations, law firms, botanical gardens, etc. “SLA serves more than 12,000 members in 83 countries in the information profession, including corporate, academic and government information specialists.”2

Publisher: The San Francisco Bay Region Chapter of the SLA.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news magazine.5

Medium: Online. In 2013, Bayline shifted from a web magazine to a blog that’s incorporated into SF chapter’s website.6

Content: Profiles of member libraries (which can be very interesting and varied), and articles presenting information librarians in nontraditional settings would find useful. It also contains business news for the professional organization, such as the treasurer’s report and information on what members are doing.7

Frequency of publication: Monthly issues, with new posts added as often as necessary. From a recent post, Bayline is updated with at least 2-3 posts per month.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no submission guidelines at the Bayline website however each newsletter contains this statement, “All article submissions must receive approval from the editor and are subject to editing. Submitting authors must sign a copyright release. Authors retain all rights to their articles and know that the full contents of Bayline will be published online at the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter web site. Articles previously published will usually not be accepted for Bayline but exceptions can be negotiated.”9

Types of contributions accepted: There are no limitations given, however the articles should be of interest to the target audience. The invitation to submit does note that Bayline prefers not to publish articles that have seen prior publication, but this is negotiable.10

Submission and review process: Articles must be submitted to the editor before the publication date of the issue they were written for. The editor will read and make sure the article is appropriate for the audience, and is an appropriate length.

To contact the editor email: mcwjrlis@gmail.com .11

Editorial tone: There are no instructions given as to editorial tone, most articles are written in the first person, or third person familiar and informal manner.12

Style guide used: None listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication would be a good venue for anyone writing an informal article on subjects of interest to almost any LIS subject, since special librarianship covers such a wide range of topics. There is no indication authors must be members of SLA to submit work for publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Bayline is a free online newsletter/magazine. It is emailed to members of the Bay Area Special Library Association, but is not printed and distributed. As an online periodical, it’s available throughout the world, but is actively read mostly in the Bay Area.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Bayline is focused on the Bay Area, and deals with subjects of interest to librarians in the Bay Area. It is possible that articles with a national focus would be accepted for publication, but the readership is almost entirely local. This periodical is written in American English. Articles may deal with librarianship in other languages or cultures as special libraries may have collections in other languages, but the articles are written in English. There is a wide variety of cultures represented in the SLA, so authors should be sensitive to other cultures and avoid stereotypes and explain information that might not be evident to someone from a different cultural background.14

Reader characteristics: The range of librarians covered by the SLA is huge. The SLA local chapter website illustrates this by saying, “Members of the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter of SLA work in diverse information environments ranging from business and technical organizations to research, government and academic institutions. We are found in public and private corporations, law firms, colleges and universities, banks and financial institutions, newspapers, hospitals, research facilities, public libraries, and engineering and architectural firms. Although many members work in corporate and special libraries, others are managers, researchers, analysts, technical services specialists, and consultants.”15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are almost entirely professional librarians or library students. A broad background in LIS subject matter can be assumed, but due to the diverse nature of the libraries represented, extremely specialized terms used in specific kinds of libraries or specializations (such as cataloging, technical services, reference) would need to be defined.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of Bayline would be interested in any library topic, especially if it’s local, especially if it involves an unusual library or an unusual librarian. Profiles of libraries, tours of libraries, information on collections, profiles of members and information on resources are all of interest. Information on marketing to the general public would be slightly less well-received here than in other publication (because of the largely corporate nature of the libraries represented) but marketing within the organization would be of great interest.

Bayline is more of a community newsletter than other professional publications, with a section on member news and neighborhood professional dinners. The long community history of the newsletter may explain this, the archive shows that newsletter publication dates back to the 1920s.17

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  2. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  3. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  4. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Bayline Issues. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/issues/
  5. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  6. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  7. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  8. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  9. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2010, February/March). Bayline Staff/Editor’s Notes. Bayline, 80(1). Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/febmar10.pdf
  10. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2010, February/March). Bayline Staff/Editor’s Notes. Bayline, 80(1). Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/febmar10.pdf
  11. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/bayline/
  12. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  13. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  14. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  15. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  16. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  17. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
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Journal of Creative Library Practice, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Creative Library Practice

ISSN: 2330-42271

Website: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website’€™s About page: “The Journal of Creative Library Practice provides an outlet for librarians and information professionals to €œdescribe and encourage greater creativity in library and information center communications, policies, collections, instruction, and other areas of librarianship€.”2

Target audience: “This journal reaches librarians and information professionals of all types, including academic, public, school, special, medical, legal, and others.” The journal is working to broaden its readership to individuals outside the profession, to anyone interested in creative solutions to LIS issues; or anyone who wants to participate in discussions about creative issues and solutions.3

Publisher: Published as an online blog-format journal by Creative Library Practice4

Peer reviewed? Yes,5 though this blog-style journal also publishes non-peer reviewed content. The refereed articles are distinguished from the blog posts on the site.6

Type: LIS scholarly and professional7

Medium: Online,8 peer-reviewed blogposts9

Content: Posts on creative solutions to LIS issues.10

Frequency of publication: This online journal is updated as frequently as the editors write posts and peer-reviewed articles are accepted.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Any article focusing on creative solutions to LIS issues, including communications barriers, technology issues, reviews of relevant books or websites.12

Submission and review process: The website provides a link to email manuscripts in MS-Word .doc, .docx, or RTF format.13

Editorial tone: Editor Joseph Kraus, in a Q&A with Library Journal, stated, “€œWe want to encourage prospective authors to write with less formal rhetoric.”14

Style guide used: References should be provided in a consistent format, whether Chicago, Turabian, MLA, or APA, or author may simply provide links to cited material.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal’s editors consider the publication to be an open source alternative to the stodgy print publications usually favored by the LIS community. They are a creative group open to all sorts of submissions, so this would be a great place to expand on an LIS student paper or thesis, or write about a creative approach tried at a library-related job, and how it helped the organization.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics are not available, but as this journal is also an informal blog there is potential to reach a large audience.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is online and the editors are LIS professionals at colleges and universities around the United States.16 The journal is written in American English.17

Reader characteristics: This journal appeals to forward thinking, creative, multidisciplined, against-the-grain LIS professionals seeking to share information with like-minded peers. The journal is written for and by LIS professionals in all possible settings, including academic, public, school, special, medical, and law libraries. It also aims to reach those readers who are interested in libraries but not necessarily working in them, including teachers, parents, students, and businesses.18

The journal was created by LIS professionals who wish to have a truly open access information sharing site that features creative solutions to common problems in information organizations. This is an open minded, nontraditional group that sees the value in current technologies and is working to take advantage of anything that can help the library community achieve its goals. The journal leans toward the informal, so potential authors should keep this in mind while writing for the publication. The goal is to provide articles from a variety of perspectives.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The knowledge level is probably quite high, but as the editors are attempting to appeal to laypeople as well as LIS students and professionals, potential authors should keep the jargon to a minimum and avoid highly technical terms and unusual acronyms.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Creative Library Practice is part of a new LIS journal standard: using open access for peer-reviewed articles under Creative Commons licensing, and providing relatively loose guidelines in terms of content, and even citations.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523479339830/779051
  2. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  3. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  4. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  5.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  6. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  7.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  8.  The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494814869196/779051
  9. “Home,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org
  10. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  12. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  14. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017,  http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/instructions-for-authors/
  16. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  17. The Journal of Creative Library Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory,  accessed May 14, 2017,
  18. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/about/
  19. “About,” The Journal of Creative Library Practice, accessed May 14, 2017, http://creativelibrarypractice.org/2013/01/02/welcome-to-the-journal/
  20. Meredith Schwartz, “Six Questions for Joseph Kraus and a Board of Creative Librarians,” Library Journal Academic Newswire, accessed May 14, 2017, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/02/oa/six-questions-for-joseph-kraus-and-a-board-of-creative-librarians/
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Government Information Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Government Information Quarterly

ISSN: 0740-624X (Print) and 1872-9517 (Online)1

Website: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/620202/description#description

Purpose, objective, or mission:Government Information Quarterly is an international journal that examines the intersection of policy, information technology, government, and the public.”2

Target audience: This is a cross-disciplinary journal, seeking submissions from disciplines including information science, public policy, public administration, political science, business, law, geography, information systems, communications, economics, sociology, computer science, and public health. Its purpose is to examine how policy, information technology, government and the public intersect. Articles of the most interest would be those concerning government policies on electronic resources and data.3

Publisher: Elsevier Ltd.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Public Administration and LIS, scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Government Information Quarterly has its focus on how “policies affect government information flows and the availability of government information; the use of technology to create and provide innovative government services; the impact of information technology on the relationship between the governed and those governing; and the increasing significance of information policies and information technology in relation to democratic practices.”8 The Quarterly includes original research, analytic essays, editorials, teaching cases, and case studies.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/620202/authorinstructions. This information is also available at this site as pdf download titled “Author Information Pack.” There are informative webcasts with advice for prospective authors at https://www.journals.elsevier.com/frontiers-in-neuroendocrinology/policies/publishing-connect-training-webcasts.

Types of contributions accepted: Per the guidelines, submissions that “include original research papers that are theory-driven research; papers that combine theory & practice; reviews & review essays, editorials, teaching cases and case studies”11 are encouraged. This is an international journal so contributions from all parts of the world are welcome; however, papers must be in either American or British English, with spelling consistent. This publication accepts new and revised manuscripts that have not been previously published and does not allow simultaneous submissions. Typical manuscripts are 25-30 pages in length, double-spaced.12

Submission and review process: The submission guidelines are extensive, beginning with a section covering topics such as ethics, copyright, conflict of interest, and the roles of funding sources. All submissions are made electronically online through the publisher’s website. The guidelines detail the expectations of article structure and there is a submission checklist.13

Articles are subject to a double-blind review process, performed by the editorial board and other peer reviewers. “The criterion for acceptance is appropriateness to the field, taking into account the merit of content and presentation.”14 Through the publisher’s online submission process authors are able to track their submission.

Editorial tone: This is a scholarly journal based on theory-driven research and submissions should follow research paper tone and format. The articles tend to take a clear, but formal tone. The writing is scholarly, well organized, and not overly wordy.15

Style guide used: Publication Manual for the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This scholarly journal is a good choice for information professionals interested in publishing research and analysis of government electronic information trends and best practices. They appear to be most interested in practical application and results of information policy, making it a good choice for action research publications. It would be suitable for professors attempting to build up publication credits for tenure, or graduate students interested in being published for the first time.

Journal metrics: Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP): 2.384; SCImago Journal Rank (SJR): 1.049; Impact Factor: 1.910; 5-Year Impact Impact Factor: 2.263.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Unknown; not listed on their website or Ulrichsweb.com, and unavailable from publisher. It is likely that many people have access to this periodical through ScienceDirect, and that most, if not all, government libraries and information technology departments subscribe or access this publication online.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though main audience is within the United States and is national in scope,19 this journal publishes articles on worldwide topics. For example past articles included: “Restructuring Taiwan’s Port State Control Inspection Authority,” and “Modernizing Bangladesh Public Administration Through e-Governance: Benefits and Challenges.”20 Government Information Quarterly is published in English,21 and the article submission guidelines indicate that they use common American or British spelling and grammar.22 The editorial board is international, with members in a variety of countries but mostly represented by the United States.23

Reader characteristics: Reader profiles were not available; however, it appears that this journal is aimed at government and library professionals, public administration professionals, and government information architects. The journal’s target audience includes government officials and policy makers, scientists, journalists, lawyers, researchers, teachers and scholars, students, and librarians. Articles would be of the most interest to those helping to steer government policy toward electronic resources and data.24

The editorial board is a mix of communications, information technology, law, library, and information sciences faculty as well as librarians and government officials.25 The heavy presence of faculty indicates that the journal veers toward more scholarly writing over applied theory (or “how-to” articles). The job titles of the board also tend to indicate they will favor articles on technology’s use in government services. A review of the articles published shows this to be true.26

No demographic information on the readers is available at this time, but it would appear from the selection of articles published that the subscribers would be in similar professional positions to the editors.27 This journal would be most useful to people making practical decisions related to public policy and the dissemination of government information or academics in the same areas, but there is a wide enough variety in the articles that law school staff and librarians (especially government documents librarians) would also be interested in the subject matter.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are a cross section of librarians, information professionals, IT workers, lawyers and government officials. Technical jargon should be avoided and even basic LIS principles should be explained when included in an article.29 Ulrichsweb.com lists the subject area as “public administration.”30

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although this journal will accept articles on any topic related to government, the most popular (for publication, and for downloading once published) are on e-government and ways to use technology to further government services. There is room for other articles (for instance, “Standardized American Indians: The “€œNames of Indian tribes and bands”€ list from the Office of Indian Affairs “), but articles combining government services and information technology will be most well received. Information delivery topics, tailored to a government audience, would also be very well received.31

As noted above, subscribers would be reading this publication to keep abreast of current developments in the field of government information, and most articles of interest would deal with how to distribute such information effectively. The readers are primarily academics or government decision-makers. Authors should keep in mind that though scholarly in nature, the core of each article should deal with a practical problem, and offer solutions or at least a detailed analysis of the issue.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 31 footnotes

  1.  Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-2053607882
  2. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  3. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  4. Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  5. Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  6. Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  7. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, https://www.elsevier.com/journals/personal/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X
  8. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  9. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  10. Government Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  11. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  12.  “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  13. “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  14. “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  15. “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  16. “Guide for Authors,” Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  17. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  18. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  19. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  20. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Science Direct. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0740624X
  21. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  22. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly: Guide for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.elsevier.com/journals/government-information-quarterly/0740-624X/guide-for-authors
  23. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly Editorial Board. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/editorial-board/
  24. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  25. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly Editorial Board. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/editorial-board/
  26. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Science Direct. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0740624X
  27. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Science Direct. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0740624X
  28. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  29. Elsevier B.V. (2014). Government Information Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.journals.elsevier.com/government-information-quarterly/
  30. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Government Information Quarterly: an international journal of information technology management, policies, and practices. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405971391820/146754
  31. Government Information Quarterly, Elsevier B.V., accessed April 26, 2017, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0740624X
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Southern California Association of Law Libraries Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Southern California Association of Law Libraries (SCALL) Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: The association’s homepage is http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/. The current newsletter can be found under “Newsletter” in the first listings of blog posts on the far right.

Purpose, objective, or mission: The SCALL Newsletter is the official association newsletter of the Southern California Association of Law Libraries, which aims to keep members up-to-date with goings on in the society.1

Target audience: Law librarians and other information professionals working in the legal industry in the Southern California area, especially those who are members of SCALL.2

Publisher: Southern California Association of Law Libraries, a division of the greater organization, American Association of Law Libraries (AALL).3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Professional LIS newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: SCALL Newsletter contains many reviews and discussions of programs and conferences, both those sponsored by SCALL and others of interest in the community. It also publishes articles about new technologies or issues in the legal profession.7

Frequency of publication: Five times per year.8 The issues are September/October, November/December, January/February, March/April, and May/June.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: See most recent newsletter. (Guidelines included in each issue.)9

Types of contributions accepted: The publication is interested in a broad range of articles and submissions, as long as they are of interest to the law library community.10

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted to the newsletter editor via email. Deadlines for submission are included in each issue along with current editor’s contact information.11

Editorial tone: Though not specifically stated, the tone seems to be informal. Many of the articles are divided into shorter sections, so the reader can quickly and easily decipher the most important points or see an outline of the ideas presented in a conference.12

Style guide used: There is no mention of a specific style guide requirement however, none of the articles in the current issue contained bibliographies or footnotes.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is useful for information professionals in the legal industry, especially those who are based in Southern California. It provides up-to-date information on events held by the SCALL as well as discussions of other local law conferences and programs. Also, this newsletter is very effective in keeping the members of SCALL informed as to what is taking place within the association, especially with regards to its officers and upcoming events.

This publication seems to be very receptive to author contributions. Most likely those who are members of the association would be especially welcomed to contribute. It seems that it would be a promising publication for an information professional who may not yet be comfortable writing academic research papers, but who is interested in discussing a presentation or conference he or she attended.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This newsletter is a benefit of SCALL membership and there are over 300 SCALL members.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of this publication are primarily in the Southern California area. Many of the events discussed in the newsletter are specific to this locale.15 However, there is a separate division, San Diego Area Law Libraries, or SANDALL, for the San Diego area members of AALL, so SCALL may be said to include only Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Because this is not an international publication, authors do not have to be concerned with language or cultural discrepancies. As the readers are concentrated in a limited area and work in a specific field, it is likely that they will have a similar understanding of library issues and the words used to describe them.16

Reader characteristics: Individual characteristics of SCALL members are not available, but members of SCALL work in academic, professional, private, state, and county law libraries.17 It can be assumed that the statistics for SCALL readers are close to those of the wider association, American Association of Law Libraries (AALL). According to the AALL 2016 Media Kit, the most common workplaces for members are private or corporate law libraries (36%). A slightly smaller, but still significant portion, 24 percent, work in government or other types of law libraries. The highest percentage of members (40%) are still in law school. 18 Information professionals who are likely to read SCALL Newsletter are interested in the legal field, and judging by the scope of the articles, they seem to have an interest in technology as well.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It can be assumed that readers of the SCALL newsletter are very familiar with LIS related subjects. According to the information about AALL, which all SCALL members are a part of, 62 percent of members have at least 11 years of experience working in libraries, and close to 50 percent have at least 16 years of experience. Though it was not explicitly stated, it can be assumed that most of the readers are also fairly comfortable with technology, as those who work in legal libraries today are consistent users of electronic resources.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important characteristic of this audience is their common interest in the legal profession. Because this is not a scholarly publication and it is intended to spread news and share information, potential authors should keep in mind that their pieces can be more casual in nature but should still be informative and thought-provoking in their viewpoints. Writers should remember that readers of this publication are interested in law libraries and the specific technological issues and advancements that affect their work. While many readers have years of experience working with legal materials, electronic resources are being introduced frequently which change the way many SCALL members are doing their jobs. As the AALL Spectrum media kit points out, law firm budgets for libraries are rising and librarians are presented with many choices.21 These changes in the field present opportunities for authors to explain new developments, discuss up-and-coming technologies, and educate the readers.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016). Welcome to SCALL – Southern California Association of Law Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/#/
  2. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016). Welcome to SCALL – Southern California Association of Law Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/#/
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). SCALL Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406774838598/217965
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). SCALL Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406774838598/217965
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). SCALL Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406774838598/217965
  6. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016, March/April). SCALL Newsletter, 43(4). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  7. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016, March/April). SCALL Newsletter, 43(4). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2016). SCALL Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406774838598/217965
  9. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016, March/April). SCALL Newsletter, 43(4). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  10. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016, March/April). SCALL Newsletter, 43(4). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  11. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016, March/April). SCALL Newsletter, 43(4). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  12. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016, March/April). SCALL Newsletter, 43(4). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  13. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016 March/April). SCALL Newsletter, 43(4). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  14. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016). Welcome to SCALL – Southern California Association of Law Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/#/
  15. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2014, July/August). SCALL Newsletter, 41(5). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  16. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016). Welcome to SCALL – Southern California Association of Law Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/#/
  17. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2016). Welcome to SCALL – Southern California Association of Law Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/#/
  18. American Association of Law Libraries. (2016). 2016 media kit. AALL Spectrum. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/Advertising-Opportunities/media-kit-2014.pdf
  19. Southern California Association of Law Libraries. (2014, July/August). SCALL Newsletter, 41(5). Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/chapter/scall/newsletter/SCALL_newsletterJulyAugust2014.pdf
  20. American Association of Law Libraries. (2016). 2016 media kit. AALL Spectrum. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/Advertising-Opportunities/media-kit-2014.pdf
  21. American Association of Law Libraries. (2016). 2016 media kit. AALL Spectrum. Retrieved from http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/Advertising-Opportunities/media-kit-2014.pdf
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