Wiki Tags Archives: International scope

Library & Information History

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library & Information History

Website: http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh

Purpose, objective, or mission: To publish articles on “all subjects and all periods relating to the history of libraries and librarianship and to the history of information, in its broadest sense.”1

Target audience:Library & Information History is a journal for anyone interested in the social, cultural and intellectual history of libraries and of information.”2

Publisher: Maney Publishing.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: “Issues include substantial articles as well as book reviews, occasional surveys of recent publications, and guides to relevant sources.”7

From the journals’ submissions flyer: “The editorial board would particularly welcome ideas or fully formed proposals for guest edited special issues on important themes in library and information history.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh

Types of contributions accepted: According to the website: “Library & Information History welcomes original submissions that match the aims and scope of the journal on the understanding that the article has not previously been published, and is not being concurrently submitted for publication elsewhere.”10

“Articles should not normally exceed 8,000 words in length. Articles must be accompanied by a short abstract (c. 150 words) summarizing the contents of their article. Articles should also be accompanied by up to 6 key words to aid search ability of the article online.”11

Submission and review process: All submissions should be sent as an email attachment in Word or Rich Text format to the relevant editor listed below12:

Submissions from researchers in North America should be sent to the North American Editor:
Dr. Melanie Kimball (Graduate School of Library and Information Science Simmons College, Boston)
Email: melanie.kimball@simmons.edu

All other contributions should be sent to the Editor:
Dr. Mark R. M. Towsey (University of Liverpool, UK)
Email: M.R.M.Towsey@liverpool.ac.uk13

All submissions will be sent to independent referees.14

Editorial tone: The only indication of tone is found in the About this Journal statement: “articles of a high academic standard”15 are expected.

Style guide used: All references should conform to the Maney Style Guide.16

Library & Information History does not use the Harvard system of citation. Please use an automatic endnoting system (found in the Maney Style Guide), if possible.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although Library & Information History seems an esoteric U.K. publication, there are clear indications that it welcomes international voices on “all subjects and all periods relating to the history of libraries and librarianship and to the history of information.”18 A recent issue featured articles by authors based in Australia, Romania, and the U.S.19 For the author who has a passion for this particular field of LIS, being published in this high caliber journal would be an excellent opportunity to share expertise.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to Library & Information History advertising guidelines, this journal receives “2,000 – 3,000 pageviews per month.”20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although based in the U.K., this is an international journal with a global reach.21 As such, regional cultural references and language should be kept to a minimum.

Reader characteristics: While the readers’ jobs, workplaces and level of education may vary, they will share an interest in the history of libraries and information. As this is a high level academic journal22, readers will most likely have post-secondary degrees in Library Science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will expect a high caliber piece of writing in this journal. Their knowledge of LIS terminology will be high, yet as this journal offers an eclectic range of topics23, readers will probably not be knowledgeable about the particular historical subject of every article.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

A review of this journal calls it “a little gem for library history buffs.”24 Readers will have a passion for the specialized area of this journal and will appreciate a thoroughly researched and scholarly paper. Because of the international flavor of this publication, paired with its diverse range of topics, any author with an academic interest in a particular historical topic would reach a wide and interested audience.

Last updated: July 8, 2015


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  2. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  7. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  8. Maney Publishing. (2015). Submissions flyer. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/pb/assets/raw/history/LBH_postcard.pdf
  9. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  10. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  11. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  12. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  13. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  14. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  15. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  16. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  17. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  18. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  19. Maney Publishing. (2015). Volume 31, Issue 1. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lbh/31/1
  20. Maney Publishing. (2015). Online advertising. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/advertising/r4
  21. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  22. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  24. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
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Information Discovery and Delivery

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Discovery and Delivery, formerly Interlending and Document Supply

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd

Purpose, objective, or mission: This journal “covers information discovery and access for digital information researchers.”1

Target audience: Information Discovery and Delivery is read by “educators, knowledge professionals in education and cultural organizations, knowledge managers in media, health care, and government, as well as librarians.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: This journal investigates the transport, flow, tracking, exchange, and sharing of information within and between libraries. It also covers digital information capture, packaging, and storage by repositories of all kinds.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles, opinion pieces, product and service reviews, theoretical works, case studies, literature reviews, and descriptive or instructional papers9

Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 4,000 and 6,000 words in length, including references and appendices.10

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. Individuals submitting manuscripts are invited to register, create an account, and go through a submission process to upload an article.11 Emerald Publishing offers and editing service for non-native English-speaking authors.12 Authors should also consult the Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that  submissions are complete.13 According to the author guidelines, “each paper is reviewed by the editor and, if it is judged suitable for this publication, it is then sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review.”14 Submissions are welcome at any time, though authors may wish to consult the schedule of submission deadlines for upcoming issues of the journal.15

Editorial tone: Though the guidelines for submission do not discuss tone, the writing is in an academic style and often technical.

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.16 References should be written in Harvard style.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS practitioners who are responsible the discovery and transmission of digital information, this journal offers an excellent opportunity to share knowledge. As Information Discovery and Delivery emphasizes the sharing of information within and between repositories the world over,18 there is a strong international component to the content of this publication. Authors published in this journal will also have an excellent opportunity to draw attention to practices unique to their geographical area in this specialized field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information Discovery and Delivery is written in English.19 Given that the editorial advisory board represents countries as diverse as the United Kingdom, France, Turkey, Denmark, Lebanon, Australia, Taiwan, Saudi Arabia, and the United States, an international readership may be assumed.20

Reader characteristics: As this journal’s focus is in the specific field of information retrieval and transmission, readers will share an interest in this topic. 21 Representing countries worldwide, articles in this journal will be read by a global audience.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior librarians. 22 They will also have specific knowledge about document lending and supply, and will be comfortable with terminology from this field of library and information science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Discovery and Delivery is read by a knowledgeable, diverse, and academic audience. Subscribers will expect thorough and professional research on digital information issues in libraries. Being international in scope, readers will be open to cultural differences in approaching this topic, and will welcome innovative ideas.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  3. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  4. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  5. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  6. “Purchase Information,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  7. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  8. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  9. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  13. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  17. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=idd
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
  19. Interlending and Document Supply (former title), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436290161532/339098
  20. “Editorial Team,” Emerald Group Publishing,  accessed May 13, 2017 http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=idd
  21. Emerald Group Publishing, Ltd. (2015). Journal Information. Interlending and Document Supply. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=ilds
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Emerald Group Publishing, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=idd
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Library Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”1

Target audience: “Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”7

Content: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”8

Included in every subscription is an annual Chinese supplement.9

Frequency of publication: 9 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 3000 and 6000 words in length.11

The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

Emerald publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that your submission is complete.14

As per the Author Guidelines: “Each paper is reviewed by the Editor and, if it (is) judged suitable for publication, is evaluated using a double-blind peer review process.”15

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. There is a strong international component to the selection of articles in each issue. While the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas”, there is a practical tone in the sharing of issues concerning individual libraries.16

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.17

References should be written in Harvard style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a highly informative publication in the field of library management. The articles in this journal explore a wide range of issues in various types of libraries worldwide. In the current issue alone (Volume 36 Issue 4/5), articles topics include: e-reserves in a Manila library; social welfare information management in Nigerian libraries; academic library leadership; and promotion and tenure for academic librarians.19

LIS authors, whether professional librarians, or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into  current issues in library management, and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

International authors also have an excellent opportunity to publish research on issues important to their particular geographical area.20 Of particular interest to Chinese authors is the annual Chinese supplement — an excellent avenue for publication.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English23, yet is international in scope. While the editor and book review editor are located in Australia, the editorial advisory board comprise professionals worldwide; including, the U.K., Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand and South Africa.24

Emerald offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, that offers “expert Language Editing services for non-native English-speaking authors, and…discounts to authors planning to submit to Emerald’s journal(s).”25

The annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”26, with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”27

Reader characteristics: Readers are senior managers and academics from across the globe. As this journal has an international scope, the audience will have diverse cultural experiences. Despite this, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior managers and academics.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a knowledgeable, diverse, academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience.

Last updated: June 24, 2015


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  10. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  15. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  19. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  22. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Editorial Team. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  27. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  28. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  29. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library and Information Science (JLIS)

Website: http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Library and Information Science aims to serve as a forum for discussion of problems common to librarians and information scientist; to introduce new concepts, systems and technology; to report leading events worldwide; and to promote the development of Chinese library and information services.1

Target audience:
• Chinese and Chinese-American information professionals
• Information professionals interested in Chinese library and information services
• Those interested in problems common to librarians and information scientists, especially in the areas of new technologies and concepts.2

Publisher: Graduate Institute of Library & Information Studies, National Taiwan Normal University, Republic of China and the Chinese American Librarians Association, U.S.A.3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts undergo a double-blind review, and the editor and associate editor are responsible for the final selection of content.4

Type: LIS scholarly.5

Medium: Web-based.6

Content: The journal contains articles that discuss problems common to librarians and information scientist; introduce new concepts, systems and technology; report leading events worldwide; and promote the development of Chinese library and information services.7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually in April and October.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts manuscripts of original research and reviews of monographs, books, and reports about library and information science. Manuscripts may not exceed 10,000 words (not including notes, tables, and forms of data) and those in English must be typed in MS Word.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must have a title page including the name of the article, author name, title, affiliation, email address, and postal address. Author information may not appear on the manuscript itself, as JLIS engages in double-blind review of manuscripts. Articles presented at a conference must include the name, place, and date of the conference.10

The body of a manuscript must be preceded by a 100-150-word abstract and 3-8 keywords, and followed by references and bibliographies. Title, keywords, and abstract should be in both English and Chinese. Each illustration or table should be numbered and have a brief caption.11

Editorial tone: Formal, academic.12

Style guide used: Manual of the American Psychological Association.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an authoritative and credible journal that would be an appropriate publishing avenue for practitioners and student authors. The journal is indexed or abstracted in Index of Chinese Periodicals, Library Literature, PAIS, Information Science Abstracts, Library & Information Science Abstracts.14

 

Audience Analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not provided, but the journal is available online.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers are mostly located in the United States and China. Title, keywords, and abstract should be in both English and Chinese.16

Reader characteristics: Readers will have the same characteristics as most librarians, but there will be a higher emphasis on services, technologies and innovations for Chinese speakers. Readers will expect to find information that is immediately relevant to Chinese communities.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with LIS subjects, and may be expected to understand jargon in the field.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal appear to be information and library science researchers and practitioners. Contributors can expect the readers to be well versed in LIS knowledge and terminology.

Last updated: September 6, 2015


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  2. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  3. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  4. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  5. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  6. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  7. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  8. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  9. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  10. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  11. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  12. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  13. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  14. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  15. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  16. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  17. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
  18. CALA. (2014). Journal of Library and Information Science. Retrieved from http://jlis.glis.ntnu.edu.tw/ojs/index.php/jlis/index
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ALA Editions

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: ALA Editions

Websitehttp://www.alaeditions.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Publishing resources for librarians and LIS professionals worldwide to “improve programs, build on best practices, develop leadership, and for personal development.”1 ALA Editions focuses on publishing professional library tools and resources, and also publishes textbooks and materials for LIS programs.2

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals.3

Owner: American Library Association (ALA)4

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes5

Types of books published: Books, digital content, online workshops, textbooks and materials for LIS programs.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Topics covered: From the website’s About page: “if you have ideas about improving library services and a desire to share your expertise, you might just have a book in you.”8

ALA Editions strongly encourages authors to consider diversity issues as part of a proposal or manuscript, noting that “Throughout the country, our communities are changing, and diversity is integral to library service and professionalism.”9 Authors should include information on how diversity plays a role in their proposed topic.10

Number of titles published per year: In 2012, there were 137 new titles published by ALA Editions.11

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.alaeditions.org/writers / 

Types of submissions accepted: From the proposal guidelines, ALA Editions is interested in:

  • Standards and guidelines used broadly in the library/information field
  • Basic approaches to major new developments in the field
  • Handbooks, manuals, primers, deskbooks, encyclopedias, textbooks
  • Projects that go “beyond information,” adding practical applications and other values to serve a broader audience
  • Specialized but high-value information12

Types of submissions the publisher is not interested in:

  • Short manuscripts
  • Arcane topics or approaches and dated information
  • Theoretical treatment of pract0ical topics
  • Dated information
  • Bibliographies without useful annotations
  • Conference proceedings
  • Historical treatments13

Submission and review process: It is highly recommended that you start with a query that describes your topic of interest, why it’s relevant/necessary, how it fits the publications’ readers needs, and a brief bit about yourself.14 Email query to appropriate staff member (see the About page for a complete list)15:  if they like it they’ll request a full proposal.16

You may also send a complete 2-3 page proposal or complete manuscripts for consideration, but ALA Editions prefers the initial query.17

If your query/proposal is not a fit for ALA Editions, you will be notified promptly.18

If accepted, ALA assigns the proposal to a “acquisitions editor” for consideration; this “sponsoring editor” prepares more information on the proposal and passed it along to a group of ALA Publishing staff to evaluate the project.  If ALA Publishing staff accept the project, then you move into the publication process. The normal publishing cycle is seven to ten months to publication after a manuscript is approved.19

For more information please see the Author Guidelines.20

Editorial tone: Professional but readable. Tailored specifically to the library community, publications can range from books for professional development to books for young adults and children, so the tone will vary depending on the nature of the publication.21

Style guide used: General style: The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, for punctuation, capitalization, quotation, abbreviation, source citation, use of italic, etc. The two types of source documentation that ALA Editions accepts are Chicago humanities style and Chicago author-date style.22

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

The ALA is a widely recognized and respected LIS resource, consulted by librarians and information professionals worldwide. ALA authors are leaders in their field, and so having a manuscript accepted for ALA Publication would provide authors with a large market for potential readership, amongst LIS professionals and peers. ALA works closely with authors on the marketing side, which includes potential to present material in ALA webinars, presentations and “meet the author” events at ALA conferences, listings in the ALA Online Store and several international and general catalog listings, and targeted media release events. From the Writer Guidelines: “Your work is in the hands of seasoned publishing pros and professional librarians. We develop, manufacture, and market your project in a way that draws good reviews and customer interest worldwide.”23

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: This is a very large, encompassing publishing house. ALA Editions markets every title to at least 100,000 customers.24

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although based in Chicago, IL, ALA Editions publishes and reaches librarians and LIS professionals worldwide.25 ALA Editions “develop, manufacture, and market your project in a way that draws good reviews and customer interest worldwide.”26 ALA titles are written in English, but marketed to a worldwide audience.27

Reader characteristics: This is the more professional ALA publishing imprint, focusing on LIS professional development and improving library services. Readers are interested in library and information science, with backgrounds varying from librarian, educator,  LIS administrators and professionals. ALA is the premier Library and Information Science group around, and it would be well worth any author’s time to try to work with them. Their bias is simply pro anything LIS, rather than other publishing houses who have an LIS focus. With ALA, LIS is everything.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as this is the imprint of the American Library Association.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

You’re guaranteed a knowledgeable audience eager for new LIS material when you publish with ALA. Not only are ALA Editions books marketed on the ALA website (including ALA Store), but they’re promoted at ALA conferences and events, emailed to a huge mailing list, and heavily marketed through a partnership with Amazon. Readers of ALA Editions books are seeking LIS material specifically, and will most likely be up to date on your subject matter or, if not, curious to learn from like-minded professionals in the field. This is the first stop publisher and organization for anyone seeking LIS reading material, and is an excellent group to be a part of.

Last updated: November 14, 2014


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  2. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  3. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  4. American Library Association. (2014). ALA Editions home page. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/
  5. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  6. American Library Association. (2014). ALA Editions home page. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/
  7. American Library Association. (2014). ALA Editions home page. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/
  8. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  9. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  10. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  11. American Library Association. (2014). Publishing: ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/aboutala/annualreport12/publishing
  12. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  13. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  14. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  15. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  16. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  17. American Library Association. (2014). Proposal guidelines. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/proposal-guidelines
  18. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  19. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  20. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  21. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  22. American Library Association. (2012). Manuscript preparation guidelines. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/files/MS_Prep_Guide.doc
  23. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  24. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  25. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  26. American Library Association. (2014). Writing for ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers
  27. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  28. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  29. American Library Association. (2014). About ALA Editions. ALA Editions. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/about
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
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Library and Information Research (LIR)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Library and Information Research

Website: http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir

Purpose, objective, or mission: Among others, this publication’s goals are to “encourage reporting of research by practitioners” and to “raise awareness of new tools, books, and funding opportunities for research.”1 The majority of information is centered in the UK and Ireland.2

Target audience: This publication is written by and for members of the Library and Information Research Group and all parties interested in current research topics in library and information science.3

Publisher: Library and Information Research Group4

Peer reviewed? Both. “Refereed research papers” are peer reviewed, while other research articles and other types of writing are not peer reviewed.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6 Both peer-reviewed and research articles are submitted for publication and all are connected to the LIS world.7

Medium or mode of distribution: Online only.8

Content: The journal consists of research articles ranging from 2000-7000 words, editorials, reports, and book reviews.9

Frequency of publication: This journal is published three times a year,10 in spring, summer and winter issues.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All sections of LIR are open to submission except for editorials.12 Submission guidelines may be found at http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Journal articles (for both peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed sections) are accepted for submission, as well as reports on events and conferences and book reviews.13

Submission and review process: Deadlines are set for authors who have preferred issues in which they might wish to publish. Free registration is required for authors who wish to submit and review.14 Authors are asked to follow the submission guidelines before submitting their article to ensure it meets the journal’s standards.15

Editorial tone: Formal and very technical. According to the guidelines “All authors are encouraged to conclude their paper with a section describing the practical applications of their research, i.e., answering the “so what?” question. What effect should your work have on the LIS practitioner or the research community? Is there anything the community should be doing differently as a result of your research? Have you identified areas for future research? If so, please state them here.”16

Style guide used: Harvard-style references. Examples are given in the guidelines.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and Information Research has a great deal of potential for LIS researchers and authors. As an open-source journal, it allows for a great number of readers. Its scope as a “research into practice”18 journal presents both new information and future possibilities through long and short articles, as well as links to other resources, including new books. Both student readers and authors can benefit from this type of publication while in the prime of their research.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is an open-access, online-only journal,19 and thus circulation increases daily. The editor could not be contacted in order to discern daily or overall hits to the LIR or Library and Information Research Group sites.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is produced in the  UK,20 so it is probable that the majority of readers and writers can be found there, but as LIR is an open-access journal,21 readers can be found across the globe. Readers will be more likely to use British English than American English.22 Most readers, however, will be able to understand both. Due to the nature of the writings, colloquialisms and unexplained cultural references are not expected.

Reader characteristics: The majority of the readers will be interested in the LIS field and likely work in libraries or other research institutions in some capacity. The majority of the articles and papers written for this publication are from an objective viewpoint, and should not present strong biases. However, the idea of “research into practice” is very strong in all aspects of the journal, and thus a forward view of research and its possibilities should be present.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will often be students and scholars in the LIS field. LIS jargon, unless decidedly specialized, should not have to be explained in depth.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important aspect of this journal that one must consider when writing is its impartiality to opinion. The editors of this publication believe strongly in research and the presentation of that research. It may be assumed that, particularly when reading the refereed papers, the readers, your peers, will feel the same. Even when writing a book review, writing should be straightforward and technical in its appearance. Writings on action, historical, evaluation and any other type of research should be understandable for your peers.

While this journal, as web-born, does not likely have an extensive readership, it is still a useful place to present research and ideas to your peers and have them in turn present theirs to you. As an American LIS writer presenting an American understanding to a majority-UK audience, new ideas may be formed from intercontinental collaboration.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  3. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  5. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  7. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  9. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  11. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  14. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  18. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  21. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  22. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library and Information Research. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  23. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. CILIP. (2014). Library and Information Research Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian provides “€œa forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS).”1 It publishes critical perspectives in librarianship that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.2

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive issues within the profession.3

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly. This journal aims to provide critically relevant information in an academic setting.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Full text of articles are available online, previous to and including the Winter/Spring 2009 issue.8

Content: From the website: “€œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice yearly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”11

Submission and review process: Submit electronic files only via e-mail in rich text format (.rtf) or Microsoft Word (.doc). Prints and digital images are welcome; if digital, provide 300 dpi grayscale TIFF (.tiff) files no larger than 5X7 inches. The editors reserve the right to edit all manuscript submissions before publication.12

Submit manuscripts to Kathleen de la Peña McCook at klmccook@gmail.com or Susan Maret at iecologie@yahoo.com.13

To submit a book review contact:

Michael Matthews
Watson Memorial Library, Room 311-D
Northwestern State University of Louisiana
Natchitoches, LA 71497
318-357-441914

Papers are published under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No-Derivatives 2.0 license, which places work in the public domain.15

Editorial tone: The articles are both innovative and present alternative views to typical librarian publications. Social justice, racism and other topics that may be considered controversial are published.The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.16

Style guide used: Submissions in your favorite citation style such as Chicago, MLA, APA, Harvard, Turabian are accepted. The style of choice has to be used consistently throughout the paper.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

According to the Progressive Librarians Guild, every library issue embodies a political value choice–and its publication, Progressive Librarian, aims to unearth those propositions and discuss them openly.18 Progressive Librarian rejects the proposition that contemporary libraries are value-neutral information markets, embracing the older idea that librarianship is a profession firmly for the people,€ a democratic force that promotes intellectual inquiry and an informed citizenry.19 It aims to publish articles and promote discussion that defend and extend the library as a free public sphere that makes independent democratic civil society possible.€ Accordingly,the Progressive Librarians Guild is opposed to commercial and business interests that threaten the free flow of information.20 If you are interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and how politics informs professional practice, consider writing for this publication.

A survey of past articles included cultivating freedom of expression within the workplace, Mexican libraries, the internet, and titles such as, “€œCataloging the Path to a New Dark Age: a taxonomy of the Bush administration’s pervasive crusade against scientific communication.” Papers that tie LIS issues, concepts, practices or history to women’s, workers’€™ or civil rights; education; culture; environmental protection; social welfare or insurance; and supporting the public sector in general will be welcomed here. For LIS students, the Progressive Librarian’€™s Guild presents the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize, which annually awards the best student paper about an aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are approximately 400 subscribers, 25% being libraries. Accordingly, it is difficult to gauge total readership–but certainly over 400.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is international in readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, though there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.23 As with any scholarly article, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.24

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.25 The readership is made up almost entirely of librarians, librarian graduate students, or library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice, and how politics informs LIS practices.26 Readers are probably liberal. They are interested in activism, the struggle for social justice, and how politics can inform LIS practices.27

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have a basic understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about commonplace news and events in the LIS world, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues or events others may not be familiar with.28

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication and its readers stand within the American Progressive tradition, hearkening back to FDR’€™s New Deal and representing a spectrum of views that moves left from New Deal-type reformism to much more radical positions and approaches.29 In late February of 2011 the Progressive Librarians Guild issued a statement in support of the Wisconsin employees who protested against proposed cuts to union benefits and health care.30 Progressive Librarian is one of the only journals in the LIS field to report on and document labor activism within the library profession.

This readership values the working class and the public sector, and is concerned with how the LIS profession can support and advance these causes. The journal is characterized by an interest in and/or commitment to socialism, anti-capitalism, feminism, environmentalism, anti-racism, labor advocacy, cultural democracy, ideology-criticism, radical social movements, anti-imperialism and holds skeptical/critical views of technological issues.

Papers that view library and information issues in this framework will be welcomed—whether they offer collection development practices for sex education materials, suggestions for communicating with right-wing colleagues or patrons, or advocate international library rights.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 30 footnotes

  1. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  2. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  3. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  8. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  9. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  11. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  12. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  13. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  14. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  15. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  16. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  17. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  18. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  19. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  20. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  21. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). 2014 Braverman Award Winner Announced. Retrieved from http://progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml
  22. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  23. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  24. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  25. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  26. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  27. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  28. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  29. Progressivism in the United States. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressivism_in_the_United_States
  30. Davey, M. & Greenhouse, S. (2011, February 16). Angry demonstrations in Wisconsin as cuts loom. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/17/us/17wisconsin.html?_r=0
Continue Reading

Information for Social Change

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information for Social Change

Website: http://libr.org/isc/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An activist librarian organization that “examines the issues of censorship, freedom and ethics amongst library and information workers.”1

Target audience: LIS workers and practitioners.2

Publisher: Information for Social Change.3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional. The topics and informal style of the content may also appeal to civilian readers.5

Medium: Online6

Content: Documenting the control of information globally and also alternatives to the control of information.7

Frequency of publication: Semi-annually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libr.org/isc/call-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles between 500 and 2500 words. Longer articles may be excerpted with the full text made available from the author, according to the guidelines. Letters, review articles and poems are also accepted for publication.9

Submission and review process: Send an email to the editor at isc-journal@libr.org.10

Editorial tone: Simple and clear English. Views are radical and thought-provoking themes that promote debate.11

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS authors who are interested in radical librarianship that examines censorship, ethics and freedom, this journal would be a good choice. The journal suggests potential authors review past and current issues in order to gauge the interest.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not stated but British English style of writing is used.13 Website is in British English but it’s not stated as to whether that is the only acceptable version. This journal addresses global issues so it is safe to assume their readers are international. The organization holds events in association with progressive groups such as Third World Book Fair.14

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely progressive in their viewpoints. Readers are LIS professionals with progressive and radical views15 who are interested in finding channels in which to allow “unfettered and unmediated ideas” to circulate.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS terms and the profession is helpful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal most likely hold progressive viewpoints and feel strongly about the issues presented such as freedom of information and radical changes to the way information is controlled and disseminated. Authors who wish to submit to this publication should hold similar views or at least be extremely open to new ideas.17


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Information for Social Change. (2016). Welcome. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/
  2. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  5. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  7. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  9. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  10. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  11. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  12. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  13. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  14. Information for Social Change. (2016). Events. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/events/
  15. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  16. Information for Social Change. (2016). Policies. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/policies-submission-guide/#1
  17. Information for Social Change. (2013). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
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Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

Website: http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap

Purpose, objective, or mission: To provide opportunities to Pennsylvania librarians to share their knowledge on all areas of librarianship to other librarians in the state and beyond.1

Target audience: LIS professionals in Pennsylvania and internationally especially in the academic library field.2

Publisher: PALA College & Research Division/University of Pittsburgh University Library System.3

Peer reviewed? Research and Practice articles are subject to double-blind peer review. News and Commentary items are not peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Online and open access.6

Content: News, commentary and peer-reviewed journal articles on best practice of interest to academic libraries in Pennsylvania.7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually. (Note: this is a new journal and the 2013 issue is the first one.)8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions. Registration and login is required.

Types of contributions accepted: Items that have already been published or are under consideration for publication, either in print or online, will not be accepted. The journal focus and scope page states it will “consider all submissions that report original research (research articles), highlight innovative initiatives (practice articles), or discuss current trends/challenges (editorial/commentary). Each issue will also feature news items (collections, services, awards, events, etc.) from Pennsylvania’€™s libraries.”9

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted in 12-point font and use italics rather than underlining. The journal can accept articles in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF format.10 Specific formatting and submission requirements for each type of article can be found here: Submissions. Research and Practice articles are subjected to blind peer review and should have no identifying names or terms and include a 100 to 150 word abstract and a completed Submission Preparation Checklist. News articles do not have to follow peer review guidelines.11

Editorial tone: The publisher’s intent is to provide articles on a wide range of subject with a focus on academic libraries.12 A review of Research and Practice articles issue indicates there is a definite scholarly tone.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is a place for Pennsylvania librarians to publish, in particular, in the academic field. As this is a new journal, it is an especially excellent place for new writers to submit articles and news items. As it’s open-access and online, the audience will not be limited to Pennsylvania readers. For example, one article published in the first issue addressed the topic of “Using Social Media to Promote International Collaboration.”

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is a new online open-access journal directed specifically to librarians in Pennsylvania librarians. No numbers have yet been determined.15

Audience location and location or cultural considerations: Pennsylvania, USA with an expected international audience.16 American English and American practices will probably be the focus; although, the editors do intend it to be read internationally.17

Reader characteristics: Readers will most likely be academic librarians in Pennsylvania. Biased towards research and articles written about academic libraries in Pennsylvania.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have LIS subject matter knowledge.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although this publication is intended for academic and other librarians in the state of Pennsylvania only, the editors anticipate a wider audience including global interest. Therefore, authors should keep in mind that there is a potentially much wider audience than just a local one.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  2. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  4. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  7. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  10. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  11. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  12. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  13. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap
  14. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  15. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  16. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  17. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  18. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  19. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
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