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Library Connect Newsletter

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Connect Newsletter

ISSN: 1549-37331

Website: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Library Connect Newsletter covers library and information science best practices, issues, technology and trends. Library Connect is a global program from Elsevier for academic, medical, corporate and government librarians. .”2

Target audience: Academic, medical, corporate and government librarians. 3

Publisher: Elsevier, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Topics of interest to librarians, including LIS news, current issues in LIS, best practices, Elsevier news, and thoughts from leaders in the LIS field.8

Frequency of publication: 10 times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract

Types of contributions accepted: Interested in your experiences as an academic, corporate, medical or government librarian such as tactical or how-to articles, librarian roles, big ideas or strategies, community news, and how Elsevier products provide solutions.10

Submission and review process: Read the editorial guidelines and if your article fits, then email the editor at libraryconnect@elsevier.com with a short description for review and response.11

Editorial tone: Conversational and professional12

Style guide used: The Library Connect Newsletter evaluates submission based on their content, not form or language, and provides editing support to authors.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Connect Newsletter is a respected professional publication with a global audience. LIS practitioners, educators, and students are encouraged to submit work or story ideas here particularly for their targeted librarian groups. Editing support is available which makes it an ideal site for new writers.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are more than 50,000 subscribers in 175 countries to Library Connect webinars and the newsletter.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Publisher based in United States, publication has international audience and a review of the past issues finds articles written by information professionals from around the world.16

Reader characteristics: Library Connect Newsletter is read around the globe by academic, special and medical librarians “interested in library and information science best practices, issues, trends and events.” Readers are likely to be professionals in the field of library issues as well as Elsevier advocates.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to be familiar with general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors should avoid highly specialized topics and language.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors are advised to submit work of a practical nature, rather than overly scholarly content, as Library Connect Newsletter serves as forum for professional news and discussion.19

Last updated: March 16, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Connect Newsletter, Elsevier, Inc., accessed March 16, 2020, https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/
  2. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  3. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  5. Elsevier Inc. (2020). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
  6. Elsevier Inc. (2020). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  7. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  8. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  9. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  10. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  11. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  12. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Library Connect Newsletter – Print Archive. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/newsletters
  13. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  14. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  15. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  16. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Library Connect Newsletter – Print Archive. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/newsletters
  17. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  18. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  19. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
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Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals

ISSN: 1361-32001

Purpose, objective, or mission: Ariadne is published by Loughborough University Library in the U.K. for Information Professionals to stay abreast of a wide variety of LIS topics. Initially, Ariadne was made available in electronic format by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), in order “to create awareness of Internet developments in the UK higher education LIS community”. 2 Website: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Target audience: The target audience for Ariadne is librarians, museum curators, archivists and associated technical staff & managers. Articles should cover topics that will be of interest to one or more of these audiences. 3

Publisher: Loughborough University Library in the U.K. 4

Peer reviewed? No. The editor makes all decisions regarding manuscript submissions.5

Type: LIS professional news. Although Ariadne does publish some research-oriented content, it is not peer reviewed and it cannot be considered “scholarly.” ISSN is 1361-3200.6

Medium: Entirely online. Ariadne is free and open access, so the full text of all issues (current and archived) is available on the website. 7

Content: Ariadne publishes a variety of articles on current trends and issues in the LIS field. A standard issue contains an editorial, a number of articles including a feature article, news, and events. Prominent topics include emerging technologies and trends, digital libraries and collections, information architecture, search engines, metadata, and conference information. 8

Frequency of publication: Undefined. The magazine was published quarterly up through 2010; as of 2013 there are two issues per year. 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines can be found on the Guidelines page. The publication’s website indicates to submit proposals the editor who will then correspond via email once an article proposal has been accepted. 10

Types of contributions accepted: Ariadne accepts a variety of contributions, including articles (i.e., scholarly papers, position pieces, and case studies), reviews, and reports on events, workshops, meetings, and conferences. The magazine also accepts proposals regarding organizations and work-related projects. There are no stated requirements for length.11

Submission and review process: Ariadne requires an initial proposal for all articles. Authors should submit an abstract, outline, or general description to the editor prior to submission of the completed manuscript. After an agreement is reached, a date for submission is set and the editor then sends out an explanation of the editorial process. No peer-review process is used.12

Proposals can be submitted through an email to the editor: editor@ariadne.ac.uk.13

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for editorial tone. Main articles tend to have a more formal, scholarly tone, while reviews and other articles appear to be relatively informal (i.e., first person is acceptable).14

Style guide used: Ariadne does not use a formal style guide.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Ariadne has remained on the forefront of the open access movement and continues to focus its content on current and emerging LIS trends and technologies. Thus, although it is not peer reviewed, it is a credible and highly accessible source with great publishing potential for LIS practitioners, educators, and students. Contributors might consider writing about LIS conferences or workshops, workplace technologies, online learning, digital collections, social networking, Web 2.0./Library 2.0, or Web-based information seeking behavior.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Ariadne is an open access electronic publication that is available free to anyone with Internet access. As such, there is no formal subscription process and no readily available circulation data. Generally, though, freely accessible online resources do at least have the potential of a large audience base.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although Ariadne maintains an international audience, the majority of readers are located in the U.S. and U.K., and content reflects this. 16

Ariadne is published solely in English, and based on geographic information, it can be assumed that the vast majority of readers are, in fact, native English speakers. However, authors should be aware of the linguistic and cultural differences that exist between the U.S. and British English. For example, submission guidelines indicate that “British English” should be used rather than “US English.” 17

Reader characteristics: Ariadne does not provide any detailed demographic information relating to the gender, age, or ethnicity of its readers. Because this is an international professional publication geared towards practicing information professionals, it is likely that the audience is relatively mature and experienced, but also demographically diverse. Although readers are likely to hold a wide variety of professional specializations, they are also very likely to share professional interests based on Ariadne‘s primary topics, which include digital libraries, technological developments, digital information management, and online learning. As a large portion of Ariadne readers work in libraries and archives, they are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship in an information society. It should be noted that Ariadne also features more opinion-based reader reviews, retrospectives, and reflections.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Ariadne readers are likely to be quite knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and jargon. As practicing information professionals, they would certainly be interested in library topics that are directly applicable to their careers. Read through the archived issues to get a sense of the current topics. 19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Ariadne is a professional publication with a very specific focus on practical articles that discuss sophisticated technological issues and developments in LIS. Overly general library articles, theoretical papers, or pieces that fail to directly address current trends in librarianship with a heavy focus on digital initiatives may not interest Ariadne readers. Submissions should be professional but not necessarily scholarly in tone, and they should focus on relating practical applications for LIS practitioners (see topic suggestions in the Publication Analysis above).

It is important for the author to note that although Ariadne is a British publication with a core following in the UK, the majority of readers actually reside in the U.S., and it is a global magazine. This allows for increased opportunities to effectively reach Ariadne readers.

Last Updated: March 8, 2020


References

 

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals, Loughborough University Library, accessed March 8, 2020, http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/
  2. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about/copyright
  3. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  4. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about/copyright
  5. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  6. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines 
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  8. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  9. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  10. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  11. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  12. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  13. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  14. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  15. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  16. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
  17. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/guidelines
  18. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
  19. Loughborough University Library. (2020) Ariadne: Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue
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In the Library with the Lead Pipe

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: In the Library with the Lead Pipe

ISSN: 1944-61951

Website: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website’s About page: “Lead Pipe believes libraries and library workers can change the world for the better. We improve libraries, professional organizations, and their communities of practice by exploring new ideas, starting conversations, documenting our concerns, and arguing for solutions.”2

Target audience: Educators, administrators, library support staff, technologists, and community members.3

Per co-founder Brett Bonfield: “We do our best to reach beyond librarians, administrators, etc. and also engage people who care about the same things that we care about, such as publishing, reading, knowledge, intellectual freedom . . . all the intersections between librarians and other fields, professions, avocations. We do this by trying to avoid jargon and by telling good stories, and we also do it by interviewing non-librarians and by asking non-librarians to write for us or serve as peer reviewers.”4

Publisher: The editorial staff of In the Library with the Lead Pipe5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 by at least one external and one internal reviewer7

Type: An LIS scholarly publication that crosses over into the professional and trade publication category.8

Medium: Online.9

Content: The goals of Lead Pipe are to start conversations and to propose solutions to LIS problems and concerns. The content includes essays by the editorial board and articles by guest authors, including “educators, administrators, library support staff, technologists, and community members.”10 Articles range from advice to LIS students, to notes from LIS professionals in the workplace, to favorite books and commentary on current LIS-related news items such as retaining LGBTQ staff and library use of social media.11

Frequency of publication: Monthly.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Constructive criticisms and commentary from people experiencing the library from the inside as librarians, administrators, and support staff, as well as community members who interact with libraries. The goal is to provide perspective from all aspects of the library community. The editors encourage article proposals from LIS students and those new to the profession.13

Examples of material published include:

  • Original research with a discussion of its consequences and an argument for action.
  • Articles arguing for a particular approach, strategy or development in librarianship, with practical examples of how it might be achieved.
  • Transformative works with additional explanatory or interpretive content. For example, a transcription of an interview or panel discussion, with a substantial introduction explaining the importance of the subject to librarianship and a discussion of related literature.14

Submission and review process: Prospective authors are asked to submit a 200-word abstract, a link or attachment to writing samples, and a current resume or CV using the email address listed on the submissions page. Authors may also submit a completed article, from 2000-5000 words, with citations as necessary.15

A staff member will respond to submissions within three weeks to indicate whether an article is appropriate to Lead Pipe publication goals in terms of content and style.16

According to Lead Pipe author instructions, “The author does the hard work of actually writing the article. Articles may have multiple authors, but in this case one author must be designated as the primary point of contact for the Editorial Board. Authors are also responsible for identifying an external reviewer. The external reviewer should have some professional connection to or knowledge of the article’s topic, and is expected to provide expert review and constructive feedback. The external reviewer does not necessarily have to be librarian. Authors may work with someone they already know or reach out to the professional community. The Editorial Board is happy to offer guidance in identifying and contacting an appropriate reviewer if needed.”17

Per co-founder Brett Bonfield, “Our goal is to make sure the article is factually accurate, well written, well edited, and interesting.”18

The process from selection to publication takes at least six weeks, with Lead Pipe editors requesting feedback and drafts from the author as necessary. This is a highly collaborative process where editors work closely with writers to produce the most fabulous writing possible for the site. Prospective authors should consult the Guest Author Instructions, Framework for Guest Author Proposals, and Peer Review Guidelines before submitting.19

Editorial tone: Informal and engaging; informative yet relaxed. The articles are peer-reviewed, but speak to the entire community of people who work in and use the library. They are thoughtful, positive articles that pose challenging questions and educate readers on diverse aspects of the LIS world.20

Style guide used:  The Lead Pipe includes an in-house style guide in its submission guidelines. Authors may use any citation style, as long as it is consistently applied within an article. The editors encourage use of the first-person for many articles, and request that authors avoid use of the passive voice.21 See the site’s detailed Style Guide for more information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an extremely LIS-student-friendly publication open to a great variety of topics within the field.22 The site has a registered ISSN number and although it has been awarded titles such as “€œBest General Blog”€ in 2012 from the Salem Press Library Blog Awards, the editors “feel that this rich peer review process sets us apart from scholarly blogs and puts us in the realm of “journal.”23 Many writers have referenced the site through other publications.24

The editors “encourage creative thinking, envelope-pushing, and constructive criticism,”25€œ while “articles indulging in non-constructive criticism will not be accepted.”26

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not specified. According to a survey performed by Arthur Hendricks of 67 university library professionals, 3 of those 67 (4.5%) mentioned In the Library with the Lead Pipe as a blog that they regularly read.27

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Currently all members of the editorial board work in the United States,28 and articles are written in American English.29 However, given that Lead Pipe is an internationally recognized, well-respected, yet informal journal that was previously a popular peer-reviewed blog, a more global readership may be assumed.

The publication style guide requests that authors “. . . incorporate a global perspective in the context and arguments of articles (e.g., by considering what the broad international profession should do, not just what the American Library Association or U.S.-based librarians should do). It is acceptable for an article’s focus to be on one geographic region, but this should be made clear in the article, and avoid phrases like “across the country” without mentioning which country.”30

Reader characteristics: Editors take pride in having diverse skills and interests, and bring all of that knowledge to the website, making it an interesting site to read even by those outside the profession. Lead Pipe is directed towards people involved in libraries in any capacity, from librarians to support staff and community members.31

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.32

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The journal is one of the longer standing open source, peer-edited and -reviewed LIS sites, dating back to 2008. It is read and referenced by librarians internationally, and provides good information and topics of conversation for librarians and those interested in the LIS community. It is an informally written site but still presents scholarly articles along with editorials and opinion pieces, and would be a good platform for LIS students who wish to network and share ideas and concerns through writing articles for a community of peers.

Per editor Brett Bonfield: “We think of ourselves as a journal and we publish “articles,” not posts, and those articles are indexed by EBSCO for its library database products. We’re not aggressive about it or anything–we were delighted by the Salem Press blog award, for instance–but it’s a distinction that has meaning for us. We love a lot of LIS blogs and we love a lot of LIS journals, we just think we have a bit more in common with the journals than the blogs.”33

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 33 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “In the Library with the Lead Pipe,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523475745273/672658
  2. “About,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019 http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/
  3. “About,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/
  4. B. Bonfield, personal communication, March 17, 2013
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  7. “Lead Pipe Publication Process,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/lead-pipe-publication-process/
  8. “About.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. “About.”
  11. “Archives,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/archives/
  12. “Archives.”
  13. “About.”
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/
  16. “Submission Guidelines.”
  17. Lead Pipe Publication Process.”
  18. Bonfield, personal communication.
  19. Lead Pipe Publication Process.”
  20. “About.”
  21. “Style Guide,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed May 3, 2017, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/style-guide/
  22. “Archives.”
  23. Ellie Collier, “And the Survey Says . . .,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, September 5, 2012, accessed May 3, 2017, http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2012/survey-says/
  24. “Awards and Good Words,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed May 3, 2017,  http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/awards-good-words/
  25. “About.”
  26. “About.”
  27. Arthur Hendricks, “Bloggership, or is publishing a blog scholarship? A survey of academic librarians,” Library Hi Tech 28, no. 3 (Summer 2010): 470-477, https://doi.org/10.1108/07378831011076701.
  28. “Editorial Board,” In the Library with the Lead Pipe, accessed June 30, 2019,  http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/about/editorial-board/
  29. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  30. “Style Guide.”
  31. “Style Guide.”
  32. “About.”
  33. Bonfield, personal communication.
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Archival Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archival Outlook

ISSN: 1520-33791

Website: http://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook

Purpose, objective, or mission: A newsletter €œmembership benefit€ for members of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) that updates readers on the work of the Society and its many component groups and reports on regional, national, and international news of relevance to members of the profession.2

Target audience: Those interested in or specializing in the archival profession or one of its allied fields.3

Publisher: The Society of American Archivists (SAA)4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Print issues are mailed exclusively to members, but digital versions are available to the general public on the SAA website.8

Content: Features often cover best-practice and how-to articles on timely archival topics; notable collections, projects, or advocacy work; how archives are used by the public; and profiles of archives or archivists at work. SAA aims to nurture both new voices and established writers; the content is primarily written by the organization’s members and those in the profession.9

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly: January/February, Marcy/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook

Types of contributions accepted: A range of relevant topics will be considered, but articles typically focus on best practices, unique collections, notable achievements by an archivist or archives, and updates on the Society and its component groups. Articles should include “some kernel of information that will enlighten the reader professionally.”11 Illustrations are encouraged. Articles should run 700 words for a one-page story or 1,200 words for a double-page spread.12

Submission and review process: Send queries and article ideas to the current Editorial and Production Coordinator via email. This position is currently held by Abigail Christian.13

Editorial tone: This is the member newsletter, not the official journal. While the articles are highly relevant to the archival profession, the tone is more friendly and laid back.14

Style guide used: No style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newsletter is a perfect place for students in the archive sector to share short articles or feature stories on news, information, special projects or advocacy, or profiles of SAA members. It is neither peer reviewed nor the official SAA scholarly journal, so it is most likely not an avenue for publishing in efforts to gain tenure, but it would be an excellent place to start writing about all things archives, explore different topics within the archives world, or share information about relevant individuals, organizations, and conferences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 6,200+ members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Society is based in Chicago and is North America’s oldest and largest national archival professional association.16 Outlook is written in English.17 The newsletter accepts international updates and news, but is a North American publication.18

Reader characteristics: The newsletter can have a very insider, quirky tone because it is directed at SAA community members. A unique feature is the use of visuals (mostly archival photos) to tell a story or as stand-alone pieces.19 If a LIS student came across an interesting visual, this would be the place to share it. The publication’s articles are largely written by members and those in the archives profession. The newsletter is strictly for those in the archival profession, or those interested in it. This does not just mean those in library-specific archives: professionals from all sectors within the profession are profiled and encouraged to share news and updates.20 Readers are positively archival advocates. This is a newsletter that is very proud of being all about archives and celebrating archival and library professionals.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As the readership is comprised of professional archivists, LIS knowledge and language is encouraged, though education level and degrees may vary.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this publication have one crucial aspect in common: their love of archives. Articles need to focus on positive aspects of the profession -€“ this is not the venue to share negative comments or criticisms, although critiques might be accepted, and definitely reviews of new exhibits, books, or professionals would be fine. The level of LIS knowledge is high -€“ this is not a newsletter for neophytes but is directed toward professionals. However, its tone is friendly, open, and welcoming to anyone with an interest in archives. This would be a fun, interesting place to publish with the aim to keep readers up to date as well as entertained.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook
  2. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership,” accessed June 30, 2019, http://www2.archivists.org/membership
  3. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  4. ProQuest, “Archival Outlook,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1402338917688/244199
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  8. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  9. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  10. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  11. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  12. Society of American Archivists, “Submit an Article,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/publications/archival-outlook/submitanarticle
  13. Society of American Archivists, “Submit an Article.”
  14. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  15. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook Display Ad Information,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/advertising/archival-outlook
  16. Society of American Archivists, “Who We Are,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/aboutsaa
  17. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  18. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
  19. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook: Back Issues by Year,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/archival-outlook/back-issues
  20. Society of American Archivists, “Benefits of Membership.”
  21. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook: Back Issues by Year.”
  22. Society of American Archivists, “Archival Outlook.”
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Young Adult Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Young Adult Library Services (YALS)

ISSN: 2374-7706 1

Website: http://www.ala.org/yalsa/young-adult-library-services

Purpose, objective, or mission: It is the official journal of Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), whose mission is “to support library staff in alleviating the challenges teens face, and in putting all teens ‒ especially those with the greatest needs ‒ on the path to successful and fulfilling lives.”2 In support of these efforts, YALS “features articles that showcase best and emerging practices, provides news from related fields, spotlight significant YALSA events and opportunities, and offer in-depth reviews of professional literature.”3

Target audience: Librarians and library staff who serve youths, ages 12 through 18.4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Showcases best practices, news from related professions, reviews of professional literature, and spotlights YALSA events.9 Each issue may contain articles on important topics such as: intellectual freedom, intersectionality, cultural competence, adolescent literacy, youth development, and leadership. There may also be interviews, speeches, or bibliographic essays.10

Frequency of publication: Four times a year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://yalsa.ala.org/blog/yals/author-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Feature articles ranging from 1,800 to 4,000 words in length. News of current interest to the profession, articles on best practices, news from related professions, and reviews of professional literature. Manuscripts submitted should not be under consideration or accepted elsewhere.12

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted as Microsoft Word documents via email to the editor. Contact the editor for specifics concerning submission and style guidelines. Submissions may be edited for clarity accuracy, and readability.13

Editorial tone: There is no stated tone for article submissions, and articles can range from academic to reports on field practice. A wide variety of styles is acceptable as long as the submission conforms to the themes and types of articles YALSA is interested in for their readers.14

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is eminently suitable to anyone who has an interest in writing articles geared towards librarians serving young adults (aka “teenagers,” adolescents,” “youth”). It would be an excellent resume builder to have been published in the YALSA journal. The guidelines are direct and exact. Getting published in this journal might be difficult for a novice, but the attempt would be worth it.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: YALS reaches YALSA membership, over  5,000 librarians and educators.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: YALSA is centered in Chicago, IL, and the main geographic location served is the United States. However, they do outreach programs in other countries and some members are international, so the journal has a limited international scope as well. Cultural considerations do not generally enter into the journal’€™s authorship. Most authors appear to be writing solely for American librarians who serve young adults. These articles can be applicable to most any other developed country’€™s librarians serving youth (ages 12-18), however, even more than with young adult services in the U.S., there is a dearth of research and scholarship on developing nation’s youth services.17

Reader characteristics: Readers range in location, age, and gender. They are spread all over the U.S. in both public and school libraries. The vast majority of readers have MLIS degrees and work as Young Adult Specialists or youth generalists in public library librarians or School Library Media Technicians. Some readers are para-professionals or library assistants at these locations and do not have a MLIS degree. All the librarians who read YALS, however, are highly interested in services to young adults (ages 12-18) as that is the target issue for this particular journal. Some interests they all share are collection development for YA literature, community development, inclusivity, methods of incorporating library use into school curricula, intellectual freedom, and hot topic issues having to do with youth services. Since the librarians targeted by this journal work with young adults (ages 12-18), their needs tend to be a trifle more progressive than some fields. The world of youth services is constantly expanding and evolving due to YA reliance on the internet and technology. In order to keep up with the clientele they serve, the readers are going to be looking for innovative articles which will offer the ideas, experiences, and opinions of their colleagues.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that most of the readers have MLIS degrees, contributors can assume that readers will be familiar with the profession’s vocabulary, particularly that pertaining to young adult services.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important thing to keep in mind when writing for YALS is that the readership is going to be interested primarily in topics having to do with youth librarianship. They are not going to be interested in esoteric topics on archives, law libraries, etc. Some articles on cataloging or subscription databases would be acceptable, but primarily articles should be geared toward advancing, managing and delivering excellent library and information services to young people.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Young Adult Library Services (Online),” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561864038399/442511
  2. American Library Association, “About YALSA,” Young Adult Library Services Association, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/yalsa/aboutyalsa.
  3. American Library Association, “Young Adult Library Services (YALS),” Young Adult Library Services Association, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/yalsa/young-adult-library-services.
  4. American Library Association, “Young Adult Library Services (YALS).”
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. American Library Association, “Young Adult Library Services (YALS).”
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Library Association, “Young Adult Library Services (YALS).”
  9. American Library Association, “Young Adult Library Services (YALS).”
  10. Young Adult Library Services Association, “YALS Archive,” YALSA Blog, accessed June 29, 2019. http://yalsa.ala.org/blog/yals/yals-archive/.
  11. Young Adult Library Services Association, “YALS Archive.”
  12. Young Adult Library Services Association, “YALS Author Guidelines,” YALSA Blog, accessed June 29, 2019. http://yalsa.ala.org/blog/yals/author-guidelines/.
  13. Young Adult Library Services Association, “YALS Author Guidelines.”
  14. Young Adult Library Services Association, “YALS Author Guidelines.”
  15. Young Adult Library Services Association, “YALS Author Guidelines.”
  16. Young Adult Library Services Association, “YALS Advertising,” YALSA Blog, accessed June 29, 2019, http://yalsa.ala.org/blog/yals/yals-advertising/.
  17. American Library Association, “About YALSA.”
  18. American Library Association, “Young Adult Library Services (YALS).”
  19. American Library Association, “Young Adult Library Services (YALS).”
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LISNews

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LISNews

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.lisnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “LISNews is a collaborative weblog devoted to current events and news in the world of library and information science.”1

Target audience: LIS professionals and anyone interested in reading about library and information science news.2

Publisher: Blake Carver, MLS.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news and forum.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The content on LISnews varies from day to day and includes newspaper articles from the United States and other English-speaking countries, editorials, interviews, book reviews, and original writings. Glancing at the most recent postings reveals excerpts and links from LIS-related articles in popular publications and organizations. Activity on the site has slowed down significantly in recent years, but new blog posts are added about once a week by the blog’s owner. Some articles do not speak anyone’s interest; other postings can generate heated, but civilized discussion for several days.7

Frequency of publication: According to the blog owner, content is updated “frequently, usually 7 days a week.”8 However, recent activity suggests a pattern of updating slightly more than once per week.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no guidelines as this is an informal forum for open discussion. The author attempts to maintain accuracy and fairness in postings and gently hints that others do the same.10

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, editorials, original work; anything of interest to a LIS audience.11

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent to the ”submit suggestion” link on the website. Contributions remain the property of the author and can be removed from the website any time by request. There is no review process other than the publication of that which interests a majority of readers. The author does caution that anything that “causes trouble” will be deleted.12

Editorial tone: Informal blog that accepts any writings about LIS news. Authors are free to post and opine on the blog regarding any previously published works. The publisher does, however, “reserve the right to remove any work at any time for any reason.”13

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LISNews does not provide any scholarly writing opportunities, but does offer an almost daily opportunity for new writers to post their work and ideas on any library topic. The blog offers a nice opportunity to get one’s feet wet in the world of LIS writing but not much else. This may be good venue to find the pulse of library and information science news, to find out what others are talking about, what is of interest to other LIS professionals, and what LIS topics are making headlines in mainstream publications.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There is no circulation information available. However, readership is not necessarily restricted to the activity on the site, as the blog is also be delivered via an email subscription list.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publisher is in New York, and it is claimed that there is some international reach.15 American English is the standard for communication as the focus is on North American information science and news. Newspaper articles posted here are from all over the country, Canada, and the UK.16

Reader characteristics: A majority of the readers are librarians of every specialty; however, the publisher does not ask any specific information. The readers are likely to have similar types of workplaces, as the majority of most recent posts focus on public or academic librarianship.17 Readers, as librarians, tend to be open to new information, are willing to express their opinion online, and listen to what others have to say. The editor will post anything of value related to library issues but will remove anything that causes too much discord.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since this is an audience of mostly librarians (as determined by the editor)19, there is a great deal of LIS knowledge. Information is gathered from many sources for contributions to LISNews. Some posted articles are highly technical, while others are newspaper articles free of any jargon.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a resource for librarians to contribute information on anything related to library and information science from the conventional to the bizarre.21 Some articles are very technical and directed toward librarians with a specialization and a knowledge of library jargon and acronyms. Other articles are of a general nature that are of interest to not only librarians, but a general audience as well. Authors are welcome to contribute on any library related topic. Since there are few productive authors relative to prior years, there is opportunity for authors to stand out and be heard by posting frequently. 22 This is an informal and engaged audience of librarians that will be interested in anything that writers have to post.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Carver, B., “About LISNews,accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.lisnews.org/about_lisnews
  2. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  3. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  4. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  5. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  6. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  7. Carver, B., “Recent Posts,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.lisnews.org/supertracker
  8. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  9. Carver, B., “Recent Posts.”
  10. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  11. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  12.  Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  13. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  14. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  15. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  16. Carver, B., “Recent Posts.”
  17. Carver, B. “Recent Posts.”
  18. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  19. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  20. Carver, B., “Recent Posts.”
  21. Carver, B.,  “About LISNews.”
  22. Carver, B., “Recent Posts.”
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Public Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Public Libraries

ISSN: 0163-55061

Website: Public Libraries magazine: http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries; Public Libraries Onlinehttp://publiclibrariesonline.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Public Libraries is the official trade publication of the Public Library Association (PLA), a division of American Library Association (ALA), and thus reflects its standards. The magazine seeks to provide public librarians with the news and information they need to be as successful in their careers as possible.2

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.3

Publisher: Public Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS professional news. This publication focuses on the public library workplace rather than on scholarly research.6

Medium: Print.7 Public Libraries Online, a complement to the printed journal, is available online.8

Content: Quality articles and information germane to all aspects of public libraries.9

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl

Types of contributions accepted: The following types of contributions are considered for publication:

  • Feature articles. Manuscripts should be 3,000-6,000 words.
  • €œVerso€ pieces, of no more than 1,500 words.
  • Vendor announcements. (Contact Kathleen Hughes, khughes@ala.org.)
  • Reviews of professional literature. (Contact Kathleen Hughes, khughes@ala.org.)11

Submission and review process: Public Libraries has a specific style guide that authors should adhere to before submitting manuscripts to the editor. Manuscripts are evaluated by the Feature Editor and persons knowledgeable about the topic of the work.12 All submissions are reviewed in a double-blind process to ensure that published papers are of high quality.13

Articles are accepted on a rolling basis and the evaluation process generally takes eight to twelve weeks. Articles are typically scheduled for publication in the order in which they are received.14

All submissions must be submitted through the online Public Libraries Editorial Manager. First-time authors will need to register. You may then submit your manuscript and track its progress through the system.15

Editorial tone: From the website: “Write in a clear, simple style. Use the active voice whenever possible. Avoid overly long sentences.”16

Style guide used: Consult the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. and the Random House Webster’€™s College Dictionary for questions about grammar, usage, or spelling.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an excellent publication for public librarians, LIS professionals or student authors interested in sharing unique knowledge or experiences germane to public libraries. This is a credible resource since it is published by the Public Library Association, a division of the American Library Association. Potential topics this publication may address include: career development, serving diverse populations in public libraries, and improving public programming.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Subscription accompanies membership in the Public Library Association (PLA),18 meaning that each issue of Public Libraries circulates to nearly 10,000 PLA members and subscribers throughout the entire United States and Canada.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLA is a division of the American Library Association, indicating that readers of this publication are primarily located throughout the United States.20 The information in this publication is printed in the English language.21 It is culturally focused on the U.S. and on library and information science issues relevant to American librarians working in the public library realm.22

Reader characteristics: Expect readers to be familiar with current library technologies and policies. Readers are likely working in a public library, and are knowledgeable of procedures and technologies related to their field. By subscribing the magazine, the readers are displaying a personal interest in bettering themselves and their knowledge of their chosen field. The majority of this publication’€™s readers include reference, children, youth, special collections, and technical librarians working in public libraries. Although most of the audience has an MLIS education, there are professionals who have worked in libraries for an extensive amount of time and may have gotten involved when a graduate degree was not required. Furthermore, this publication is appealing to LIS graduate students interested in learning more about issues in the public library realm. This publication is progressive insofar as it is concerned with ensuring that the general public, including the disadvantaged, has access to information, services and programs.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that this is a professional publication, most readers are already familiar with issues relevant to the library and information science profession. They will also be familiar with LIS jargon, specifically that used in public libraries.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Public Library‘s readers are professionally affiliated with both the American Library Association and the Public Library Association. Collectively, readers are very likely to be public library employees. Most read this publication to learn about national public library news, to build camaraderie within the field, and to gain insight about how they might approach issues within their own libraries. Considering this publication’s national audience, it is important to link unique experiences to national issues. For instance, an article about lending e-readers in one library would make connections to copyright or cost issues relevant to other libraries.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Public Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 11, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399522510/23515
  2. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries
  3. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Library Association, “Write for Public Libraries Magazine,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl
  6. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  7. Proquest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  9. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl/editorialguidelines
  12. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  14. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  15. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  16. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  17. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.”
  18. American Library Association, “Subscribe to Public Libraries,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/subscribe
  19. American Library Association, “Advertise with PLA,” Public Library Association, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/advertise
  20. American Library Association, Subscribe to Public Libraries.
  21. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  22. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  23. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
  24. American Library Association, “Public Libraries Magazine.”
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Information Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Outlook

ISSN: 1091-0808 (Print) and 1938-3819 (Online)1

Website: https://www.sla.org/access-membership-3/io/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Information Outlook is the official publication of the Special Libraries Association (SLA). The SLA “promotes and strengthens its members through learning, networking, and community building initiatives.”2

Target audience: Information Outlook is targeted towards their membership of information professionals, specifically those working in special libraries.

Publisher: Special Libraries Association (SLA).3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, the publication contains “articles on timely topics such as data curation, digital asset management, bibliometrics, and value co-creation; columns about technology, copyright law, and other issues of perpetual interest; and interviews with SLA members, offering a close-up look at information professionals in different disciplines, work environments, and countries.”7

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/

Types of contributions accepted: From the “Write for IO,” “Although written primarily by SLA members, articles in Information Outlook also are contributed by futurists, attorneys, academicians, technology professionals, human resources specialists, communications experts–anyone with knowledge or ideas about how information professionals can better serve their clients.”9

Submission and review process: Interested authors should send a query email to the current editor with an outline of your topic along with your qualifications. The editor will forward your query to the advisory council for review. The guidelines encourage illustrated article of approximately 2,000 words in length.10

Editorial tone: Written in an active voice following the SLA style guide provided in the submission guidelines.11

Style guide used: Current edition of Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information Outlook is an excellent forum for LIS authors writing on topics of interest to special libraries. Since there is such a wide variety of special library types, there are a number of topics that can be addressed. Despite differences among particular types of special libraries, many experiences and situations can be generalized and made applicable to all of Information Outlook readers.13

Although this is not a scholarly journal, Information Outlook is a highly respected journal, and LIS authors would benefit from having their work published by the SLA.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 4,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Special Libraries Association has 49 regional chapters. The majority are located in the United States, but there are also chapters in Canada, Africa, the Arabian Gulf, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean. In addition to the regional chapters, SLA boasts members in 75 countries.15 Information Outlook is published in English, but circulates to members in other countries as well (as listed above). Issues pertaining to special librarians will be of general interest to all readers, but there may be some regional/cultural specifics that might not be applicable to readers in different countries.16

Reader characteristics: The readers of Information Outlook are individuals who typically hold a library degree. Many have master’s degrees in subject specialties as well. There is gender diversity in the audience, and they range in age, typically from late 20s upwards. They may be brand new to the profession or they may be upper management with many years of experience. All readers of Information Outlook are special librarians, and therefore they have a common mission and values, and much in common within the profession. However, they work in settings that are incredibly varied, both in size and type. Readers might work alone or in large organizations, and might specialize in institutions such as government, medical, legal, and academic libraries.17 The readers of Information Outlook care specifically about issues pertaining to special libraries. According to the publication’s website, its readers are interested in articles about “administration, organization, marketing, and operations.” They value information that will help their organizations stay successful and stay informed of the latest developments and technologies.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Information Outlook are extremely knowledgeable about issues relating to library and information science. They will be at different stages of their careers, of course, with some readers having more experience and expertise than others, but writers can assume a basic level of knowledge and can expect readers to understand LIS jargon.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Outlook‘s readers are hungry for the latest information about issues that impact special libraries. They want to read articles that have practical application in their day-to-day lives and careers. As stated on SLA’s website, “readers want to read articles about new techniques, new ideas, new trends…They’re interested in growing their organizations and in planning their careers…They want to know how to confront problems and how to avoid them.” The profession is comprised of individuals who “strategically use information…to advance the mission of the organization…through the development, deployment, and management of information resources and services.”20

Potential authors can reach this audience effectively by providing case studies and real-world examples, and by focusing on what is new and innovative in the field. Most special librarians are technologically savvy and interested in cutting-edge applications that will help them accomplish their professional goals and serve their patrons. They will also likely have limited time to devote to professional reading, and will only devote that time to articles and reviews that are relevant and timely. Therefore, authors will be best served by submitting writing that is direct and to the point.

Last updated: June 9, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Information Outlook,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 9, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  2. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  3. ProQuest. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Special Libraries Association, “Information Outlook,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/
  8. Special Libraries Association, “2019 Editorial and Advertising Calendar,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/editorial-calendar/
  9. Special Libraries Association, “Write for Information Outlook,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  10. Special Libraries Association, “Write for Information Outlook.”
  11. Special Libraries Association, “Write for Information Outlook.”
  12. Special Libraries Association, “Write for Information Outlook.”
  13. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  14. Special Libraries Association, “Association Finances,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/association-finances/
  15. Special Libraries Association, “Chapters,” accessed June 9, 2019, http://www.sla.org/get-involved/chapters/
  16. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  17. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA.”
  18. Special Libraries Association, “Editorial and Advertising Calendar.”
  19. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA.”
  20. Special Libraries Association, “About SLA.”
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AALL Spectrum

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AALL Spectrum

ISSN: 1089-86891

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Spectrum is the professional magazine for the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and is included in association membership. This publication “provides informative and engaging articles of interest to AALL members. The magazine informs readers about the ever-changing, multifaceted world of legal information professionals on areas including the transformation of law, career and leadership development, accessibility, education, information technology, and best practices. The magazine also keeps members apprised of Association events and activities.”2

Target audience: Members of AALL are the target audience: members are law librarians in a variety of settings, including academic law school libraries, private firms libraries, judicial and government libraries, and public law libraries for counties and states, as well as other legal information professionals.3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. This is an informal publication of AALL, primarily for association news and short practical pieces that would be of interest to practicing law librarians.6 Though it is not a scholarly journal, it is very well respected and has a high profile in its field.

Medium: Spectrum is a print publication sent free to all AALL members.7 The archives are available online back to mid-1998 at the Spectrum website.8

Content: Spectrum includes articles on subjects of interest to law librarians, especially practical pieces on marketing the library and management tips. The scholarly journal for AALL is titled Law Library Journal;  Spectrum publishes informational pieces more informally written but still of practical use to law librarians.9

Frequency of publication: Spectrum is published six times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/editorial-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Spectrum includes a mix of trend or feature stories, news briefs, regular columns, and opinion pieces about issues that affect legal information and law librarianship as well as Association events and activities.11

Submission and review process: The publishing guidelines indicate that “Spectrum prefers a thorough, detailed proposal letter that fully outlines the article topic.”12

Regarding article length, they note that “Feature articles should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words. News and department articles are typically between 800 and 1,200 words. Shorter or longer articles will be considered. “13

After submitting a query letter, the author should submit the requested article electronically, with any graphics in a separate file. “All submissions will be edited for clarity, grammar, and length.” “Whenever possible, the author will be contacted by either the AALL Spectrum editorial director or AALL publications manager to discuss questions of intention and interpretation.”14

Editorial tone: Reviewing the articles themselves, it appears that Spectrum attempts to include articles that will be of interest to firm, academic, and government librarians rather than focusing on just one type of library. The submission guidelines request “authoritative, well-researched articles about legal information and the profession.  Articles that inform, inspire, provoke, influence, or help improve practices are welcome additions to AALL Spectrum. Each submission should be an original, educational piece.”15

Style guide used: Spectrum follows The Chicago Manual of Style Seventeenth Edition and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition for style and usage, as well as an AALL Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

AALL Spectrum is the best place to engage in the informal professional conversation surrounding law librarianship. Though it is not as high profile or scholarly as Law Library Journal, it may be more widely read, and will help any law librarian make a name for him or herself. The quality of writing is very high, as are the editorial standards. However, it is not appropriate for professors seeking tenure to boost publications, as it is not a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Spectrum is sent free to all AALL members. The archives for this publication are available online at the AALL website,17 and Ulrich’s Periodical Directory indicates that they are also searchable on various LIS databases (including EBSCOhost, H.W. Wilson products, and Thomson Gale databases).18 It is possible the articles will reach non-law librarian readers through these sources.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The main circulation of this magazine is within the United States, but AALL does have some international members. Unfortunately, international demographics were not available on the Spectrum site, advertising materials, AALL Salary Survey, or AALL member information.19 Spectrum is written in American English, and is primarily interested in legal librarianship relevant to the United States.20 If international subjects are covered, the legal systems will require more explanation. An example of international coverage is “Beyond the Spectrum,” by Shaikh Mohamed Noordin, available for download.21

Reader characteristics: AALL reports over 4,000 members, roughly half of whom work in an academic or law school setting. The most populated Special Interest Sections of AALL members are Academic Law Libraries and Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals.22  All librarians in AALL are either law librarians or are interested in the organization of legal information.  This publication is run by, written by, and edited by law librarians, and as such tends to reflect the dominant views of the profession. It’s analytical; fairly negative towards vendors, but strives to be fair; focuses primarily on academic and firm librarian concerns (such as training law students or new attorneys) and to a lesser extent of government librarianship.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed. However, specialized information from non-law library disciplines or terms specific to certain jobs (such as cataloging or database administration) require explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in publishing in Spectrum are advised to list their qualifications in their cover letters, as this audience respects degrees and library experience. Though the publication is focused entirely on law librarianship, general subjects of interest to LIS professionals will overlap in this field — for instance, information on Web 2.0 is of great interest to law librarians, and recent articles have dealt with how Second Life can be used in libraries. It is best, even with general topics, to make it evident how the subject could be useful to a law librarian.24

Last updated: March 24, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521387398626/111034
  2. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy,” accessed March 24, 2019, http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/spectrum/policy-spectrum.html
  3. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  6. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  7. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum.”
  8. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/spectrum_issue/
  9. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  10. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  11. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  12. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  13. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  14. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  15. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  16. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  17. American Association of Law Libraries,  “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive.”
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Association of Law Libraries, “Meet Our Members,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/meet-our-members/
  20. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  21. Noordin, Shaikh Mohamed, “Perspective: Beyond the Spectrum,” Spectrum 10, no. 6: 12-13, 17, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/_mediavault/2017/11/pub_sp0604_Persp.pdf
  22. American Association of Law Libraries, “By the Numbers,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/
  23. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  24. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
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Interactions (ACM)

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Interactions

ISSN: 1072-5520 (Print) and 1558-3449 (Online)1

Website: http://interactions.acm.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Interactions is a trade magazine that is interested in the specific locus of culture, communication, and technology. While the magazine is not librarian specific, most of its content is relevant. From the website: “It is a multiplicity of conversations, collaborations, relationships, and new discoveries focusing on how and why we interact with the designed world of technologies.”2

Target audience: Professionals interested in best practices and methodologies regarding communicative interactions. “Each issue reaches thousands of designers, managers, researchers, and product specialists who wield great influence within their own companies and institutions and throughout the computing industries.”3

Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).

Peer reviewed? No. Submissions to Interactions are reviewed by an internal review board, and then may be returned for edits and changes before final acceptance.4

Type: Information professional and interface design trade magazine.5

Medium: Electronic and print.6

Content: Practical essays on design, computing, research methods, best practices, etc. as they relate to technology, and more importantly, the interaction between people and technology. “Interactions has a special voice that lies between practice and research with an emphasis on making engaging human-computer interaction research accessible to practitioners and on making practitioners voices heard by researchers.”7

Frequency of publication: Six times a year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:

Interactions guidelines: http://interactions.acm.org/submissions

ACM guidelines: http://www.acm.org/publications/authors/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: From the site:

“Word document (minimally formatted text and graphics) that includes a short, crisp working title or headline, and a standard byline: author name, affiliation, email address.”9

“All articles should contain no more than six endnotes/references.”10

“Brief author biography (50-word maximum) for each author listed in the byline. A bio generally includes the author’s current affiliation and his/her research interests.”11

The submission page also states specific formatting guidelines for images, and asks that writers have permission to use any third-party material in their submission.12

Submission and review process: From the website: “Articles go through several rounds of editing: first with the magazines editors-in-chief and forum editors for relevance, clarity, and groundedness and then with ACM’s managing editor and copy editor for grammar, punctuation, and length. ACM staff will send authors the copyedited version for their review. Once they have approved the copyedited version, authors will not review the copy again. Authors may be asked to review any redrawn figures.”13

Editorial tone: The publication’s tone is direct, inclusive, and conversational. Authors should avoid jargon, academic language, and references.14

Style guide used: The ACM uses a citation style that is detailed here: https://www.acm.org/publications/authors/reference-formatting

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Interactions has great potential for LIS professionals. Looking through the archives, one can see such essay topics as “Bridging the gap between accessibility and usability,” “Digital government information services: the Bureau of Labor statistics case,” “Web 2.0 and beyond,” and “Designing useful and usable questionnaires: you can’t just ‘throw a questionnaire together’.” While the magazine is not specific to librarians and does seem to focus on user interface design, its primary stated theme is the interaction of humans and technology. LIS professionals, whether they are reference librarians, information architects, or database administrators, all have direct experience and knowledge in this subject that can inspire meaningful written work.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No numbers given. According to the section “For Advertisers”: “Each issue reaches thousands of designers, managers, researchers, and product specialists who wield great influence within their own companies and institutions and throughout the computing industries.”16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International. The members of the Interactions advisory and editorial boards are located throughout the United States and as far as Korea.17 English is the dominant language of Interactions, but because it is both print and electronic the readership is dispersed geographically. As such, area-specific language should be avoided — especially since the specific focus of Interactions is the practices that increase better communication.18

Reader characteristics: Judging from the articles in Interactions archives, the average reader is most likely a professional working in field that utilizes technology as an interface with other patrons, clients, and customers. A quote from the history page and attributed to John Rheinfrank and Bill Hefley states that, “Today a widely distributed diverse community of working professionals is inventing a reality where the use of computing resources will have a profound impact on the quality of everyday life. And so we are practicing in a field where the gradient of change is staggering, the boundaries fuzzy, and the component parts only loosely aggregated.”19 This description very much includes LIS professionals, and as such the language used can be technical, but should not be library-specific.

Judging from the portions of the articles available without a subscription, and correlating this to the magazine’s readership, potential authors can be assured of at least one thing regarding their readership: an interest in innovative ideas relating to the intersections of culture, technology, and interaction. The magazine is certainly not just for LIS professionals, but if a librarian had a piece that was fresh, innovative, and surprising, the piece could easily find a home in Interactions.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The average reader will probably not have both a clear and broad knowledge of LIS subject matter; however, the average reader will probably have a very good understanding of human/technology interactions (user interfaces, information architecture, web 2.0, content management systems). Thus, those LIS professionals interested in writing about this aspect of the profession should have a easy time understanding for whom they are writing.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

After perusing the site, I can easily imagine both upper level managers in software companies looking for potential market edges and 30-something punk-rock designers interested in community development and technology reading this magazine. The two most important elements for potential writers to keep in mind are to display some degree of “lateral thinking” and/or to write on unique and, above all, useful perspectives regarding interaction and technology; these could be reports, analyses, experiments, or original research.

Interactions is a multidisciplinary magazine that overlaps with many topics in which many librarians are interested. Some technical jargon is to be expected, and readers will be well acquainted with terms relating to user-interfaces, web design and aesthetics. Because this publication is published by the Association for Computing Machinery, terminology relating to computers and software is likely to be well understood by the journal’s readership.

Authors should not, however, assume that any piece they have written relating to computers or interfaces will be appropriate for the journal. Interactions is very specifically interested in communication and technology.22 Thus a piece written on the research and production of a clever piece of code would not be appropriate to the journal. A piece talking about how some clever coding affected users’ interactivity with the interface or each other would be, however, perfect.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Association for Computing Memory, “Interactions,” accessed February 16, 2019, https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3190768&dl=ACM&coll=DL
  2. Association for Computing Machinery, “About ACM Interactions,” accessed February 16, 2019,  http://interactions.acm.org/about
  3. Association for Computing Machinery, “For Advertisers,” accessed February 16, 2019, http://interactions.acm.org/for-advertisers
  4. Association for Computing Machinery, “Submissions,” accessed February 16, 2019, http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  5. Association for Computing Machinery, “About ACM Interactions.”
  6. ProQuest, “Interactions (New York),” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412282554209/237122
  7. Association for Computing Machinery, “About ACM Interactions.”
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Association for Computing Machinery, “Submissions.”
  10. Association for Computing Machinery, “Submissions.”
  11. Association for Computing Machinery, “Submissions.”
  12. Association for Computing Machinery, “Submissions.”
  13. Association for Computing Machinery, “Submissions.”
  14. Association for Computing Machinery, “Submissions.”
  15. Association for Computing Machinery, “Archives,” accessed February 16, 2019, http://interactions.acm.org/archive
  16. Association for Computing Machinery, “For Advertisers.”
  17. Association for Computing Machinery, “About ACM Interactions.”
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. Association for Computing Machinery, “Archives.”
  20. Association for Computing Machinery, “Archives.”
  21. Association for Computing Machinery, “About ACM Interactions.”
  22. Association for Computing Machinery, “About ACM Interactions.”
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