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Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

ISSN: 2475-0158 (Print) 2475-0166 (Online)1

Website: https://www.alia.org.au/jalia

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is the flagship journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA).”2. “The Journal aims to stimulate discussion and inform practice by showcasing original peer reviewed research articles and other scholarly papers about, or relevant to, the Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions.”3

Target audience: “It is a quarterly publication for information science researchers, information professionals, related disciplines and industries.”4

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis5

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All Research and Research-in-Practice articles in JALIA have undergone double-blind peer review. Information-in-practice papers will undergo editorial screening.”6

Type: LIS scholarly journal

Medium: Print and Online7

Content: According to their website, this journal publishes, research papers; research-in-practice papers; information-in-practice papers; and book reviews.8 Research papers and book reviews make up the majority of the publication. Book reviews are accepted for any library related topic or resource and can range from personal digital archiving, marketing, genealogy, youth resources, and much more. If it is a topic a librarian might find useful, it has a chance of being published here. Research-in-practice and information-in-practice papers appear to be research papers that focus on practical applications. Examples can be seen by viewing the journal’s table of contents.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj21&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: “This journal accepts the following article types: Research papers; Research-in-practice papers; Information-in-practice papers; Book reviews.”10

Submission and review process: “Please ensure your manuscript is anonymised for peer review. A minimum of two files should be prepared for submission: 1) Title page (including title, author names and details, acknowledgements as well as funding and grant-awarding bodies) 2) Manuscript – anonymised (including title, abstract and keywords on first page; main text; references; appendices (as appropriate); table(s) with caption(s) (on individual pages); figure caption(s) (as a list). If you are including tables and/or figures in your manuscript, please submit these as additional files headed ‘Tables’ or ‘Figures’. Please include a word count for your paper. A typical peer reviewed research paper for this journal should be more than 5000 and no more than 8000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical peer reviewed research-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2500 and no more than 5000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical information-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2000 and no more than 2500 words; this limit does not include tables, references, footnotes, figure captions, endnotes. For other types of submissions, please contact the editors.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly

Style guide used: “Please refer to these quick style guidelines when preparing your paper, rather than any published articles or a sample copy. Please use British (-ise) spelling style consistently throughout your manuscript. Please use single quotation marks, except where ‘a quotation is “within” a quotation’. Please note that long quotations should be indented without quotation marks.”12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association offers a variety of publishing opportunities for LIS authors. Whether it’s original research, advancements in professional practice, or book reviews, there are many different writing avenues to explore. As this journal focuses on Australian library and information research, potential authors should tailor their writing to this geographical area and take care to submit works that will be relevant to Australia and Southern Asia Pacific regions. That said, this journal also invites contributions from around the world. For the North American LIS researcher and author, this journal provides an opportunity to showcase original research to a global community. Additionally, this publication also publishes a wealth of book reviews.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not readily available for this journal. However, as the flagship publication for the ALIA, the journal is available to 5000 institutional members of the professional organization and therefore should be assumed has a wide audience.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A majority of readership will be information professionals from Australia, however, “ALIA welcomes anyone with an interest in libraries and information management,”14 so readership is likely diverse both in profession and location. This publication prints in English and requests British English style spellings be used.15

Reader characteristics: Readers of this publication will have a strong interests in library and information science research and many will be ALIA members. They are an educated and diverse group interested in staying on top of the latest research and resources for LIS fields.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although some readers may not be information science professionals, the majority work in LIS fields and would therefore be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is an internationally recognized publication that holds high standards for its published works. This journal reaches a wide audience of library and information professionals who are interested in current research in the field as well as relevant issues in their workplaces. Focus on LIS topics relevant to Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions will be prevalent but there is also opportunity for broader library science articles as well as reviews of a variety of LIS related books/resources.

Last updated: October 4, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  2. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  3. Journals
  4. Journals
  5. Journals
  6. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  7. Journals
  8. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  9. Journals
  10.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  11.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  12.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  13. “About ALIA,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 4, 2018  https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia
  14.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  15.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
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Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
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Online Learning Journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Learning

ISSN: 2472-5730 (online) – 2472-5749 (print)

Website: http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/journals/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Online Learning Consortium is a community of higher education leaders seeking to improve and advance the quality of digital and online teaching.1

Formerly the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, the goal of Online Learning is to “promote the development and dissemination of new knowledge at the intersection of pedagogy, emerging technology, policy and practice in online environments.”2

Target audience: “Scholars, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers in online education.”3

Publisher: Online Learning Consortium.

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a traditional double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Both online and in print.5

Content: Online Learning is looking for papers that “investigate how online environments amplify, shape, and contain teaching and learning.”6

They also welcome submissions on the following topics:

  • “online interaction
  • collaboration
  • individualized instruction
  • multimedia
  • adaptive environments
  • blended learning
  • issues of learning at scale (in both MOOCs and “traditional” online learning environments)
  • emerging technologies
  • analysis of large data sets in understanding online educational processes
  • effective approaches and interventions that promote online student engagement, persistence and improvement”7

Frequency of publication: “Online Learning is published 4 times a year, and entire issues are published from time-to-time around a single topic or disciplinary areas. Calls for papers for special issues include specific due dates, but general submissions are accepted year-round.”8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/guide-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: 6,000 to 8,000 word papers.9

“Papers building on and/or developing theory and supported by rigorous methods are the norm. Occasionally, papers reviewing broad areas are published, including critical reviews of thematic areas.”10

Submission and review process: Email the journal’s managing editor for more information: sturdy.knight@onlinelearning-c.org. Papers are submitted via the Open Journal System on the Submit a Paper page.

The acceptance rate for papers is 25%.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: APA Style 6th Edition Style except where otherwise indicated.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The OLJ is not limited to the LIS field, but covers online learning across all academic subjects. This gives authors room to work outside of the realm of librarianship. OLJ could be a fitting journal for authors who have done extensive research on a topic, considering the standards that the journal upholds. Be sure to keep an eye out for calls for articles to be published in special, single topic journal issues.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: OLJ can be found in the following databases: EBSCO, ERIC, H.W. Wilson Company, Cabell Publishing Inc., ERA Online, Ulrichs Web, Index Copernicus. The Online Learning Consortium is also a supporter of the Directory of Open Access Journals.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Worldwide, but focused in the U.S.

Reader characteristics: Readers come from many different backgrounds, with a common interest in the dissemination of new research on online learning. The journal is written for “scholars, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers” so the journal’s audience is well versed in the online learning environment and the literature written about it.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering that OLJ is read by professionals from many different fields, it may be best to leave out LIS-specific jargon. Readers are interested in new knowledge and well researched topics, therefore in depth, scholarly articles may be best received.

Last updated: April 5, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed April 2, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/about/
  2. “Journals,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/journals/
  3. “Journals.”
  4. “Journals.”
  5. “Journals.”
  6. “Journals.”
  7. “Journals.”
  8. “Journals.”
  9. “Guide for Authors,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed April 2, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/guide-authors/
  10. “Journals.”
  11. “Journals.”
  12. “Guide for Authors.”
  13. “Journals.”
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Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

ISSN: 1944-9682

Website: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ULJ “addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.” The journal was formerly titled Urban Academic Librarian.1

Target audience: ULJ’s audience includes librarians, LIS students, and other professionals working in urban libraries, those serving diverse and urban populations, and those interested in these and related fields.

Publisher: ULJ is published by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY)2 and is sponsored by the Office of Library Services at CUNY Central.3 The journal is hosted by CUNY Academic Works.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: ULJ publishes research, theory, and practice articles addressing “all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.”7 The journal has a regular book review section. Furthermore, the journal publishes Selected Proceedings from the 2017 LACUNY Institute, which regularly appear in one issue of each volume.8

Frequency of publication: ULJ “is published online on a rolling basis, and will be collected into issues twice per year.” 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: ULJ “welcomes articles dealing with academic, research, public, school, and special libraries in an urban setting”10 The journal’s scope is broad, as it invites manuscripts on “areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources.” Further, the editors invite recommendations for columns or special issues.11 The website lists the most popular articles, according to full-text download statistics.12

Submission and review process: ULJ accepts submissions via the journal’s website.13 Authors can submit manuscripts at any time. Manuscripts that the editors determine to be in the journal’s scope are sent to at least two reviewers for double-blind peer review, and authors receive reviewers’ comments. The editors strive to make decisions on manuscripts, including peer review, within sixty days of receipt.

Editorial tone: Articles exhibit a formal, academic style.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ULJ is a long-established leading journal, and its peer-review process, emphasis on research, and scholarly tone make it a viable option for LIS professionals and scholars with experience in urban libraries or whose research focuses on theories and practices in urban and diverse settings. It may not be suitable for beginning or student authors, but those with workable ideas should not be discouraged from submitting.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available for ULJ. LACUNY, the journal’s publisher, has about 150 members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LACUNY members are City University of New York faculty and staff, as well as library employees from affiliated institutions.16 ULJ editorial board members are mostly from CUNY campuses. However, the journal’s reach and relevance are broad because it is an open-access journal and its articles are of interest to LIS professionals throughout the United States and in other countries. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Overall, readers have master’s degrees in educational technology, computer science, and library science, and are associated with urban academic libraries. The journal is also relevant to librarians, library staff members, and other LIS professionals in a variety of libraries in urban settings or with diverse populations. Academic librarians and practitioners in other types of libraries, including school, public, and special, contribute to the journal, showing that the interest in urban libraries is emphasized more than the library type.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will possess considerable knowledge about LIS topics and subjects, with many readers knowledgeable about the inner workings of academic libraries. However, specialized jargon should be avoided or explained, in order to appeal to a wide range of librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

ULJ is a scholarly journal that publishes theoretical, practical, and heavily researched articles. Readers are from academic, public, school, and special libraries serving urban and diverse populations. Topics including services to immigrants, services to students, affordability and open educational resources, libraries as community spaces, advocacy, and the urban library setting are all suitable.

Last updated: March 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About This Journal,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/about.html.
  2. “Publications,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Publications.
  3. “About This Journal.”
  4. CUNY Academic Works, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/.
  5. “About This Journal.”
  6. “About This Journal.”
  7. “About This Journal.”
  8. For example, Urban Library Journal 23, no. 2 (2017), https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/vol23/iss2/.
  9. “About This Journal.”
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html.
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Most Popular Papers,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/topdownloads.html.
  13. “Submit Article,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=https%3A%2F%2Facademicworks.cuny.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dulj&context=ulj.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Paid Members,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Paid-Members.
  16. “Join Us,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Membership.
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Technical Services Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Technical Services Quarterly

ISSN: 0731-7131 (print), 1555-3337 (online)

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wtsq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Technical Services Quarterly is “dedicated to providing a forum for the presentation of current developments and future trends concerning the technical operations of libraries and information centers.” Its purpose is to keep readers informed of developments and research and “practical implementation of systems and applications of traditional and non-traditional technical services and the public operations they influence and sustain.”1

Target audience: LIS professionals, particularly those who are involved with the technical operations of libraries and information centers.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.2

Peer reviewed? Yes.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content: Technical Services Quarterly publishes original articles on research, theory, and implementation of all aspects of technical services in library and information centers. Regular columns include Technical Services Report, Tech Services on the Web, Reviews (of software and books), and Trending Tech Services.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: Technical Services Quarterly “accepts original research, theoretical, and implementation articles pertaining to technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies, cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management.”7 The journal advises authors to include a literature review and provides a link to guidelines.8

Submission and review process: Technical Services Quarterly uses Routledge’s Submission Portal to manage manuscripts. Manuscripts “undergo editorial screening and peer review by anonymous reviewers.”9 Taylor & Francis provides an Author Services website that gives a helpful overview of the publishing process.10

Editorial tone: This is a scholarly journal dealing with technical aspects of LIS geared toward professional technical operations of a library. As such, articles are technical and scholarly in tone. LIS-specific terms are used with the underlying assumption that the reader is familiar with them. While the language and tone are technical and scholarly, articles must also be interesting and readable.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Technical Services Quarterly is geared towards LIS professionals, especially those whose interests lie in the technical operations of libraries. For authors and researchers whose manuscripts are geared toward current and future trends in collection methods, technical services, OCLC, metadata, document delivery, among other subjects, this journal is ideal for submission. Articles have addressed interlibrary loan, ebook cataloging and management, low-cost textbooks, and technology-specific studies and reviews; there is a wide variety of librarian roles represented.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a print and online journal published in the United States. Although it does have appeal for international librarians due to its technical nature, Technical Services Quarterly is geared toward American libraries and uses American English. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.12

Reader characteristics: This journal is geared toward LIS professionals in the technical field who are interested in the latest trends.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are most likely to be LIS professionals and, given the technical nature of this journal, will be highly knowledgeable of LIS terminology and practice.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Technical Services Quarterly are LIS professionals who are highly interested in the latest technical information and research. Readers are interested in cutting-edge technology and how it is being implemented in libraries and information centers. Writers who follow trends and understand how the technology of libraries is evolving would be the best bet for this journal.

Last updated: March 21, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Instructions for Authors,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions.
  4. “Journal Information,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wtsq20.
  5. “Aims and Scope.”
  6. “Journal Information.”
  7. “Aims and Scope.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors.”
  10. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed March 21, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  11. “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. “Editorial Board,” Technical Services Quarterly, accessed March 21, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wtsq20.
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Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

ISSN: 2333-3316

Websitehttps://www.weaveux.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weave is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.”1

From it’s editorial philosophy, “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students, library User Experience professionals.

Publisher: Michigan Publishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a double-blind review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Weave UX consists of full length, scholarly articles and The Dialog Box, featuring book and media reviews.6

Frequency of publication: Issues are published twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Manuscript submission guidelines can be found in a Google Doc linked on the submissions page.

Types of contributions accepted: Weave is looking for two types of submissions:

  • Full length, scholarly articles of relevance to UX in libraries
  • The Dialog Box, a new kind of review section aiming to “extend beyond traditional book review sections and feature critical dialog not only with books but with other media that set the boundaries of UX”8

Submission and review process: Before writing an article, Weave asks that you send a short pitch about your topic, they can then help develop it into an article. If you already have something written, send them a few sentences about your article and they’ll take it from there.9

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: APA is used for in-text citations and works cited pages, and the Chicago Manual of Style is used for spelling, grammar, punctuation and all other style concerns.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Weave has a “come one, come all” approach regarding librarians and professionals who are passionate about UX. Whether you have ideas you want to explore or you have already composed a full-fledged article, Weave is an excellent place to start if you are writing about user experience in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: All editors are based in the United States and the journal is hosted by Michigan Publishing. However, this quote pulled from the Editorial Philosophy shows that the journal is not limited to only U.S.-based librarians: “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries (wherever they are, whatever their job title is) can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Weave’s audience and authors are not limited to just the United States, they have published articles from Canadian, Swedish and Australian writers.12

Reader characteristics: According to their Editorial Philosophy, “Weave’s intended primary audience consists of people in libraries who are using or are interesting in using UX.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Readers are already familiar with UX in libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Weave articles are obviously passionate about libraries and user experience in libraries. The latest issues of Weave have featured articles such as “A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility,” “How Much Research is Enough?” as well as a book review, demonstrating that Weave’s readers are interested in a broad array of topics related to User Experience.14

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Home,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/
  2. “Editorial Philosophy,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/about.html#philosophy
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Editorial Philosophy”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Weave Submissions,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  7. “Archive,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://quod.lib.umich.edu/w/weave/12535642.*
  8. “Weave Submissions”
  9. “Weave Submissions.”
  10. Submission Guidelines for Manuscript drafts,” Weave, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  11. “About.”
  12. “Archive.”
  13. “Editorial Philosophy.”
  14. “Archive.”
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Library Trends

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Trends

ISSN: 0024-2594 (Print) and 1559-0682 (Online)1

Website: http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library_trends/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “Library Trends is an essential tool for professional librarians and educators alike. Every issue explores critical trends in professional librarianship, and includes practical applications, thorough analyses, and literature reviews.”2

Target audience: College and research libraries, public libraries, library systems and networks, special libraries, and international college and research libraries.3

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly; provides resources for the professional development of librarians and educators, with its research-oriented analysis of current library trends, literature reviews, and coverage of practical applications.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Articles on library trends, practical applications, special libraries, emerging technologies, and more.8 Recent article topics include empowerment as it pertains to connectivity (specifically, Native Americans affiliated with Standing Rock, as well as parents living in rural parts of the Congo), informed asset-based pedagogy, and LIS services through WeChat in Chinese university libraries.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library_trends/guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Library Trends does not accept single-article submissions; rather, each issue covers a specific topic, and manuscript submissions are invited and organized by guest editor(s). “Articles published in Library Trends are typically in the range of 4,000-10,000 words, not including references and supplementary material. Longer or shorter submissions can be accommodated, but this is dependent on the significance of the content and subject to consultations with the guest and general editors.”11

Submission and review process: “Articles must be submitted in Microsoft Word, typically via e-mail or an electronic file sharing service, to the guest editor, who will then shepherd it through for review.”12

Editorial tone: “The style and tone of the journal is formal rather than journalistic or popular.”13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Trends is an excellent choice for LIS authors who work well with specific writing prompts. “A guest editor proposes the theme and scope of a new issue, draws up a list of prospective authors and article topics, calls for submissions to the issue, arranges for review of the manuscripts, provides short annotations of each article’s scope, and prepares a statement of philosophy guiding issue development.”15 Working closely with a guest editor in such a structured manner allows LIS authors to hone desirable skills such as discipline and teamwork. It also provides valuable networking opportunities. All in all, this journal is a prestigious choice for both new and seasoned LIS authors.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Print circulation: 459.”16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the U.S.17, so it’s safe to say that a substantial portion of its readers live in the U.S. However, as mentioned above, many articles cover issues pertaining to libraries around the world, so authors should limit colloquialisms, specific cultural references, etc. to ensure their pieces appeal to readers worldwide.

Reader characteristics: No readership information is provided, although the journal allows advertisers to rent lists of subscribers who belong to a variety of scholarly associations, including the American Studies Association (ASA).18 Most readers will be interested in scholarly topics and will likely have advanced degrees. The publication notes, “Issue topics for Library Trends are developed in many ways. We value recommendations from professional librarians, archivists, and other information personnel, from members of the faculties of schools of library and information science, and from others whose concern is with issues of the management of cultural heritage,”19 suggesting that many readers value the preservation of cultural heritage as it pertains to libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to have a solid understanding of LIS issues and terminology pertaining to public libraries, international libraries, research libraries, special libraries, etc.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers expect authors to provide well-researched articles on new and emerging LIS trends.21Additionally, readers will expect a thoughtful analysis of the theme in question (e.g., empowerment for the volume 66, no. 2 issue).22 Finally, due to the journal’s international focus, readers will expect authors to be well-informed on the ways specific cultures and LIS trends intersect.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Library Trends, Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends
  2.  Library Trends, Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends
  3. “Advertising Info,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/advertising-info
  4.  Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  5.  Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  6. Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  7.  Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  8.  Library Trends, Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends
  9. Antony Bryant, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Trends 66, no. 2 (2017).
  10. Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  11. “Author Instructions,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/author-instructions
  12.  “Author Instructions,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/author-instructions
  13. “Guest Editing an Issue,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/guest-editing-issue
  14.  “Author Instructions,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/author-instructions
  15. “Guest Editing an Issue,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/guest-editing-issue
  16. “Advertising Info,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/advertising-info
  17. Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  18. “Mailing List Rental,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 12, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/advertising-mail-lists/mailing-list-rental
  19.  “Guest Editing an Issue,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/guest-editing-issue
  20. “Advertising Info,” Johns Hopkins University Press, accessed March 11, 2018, https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/advertising-info
  21. Library Trends, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520795935546/48848
  22. Antony Bryant, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Trends 66, no. 2 (2017).
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School Library Research (SLR)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Research (SLR)

ISSN: 2165-1019

Website: http://www.ala.org/aasl/slr

Purpose, objective, or mission: School Library Research (SLR) is the research journal of the American Association of School Librarians, which is a division of the American Library Association. The purpose of the journal “is to promote and publish high quality original research concerning the management, implementation, and evaluation of school library programs.” The journal also emphasizes “research on instructional theory, teaching methods, and critical issues relevant to school libraries and school librarians.” SLR succeeds School Library Media Research and School Library Media Quarterly Online.1

Target audience: SLR’s target audience is “academic scholars, school librarians, instructional specialists and other educators who strive to provide a constructive learning environment for all students and teachers.”2

Publisher: American Library Association.

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.4

Content: SLR publishes original research reports, conceptual essays, and literature review and proposal papers.5 The journal also distributes “major research findings worldwide through both electronic publication and linkages to substantive documents on the Internet.”6

Frequency of publication: Each volume is published annually, but articles are added to the electronic journal after peer review and acceptance by the editorial board.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submit a Manuscript.

Types of contributions accepted: SLR accepts high-quality, original research on the the management, implementation, and evaluation of school library programs and on instructional theory, teaching methods, and critical issues relevant to school libraries and librarians. “Manuscripts may be based on original research, an innovative conceptual framework, or a substantial literature review that opens new areas of inquiry and investigation.”8

Submission and review process: Manuscripts, preferably in Microsoft Word, can be submitted via an online submission form or by email to the editors. Manuscripts undergo double-blind review, which usually takes eight to twelve weeks. If a manuscript is not accepted, the editor may forward reviewers’ recommendations to the author, and the manuscript can be revised and reviewed until accepted. Manuscripts are placed online only after full board review and majority acceptance; they remain open to critical review by readers.9

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly and academic. The work submitted must follow all guidelines and present original scholarly material that adds something new to the field; published manuscripts must meet “the extensive review criteria.”10

Style guide used: €Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) and an additional journal-specific guide.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a high-profile, standard-setting research journal. SLR is appropriate for LIS authors who have experience in conducting original school library research and in writing articles that following standard research reporting guidelines: discussion of research questions, application of appropriate research methodology, review of and reference to relevant literature, and clear conclusions. Conceptual essays and literature review and proposal papers must follow the journal’s structural guidelines as well. LIS authors should carefully read the journal’s submission guidelines and see the Definitions of Acceptable Manuscript Content section for particulars.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  SLR is a U.S.-based journal written in English. The journal is a publication of the American Association of School Librarians, so readers are concerned with issues related to school libraries in America, but they are aware of and seek out more global perspectives on these issues. SLR is an open-access journal, so it does have an international reach.

Reader characteristics: The journal reaches a broad range of readers: school librarians in a variety of K-12 settings, LIS graduate students, academic scholars and researchers, and other educators. Readers will share a belief in the importance of high-quality services for students in K-12 schools and a desire “provide a constructive learning environment for all students and teachers.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is likely that readers have a strong understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will expect articles, especially original research, that inform their own practices in school libraries and that will further their understanding of the present and future of school librarianship. They will also look to the journal for interpretations of policies, guidelines, and best practices published by the American Association of School Librarians and to keep up to date on the association’s standards and recommendations.14

Last updated: March 9, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. Homepage, School Library Research, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.ala.org/aasl/pubs/slr.
  2. Homepage.
  3.  “School Library Research (SLR) Submission Guide,” School Library Research, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/SLR%20Submission%20Guide_UPDATE.pdf.
  4. “Publications & Journals,” American Association of School Librarians, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.ala.org/aasl/pubs.
  5. School Library Research (SLR) Submission Guide.”
  6. Homepage.
  7. School Library Research (SLR) Submission Guide.”
  8.  “School Library Research (SLR) Submission Guide.”
  9.  “School Library Research (SLR) Submission Guide.”
  10.  “School Library Research (SLR) Submission Guide.”
  11.  “School Library Research (SLR) Submission Guide.”
  12.  “School Library Research (SLR) Submission Guide.”
  13. “Homepage.”
  14. See, for example, “School Library Research (SLR) Editor’s Choice,” School Library Research, accessed March 9, 2018, http://www.ala.org/aasl/pubs/slr/editors.
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Reference Services Review (RSR)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Reference Services Review: Reference and Instructional Services for Libraries in the Digital Age (RSR)

ISSN: 0090-7324

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=RSR

Purpose, objective, or mission: Reference Services Review (RSR) “is a leading journal dedicated to the enrichment and advancement of reference knowledge and the improvement of professional practice.” Further, the journal “raises questions, explores new frameworks for user services, advances fresh analyses and research and proposes solutions to diverse operational issues facing librarians and information professionals.”1

Target audience: Librarians, information professionals, and LIS students, especially those interested in reference, instruction, and public services.

Publisher: Emerald Publishing.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: RSR articles “draw upon traditional areas of inquiry within the fields of information studies and education, as well as from newer interdisciplinary perspectives such as critical pedagogy” and relate to “all aspects of reference and library user services in a digital age.”4 RSR regularly publishes special issues, such as 2017’s two-part Transfer Students and Students in Transition.5

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted:  RSR publishes research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews. The author guidelines provide a description of each article type in the Article Classification section.6 Topics are wide ranging, including user research, instruction, digital services and software, assessment, management, and any topic relevant to improving and innovating reference services.

Submission and review process: Articles are submitted to RSR using ScholarOne Manuscripts. The editor reviews the manuscripts and sends those that are appropriate for the journal to at least one independent referee for double-blind peer review.7  Reviewers are “distinguished practitioners, managers, administrators, educators, and scholars from library and information studies and higher education, as well as other fields.”8 Additional manuscript requirements and a production cycle with approximate dates and deadlines for the current volume are available on the Author Guidelines page.9

Editorial tone: Professional and academic.

Style guide used: Harvard style in-text citations and reference list. Examples are provided in the Author Guidelines.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

RSR is a strong choice for librarians and information professionals looking to publish scholarship and research on topics relating to reference and readers’ advisory, instruction, information literacy, and public services. It is interdisciplinary in nature, so LIS authors who write from other disciplines or perspectives (for example, critical pedagogy) will find an outlet here. Furthermore, RSR is a leading journal that “provides a quick and efficient service to first-time authors.”11

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: RSR “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: RSR is a North American English-language journal. It is widely abstracted and indexed.13 The editorial board consists of LIS professionals from North America, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Canada, so although the articles have an overall North American focus, the reach of the journal is international.

Reader characteristics: Readers include LIS practitioners, managers, administrators, educators, scholars, and students, with a wide range of professional interests in the area of reference services. RSR “is valued reading by the majority of North American library schools with its ‘au courant’ focus.”14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a high familiarity with terminology, trends, and best practices relating to reference services; they will also be LIS graduate students familiar with but learning about these topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

A typical reader of this journal will be an LIS professional or graduate student looking for innovative approaches and thoughtful analysis that is written in an accessible style.

Last updated: March 6, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Aims & Scope,” Reference Services Review, accessed March 6, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=RSR.
  2. “Aims & Scope.”
  3.  “Author Guidelines,” Reference Services Review, accessed March 6, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=rsr.
  4. “Aims & Scope.”
  5. See Reference Services Review 45, no. 2 (2017), http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/rsr/45/2,  and 45, no. 3 (2017), http://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/rsr/45/3.
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Aims & Scope.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Author Guidelines.”
  11. “Aims & Scope.”
  12. “Aims & Scope.”
  13. “Aims & Scope.”
  14. “Aims & Scope.”
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