Wiki Tags Archives: Instruction

School Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Journal (SLJ)

ISSN: 0362-89301

Website: https://www.slj.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “School Library Journal is the premiere publication for librarians and information specialists who work with children and teens. A source of quality journalism and reviews for more than 60 years, SLJ produces award-winning features and news coverage on: literacy, best practices, technology, education policy and other issues of interest to the school library and greater educator community.”2

Target audience: Any librarians and information professionals working with children and teens, including librarians in K-12 schools as well as those in public libraries.3

Publisher: Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Professional.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Claims to be one of the most authoritative reviewers of children’s and young adult materials. It mainly focuses on books, but also includes reviews on audio and video items. The journal also contains columns, news, and feature articles.8

Frequency of publication: Monthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.slj.com/?page=Submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Items of interest to librarians and educators who work with children: feature articles, news articles, and specialty columns.10 Articles from the last few years include topics such as rural public libraries, fundraising, app reviews, bloggers, LGBTQ+ Pride, diversity, and tips for school librarians preparing for the first day of school.11

Submission and review process: Send brief article proposals to the appropriate editor before submitting any complete articles. Feature articles are generally less than 2,500 words, while opinion pieces are around 600-700 words. News articles can vary in length, depending on the topic.12

Editorial tone: Informative, but not academic.13

Style guide used: None indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a successful and popular publication that, while encouraging of submissions, may be difficult to break into as a writer. A thorough study of the publication with attention to the authors published in their pages will give a writer a better idea if this is a good match for them.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: School Library Journal has a circulation of 23,000 in the print edition with an estimated reach of 92,000 readers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: There is no specific breakdown on the nationality of the readers available, but the history of the journal reveals that it is entirely geared toward schools in the United States and Canada.15 Most of the readers of this journal would be those who work with youth in libraries in the United States, so there should not be any problems with cultural references, LIS jargon, or terminology particular to education.16

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal would be those who work with K-12 students, either in schools or public libraries. They have a shared interest in promoting literacy and welcome resources that inspire student achievement.17 Articles openly and positively discuss diversity and inclusivity in library services, with article topics ranging from combating systematic racism in schools to selecting LGBTQ+ books for pre-teen collections. More articles and reviews touching on these topics would be welcome.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this journal would not be limited to those with teaching credentials or MLS degrees. Some may be library media technicians who may not have an advanced degree, but would have enough education or professional training in order to understand the subject matter.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of School Library Journal have a common interest in children’€™s literature and issues regarding school libraries. Many of the readers are library technicians, so some articles are geared toward encouraging collaboration with teachers and librarians. Authors should recognize that there is an education gap as well as a wage gap between the professionals and the paraprofessionals and should refrain from using an excess of technical terms in their articles. Readers of SLJ maintain a great interest in information literacy and how this can be integrated into the curriculum, as well as increasing the technology available to the students. Introducing ideas that are on the cutting edge of technology yet are not restricted by financial or time constraints would be a way of effectively reaching the intended audience.

Last updated: June 26, 2019.


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “School Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399134773/52981
  2. School Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.slj.com/?page=About-Us
  3. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory
  7. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.slj.com/?page=Submissions.
  8. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  11. School Library Journal, “News & Features,” accessed June 29, 2019. https://www.slj.com/?subpage=News%20%26%20Features
  12. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  13. School Library Journal, “School Library Journal content submission guidelines.”
  14. Library Journals, LLC., “Print,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://media.libraryjournal.com/print/#schoollibraryjournalmag.
  15. School Library Journal, “News & Features.”
  16. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  17. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
  18. School Library Journal, “News & Articles.”
  19. School Library Journal, “About Us.”
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Knowledge Quest

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Knowledge Quest

ISSN: 1094-9046 (Print) and 2163-5234 (Online)1

Website: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Knowledge Quest supports the American Association of School Librarians’ mission to empower leaders “to transform teaching and learning.”2 The journal is devoted to offering substantive information to assist building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school libraries and school library services.3

Target audience: “Building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school library programs and services.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: Per their site, “Articles address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.”9 Emerging trends, literacy, co-teaching, leadership, and makerspaces are some encouraged topics.10

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly, September through June.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/ (Scroll down to the link to the PDF Author Guidelines.)

Types of contributions accepted: Knowledge Quest seeks “original, unpublished manuscripts that address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.” The editors are not interested in “basic primers” on the role of school librarians or press releases and vendor news.12 Articles should be 2500 words or less.13

Submission and review process: Articles may be emailed to the editor14 or through an online submission form.15 “Unsolicited manuscripts undergo blind review by the Knowledge Quest editorial advisory board. The process takes approximately 3-4 weeks. When the review is completed, the author will be notified of the outcome.”16

Editorial tone: Professional. Through well-written articles, the journal provides information in a helpful and supportive manner.17

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.).18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although this publication has numerous readers, over half of its readership is comprised of elementary school, middle school, and high school librarians.19 The fact that its content does not apply to all aspects of library science limits the reader base and therefore, the scope of articles covered. Professionals working in school libraries are encouraged to submit their work for review. Knowledge Quest desires to be part of the library community and provide support for members of this community through its articles and reviews. Publishing in this journal represents the authors’ dedication to the school library community.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is distributed to 7,000 members and and additional 150 readers. The online component reports over 1,200 visits per day.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This magazine is a publication of the American Association of School Librarians. The material provided in the magazine is designed to support the curriculum in United States public and private schools. The print version of the magazine can be shipped anywhere, but the typical readers reside and work in the United States. Readers can also access the journal via the online component KQ Web and this website can be accessed world wide over the internet.22 This magazine is presented in English and uses terminology relevant to elementary and secondary school librarians. As a publication of the AASL, the magazine has the same vision statement as the organization. This vision statement highlights the magazine’s and the association’s goal to support and embrace cultural and ethnic diversity.23

Reader characteristics: The readers of the magazine are comprised of professionals and supervisors working in library media centers. Readers can be expected to embrace and be familiar with the ethics and values present in school library programs today. By subscribing to the magazine, readers are demonstrating their stance as advocates of literacy and supporters of intellectual freedom. Media specialists are closely related to teachers as they are active members of the learning community. These individuals are well aware of the resources available to them and are always working towards learning new ways to use these resources in better and more productive ways. Most of the readers work in elementary and secondary school libraries both public and nonpublic schools, and will be interested in issues and programs such as library funding, student achievement, student internet use, literacy, intellectual freedom, and technology that effect or involve the readers. Knowledge Quest is interested in producing a quality publication that presents ideas in a friendly and inclusive manner.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With 87% of readers reporting possession of a Master’s degree, it is probable that many have LIS degrees. Readers can be expected to know about school curriculum and are knowledgeable about the technologies and issues relevant to school media centers today.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since Knowledge Quest is a publication of the AASL, the readers expect that the publication will have the same guidelines and requirements characterized by an AASL publication. The readers expect the magazine to publish works which are balanced, relevant to the field, accurate, and up-to-date on issues pertinent to school libraries. 78% of readers report that Knowledge Quest is “essential professional reading,” so authors should expect to produce content that meets that description. 26

Last updated: June 21, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Knowledge Quest,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 19, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560951075174/52980
  2. American Library Association, “About AASL,” accessed June 19, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/about
  3. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ,” accessed June 19,  2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/about-kq/
  4. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/KQ_mediakit_201920_WEB.pdf
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  10. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  11. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  12. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  13. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines,” accessed June 20, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/Author%20Guidelines%20REVISED.pdf
  14. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  15. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  16. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  17. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  18. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  19. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  20. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  21. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  22. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  23. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  24. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  25. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  26. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
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CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://cclibrarians.org/outlook/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œThe purpose of the Council of Chief Librarians is to represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education; to provide a vehicle for communication, discussion and collaboration among libraries; to provide opportunities for professional development, training and leadership development for library leaders and other librarians; and to support data collection, analysis and dissemination for the purpose of good public policy development.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: News items about events and open positions should be less than 300 words. Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (500-1,500 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.10

Submission and review process: Articles may be submitted through the CCL website. The editorial team will revise for grammar, spelling, formatting, and style.11

Editorial tone: Per the website, “Succinct, inviting and informative style of writing is preferred.” The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.12

Style guide used: There is no style guide listed, but the editorial guidelines state that endnote citations should be in accordance with the current edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of librarians, library managers, and library deans, to whom it is sent electronically.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.15

Reader characteristics: While no information is available concerning their ages, members are all supervising librarians and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.16

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be library leadership, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.19

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. “Home,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/outlook-archive
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Mailing List Information,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/mailing-list-information
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/directory
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory.”
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
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Community & Junior College Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Community & Junior College Libraries

ISSN: 1545-2522[1 ProQuest, “Community & Junior College Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728955023/484756]

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjcl20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Through research and insightful interviews with professionals in the field, Community & Junior College Libraries provides a coherent voice for community college librarians. It addresses the need to define and enhance the leading edge of LRC planning and practice in the United States and abroad. Readers receive information on pertinent topics such as information literacy, collection development, programming initiatives, proven policies, conference reports, and networks and consortia.”1

Target audience: Librarians and educators who deliver information resources to community college students and other lower-division undergraduates.2

Publisher: Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group).3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS professional news publication. Although submissions are peer-reviewed, the content is news oriented rather than research oriented, so the publication isn’t considered scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, “news of special relevant legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges” and also “Book reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, and ongoing columns with specific focus are also included.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (4 issues per volume).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their Instructions for Authors, “Theoretical research and practical studies dealing with the broad general topic of the delivery of information resources to lower division undergraduate students. This unique publication specifically targets issues concerning community college libraries and learning resource centers. Contributors to this fundamental resource present profiles of learning resource centers (LRCs) around the country and address news of special relevance: €”legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges.”9 Topics for submission include information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming or initiatives which involve the library and the academy at large.10

Submission and review process: The journal provides MS Word templates for authors to properly format their submissions. All submissions and reviews are completed and managed through Editorial Manager, which requires authors to create an account.11

Editorial tone: Academic.12

Style guide used: An in-house style guide based on The Chicago Manual of Style. The guide can be found here.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS authors, especially those who work in two-year colleges. Since both theoretical research and practical studies are welcomed on the many topics covered in the journal, LIS authors in any stage of their careers may publish their works on the topics covered in the journal.14

Topics for possible articles include: information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming and initiatives that involve the library and the academy at large.15

The focus on community and junior college libraries creates varied opportunities for LIS authors, as it encourages dialogue regarding the new challenges in the library science field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication focuses primarily on learning resource centers in two-year colleges throughout the United States. The current editor-in-chief is affiliated with the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC.16 The publication is aimed at educated, LIS-focused readers involved in the community colleges of the United States, indicating a familiarity with LIS jargon without any special consideration for language other than the courtesy of avoiding regionalism. Readers are most likely familiar with diverse cultures due to the varied population that often makes up urban community and junior colleges.17

Reader characteristics: No specific information was found on gender and ethnicity for this specialized group of librarians. The workplace similarity is the tie that binds together the professional librarians in libraries and learning resource centers within community junior colleges.18 Safely assume readers have a commitment to accessibility of information and to providing it to the public, given the open admissions policies and low tuition of two-year colleges that help to create a rich diversity of people of all ages, cultural backgrounds, and socioeconomic backgrounds.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The professionals would have working knowledge of most LIS subject matter related to academic and school library settings. Use of jargon and acronyms of associations would be familiar to the reader.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Community & Junior College Libraries has a readership that works with a wide variety of patrons. Each type of patron or student has different reasons for being at the community college. The librarians try to fulfill the information needs of many different kinds of patrons including those with low incomes, those who need adult school, a GED or remedial education. Some students are prepared for college and their transition to four-year institutions. Some students are enrolled in high school but are taking accelerated programs at the college. There are also many certificate programs that prepare students for a specific career. The librarian must meet the information needs of all of these groups. Author’s writing for this publication must take all this in to consideration.21

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjcl20#.VChU1xawS3M
  2. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  3. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions#.VChZShawS3M
  10. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  13. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  14. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  16. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group). 2019. Editorial Board. Community & Junior College Libraries. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjcl20
  17. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  18. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  19. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  20. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  21. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
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Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

ISSN:1911-9593

Website: http://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Partnership is the journal of The Partnership organization, which is “Canada’s national network of provincial and territorial library associations.” The journal “promotes the exchange of ideas about libraries, librarianship, and information science among practitioners across all library sectors.”1

Target audience: Canadian librarians and library workers and LIS professionals, archivists, scholars, researchers, and students. Although the journal is published by The Partnership, a network of Canadian library associations with more than 7,000 people, it is an open-access journal, so its audience is not limited to members.2

Publisher: The Partnership: The Provincial and Territorial Library Associations of Canada (Ontario, Canada).3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts submitted to the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.5

Content: Regular sections in Partnership include Editor’s Comments, Innovations in Practice, Theory and Research, Features, Book Reviews, and News and Announcements.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Partnership accepts “original, unpublished manuscripts in French or English on a broad range of topics relevant to library and information science practitioners in all library sectors.” The editors “encourage submissions which consider the Canadian context, but this is not a necessary condition for acceptance to the journal.”8 Each section has its own editorial guidelines in terms of topic, word count, tone, and approach.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the journal’s website.10 Manuscripts for the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo a double-blind peer-review process, usually within two months of submission.11

Editorial tone: The tone depends on the section; it is overall scholarly but not overly formal.

Style guide used: APA (6th edition), with a modified style for online articles and documents.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This open-access journal appears to be an excellent opportunity for Canadian LIS authors, as it is written for the Canadian LIS community. LIS authors outside of Canada are not excluded by the guidelines, but they should ensure their work meets the needs of the Canadian readers.13 The many sections–theory, pedagogy, practice, professional development, reviews, and library news–cover a huge variety of content and offer writers many opportunities for submitting work that ranges from scholarly to practical to reflective.14  There are a few must-read articles and editorials for authors submitting to Partnership, especially “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership15 and editorials reflecting on the journal’s past and future.16 Furthermore, the journal “provides a chance for librarians and library workers to be editors and reviewers.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to a past announcement, in 2017 the journal received over 45,000 views. They have 1500 readers registered with their website.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  This is a Canadian bilingual publication (English and French) for librarians and information professionals of Canada. Authors would need to ensure their work meets their needs and explains any cultural or language differences.

Reader characteristics: Overall, Partnership has a very broad spectrum of readers in the Canadian library and information professions: librarians, library works, scholars, researchers, practitioners, and students. It can be safely assumed the readers are interested in promoting successful libraries and acquiring knowledge to allow them to succeed in their own work. The authors and content of the publication suggests that the majority of readers are working in all types of libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The journal works to connect members of the Canadian library community,19 and the journal’s sections are variously academic, reflective, and newsy. Readers probably have a range of LIS knowledge, from the practical to the academic.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should first take into consider how their work is broadly or specifically related to libraries and library scholarship in Canada. Furthermore, readers come to this journal to read on a a wide range of current topics in the library profession: research, pedagogy, professional development, and current news and profiles. Readers work at every level of the Canadian library profession and in all types of libraries.

Last updated: April 8, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “What is The Partnership?” ThePartnership.ca, accessed February 19, 2018, http://www.thepartnership.ca/web/PARTNERSHIP/About/PARTNERSHIP/About.aspx?hkey=57981e1d-6cc7-4b09-822e-ebdfd7f2e3b2.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Submissions,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/submissions.
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Information for Authors,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/information/authors#.WouLFRPwZUM.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “Editorial Policies.”
  15. See David Fox, “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership,Partnership 8, no. 1 (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v8i1.2692.
  16. See Robin Bergart, Leanne Olson, and Nathalie Soini, “Editorial: Charting the Course of Partnership,Partnership 12, no. 1 (2017): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v12i1.3976, and Jennifer Richard, “Celebrating 10 Years of Canadian Librarianship through the Partnership Journal,” Partnership 11, no. 1 (2016): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i1.3682.
  17. “Journal History,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/history#.WouedhPwZUM.
  18. “Top Viewed Articles,” Partnership, December 06, 2017, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/announcement/view/128.
  19. “Journal History.”
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Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

ISSN: 2475-0158 (Print) 2475-0166 (Online)1

Website: https://www.alia.org.au/jalia

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is the flagship journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA).”2. “The Journal aims to stimulate discussion and inform practice by showcasing original peer reviewed research articles and other scholarly papers about, or relevant to, the Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions.”3

Target audience: “It is a quarterly publication for information science researchers, information professionals, related disciplines and industries.”4

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis5

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All Research and Research-in-Practice articles in JALIA have undergone double-blind peer review. Information-in-practice papers will undergo editorial screening.”6

Type: LIS scholarly journal

Medium: Print and Online7

Content: According to their website, this journal publishes, research papers; research-in-practice papers; information-in-practice papers; and book reviews.8 Research papers and book reviews make up the majority of the publication. Book reviews are accepted for any library related topic or resource and can range from personal digital archiving, marketing, genealogy, youth resources, and much more. If it is a topic a librarian might find useful, it has a chance of being published here. Research-in-practice and information-in-practice papers appear to be research papers that focus on practical applications. Examples can be seen by viewing the journal’s table of contents.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj21&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: “This journal accepts the following article types: Research papers; Research-in-practice papers; Information-in-practice papers; Book reviews.”10

Submission and review process: “Please ensure your manuscript is anonymised for peer review. A minimum of two files should be prepared for submission: 1) Title page (including title, author names and details, acknowledgements as well as funding and grant-awarding bodies) 2) Manuscript – anonymised (including title, abstract and keywords on first page; main text; references; appendices (as appropriate); table(s) with caption(s) (on individual pages); figure caption(s) (as a list). If you are including tables and/or figures in your manuscript, please submit these as additional files headed ‘Tables’ or ‘Figures’. Please include a word count for your paper. A typical peer reviewed research paper for this journal should be more than 5000 and no more than 8000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical peer reviewed research-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2500 and no more than 5000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical information-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2000 and no more than 2500 words; this limit does not include tables, references, footnotes, figure captions, endnotes. For other types of submissions, please contact the editors.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly

Style guide used: “Please refer to these quick style guidelines when preparing your paper, rather than any published articles or a sample copy. Please use British (-ise) spelling style consistently throughout your manuscript. Please use single quotation marks, except where ‘a quotation is “within” a quotation’. Please note that long quotations should be indented without quotation marks.”12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association offers a variety of publishing opportunities for LIS authors. Whether it’s original research, advancements in professional practice, or book reviews, there are many different writing avenues to explore. As this journal focuses on Australian library and information research, potential authors should tailor their writing to this geographical area and take care to submit works that will be relevant to Australia and Southern Asia Pacific regions. That said, this journal also invites contributions from around the world. For the North American LIS researcher and author, this journal provides an opportunity to showcase original research to a global community. Additionally, this publication also publishes a wealth of book reviews.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not readily available for this journal. However, as the flagship publication for the ALIA, the journal is available to 5000 institutional members of the professional organization and therefore should be assumed has a wide audience.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A majority of readership will be information professionals from Australia, however, “ALIA welcomes anyone with an interest in libraries and information management,”14 so readership is likely diverse both in profession and location. This publication prints in English and requests British English style spellings be used.15

Reader characteristics: Readers of this publication will have a strong interests in library and information science research and many will be ALIA members. They are an educated and diverse group interested in staying on top of the latest research and resources for LIS fields.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although some readers may not be information science professionals, the majority work in LIS fields and would therefore be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is an internationally recognized publication that holds high standards for its published works. This journal reaches a wide audience of library and information professionals who are interested in current research in the field as well as relevant issues in their workplaces. Focus on LIS topics relevant to Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions will be prevalent but there is also opportunity for broader library science articles as well as reviews of a variety of LIS related books/resources.

Last updated: October 4, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  2. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  3. Journals
  4. Journals
  5. Journals
  6. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  7. Journals
  8. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  9. Journals
  10.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  11.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  12.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  13. “About ALIA,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 4, 2018  https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia
  14.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  15.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
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Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
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Online Learning Journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Learning

ISSN: 2472-5730 (online) – 2472-5749 (print)

Website: http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/journals/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Online Learning Consortium is a community of higher education leaders seeking to improve and advance the quality of digital and online teaching.1

Formerly the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, the goal of Online Learning is to “promote the development and dissemination of new knowledge at the intersection of pedagogy, emerging technology, policy and practice in online environments.”2

Target audience: “Scholars, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers in online education.”3

Publisher: Online Learning Consortium.

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a traditional double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Both online and in print.5

Content: Online Learning is looking for papers that “investigate how online environments amplify, shape, and contain teaching and learning.”6

They also welcome submissions on the following topics:

  • “online interaction
  • collaboration
  • individualized instruction
  • multimedia
  • adaptive environments
  • blended learning
  • issues of learning at scale (in both MOOCs and “traditional” online learning environments)
  • emerging technologies
  • analysis of large data sets in understanding online educational processes
  • effective approaches and interventions that promote online student engagement, persistence and improvement”7

Frequency of publication: “Online Learning is published 4 times a year, and entire issues are published from time-to-time around a single topic or disciplinary areas. Calls for papers for special issues include specific due dates, but general submissions are accepted year-round.”8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/guide-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: 6,000 to 8,000 word papers.9

“Papers building on and/or developing theory and supported by rigorous methods are the norm. Occasionally, papers reviewing broad areas are published, including critical reviews of thematic areas.”10

Submission and review process: Email the journal’s managing editor for more information: sturdy.knight@onlinelearning-c.org. Papers are submitted via the Open Journal System on the Submit a Paper page.

The acceptance rate for papers is 25%.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: APA Style 6th Edition Style except where otherwise indicated.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The OLJ is not limited to the LIS field, but covers online learning across all academic subjects. This gives authors room to work outside of the realm of librarianship. OLJ could be a fitting journal for authors who have done extensive research on a topic, considering the standards that the journal upholds. Be sure to keep an eye out for calls for articles to be published in special, single topic journal issues.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: OLJ can be found in the following databases: EBSCO, ERIC, H.W. Wilson Company, Cabell Publishing Inc., ERA Online, Ulrichs Web, Index Copernicus. The Online Learning Consortium is also a supporter of the Directory of Open Access Journals.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Worldwide, but focused in the U.S.

Reader characteristics: Readers come from many different backgrounds, with a common interest in the dissemination of new research on online learning. The journal is written for “scholars, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers” so the journal’s audience is well versed in the online learning environment and the literature written about it.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering that OLJ is read by professionals from many different fields, it may be best to leave out LIS-specific jargon. Readers are interested in new knowledge and well researched topics, therefore in depth, scholarly articles may be best received.

Last updated: April 5, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed April 2, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/about/
  2. “Journals,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/journals/
  3. “Journals.”
  4. “Journals.”
  5. “Journals.”
  6. “Journals.”
  7. “Journals.”
  8. “Journals.”
  9. “Guide for Authors,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed April 2, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/guide-authors/
  10. “Journals.”
  11. “Journals.”
  12. “Guide for Authors.”
  13. “Journals.”
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Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

ISSN: 1944-9682

Website: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ULJ “addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.” The journal was formerly titled Urban Academic Librarian.1

Target audience: ULJ’s audience includes librarians, LIS students, and other professionals working in urban libraries, those serving diverse and urban populations, and those interested in these and related fields.

Publisher: ULJ is published by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY)2 and is sponsored by the Office of Library Services at CUNY Central.3 The journal is hosted by CUNY Academic Works.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: ULJ publishes research, theory, and practice articles addressing “all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.”7 The journal has a regular book review section. Furthermore, the journal publishes Selected Proceedings from the 2017 LACUNY Institute, which regularly appear in one issue of each volume.8

Frequency of publication: ULJ “is published online on a rolling basis, and will be collected into issues twice per year.” 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: ULJ “welcomes articles dealing with academic, research, public, school, and special libraries in an urban setting”10 The journal’s scope is broad, as it invites manuscripts on “areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources.” Further, the editors invite recommendations for columns or special issues.11 The website lists the most popular articles, according to full-text download statistics.12

Submission and review process: ULJ accepts submissions via the journal’s website.13 Authors can submit manuscripts at any time. Manuscripts that the editors determine to be in the journal’s scope are sent to at least two reviewers for double-blind peer review, and authors receive reviewers’ comments. The editors strive to make decisions on manuscripts, including peer review, within sixty days of receipt.

Editorial tone: Articles exhibit a formal, academic style.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ULJ is a long-established leading journal, and its peer-review process, emphasis on research, and scholarly tone make it a viable option for LIS professionals and scholars with experience in urban libraries or whose research focuses on theories and practices in urban and diverse settings. It may not be suitable for beginning or student authors, but those with workable ideas should not be discouraged from submitting.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available for ULJ. LACUNY, the journal’s publisher, has about 150 members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LACUNY members are City University of New York faculty and staff, as well as library employees from affiliated institutions.16 ULJ editorial board members are mostly from CUNY campuses. However, the journal’s reach and relevance are broad because it is an open-access journal and its articles are of interest to LIS professionals throughout the United States and in other countries. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Overall, readers have master’s degrees in educational technology, computer science, and library science, and are associated with urban academic libraries. The journal is also relevant to librarians, library staff members, and other LIS professionals in a variety of libraries in urban settings or with diverse populations. Academic librarians and practitioners in other types of libraries, including school, public, and special, contribute to the journal, showing that the interest in urban libraries is emphasized more than the library type.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will possess considerable knowledge about LIS topics and subjects, with many readers knowledgeable about the inner workings of academic libraries. However, specialized jargon should be avoided or explained, in order to appeal to a wide range of librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

ULJ is a scholarly journal that publishes theoretical, practical, and heavily researched articles. Readers are from academic, public, school, and special libraries serving urban and diverse populations. Topics including services to immigrants, services to students, affordability and open educational resources, libraries as community spaces, advocacy, and the urban library setting are all suitable.

Last updated: March 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About This Journal,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/about.html.
  2. “Publications,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Publications.
  3. “About This Journal.”
  4. CUNY Academic Works, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/.
  5. “About This Journal.”
  6. “About This Journal.”
  7. “About This Journal.”
  8. For example, Urban Library Journal 23, no. 2 (2017), https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/vol23/iss2/.
  9. “About This Journal.”
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html.
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Most Popular Papers,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/topdownloads.html.
  13. “Submit Article,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=https%3A%2F%2Facademicworks.cuny.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dulj&context=ulj.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Paid Members,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Paid-Members.
  16. “Join Us,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Membership.
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