Wiki Tags Archives: History

The University of Chicago Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: The University of Chicago Press Books

Website: http://press.uchicago.edu

Purpose, objective, or mission: Founded in 1890, the mission of the Press is “the obligation to disseminate scholarship of the highest standard and to publish serious works that promote education, foster public understanding, and enrich cultural life.”1

Target audience: Both scholars and casual audiences, in the United States and abroad. 2

Owner: The University of Chicago Press.

Are published books peer reviewed? Unknown, but all book proposals are to be sent to appropriate editors for a lengthy review process. Prospective authors are encouraged to consult William Germano’s book Getting It Published for more information on the publication process.

Types of books published: The Press leans toward being a civilian publication, and their Book Submissions page states that they generally do not publish work outside of their stated subject fields.3

Medium: Print and electronic, released simultaneously.4

Topics covered: Mostly liberal arts and social sciences, though they are well known for The Chicago Manual of Style and writing guides. Consult the list of acquisitions editors for a complete list of accepted book topics.

Number of titles published per year: Unknown, but the Press is a rather large publishing house, with more than 5,000 books currently in print.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/books_submissions.html

Types of submissions accepted: Book proposals only on accepted subjects. The Press has a separate division for journals.

Types of submissions the publisher is not interested in:

  • Unrevised dissertations
  • Festschriften
  • Works of original fiction

Submission and review process: After determining the appropriate editor, send a letter of introduction, curriculum vitae, table of contents and a prospectus.6 Do not send a complete manuscript unless you are asked to do so. After your submission has been received, it may take up to a month to hear back from an editor.7

Editorial tone: Unknown.

Style guide used: Unknown, though keep in mind that the Press publishes The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

The Press publishes across a wide array of subjects, including books about both library science and publishing. Glance over the list of currently published LIS books on their website to get a better sense of what the Press is looking for. Prospective authors penning writing guides, or writing about literary, media, cultural studies or education are encouraged to contact an appropriate editor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: This is a relatively large publishing house, having published more than 11,000 works since its foundation in 1890.8 It’s editors have worked to “build a broad but coherent publishing program engaged with authors and readers around the world.”9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Press publishes books that appeal to a vast, international audience: books about Chicago and surrounding areas, translations of foreign language texts and significant non scholarly works are just a sampling of their publications.10 If published by the Press, their marketing department ensures that publicity and promotions will be conducted in the United States as well as from satellite offices in the United Kingdom, Australia and Japan.11

Reader characteristics: Scholars and casual readers with specific interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A majority of the LIS books published by the Press are historical in nature, including a world history of libraries and account of medieval books of early modern England.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of books published by the Press can generally be considered knowledgeable and, potentially, subject experts. The Press also distributes dozens of other publications from the likes of the American Meteorological Society, Association of University Presses, Amsterdam University Press and many others from all over the world.12 Considering that many of these, like the Press, are affiliated with a university, potential authors may want to keep in mind that the general readership leans in a scholarly direction.

Last updated: February 14, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About,” Press.UChicago.edu, Accessed February 8, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/press/about.html
  2. “About.”
  3. “Book Submissions,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 9, 2019, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoservices/book_submissions.html
  4. “Marketing Information,” Press.UChicago.edu/InfoServices/Auth_Resources, accessed February 9, 2019, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/auth_resources.html
  5. “About.”
  6. “Book Submissions.”
  7. “Submissions FAQ,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 9, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/submissions-faq.html
  8. “About.”
  9. “About.”
  10. “About.”
  11. “Marketing Information for Authors,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 11, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/auth_resources.html
  12. “Major publishers marketed & distributed by the University of Chicago Press,” Press.UChicago.edu, accessed February 14, 2018, http://press.uchicago.edu/books/publishers.html
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Catholic Library World

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Catholic Library World

ISSN: 0008-820X

Website: http://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Catholic Library Association, an international organization established in 1921, seeks to provide professional development, promote Catholic literature and offer spiritual support. They promote the exchange of ideas and provide an inspirational source of guidance on ethical issues related to librarianship.1

Target audience: LIS professionals, both within and outside of the Catholic faith.2

Publisher: Catholic Library Association.

Peer reviewed? Yes, all submissions are subjected to a double-blind review process.3

Type: LIS scholarly.

Medium: Print.

Content: Catholic Library World publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholicism and Catholic Studies. “CLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to, academic, public, theological, parish & church libraries, and school libraries.”4

Frequency of publication: Journals are published in September, December and March.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Links to PDF files containing author guidelines can be found on CLA’s Publications page.

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews (for both children and adult works) and articles on all aspects of librarianship, particularly those that relate to Catholicism and Catholic Studies.6

For a better idea of what CLW publishes, here are two recent articles:

The Bayou Lafourche Oral History Project: Understanding Environmental Change and Religious Identity in Louisiana

Catholic Academic Libraries and Print Promotional Materials

Articles should contribute new findings to the existing literature in the field. The word count should be between 3000 and 5000 words, but may be longer if an editor gives approval.7

Submission and review process: Send manuscripts via email as an attachment including author’s full name, affiliation and email address. Manuscripts should be neither previously published nor published simultaneously elsewhere. Because of the lengthy peer review process, authors will be notified within ninety days of submission whether or not their work was accepted. 8

If published, authors keep copyrights and publication rights for their work.

Editorial tone: Accessible and well documented.9

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors should keep in mind that the Catholic Library Association does not limit their publications to works about Catholicism or Catholic librarianship. Their Publications page states that “CLW respects diverse Christian traditions as well as non-Christian. While it is a Catholic publication, CLW welcomes relevant articles from a variety of religious traditions.”10
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Catholic Library World features a wide readership within and outside of the Catholic Library Association. The journal is “indexed in Book Review, CPLI, Library Literature and Information Science, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Reference Book Review Index, Current Index to Journals in Education (ERIC), Information Science Abstract, and University des sciences humans de Strasbourg (CERDIC.)”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of Catholic Library World’s readers are likely to be American Catholics.

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to be LIS professionals. From their Publications page, “CLW is intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various libraries.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Members of the Catholic Library Association are networkers in the field of library science with a passion for the future of libraries and library trends in the U.S. and abroad.13 Considering that each issue of CLA’s award winning journal features over 100 book and media reviews, readers of Catholic Library World are interested in a wide variety of LIS topics.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Cathla.org, accessed March 6, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/About_Us/Main/About/About_Us.aspx?hkey=1d0656f5-9a4c-4436-a435-6074be93e751
  2. “Publications,” Cathla.org, accessed March 6, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  3. “Author Guidelines,” Cathla.org, accessed March 2, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  4. “Author Guidelines.”
  5. “Author Guidelines.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Publications.”
  11. “Publications.”
  12. “Publications.”
  13. “Become a Member,” Cathla.org, accessed March 13, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member.aspx?hkey=b2bcc799-8b31-4f9e-8629-f408fde31e9d
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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

ISSN: 1931-54731

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.2 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”3

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.4

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.7

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.10

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.11

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members13; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1.  SCA Newsletter, Society of California Archivists (SCA), accessed March 18, 2018, http://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  3.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  4. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  5.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  13. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  14.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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Library & Information History

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library & Information History

ISSN: 1758-3489 (Print) and 1758-3497 (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: To publish articles on “all subjects and all periods relating to the history of libraries and librarianship and to the history of information, in its broadest sense.”2

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/ylbh20

Target audience:Library & Information History is a journal for anyone interested in the social, cultural and intellectual history of libraries and of information.”3

Publisher: Routledge.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Subject matter varies widely and includes topics such as the Nazi looting of European libraries, the history of archiving, how Rome’s history informs the French revolution, etc., as well as more current topics like preserving information in today’s digitized world.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ylbh20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: According to the journal’s website: “Issues include substantial articles as well as book reviews, occasional surveys of recent publications, and guides to relevant sources.”10

Submission and review process: All submissions should be formatted according to a template available on the “Instructions for Authors” page and should be no more than 8,000 words. Six keywords should be included with each manuscript for purposes of search engine optimization. Manuscripts can be submitted in Word, LaTeX, or any other standard format and emailed to melanie.kimball@simmons.edu or p.reid@rgu.ac.uk.11

As for the review process, all manuscripts are subject to a standard double-blind peer review, in keeping with the journal’s standards for academic integrity.12

Editorial tone: Although the journal’s title suggests a neutral tone, some articles, such as “See the Movie, Read the Book! Cleveland Public Library’s Bookmarks Programme, 1923–1972” take an enthusiastic tone towards their subject matter, with descriptions like “hugely influential” and “fascinating.”13 This enthusiastic tone, however, does not in any way, shape, or form detract from the meticulous research of each article. Instead, this tone makes for a more engaging reading experience than, say, an article from a history textbook.

Style guide used: The journal asks authors to use consistently use any standard spelling throughout a manuscript, as well as single quotation marks except for  where ‘a quotation is “within” a quotation’. Lastly, the journal notes that lengthy quotes are indented without quotations marks.14 For further guidance, please see these layout guidelines.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library & Information History is an excellent choice for authors with extensive knowledge of the history of libraries, as well as the ways our current information practices shape the “future of history.”15 When viewed through this unique “future of history” lens, the options available to authors are even broader than the journal’s title suggests. As for authors strictly interested in the history of libraries, this journal is simply incomparable.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although based in the U.K., Library & Information History is an international journal with a global reach.16 As such, regional cultural references and language should be kept to a minimum.

Reader characteristics: While readers’ jobs, workplaces, and level of education may vary, they share an interest in the history of libraries and information. Since Library & Information History is a high-level academic journal17, readers will most likely have post-secondary degrees in Library Science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The bulk of this journal’s readers are likely to be historians (amateur or professional) of library and information science. Also, due to the journal’s scholarly nature, knowledge of LIS subject matter amongst readers is likely quite high.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

In keeping with the tone of the journal, readers are likely to be enthusiastic LIS history buffs and will appreciate a thoroughly researched scholarly paper. Due to the international flavor of this publication, readers are likely to be open-minded and interested in a variety of other cultures. Authors with a passion for LIS history will find a diverse audience for their ideas here.19

Last updated: February 24, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?journalCode=ylbh20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
  4.  Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  5.  Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  6. Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  7. Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  8.  Library & Information History, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/ylbh20/current
  9.  Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  10.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ylbh20&page=instructions
  12.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ylbh20&page=instructions
  13. Karen F. Gracy, “See the Movie, Read the Book! Cleveland Public Library’s
    Bookmarks Programme, 1923–1972,” Library & Information History 33, no. 4 (2017): 236.
  14. “Style Guidelines,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ylbh20&page=instructions#Style_guidelines
  15. Lena Roland and David Bawden, “The Future of History: Investigating the Preservation of Information in the Digital Age,” Library & Information History, 28, no. 3 (2012): 220.
  16. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
  17. Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  18.  Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  19.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
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Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

ISSN: 2157-0396 (Print) and 2161-3540 (Online)1

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”2

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,3 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.4

Publisher: Georgia Library Association5

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.6 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.7

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.8 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,9 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online10

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.11

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”12

Frequency of publication: Quarterly13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.14

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”15

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”16

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.17

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.18

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,20 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.22 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,23 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,24 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia25 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.26 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,27 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1.  Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/465320178
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  4. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  7. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  8. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  10. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  11. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  12. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  13. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  14. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  15. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  16. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  17. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  18. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  19. (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  20. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  21. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  22. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  23. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  27. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
Continue Reading

Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

 

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
Continue Reading

Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

ISSN: 1052-5726 (print), 1052-5722 (online)

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian “is a forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS), featuring articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”1

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive “discourse and action on library issues.” Progressive Librarians Guild (PLG) members receive a subscription, or individuals can subscribe without joining the guild.2

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, by the editorial board.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online. Full text of complete issues and individual articles are available online.5

Content: Progressive Librarian publishes “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”6 Articles cover topics such as sexual violence, social justice, sustainability, youth empowerment, intellectual freedom, international activism, and a wide variety of progressive critiques and analyses of national and international LIS issues.

Frequency of publication:  Two times a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: A Call for Papers for future issues of Progressive Librarian asks for “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, documents, artwork and poetry that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”8

Submission and review process: All manuscripts submitted to Progressive Librarian are reviewed by each member of the editorial board. Manuscripts outside the expertise of board members are sent to outside reviewers for comment and evaluation. The journal also welcomes prints and digital images. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions before publication. For book reviews, please contact the book review editor.9

Editorial tone: The articles are innovative and present alternative views to those of other LIS publications. The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.

Style guide used: Authors may use their preferred citation style “for in-text (parenthetical) citations, footnotes, and endnotes, as well as a bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian), works cited (MLA), and references (APA & Harvard) sections.” The citation style has to be used consistently throughout the manuscript.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Progressive Librarian is a innovative and welcoming journal for LIS authors who write about any issue related to progressive librarianship or the relationship of library and information science to issues of social justice and responsibility. Articles are international in scope and are often focused on current events and actions. LIS professionals and students may submit artwork and poetry, as well as documents, reports, and bibliographies, on progressive issues.

Prospective authors should read the editorial in issue 45 for an understanding of the journal’s philosophy and perspective,11 as well as the Progressive Librarians Guild Statement of Purpose.12

For LIS graduate students, each year the PLG awards the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize “for the best paper about some aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. Papers related to archivists, archives, and archival work are also eligible.” The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian, and the winner receives a $500 stipend toward travel costs to the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, where the award is presented.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal as an international readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, although there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.14 As with any scholarly writing, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.15 The readership is made up of librarians, librarian graduate students, and library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and in how politics informs LIS practices.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals, or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have an understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about news and events in the LIS world, and about national and international politics and current events, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues, or events others may not be familiar with.

 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Broadly speaking, the readers of Progressive Librarian are LIS professionals, scholars, and students who consider themselves socially and politically progressive and who bring their passion for social justice and action to their work in various library and information settings. PLG works against the current idea that “the library is merely a neutral institutional mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society of atomized information consumers.” Rather,  a “progressive librarianship demands the recognition of the idea that libraries for the people has been one of the principal anchors of an extended free public sphere which makes an independent democratic civil society possible, something which must be defended and extended.”16

 

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml.
  2. “Subscription,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_subscribe.shtml.
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml.
  5. “Archive,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml.
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Call for Papers,” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017): verso, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45.pdf.
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. Elaine Harger, “Editorial: Why PLG? Why Paper? Why Bridge Generations?” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017),  http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45/003.pdf.
  12. “Statement of Purpose,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml.
  13. “The Braverman Award,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml.
  14. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  15. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  16. “PLG’s History,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/history.shtml.
Continue Reading

Collaborative Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collaborative Librarianship

ISSN: 1943-75281

Website: http://www.collaborativelibrarianship.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The publication website identifies three mission points: To “promote sharing of ideas, best practices, opportunities, challenges and successes involving collaborative librarianship; sustain an open-access journal where professional librarians can publish articles (peer- and non-peer-reviewed) on a range of subjects relevant to librarianship, but that involve collaboration at their core; to promote sharing of ideas, opportunities, challenges and successes involving new kinds of partnerships, joint projects, and innovative approaches to collaboration that benefit all members within in the information supply chain.2

Target audience: LIS professionals, LIS instructors, and LIS students3

Publisher: Independently published, and sponsored by the Colorado Library Consortium, the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Regis University, and the University of Denver4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The publication’€™s website indicates that it provides articles relating to a wide range of issues including library-to-library cooperation; sharing resources and expertise; library-to-business partnerships; local, regional, national, and international collaboration; professional, consortium and association partnerships; the history of library collaboration; open access and online availability; better and best practices.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts for submission field reports that focus on innovative collaborations and address best practices. Field reports are usually 2,500 to 4,000 words in length. The journal also accepts scholarly articles on library collaborations at the local, national, or international level that approach their topics historically, quantitatively, qualitatively, analytically, theoretically, philosophically, or practically. Published scholarly articles are usually of at least 5,000 words.10

Submission and review process: Individuals submitting articles for review must first register with the journal.11 The submission may not be under consideration for publication by another publisher nor have been previously published. Submissions should include an abstract of approximately 200 words, a title, list of authors and affiliations, an introduction, the body of the paper, conclusions, and references. Submissions should adhere to the style guidelines provided on the website and uploaded as Microsoft Word files. 12

Editorial tone: Depending on the section, articles may be scholarly or more professionally informal.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors will find Collaborative Librarianship an appealing avenue for publication. Because collaboration is increasing across the LIS community,  professional interest in innovative ideas on this topic is high. Since the publication is a venue for both practical and scholarly articles, authors may expect to reach both professional and academic audiences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication does not provide details on circulation.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is sponsored by library consortiums and universities in Colorado, and part of its mission is to meet goals identified at the June 2008 general meeting of the Colorado Academic Library Consortium, including the promotion of the knowledge infrastructure of Colorado; the maintenance and development of the Colorado library system; and the transmission of lessons learned in the Colorado library community to the rest of the United States.15 The publication is written in English.16

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide information about individual characteristics about the readers. Persons of interest can subscribe via email to receive notification of new issues. The publication is geared toward librarians located in both the education and professional fields. The journal appears to be content neutral, appealing to readers interested in the collaborative aspect of the LIS field.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers work in the LIS field, authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because collaboration exists over practically, if not entirely, all fields in the LIS profession, potential authors can view Collaborative Librarianship as a great source for potential publication. While some readers may not be directly involved in an author’s particular LIS field, collaborative ideas can be shared and valued.

Last updated: March 20, 2017


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523415071648/668432
  2. “About this Journal/Mission Points,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  3. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  4.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  5. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  6. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  7. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  8. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  9. “About this Journal/Publication Frequency,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  10. “About this Journal/From-the-Field Reports and Scholarly Articles” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  11. “About this Journal/Submit Article” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=http%3A%2F%2Fdigitalcommons.du.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dcollaborativelibrarianship&context=collaborativelibrarianship
  12.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  13.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  14.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  15. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  16. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  17. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  18. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
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mental_floss

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: mental_floss

ISSN: 1543-4702 (Print)1

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “mental_floss is the international media brand that gives smart, curious knowledge junkies their fix with upbeat, witty explorations of everything from science to pop culture to tech to history.”2

Target audience: “Busy people who love to feel smart.”3 The audience might be similar to anyone frequenting a library.

Publisher: Mental Floss, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects, including the “hidden sides of topics in the news you thought you already knew all about.”6

Frequency of publication: New stories posted daily.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for lists and Big Questions to fill out those two sections of the site, but if you know a great story from history, a strange science phenomenon, or anything else fascinating that we need to cover, we’d love to hear it.”8

Submission and review process: Send pitches to webpitches [at] mentalfloss.com.9

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The website receives 20 million unique visitors per month.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information about audience location is not provided, but content is written in English. Readers have a high degree of knowledge in pop culture, trivia, and current events.

Reader characteristics: According to the website, readers are “brainy millennials.”11 In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: December 11, 2016


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1.  Mental Floss, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521935574828/407043
  2. “What is mental_floss?,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  3. “Advertise,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/advertise
  4. What is mental_floss?
  5. “This is Our Last Print Issue!,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, https://service.mentalfloss.com/servlet/Show?WESPAGE=csp-dp/login.jsp&MSRSMAG=LF
  6. What is mental_floss?
  7. This is Our Last Print Issue!
  8. “Freelance Help Wanted,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted
  9. Freelance Help Wanted.”
  10. What is mental_floss?
  11. What is mental_floss?
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Faculty of Information Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Faculty of Information Quarterly (*Publication currently on hiatus.*)

ISSN: 1925-91071

Website: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Faculty of Information Quarterly (FIQ) is a student-led, peer reviewed journal and provides immediate open access to its content by publishing online, on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Edited by graduate students at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information, the journal seeks to provide an environment for the voices of emerging and established scholars and practitioners in diverse Information fields, including but not limited to the following: archival science, accessibility studies, book history and print culture, communication theory, critical theory, cultural informatics, health informatics, information studies, information systems and technology, knowledge theory, library science, management science, media theory, museum studies, semiotics, and technology studies.”2

Target audience: University of Toronto LIS students, faculty and global LIS community3

Publisher: University of Toronto, Faculty of Information4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: Research articles covering any topic relevant to LIS community. Recent article titles include Research as a Social Process: Considerations for Academic Libraries, Applying Concepts of Bug-Tracking Software to e-Resource Management in Academic Libraries, and The Rare e-Vent: Concepts of Rarity and Scarcity in e-Books.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9 *The last edition published was Volume 3, Number 4, in 2011.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles from the LIS and related academic communities. Per the publication website, “While there is an emphasis on encouraging student work in FIQ we certainly support submissions from all members of the Information community. Masters and PhD students and faculty of all disciplines, practitioners and Information professionals with an interest in scholarly work, and interested members of the Information community in its broadest sense are all welcome to submit works to this publication.”11 “We encourage students to submit articles they think are of an academic calibre, which can include conference papers, reworked course papers, personal research projects, reflections on the scholarly and practical elements of Information, or other communications of excellent quality.”12

Submission and review process: All work is submitted online through the publication  website. Detailed instructions provided for authors including a checklist to ensure all requirements are met. FIQ is peer-reviewed and publication is subject to approval and review by the Editorial Staff.13

Editorial tone: Formal14

Style guide used: For Canadian English spelling, authors should consult the latest edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary; for citations and references authors should use the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although FIQ was founded in part to promote publication of student research and writing, all members of the information community are invited to submit manuscripts.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. As an open access, online publication of a leading information school, FIQ is freely accessible to academic and professional members of the information community the world over.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Toronto, Canada.18 While its target audience is the global information community, the publication requires its authors to use Canadian spellings and to ensure the relevance of articles to Canadian culture.19

Reader characteristics: Though FIQ is an open-access publication with an international reach, it is likely, given its editorial bias,20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers would have an LIS background or education; however, since FIQ strives for a global reach and LIS education varies around the global, writers should consider this when writing.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication run by graduate students and primarily for graduate students and academics in the the LIS community, fellow graduate student authors would seem to have a better chance of publication in FIQ.

Last updated: April 24, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523472560543/717394
  2. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  5. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  6. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  7. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  8. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  9. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  10. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  11. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  15. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  18. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  19. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  20.  “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines that the majority of its readers are Canadian or North American. Readers of this student-run journal will have a keen interest in the latest developments in the LIS field. The journal does state a preference for publishing the student work, so this is an ideal venue for a first publication.[21. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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