Wiki Tags Archives: History

Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.1 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”2

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.3

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.6

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.9

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.10

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.11

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members12; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  3. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  4.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  5. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  13.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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Library & Information History

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library & Information History

Website: http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh

Purpose, objective, or mission: To publish articles on “all subjects and all periods relating to the history of libraries and librarianship and to the history of information, in its broadest sense.”1

Target audience:Library & Information History is a journal for anyone interested in the social, cultural and intellectual history of libraries and of information.”2

Publisher: Maney Publishing.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: “Issues include substantial articles as well as book reviews, occasional surveys of recent publications, and guides to relevant sources.”7

From the journals’ submissions flyer: “The editorial board would particularly welcome ideas or fully formed proposals for guest edited special issues on important themes in library and information history.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh

Types of contributions accepted: According to the website: “Library & Information History welcomes original submissions that match the aims and scope of the journal on the understanding that the article has not previously been published, and is not being concurrently submitted for publication elsewhere.”10

“Articles should not normally exceed 8,000 words in length. Articles must be accompanied by a short abstract (c. 150 words) summarizing the contents of their article. Articles should also be accompanied by up to 6 key words to aid search ability of the article online.”11

Submission and review process: All submissions should be sent as an email attachment in Word or Rich Text format to the relevant editor listed below12:

Submissions from researchers in North America should be sent to the North American Editor:
Dr. Melanie Kimball (Graduate School of Library and Information Science Simmons College, Boston)
Email: melanie.kimball@simmons.edu

All other contributions should be sent to the Editor:
Dr. Mark R. M. Towsey (University of Liverpool, UK)
Email: M.R.M.Towsey@liverpool.ac.uk13

All submissions will be sent to independent referees.14

Editorial tone: The only indication of tone is found in the About this Journal statement: “articles of a high academic standard”15 are expected.

Style guide used: All references should conform to the Maney Style Guide.16

Library & Information History does not use the Harvard system of citation. Please use an automatic endnoting system (found in the Maney Style Guide), if possible.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although Library & Information History seems an esoteric U.K. publication, there are clear indications that it welcomes international voices on “all subjects and all periods relating to the history of libraries and librarianship and to the history of information.”18 A recent issue featured articles by authors based in Australia, Romania, and the U.S.19 For the author who has a passion for this particular field of LIS, being published in this high caliber journal would be an excellent opportunity to share expertise.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to Library & Information History advertising guidelines, this journal receives “2,000 – 3,000 pageviews per month.”20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although based in the U.K., this is an international journal with a global reach.21 As such, regional cultural references and language should be kept to a minimum.

Reader characteristics: While the readers’ jobs, workplaces and level of education may vary, they will share an interest in the history of libraries and information. As this is a high level academic journal22, readers will most likely have post-secondary degrees in Library Science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will expect a high caliber piece of writing in this journal. Their knowledge of LIS terminology will be high, yet as this journal offers an eclectic range of topics23, readers will probably not be knowledgeable about the particular historical subject of every article.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

A review of this journal calls it “a little gem for library history buffs.”24 Readers will have a passion for the specialized area of this journal and will appreciate a thoroughly researched and scholarly paper. Because of the international flavor of this publication, paired with its diverse range of topics, any author with an academic interest in a particular historical topic would reach a wide and interested audience.

Last updated: July 8, 2015


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  2. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  7. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  8. Maney Publishing. (2015). Submissions flyer. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/pb/assets/raw/history/LBH_postcard.pdf
  9. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  10. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  11. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  12. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  13. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  14. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  15. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  16. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  17. Maney Publishing. (2015). Instructions for Authors. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/ifa/lbh
  18. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  19. Maney Publishing. (2015). Volume 31, Issue 1. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lbh/31/1
  20. Maney Publishing. (2015). Online advertising. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/advertising/r4
  21. Maney Publishing. (2015). Home. Library & Information History. Retrieved from http://www.maneyonline.com/loi/lbh
  22. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
  24. ProQuest. (2015). Library & Information History. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436387209839/38434
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Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”1

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,2 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.3

Publisher: Georgia Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.5 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.6

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.7 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,8 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online9

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.10

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”11

Frequency of publication: Quarterly12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.13

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”14

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”15

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.16

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.17

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,19 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.21 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,22 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,23 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia24 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.25 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,26 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  4. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  7. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  9. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  10. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  11. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  12. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  13. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  14. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  15. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  16. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  17. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  18.  (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  19. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  20. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  21. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  23. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian provides “€œa forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS).”1 It publishes critical perspectives in librarianship that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.2

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive issues within the profession.3

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly. This journal aims to provide critically relevant information in an academic setting.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Full text of articles are available online, previous to and including the Winter/Spring 2009 issue.8

Content: From the website: “€œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice yearly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”11

Submission and review process: Submit electronic files only via e-mail in rich text format (.rtf) or Microsoft Word (.doc). Prints and digital images are welcome; if digital, provide 300 dpi grayscale TIFF (.tiff) files no larger than 5X7 inches. The editors reserve the right to edit all manuscript submissions before publication.12

Submit manuscripts to Kathleen de la Peña McCook at klmccook@gmail.com or Susan Maret at iecologie@yahoo.com.13

To submit a book review contact:

Michael Matthews
Watson Memorial Library, Room 311-D
Northwestern State University of Louisiana
Natchitoches, LA 71497
318-357-441914

Papers are published under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No-Derivatives 2.0 license, which places work in the public domain.15

Editorial tone: The articles are both innovative and present alternative views to typical librarian publications. Social justice, racism and other topics that may be considered controversial are published.The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.16

Style guide used: Submissions in your favorite citation style such as Chicago, MLA, APA, Harvard, Turabian are accepted. The style of choice has to be used consistently throughout the paper.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

According to the Progressive Librarians Guild, every library issue embodies a political value choice–and its publication, Progressive Librarian, aims to unearth those propositions and discuss them openly.18 Progressive Librarian rejects the proposition that contemporary libraries are value-neutral information markets, embracing the older idea that librarianship is a profession firmly for the people,€ a democratic force that promotes intellectual inquiry and an informed citizenry.19 It aims to publish articles and promote discussion that defend and extend the library as a free public sphere that makes independent democratic civil society possible.€ Accordingly,the Progressive Librarians Guild is opposed to commercial and business interests that threaten the free flow of information.20 If you are interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and how politics informs professional practice, consider writing for this publication.

A survey of past articles included cultivating freedom of expression within the workplace, Mexican libraries, the internet, and titles such as, “€œCataloging the Path to a New Dark Age: a taxonomy of the Bush administration’s pervasive crusade against scientific communication.” Papers that tie LIS issues, concepts, practices or history to women’s, workers’€™ or civil rights; education; culture; environmental protection; social welfare or insurance; and supporting the public sector in general will be welcomed here. For LIS students, the Progressive Librarian’€™s Guild presents the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize, which annually awards the best student paper about an aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are approximately 400 subscribers, 25% being libraries. Accordingly, it is difficult to gauge total readership–but certainly over 400.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is international in readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, though there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.23 As with any scholarly article, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.24

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.25 The readership is made up almost entirely of librarians, librarian graduate students, or library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice, and how politics informs LIS practices.26 Readers are probably liberal. They are interested in activism, the struggle for social justice, and how politics can inform LIS practices.27

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have a basic understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about commonplace news and events in the LIS world, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues or events others may not be familiar with.28

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication and its readers stand within the American Progressive tradition, hearkening back to FDR’€™s New Deal and representing a spectrum of views that moves left from New Deal-type reformism to much more radical positions and approaches.29 In late February of 2011 the Progressive Librarians Guild issued a statement in support of the Wisconsin employees who protested against proposed cuts to union benefits and health care.30 Progressive Librarian is one of the only journals in the LIS field to report on and document labor activism within the library profession.

This readership values the working class and the public sector, and is concerned with how the LIS profession can support and advance these causes. The journal is characterized by an interest in and/or commitment to socialism, anti-capitalism, feminism, environmentalism, anti-racism, labor advocacy, cultural democracy, ideology-criticism, radical social movements, anti-imperialism and holds skeptical/critical views of technological issues.

Papers that view library and information issues in this framework will be welcomed—whether they offer collection development practices for sex education materials, suggestions for communicating with right-wing colleagues or patrons, or advocate international library rights.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 30 footnotes

  1. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  2. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  3. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  8. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  9. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  11. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  12. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  13. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  14. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  15. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  16. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  17. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  18. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  19. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  20. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  21. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). 2014 Braverman Award Winner Announced. Retrieved from http://progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml
  22. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  23. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  24. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  25. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  26. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  27. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  28. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  29. Progressivism in the United States. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressivism_in_the_United_States
  30. Davey, M. & Greenhouse, S. (2011, February 16). Angry demonstrations in Wisconsin as cuts loom. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/17/us/17wisconsin.html?_r=0
Continue Reading

Collaborative Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collaborative Librarianship

Website: http://www.collaborativelibrarianship.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The publication website identifies three mission points: To “promote sharing of ideas, best practices, opportunities, challenges and successes involving collaborative librarianship; sustain an open-access journal where professional librarians can publish articles (peer- and non-peer-reviewed) on a range of subjects relevant to librarianship, but that involve collaboration at their core; to promote sharing of ideas, opportunities, challenges and successes involving new kinds of partnerships, joint projects, and innovative approaches to collaboration that benefit all members within in the information supply chain.1

Target audience: LIS professionals, LIS instructors, and LIS students2

Publisher: Independently published, and sponsored by the Colorado Library Consortium, the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Regis University, and the University of Denver3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: The publication’€™s website indicates that it provides articles relating to a wide range of issues including library-to-library cooperation; sharing resources and expertise; library-to-business partnerships; local, regional, national, and international collaboration; professional, consortium and association partnerships; the history of library collaboration; open access and online availability; better and best practices.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts for submission field reports that focus on innovative collaborations and address best practices. Field reports are usually 2,500 to 4,000 words in length. The journal also accepts scholarly articles on library collaborations at the local, national, or international level that approach their topics historically, quantitatively, qualitatively, analytically, theoretically, philosophically, or practically. Published scholarly articles are usually of at least 5,000 words.   9

Submission and review process: Individuals submitting articles for review must first register with the journal.10 The submission may not be under consideration for publication by another publisher nor have been previously published. Submissions should include an abstract of approximately 200 words, a title, list of authors and affiliations, an introduction, the body of the paper, conclusions, and references. Submissions should adhere to the style guidelines provided on the website and uploaded as Microsoft Word files. 11

Editorial tone: Depending on the section, articles may be scholarly or more professionally informal.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors will find Collaborative Librarianship an appealing avenue for publication. Because collaboration is increasing across the LIS community,  professional interest in innovative ideas on this topic is high. Since the publication is a venue for both practical and scholarly articles, authors may expect to reach both professional and academic audiences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication does not provide details on circulation.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is sponsored by library consortiums and universities in Colorado, and part of its mission is to meet goals identified at the June 2008 general meeting of the Colorado Academic Library Consortium, including the promotion of the knowledge infrastructure of Colorado; the maintenance and development of the Colorado library system; and the transmission of lessons learned in the Colorado library community to the rest of the United States.14 The publication is written in English.15

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide information about individual characteristics about the readers. Persons of interest can subscribe via email to receive notification of new issues. The publication is geared toward librarians located in both the education and professional fields. The journal appears to be content neutral, appealing to readers interested in the collaborative aspect of the LIS field.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers work in the LIS field, authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because collaboration exists over practically, if not entirely, all fields in the LIS profession, potential authors can view Collaborative Librarianship as a great source for potential publication. While some readers may not be directly involved in an author’s particular LIS field, collaborative ideas can be shared and valued.

Last updated: March 20, 2017


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About this Journal/Mission Points,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  2. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  3.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  4. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  5. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  6. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  7. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  8. “About this Journal/Publication Frequency,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  9. “About this Journal/From-the-Field Reports and Scholarly Articles” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  10. “About this Journal/Submit Article” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=http%3A%2F%2Fdigitalcommons.du.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dcollaborativelibrarianship&context=collaborativelibrarianship
  11.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  12.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  13.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  14. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  15. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  16. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  17. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
Continue Reading

mental_floss

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: mental_floss

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “mental_floss is the international media brand that gives smart, curious knowledge junkies their fix with upbeat, witty explorations of everything from science to pop culture to tech to history.”1

Target audience: “Busy people who love to feel smart.”2 The audience might be similar to anyone frequenting a library.

Publisher: Mental Floss, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Online.4

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects, including the “hidden sides of topics in the news you thought you already knew all about.”5

Frequency of publication: New stories posted daily.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for lists and Big Questions to fill out those two sections of the site, but if you know a great story from history, a strange science phenomenon, or anything else fascinating that we need to cover, we’d love to hear it.”7

Submission and review process: Send pitches to webpitches [at] mentalfloss.com.8

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The website receives 20 million unique visitors per month.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information about audience location is not provided, but content is written in English. Readers have a high degree of knowledge in pop culture, trivia, and current events.

Reader characteristics: According to the website, readers are “brainy millennials.”10 In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: December 11, 2016


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “What is mental_floss?,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  2. “Advertise,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/advertise
  3. What is mental_floss?
  4. “This is Our Last Print Issue!,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, https://service.mentalfloss.com/servlet/Show?WESPAGE=csp-dp/login.jsp&MSRSMAG=LF
  5. What is mental_floss?
  6. This is Our Last Print Issue!
  7. “Freelance Help Wanted,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted
  8. Freelance Help Wanted.”
  9. What is mental_floss?
  10. What is mental_floss?
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Faculty of Information Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Faculty of Information Quarterly (*Publication currently on hiatus.*)

Website: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Faculty of Information Quarterly (FIQ) is a student-led, peer reviewed journal and provides immediate open access to its content by publishing online, on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Edited by graduate students at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information, the journal seeks to provide an environment for the voices of emerging and established scholars and practitioners in diverse Information fields, including but not limited to the following: archival science, accessibility studies, book history and print culture, communication theory, critical theory, cultural informatics, health informatics, information studies, information systems and technology, knowledge theory, library science, management science, media theory, museum studies, semiotics, and technology studies.”1

Target audience: University of Toronto LIS students, faculty and global LIS community2

Publisher: University of Toronto, Faculty of Information3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: Research articles covering any topic relevant to LIS community. Recent article titles include Research as a Social Process: Considerations for Academic Libraries, Applying Concepts of Bug-Tracking Software to e-Resource Management in Academic Libraries, and The Rare e-Vent: Concepts of Rarity and Scarcity in e-Books.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8 *The last edition published was Volume 3, Number 4, in 2011.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles from the LIS and related academic communities. Per the publication website, “While there is an emphasis on encouraging student work in FIQ we certainly support submissions from all members of the Information community. Masters and PhD students and faculty of all disciplines, practitioners and Information professionals with an interest in scholarly work, and interested members of the Information community in its broadest sense are all welcome to submit works to this publication.”10 “We encourage students to submit articles they think are of an academic calibre, which can include conference papers, reworked course papers, personal research projects, reflections on the scholarly and practical elements of Information, or other communications of excellent quality.”11

Submission and review process: All work is submitted online through the publication  website. Detailed instructions provided for authors including a checklist to ensure all requirements are met. FIQ is peer-reviewed and publication is subject to approval and review by the Editorial Staff.12

Editorial tone: Formal13

Style guide used: For Canadian English spelling, authors should consult the latest edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary; for citations and references authors should use the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although FIQ was founded in part to promote publication of student research and writing, all members of the information community are invited to submit manuscripts.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. As an open access, online publication of a leading information school, FIQ is freely accessible to academic and professional members of the information community the world over.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Toronto, Canada.17 While its target audience is the global information community, the publication requires its authors to use Canadian spellings and to ensure the relevance of articles to Canadian culture.18

Reader characteristics: Though FIQ is an open-access publication with an international reach, it is likely, given its editorial bias,19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers would have an LIS background or education; however, since FIQ strives for a global reach and LIS education varies around the global, writers should consider this when writing.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication run by graduate students and primarily for graduate students and academics in the the LIS community, fellow graduate student authors would seem to have a better chance of publication in FIQ.

Last updated: April 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  4. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  5. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  6. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  7. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  8. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  9. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  10. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  14. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  18. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  19.  “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines that the majority of its readers are Canadian or North American. Readers of this student-run journal will have a keen interest in the latest developments in the LIS field. The journal does state a preference for publishing the student work, so this is an ideal venue for a first publication.[20. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleCataloging & Classification Quarterly

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4

Purpose, objective, or missionCataloging & Classification Quarterly is an international journal providing information and discussion on the subject of bibliographic organization. It addresses the theory and practice of cataloging and classification from a historic as well as a contemporary approach. “In a rapidly changing field, it seeks out and fosters new developments in the transition to new forms of bibliographic control and encourages the innovative and the nontraditional.”1

Target audience: Library and information science professionals, specifically catalogers looking for information about current issues or librarians researching the management and use of bibliographic records or the principles of descriptive cataloging.2

Publisher: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5; however, because of its mixed content it also has characteristics of Because of its mixed content, however, it could also be classified as a hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. CCQ is a peer-reviewed journal and its contributors are researchers and experts within the cataloging and classification field which, according to Taylor & Francis website, CCQ emphasizes both “full-length research and review articles” along with “descriptions of new programs and technology relevant to cataloging and classification.”6 Most articles are research oriented, with extensive bibliographies.

Medium: Print and online. The online version will continue to be published eight times per year.7

Content: Per their website, CCQ features articles that consider “…the full spectrum of creation, content, management, and use and usability of both bibliographic records and catalogs. This includes the principles, functions, and techniques of descriptive cataloging; the wide range of methods of subject analysis and classification; provision of access for all formats of materials; and policies, planning, and issues connected to the effective use of bibliographic records in modern society.”8 Besides introducing innovations in bibliographic control, the journal also discusses theoretical backgrounds and analysis of bibliographic organization. Most volumes include both general articles and guest-edited articles that focus on specialized topics.9

Frequency of publication: The printed version is published twice annually. The online version has eight issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=0163-9374&linktype=44. This publication uses Scholar One Manuscripts for peer review. A guide to using this system is found at http://journalauthors.tandf.co.uk/pdfs/SubmitGuide_S1M_1.pdf

Types of contributions acceptedCataloging & Classification Quarterly accepts research articles and cataloging news articles of 10 to 35 pages, double spaced, as well as book reviews.11

Submission and review process: Per the publication website, CCQ “…receives all manuscript submissions electronically via their ScholarOne Manuscripts website.”12

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the tone of articles. Upon examination of several articles in an issue, it’s clear that the journal chooses formal, research-oriented features.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized publication that provides relevant news, information, and analyses of and about recent trends in cataloging and classification as well as historical perspectives of experts in the field. This journal is a very useful resource for LIS professionals who deal with bibliographic organization and technical services in their institutions. Persons who are experts in the field, archivists, or other librarians, as well as students interested in writing classification-oriented research papers may submit their work for publication. Articles involving information organization or collection management are only a small part of the breadth of literature that may be written about cataloging and classification. Other topics include “cataloging and preservation, cataloging for digital resources, cataloging for special collections and archives, classification and subject access, descriptive cataloging, education and training for cataloging and classification, the internationalization of cataloging, management of cataloging and related functions, maps and other cartographic and spatial materials, online retrieval, use and usability issues related to the catalog, use of catalog data by systems outside the OPAC.”15

This journal is abstracted in Cabells Education Technology and Library Science, CSA, EBSCOhost Online Research Databases, ERIC Education Resources Information Center, H.W. Wilson Indexes, IndexCopernicus, Informed Librarian, INSPEC, JournalSeek, Periodicals Index OnlineProQuest, SCOPUS, SwetsWise All Titles.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the editor-in-chief, Sandra K. Roe, 590 subscriptions were sold in 2008. “Of these, 350 were from institutions in the United States, 180 were from non-U.S. institutions, 55 were personal subscriptions in the U.S., and 5 were personal subscriptions outside the U.S.”17

Audience location and language or cultural considerationsCataloging & Classification Quarterly may be purchased online from Taylor & Francis and is available worldwide.18 This is an English publication and its primary readers reside in the United States. However, as evidenced by the diversity of its editorial board members based in different parts of the world, articles in the journal must also accessible to a international audience.19

Reader characteristics: No individual characteristics of the journal’s readers were available. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, however, describes its audience as, “academic; special adult.”20 Naturally, because Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal, its readers have similar interests in LIS topics and issues, particularly in bibliographic organization. The majority of subscribers are likely cataloging professionals and technical services librarians.21 As LIS professionals, subscribers of this journal likely support the development of cataloging and classification and have interests in other LIS issues.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this specialized journal are doubtless familiar with cataloging and classification, as well as other LIS issues. It may be assumed that the CCQ audience understands LIS jargon.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal that is geared towards the professional cataloger but is also of interest to LIS professionals or students that are particularly interested in bibliographic organization. Authors must keep in mind that these readers are most likely LIS professionals, graduates or students that are knowledgeable about issues in the field of cataloging and librarianship. They are looking for formal and scholarly articles pertaining to topics such as records description and access or classification systems used in special libraries. Research articles on such subjects are the most appropriate for this audience. The use of subheadings is recommended to focus the reader’s attention and show the author’s intention clearly. Authors are encouraged to broach other aspects of information science but, preferably, concentrate on the relationship and importance of these other subjects to cataloging and classification.

Last updated: November 20, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  4. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  5. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  6. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  7. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  8. “CCQ Journal Home,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://catalogingandclassificationquarterly.com/
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  10. “CCQ Journal Home,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://catalogingandclassificationquarterly.com/
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  13. “List of issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wccq20#.U9KDPLFiND4
  14. “Instructions for authors, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  15. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  16. “Abstracting and indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wccq20&page=instructions#.U9J08bFiND4
  17. S.K. Roe, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  18. “List of issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wccq20#.U9KDPLFiND4
  19. “Editorial board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wccq20#.U9cg5LFiND4
  20. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  21. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  22. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  23. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
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Family Tree Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Family Tree Magazine

Website: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A how-to publication for readers interested in family history and genealogy research.1

Target audience: It is directed toward beginner genealogists and family history enthusiasts.2

Publisher: F+W Media, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication. The publication describes itself magazine as a special-interest consumer magazine.5

Medium: Print magazine with online content and research tools.6

Content: Family Tree Magazine covers all areas of family history including ethnic heritage, family reunions, scrapbooking, oral histories and memoirs.7 A typical issue might include articles, lists of resources (including apps, websites, and databases), tutorials, and tips.8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/writersguidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should appeal to a general audience: non technical enough for beginning genealogists but informative enough for seasoned researchers. New writers are encouraged to submit short pieces of new online resources for the Toolkit section, or short, amusing stories of “the lighter side of family history.” The editors caution that personal experiences or the histories of specific families are not accepted. 10

Submission and review process: Writers should query with a story idea; completed manuscripts are not accepted. Queries should be emailed or sent through the mail with a SASE, and include writing samples. Issues are planned at least six months in advance, with the December issue planned a year in advance.11

Editorial tone: The publisher says the tone is “bright, breezy, helpful and encouraging,” but warns writers never to talk down to the reader.12 The typical article has short paragraphs of two or three sentences with vocabulary that might be found in Good Housekeeping or Reader’s Digest.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be a good publication for reference librarians, adult services librarians and LIS students who are knowledgeable about genealogy and history resources. The editors specifically mention wanting articles about new reference materials, and past articles have focused on organizing research materials. They are also looking for how-to articles that will help beginners start their family history projects.13 Librarians have a good understanding of what questions patrons generally ask about family history research; those questions can be turned into simple, informative article ideas for this magazine.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 75,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This US based publication is distributed nationally on newsstands, through a retail sales program, for purchase as a download on their website, and by subscription.15 The editorial staff does not provide any statistics on geographic distribution of readers. Family Tree Magazine is printed in English.The editorial staff does not offer any information on ethnic orientation of its readers; however, they welcome articles on ethnic and cultural heritage. Feature articles on how to trace Caribbean, African American, Japanese and European roots and Latin American research have been published.16

Reader characteristics: The publisher provides a reader profile in its media kit. According to the profile, the average reader is 63 years old. The audience is largely female, and 89% of readers have education beyond high school. The readers are passionate about family history, averaging almost eleven hours per week on genealogy-related activities, with most of that time spent online.  On average they spend in excess of $500 a year on this hobby.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These readers will most likely have limited knowledge of LIS-related topics, so technical subjects as well as LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The comprehensive reader’€™s profile is a writer’€™s dream come true. That coupled with details from the editorial staff on what they are looking for should provide plenty of guidance on subject matter and writing style. LIS authors can look at the typical reader and see that the overwhelming number are well-educated women, aged 60 and older.18 Perhaps an article about organizing home office spaces (using the cataloging techniques that are familiar to a librarian) would be popular. And the fact that the majority use the Internet each day offers a whole range of possibilities for articles about researching online or how to evaluate a website. Readers who travel for their hobby will want to know about travel resource materials. The well-educated reader might want an online resource for translating family documents (like a birth certificate) that are in a foreign language. Those who are retired might be interested in historical picture books that they can read to their grandchildren to help them begin to learn about their heritage. The possibilities are endless.

Last updated: September 26, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/Info/About_Us
  2. About Us.”
  3. About Us.”
  4. “Writer’s Guidelines,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/writersguidelines
  5. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  6. About Us.”
  7.  “About Us.”
  8. “Family Tree Magazine March/April 2016,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.shopfamilytree.com/family-tree-magazine-march-april-2016
  9. About Us.”
  10. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  11. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  12.  “Writer’s Guidelines.”
  13.  “Writer’s Guidelines.”
  14. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  15. “2014 Media Planner,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://media2.fwpublications.com.s3.amazonaws.com/FTM/FTM_media_kit_2014.pdf
  16. “Article Index,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/ArticleIndex
  17. “2015 Media Planner,” Family Tree Magazine, accessed September 26, 2016, http://media2.fwpublications.com.s3.amazonaws.com/FTM/2015_FTM_media_kit.pdf
  18. 2015 Media Planner.”
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