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Marketing Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Library Services

ISSN: 0896-39081

Website: www.MarketingLibraryServices.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Marketing Library Services (MLS) emerged in 1987 and is the longest-running publication that regularly delivers how-to articles and case studies for marketers in all types of libraries. They’re written by practitioners from around the world and curated by a respected expert who has 25+ years in the field. These detailed, vetted articles deliver more value than the brief ideas and advice offered via social media.2

Target audience: Information professionals in any type of library who need to learn to do better marketing, promotion, and advocacy.3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: MLS covers strategies and tactics for all marketing-related topics: advocacy, outreach, branding, segmentation, social media, funding initiatives, long-term campaigns, assessment, ROI, partnerships, promotional materials, program publicity, communications, PR, advertising, etc. Subscribers will also benefit from interviews with marketing masters, conference coverage, book reviews, and news.8

Frequency of publication: Six times a year (January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December).9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: The editor of Marketing Library Services, Kathy Dempsey, does not accept blind submissions; instead, it is preferable to email her first (see Editor below) with an article idea, so that she can see if it fits in with upcoming issues, or whether or not something similar has already been published. In a personal correspondence she asserts that if the topic is something useful to Marketing Library Services readership, she will send the author a desired length and deadline. Writers will be sent guidelines, and all graphics (photos, charts, etc.) must be in color and high resolution.10

The site itself says very little about submissions. Editorial communications should be directed to the editor, Kathy Dempsey, at kdempsey@infotoday.com.11

Types of contributions accepted: From a correspondence with the editor: “Marketing Library Services covers a wide range of marketing-related topics, including these: advocacy, outreach, programming, fundraising, event planning, dealing with the media, getting votes for library issues, proving your value, making good promotional materials, community promotion, online promotion, winning related awards, studying demographics for target marketing, innovations, surveys and focus groups, strategic communication, etc. And, of course, true marketing (plans for full campaigns).” Also, “in addition to the case studies, Marketing Library Services carries news, reviews of books and videos, conference coverage, and links to library articles and culture.” 12

Submission and review process: Authors first should send correspondence to Kathy Dempsey stating their idea. Because Marketing Library Services is published often, timely articles are strongly recommended. Also, authors must have been directly involved in the projects they are writing about, and must write in the first person. Ms. Dempsey states that authors’ specific titles do not matter.13

Editorial tone: Marketing Library Services should not be written in third-person or academic tones. The newsletter’s tone is conversational, professional, and should inspire readers. According to the editor, “Articles should be written as if you’€™re sitting down with a colleague and explaining your project over lunch.”14

The editor will correspond with the author about this after the author’s idea has been accepted.15

Style guide used: Associated Press.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Marketing Library Services is a very good resource for LIS authors interested in writing on community outreach and marketing of library services. Many topics can fall under this umbrella, so it is important for potential authors to be creative and open in how they frame their content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Marketing Library Services has 700 subscribers. Most of these are in North America, but some are in Europe and in other English-speaking countries.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the content of the newsletter is in English and about a broad topic (marketing), the geographic location of the newsletter’s readership is assumed to reside across the United States. There are some readers from outside the United States, but because marketing can be culturally specific, those readers are likely already doing the work of cultural translation. English is used entirely throughout Marketing Library Services and, for the most part, readers are American or from Europe.18 Because of this spread, colloquialisms should be avoided (as in most professional writing).

Reader characteristics: According to Kathy Dempsey, the editor, most of the readership is comprised of librarians who market for their organization, while others are managers and directors. She also states that some are professors specializing in marketing. Because Marketing Library Services readership is comprised of professionals directly involved in marketing, it may be safely assumed that jargon specific to marketing is fine. As well, because this is a trade journal, readers will be interested in practical information. Kathy Dempsey states from a personal correspondence that, “MLS is written for a wide horizontal market that covers all types of libraries: public, academic, special (medical, gov’€™t, etc.), corporate, and to a lesser extent, K-12 school. It welcomes article queries from all of these librarians. What they all have in common is the need to promote their services. Many case studies about how one lib accomplished a goal can be used as models to doing similar things in other types of libraries. Articles on projects that have this ability to be widely replicated are especially valuable.”19

Readers of Marketing Library Services work in many types of libraries, so it may be safely assumed that they all value libraries’ continuing prosperity. That said, this does not mean that their values are identical. However, the newsletter’s tone is conversational, not argumentative. Articles written arguing strongly for one thing or another probably will not fit in Marketing Library Services.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Marketing Library Services is a newsletter informing LIS professionals the best practices and valuable ideas regarding LIS marketing. Professionals reading this newsletter are looking for good ideas and solidly practical plans and instances of good marketing. Marketing Library Services is not a dry tome of theoretical research written in an hermetic tone. Nonetheless, most of the readers are deeply engaged with marketing their organization, and are working professionals whose time and attention is valuable. Writers should consider their readers as interested colleagues who are deeply interested in successful programs and campaigns, and how they may learn from writers’ experiences and implement similar strategies in their own organizations.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Proquest, “MLS: Marketing Library Services,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521418800307/153039
  2. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Marketing Library Services,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/
  3. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  8. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  9. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  10. Dempsey, K., 27 June 2019, personal communication.
  11. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Subscription & Editorial Info,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/mls-subs.shtml
  12. Dempsey, personal communication.
  13. Dempsey, personal communication.
  14. Dempsey, personal communication.
  15. Dempsey, personal communication.
  16. Dempsey, personal communication.
  17. Dempsey, personal communication.
  18. Dempsey, personal communication.
  19. Dempsey, personal communication.
  20. Dempsey, personal communication.

    Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this newsletter have a high degree of LIS subject matter. Marketing Library Services caters to the LIS profession, so references to library specific trends, ideas, and concepts will be well received and will not require a high degree of explanation. However, because the readership is broadly based across the LIS professional spectrum some terms and knowledge specific to one group may not be appropriate for all readers.[21. Dempsey, personal communication.

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College & Research Libraries News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Research Libraries News

ISSN: 0099-0086 (Print) and 2150-6698 (Online)1

Website: http://crln.acrl.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: C&RL News “provides articles on the latest trends and practices affecting academic and research libraries and serves as the official newsmagazine and publication of record of the Association of College and Research Libraries.”2

Target audience: Members of the ACRL.3

Publisher: Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news magazine.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Per their website, “College & Research Libraries News (C&RL News) publishes articles, reports, and essays written by practitioners addressing philosophy and techniques of day-to-day management of academic library services and collections. C&RL News provides current information relating to issues, activities, and personalities of the higher education and academic and research library field. Information literacy, scholarly communication, technology, professional education, preservation, government actions that affect libraries, acquisitions, grants to libraries, product updates, and the business of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) are covered in C&RL News.”8

Frequency of publication: 11 monthly issues.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, essays, and reports.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted to the editor via email. Only original manuscripts that have not been published will be accepted, however, exception may be given to previous items published in other institutional newsletters. Submission length depends on type: “News notes may be 150-350 words; essays for “The Way I See It” should be 750-1,000 words; feature articles (Scholarly Communication, ACRL Techconnect, and Internet Resources) should be no more than 2,000 words.” Footnotes, charts and tables should be minimal; graphics should be included with submission. The author is responsible for obtaining permission for the use of any graphics. Please provide a brief caption and credit (if needed) for all images.11 Authors should consult past issues and the author guidelines for instructions on writing for specific columns.

Editorial tone: Practical, accurate, informative, and informal. Even humorous essays are welcomed.12

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing with C&RL News provides a strong foundation for both an author’s portfolio, in addition to allowing the author to be involved in a LIS association. Authors are not required to become ACRL members to publish with C&RL News; however, ACRL offers a variety of publication tools and resources, including wikis and other forums for information sharing that is important to the professional development of librarians, and LIS authors. C&RL News provides new LIS authors the potential to build their writing portfolio within a supportive, field-specific environment.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The largest division of the ALA, the ACRL claims a membership of over 10,000.15 Since these members receive automatic subscriptions to the C&RL News, this would be a certain count towards the circulation. However, nonmembers can also subscribe to the publication, and the latest circulation total notes the total circulation count at 14,000. Aside from members and nonmember single subscriptions, there may also be subscriptions by other libraries or related groups (educators) that may have an interest in receiving this publication.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, the publication is geared towards academic and research libraries in America. However, the subscription information provides rates specific to subscriptions to Canada, Postal Union of the Americas and Spain (PUAS) countries, and all other countries.17 The publication is printed in English and serves as the official news outlet for a US-based organization, so cultural considerations do not seem to expand beyond the U.S. However, some columns may include international websites and stories on librarianship in other countries18 which demonstrate an awareness of how library trends and practices in other countries can affect U.S. librarianship.

Reader characteristics: The audience of C&RL News is comprised of members of the ACRL, who are professional librarians, staff, administrators, directors, educators in LIS, and students. Nearly all members report affiliation with universities or colleges, with almost half belonging to large research or doctoral-granting universities. The smallest reported group of subscribers is those affiliated with two-year or technical colleges, who comprise 11% of the current membership.19 Readers are used to the publication’s inclusion of more personal insights into individual experiences and humorous anecdotes, and are therefore likely to be open to new perspectives.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As the ACRL is a professional association of academic librarians and individuals with interest in academic librarianship, an advanced and specific knowledge of LIS subject matter can be assumed. Readers will not want definitions and descriptions of issues that they are familiar with; this audience expects to be informed on the current news, trends, and practices in academic and research libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication’s readers are involved in their libraries, their institutions, the academic library community, and the academic community itself. Though not a scholarly publication, informal research exploring best practices and methods for improving services is a sure way to maintain readers’ attention. From archives to community college public services, any essay on a specific topic within the academic library field could offer readers the opportunity to apply the author’s findings to their own institutions. However, authors should keep in mind that readers have diverse experiences. Staff members at technical colleges may be more interested in new resources on serving local communities, whereas administrators at research universities may have a greater interest in international trends. Whatever the chosen topic, authors should be sure to write from experience and with the confidence of expertise.

Last updated: June 29, 2019.


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “College & Research Libraries News,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561866753201/119300
  2. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/pages/view/about
  3. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5.  Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  6. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  7. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0.
  8. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  9. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies.”
  10. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions.”
  11. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  12. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  13. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  14. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  15. American Library Association, “About ACRL,” Association of College & Research Libraries, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl.
  16. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2018-2019 Media Planning Guide, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/ACRL_MediaKit19.pdf.
  17. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies.”
  18. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Past Issues,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/issue/archive.
  19. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2018-2019 Media Planning Guide.
  20. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions.”
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CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://cclibrarians.org/outlook/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œThe purpose of the Council of Chief Librarians is to represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education; to provide a vehicle for communication, discussion and collaboration among libraries; to provide opportunities for professional development, training and leadership development for library leaders and other librarians; and to support data collection, analysis and dissemination for the purpose of good public policy development.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: News items about events and open positions should be less than 300 words. Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (500-1,500 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.10

Submission and review process: Articles may be submitted through the CCL website. The editorial team will revise for grammar, spelling, formatting, and style.11

Editorial tone: Per the website, “Succinct, inviting and informative style of writing is preferred.” The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.12

Style guide used: There is no style guide listed, but the editorial guidelines state that endnote citations should be in accordance with the current edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of librarians, library managers, and library deans, to whom it is sent electronically.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.15

Reader characteristics: While no information is available concerning their ages, members are all supervising librarians and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.16

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be library leadership, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.19

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. “Home,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/outlook-archive
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Mailing List Information,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/mailing-list-information
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/directory
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory.”
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
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AALL Spectrum

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AALL Spectrum

ISSN: 1089-86891

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Spectrum is the professional magazine for the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and is included in association membership. This publication “provides informative and engaging articles of interest to AALL members. The magazine informs readers about the ever-changing, multifaceted world of legal information professionals on areas including the transformation of law, career and leadership development, accessibility, education, information technology, and best practices. The magazine also keeps members apprised of Association events and activities.”2

Target audience: Members of AALL are the target audience: members are law librarians in a variety of settings, including academic law school libraries, private firms libraries, judicial and government libraries, and public law libraries for counties and states, as well as other legal information professionals.3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. This is an informal publication of AALL, primarily for association news and short practical pieces that would be of interest to practicing law librarians.6 Though it is not a scholarly journal, it is very well respected and has a high profile in its field.

Medium: Spectrum is a print publication sent free to all AALL members.7 The archives are available online back to mid-1998 at the Spectrum website.8

Content: Spectrum includes articles on subjects of interest to law librarians, especially practical pieces on marketing the library and management tips. The scholarly journal for AALL is titled Law Library Journal;  Spectrum publishes informational pieces more informally written but still of practical use to law librarians.9

Frequency of publication: Spectrum is published six times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/editorial-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Spectrum includes a mix of trend or feature stories, news briefs, regular columns, and opinion pieces about issues that affect legal information and law librarianship as well as Association events and activities.11

Submission and review process: The publishing guidelines indicate that “Spectrum prefers a thorough, detailed proposal letter that fully outlines the article topic.”12

Regarding article length, they note that “Feature articles should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words. News and department articles are typically between 800 and 1,200 words. Shorter or longer articles will be considered. “13

After submitting a query letter, the author should submit the requested article electronically, with any graphics in a separate file. “All submissions will be edited for clarity, grammar, and length.” “Whenever possible, the author will be contacted by either the AALL Spectrum editorial director or AALL publications manager to discuss questions of intention and interpretation.”14

Editorial tone: Reviewing the articles themselves, it appears that Spectrum attempts to include articles that will be of interest to firm, academic, and government librarians rather than focusing on just one type of library. The submission guidelines request “authoritative, well-researched articles about legal information and the profession.  Articles that inform, inspire, provoke, influence, or help improve practices are welcome additions to AALL Spectrum. Each submission should be an original, educational piece.”15

Style guide used: Spectrum follows The Chicago Manual of Style Seventeenth Edition and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition for style and usage, as well as an AALL Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

AALL Spectrum is the best place to engage in the informal professional conversation surrounding law librarianship. Though it is not as high profile or scholarly as Law Library Journal, it may be more widely read, and will help any law librarian make a name for him or herself. The quality of writing is very high, as are the editorial standards. However, it is not appropriate for professors seeking tenure to boost publications, as it is not a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Spectrum is sent free to all AALL members. The archives for this publication are available online at the AALL website,17 and Ulrich’s Periodical Directory indicates that they are also searchable on various LIS databases (including EBSCOhost, H.W. Wilson products, and Thomson Gale databases).18 It is possible the articles will reach non-law librarian readers through these sources.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The main circulation of this magazine is within the United States, but AALL does have some international members. Unfortunately, international demographics were not available on the Spectrum site, advertising materials, AALL Salary Survey, or AALL member information.19 Spectrum is written in American English, and is primarily interested in legal librarianship relevant to the United States.20 If international subjects are covered, the legal systems will require more explanation. An example of international coverage is “Beyond the Spectrum,” by Shaikh Mohamed Noordin, available for download.21

Reader characteristics: AALL reports over 4,000 members, roughly half of whom work in an academic or law school setting. The most populated Special Interest Sections of AALL members are Academic Law Libraries and Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals.22  All librarians in AALL are either law librarians or are interested in the organization of legal information.  This publication is run by, written by, and edited by law librarians, and as such tends to reflect the dominant views of the profession. It’s analytical; fairly negative towards vendors, but strives to be fair; focuses primarily on academic and firm librarian concerns (such as training law students or new attorneys) and to a lesser extent of government librarianship.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed. However, specialized information from non-law library disciplines or terms specific to certain jobs (such as cataloging or database administration) require explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in publishing in Spectrum are advised to list their qualifications in their cover letters, as this audience respects degrees and library experience. Though the publication is focused entirely on law librarianship, general subjects of interest to LIS professionals will overlap in this field — for instance, information on Web 2.0 is of great interest to law librarians, and recent articles have dealt with how Second Life can be used in libraries. It is best, even with general topics, to make it evident how the subject could be useful to a law librarian.24

Last updated: March 24, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521387398626/111034
  2. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy,” accessed March 24, 2019, http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/spectrum/policy-spectrum.html
  3. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  6. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  7. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum.”
  8. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/spectrum_issue/
  9. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  10. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  11. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  12. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  13. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  14. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  15. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  16. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  17. American Association of Law Libraries,  “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive.”
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Association of Law Libraries, “Meet Our Members,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/meet-our-members/
  20. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  21. Noordin, Shaikh Mohamed, “Perspective: Beyond the Spectrum,” Spectrum 10, no. 6: 12-13, 17, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/_mediavault/2017/11/pub_sp0604_Persp.pdf
  22. American Association of Law Libraries, “By the Numbers,” accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/
  23. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  24. American Association of Law Libraries, “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
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Public Library Quarterly (PLQ)

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitlePublic Library Quarterly (PLQ)

ISSN: 0161-6846 (print), 1541-1540 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wplq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission:Public Library Quarterly (PLQ) is addressed to leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends who believe that change is imperative if public libraries are to fulfill their service missions in the twenty-first century.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) “leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends,” especially those working in public libraries.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles undergo editorial screening and peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: PLQ focuses on how public library directors and operating officers affect change. It examines best practices and service improvement models, management case studies, library mythologies that impede development, planning and outcomes, marketing and fundraising, budget and financial management, new technology in practices, and programs for children.4 “Every issue of  Public Library Quarterly contains informative articles written by the directors and staffs of leading public libraries, news of current public library events, and book reviews covering issues of interest to those in public library work.”5

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: PLQ publishes original research, scholarship, and analyses of current issues in public libraries, from theoretical and practical perspectives. The journal “addresses the major administrative challenges and opportunities that face public libraries, providing insight and assistance to all public library workers.” Furthermore, the journal publishes surveys “that can be developed and used as national benchmarks for such administrative concerns as salaries, usage standards, and budget breakdowns.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online via Editorial Manager, a portal that manages the submission, revision, review, and publication process for authors, editors, and reviewers.8 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and peer review.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: PLQ uses the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

PLQ is a long-standing, high-quality LIS journal that publishes scholarship on all aspects of public libraries from around the world. As such, it is a a good fit for LIS authors whose scholarship is focused on public libraries or who study these libraries’ connections with other information organizations or in the realm of public policy. The journal is both practical and scholarly; many articles are written by public library directors or staff members, but the journal also looks to publish research and surveys in this domain. There is a sense that authors are highly experienced in the realm of public libraries, but this does not necessarily exclude graduate student authors with solid scholarship and novel approaches to the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article’s homepage lists number of views, citations, and Altmetric score.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLQ is published in English for a worldwide audience. Editorial board members are from universities, libraries, and information organizations in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Wales, Ireland, and Taiwan.10 Authors should consider readers from around the globe and explain jargon or regional usages.

Reader characteristics: Readers are public library directors and managers, staff members, trustees, and friends, as well as LIS researchers, scholars, professionals, and graduate students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter, but since this journal has a worldwide reach, authors should be careful to explain particular terms and practices.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

PLQ reaches a worldwide audience of public library directors, librarians, staff members, scholars, researchers, and graduate students. Readers are interested in how current events, policy, trends, and changes in the public library landscape will affect their institutions and how other libraries’ experiences and practices may inform their own practices. Readers look for evidence of positive leadership in and responses to a climate of change in the public library realm. Readers expect both theory- and practice-based articles, as well as larger scale surveys and research results.

Last updated: April 30, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wplq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission show=instructions&journalCode=wplq20.
  6. “Journal Information,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wplq20.
  7. “Instructions for Authors.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Aims and Scope.”
  10. “Editorial Board,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wplq20.
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Political Librarian, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Political Librarian

ISSN: 2471-3155

Website: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/ and http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Political Librarian “is dedicated to expanding the discussion of, promoting research on, and helping to re-envision locally focused advocacy, policy, and funding issues for libraries.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, scholars, practitioners, and graduate students, as well as those outside of the LIS discipline, who are interested libraries and tax and public policy.

Publisher: The Political Librarian is organized and published by EveryLibrary.2 It is hosted by the Washington University in St. Louis Open Scholarship site.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Not all articles are peer reviewed, but there is a section in most issues for those that are.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content:The Political Librarian publishes peer-reviewed articles, white papers, and editorials that focus on how funding issues, tax implications, budgeting, and broader economic policy affect libraries on the local level.4 Articles range from focused examinations, such as library budgeting strategies, to broader issues, such as tax reform and trickle-down economics.5 The journal is “at the intersection of local libraries, public policy and tax policy.”6

Frequency of publication: Two volumes each year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: PolicesFinal Manuscript Preparation Guidelines, and Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian.

Types of contributions accepted: The Political Librarian publishes opinions/first drafts, white papers, and peer-reviewed articles. The journal seeks a variety of perspectives, new voices, and lines of inquiry, and does not limit “contributors to just those working in the field of library and information science.” The journal invites “submissions from researchers, practitioners, community members, or others dedicated to furthering the discussion, promoting research, and helping to re-envision tax policy and public policy on the extremely local level.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts though the journal’s online portal. Initial submissions do not have strict guidelines to follow.8 However, accepted manuscripts need to follow the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.9

Editorial tone: The tone is professional. Clear guidelines are provided by the editorial team.10

Style guide used: The journal’s reference and citation style is explained in the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Political Librarian is a new journal (first published in 2015) that has a very particular focus: it is a “dedicated space where practitioners, researchers, and users [can] publish on frontline advocacy experiences, campaign strategy and research, and/or about tax and public policies impacting libraries on the local level.” The journal is a resource for examinations of the impact of tax and public policy locally and how policy affects library services and community outcomes and for new models of library funding and resources to educate stakeholders.12 LIS authors–professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students–who write about the intersection of libraries with tax and public policy will find a good fit with this journal.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available, but the number of downloads appears on each article’s title page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Political Librarian is written in English. The audience is mostly located in the United States, as US tax and public policy are primarily discussed.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students, as well as those outside the LIS community, who are interested in how tax and public policy affects libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a strong academic and practical understand of LIS subject matter, but there may be readers outside of the discipline for whom jargon or idiosyncratic terms should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should understand that readers have a particular interest in libraries and in public and tax policy, and they look for articles that both explain how libraries can survive and thrive in the current environment and how to advocate now for positive changes in the future. Readers also look for local analyses and examinations that may have implications on a broader scale.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


 

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Journal Home,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/.
  2.  The Political Librarian, everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/.
  3. “Browse Journals and Peer-Reviewed Series,” Washington University Open Scholarship, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/peer_review_list.html.
  4. “Journal Home.”
  5. “Most Popular Papers,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/topdownloads.html
  6. “Volume 1, Issue 1 (2015),” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/vol1/iss1/.
  7. “Aims & Scope,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/aimsandscope.html.
  8. “Policies,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/policies.html.
  9. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/styleguide.html.
  10. “Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian,” everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/editorial-team-guidelines-political-librarian/.
  11. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.”
  12. Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, and Rachel Korman, “The Political Librarian: Foundations,” The Political Librarian 1, no. 1(2015): 7, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=pollib.
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International Information & Library Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: International Information & Library Review

ISSN: Print ISSN: 1057-2317, Online ISSN: 1095-9297

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ulbr20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The overall mission of the International Information & Library Review is the provision of knowledge that will assist in the success of libraries and information-related institutions around the world.”1

Target audience: The target audience for International Information & Library Review is “library and information professionals and paraprofessionals in public, academic, special, government, and corporate environments” from around the world.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All papers in International Information & Library Review have undergone editorial screening and peer review.”4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: With a global perspective and articles written by scholars and professionals from many different countries and institutions, the International Information & Library Review “focuses on three broad areas: policy and ethical issues, including digital values, around the world; the ways in which information technologies and policies are used to help in decision-making, problem solving and improving the quality of people’s lives; and designing and implementing information systems and services in libraries and other organizations around the world.”5

Besides original articles, regular columns include Digital Trends and the Global Library Community, Advances in Library Data and Access, The Library Workforce, Perspectives on Public Services, Global Postcards: Research, Projects, and Experiences from the Field, and Digital Heritage: Spotlight on Europe.6

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors and Invitation for Column Contributions.

Types of contributions accepted: International Information & Library Review publishes “current and anecdotal information” with an emphasis on “research, current developments, and trends related to library and information leadership and management; marketing, advancement, and development; collaborative projects and insights; scholarly communication and publication; collection development and management; technology and digitization; public and technical services; physical and virtual environments, and organizational behavior.”8 Besides original articles, the journal welcomes proposals and articles for its regular columns.9

Submission and review process: International Information & Library Review uses an online submission system for manuscript management and the peer-review process.10 The Taylor & Francis Authors Services website offers an overview of the publishing process and detailed instructions for authors.11 The journal uses Editorial Manager for the peer-review process, with detailed guidelines for authors.12

Editorial tone: The overall editorial tone is scholarly, especially for the original articles. Each column has its own guidelines and topics, so authors should read these and sample articles carefully if submitting an article or proposal to a particular column.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.14 Taylor & Francis provides a document outlining APA style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

International Information & Library Review is a well-established, highly regarded journal in the worldwide library and information science (LIS) community. LIS scholars and professionals who are conducting original research that appeals to a worldwide audience and who can contribute to the journal’s regular columns are a good fit for this journal. The journal’s authorship is from within and beyond the LIS community: “Contributions to the journal have come from staff or members of many different international organizations, including the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL, and from library and information scientists in academia, government, industry, and other organizations.”16 The journal does not court student authors, and contributors seem to be well-established professionals in LIS and related organizations, but column editors do invite proposals, which may be a way for LIS students to explore publishing in this high-level journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International Information & Library Review has a worldwide scope and reach. Its audience includes “information scientists, librarians and other scholars and practitioners all over the world.”17 The journal is written in English for an international audience. Regional terms and practices should be explained.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS scholars, professionals, and practitioners from around the world, as well as stakeholders in international organizations, such as the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL,18 who may not be in the LIS field but who are interested in international information-sharing practices and standards.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Overall, readers will have an advanced understanding of LIS subject matter, but because readers are from all over the world and sometimes from outside of the field, jargon, regionalisms, and novel practices should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting to the International Information & Library Review are writing for an international readership. Readers expect “timely articles on research and development in international and comparative librarianship, information sciences, information policy and information ethics, digital values and digital libraries.”19 They are interested in how LIS practice and theory are evolving around the world–on the international stage and in particular regions–and how this might have an impact on their own policies and practices.

Last updated: April 2, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ulbr20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Invitation for Column Contributions,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/iilr-columns.
  6. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  7. “Journal Information,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=ulbr20.
  8. “Aims and Scope.”
  9. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ulbr20&page=instructions.
  11. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Editorial Manager: Tutorial for Authors,” version 14.1-Q4/2017, www.ariessys.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.ariessys.com/wp-content/uploads/EM-Author-English.pdf.
  13. See “Invitation for Column Contributions,” for links to each column’s guidelines.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” tandf.co.uk, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandf.co.uk//journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  16. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  17. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  18.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  19.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
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VINE Journal of Information & Knowledge Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems

ISSN: 2059-5891

Website: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=vjikms

Purpose, objective, or mission: VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is an international journal publishing work that considers “information and knowledge from a content management/library science perspective.” The journal highlights “the reality and need of organizations, both governmental and private, to operate in a highly interdependent world, where collaboration and knowledge/information are the predominant assets for getting things done; and, in many cases, critical for achieving competitive advantage.” The journal was formerly titled VINE.1

Target audience: Practicing professionals in the areas of information services, knowledge management services, and library management systems.

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content:VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems provides a combination of topical themed issues, well-researched, timely, unbiased articles, and practical overviews which can be applied in the workplace.” The journal “offers lively and topical coverage of developments in the field.” 5 The journal primarily publishes research papers, but conceptual papers, literature reviews, technical papers, and case studies are published regularly. Most issues are made up of individual articles, but themed, guest-edited issues regularly appear.6

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems accepts research papers, conceptual papers, literature reviews, technical papers, case studies, and opinion pieces that “consider information and knowledge from a content management/library science perspective.” The journal aims to publish new developments in the field of information and knowledge management, helping organizations stay current and competitive. The journal is international in scope.8

Submission and review process: This publication uses the ScholarOne Manuscripts system for submissions. A first review is performed by the editor, and acceptable manuscripts are sent for double-blind peer review to at least two independent referees.9 Emerald Publishing has a guide to help authors through the publishing process.10

Editorial tone: The tone of VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is academic and focused on the technology and research of knowledge management. As such, articles are technical, specific to the subject, and backed by studies.

Style guide used: Harvard style. This publication has detailed manuscript requirements, including style of references and in-text citations, which should be read carefully prior to submission.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is a well-established, highly regarded journal in the field of information and knowledge management. LIS authors best suited to this journal work and conduct research in this field and have particular knowledge of information management and its practical applications. The journal publishes articles from studies conducted around the world.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is published for the worldwide LIS information management community, and articles use technical terms specific to the discipline and high-level academic English. The editors are professors at universities in Hong Kong, Romania, Finland, and the United States, and editorial board members are from universities and companies from around the globe.12

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely LIS scholars and professionals working in knowledge and information management in the public and private sectors.13 Readers most likely have or are working on LIS master’s or doctoral degrees or are professionals with technical and practical information management expertise.

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: This publication is aimed at information management professionals and scholars. Readers will expect a strong emphasis on information management techniques and principles. The readers of this publication likely have a strong background in technology and knowledge management terminology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The journal seeks to provide readers with articles, case studies, and opinion pieces that provide current, relevant insights into the issues that are shaping the future of information and knowledge management systems, enabling readers to compare their own experiences with an international audience of their peers. Readers will be highly informed, so authors should send articles that are well researched and add to the body of knowledge.

Last updated: March 26, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “Journal History,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018,
    http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=vjikms.
  2. “Recommend This Journal to Your Librarian,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/recommend.htm?id=vjikms.
  3. “Author Guidelines,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=vjikms.
  4. “Recommend This Journal to Your Librarian.”
  5. “Journal History.”
  6. For example, Special Issue: Knowledge Strategies: A New Connection between Strategic Thinking and Knowledge Management Capabilities, VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems 47, no. 4(2017), https://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/vjikms/47/4.
  7. “Volume List,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, https://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/vjikms.
  8. “Journal History.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “For Authors,” emeraldgrouppublising.com, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/authors/index.htm.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Editorial Team,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=vjikms.
  13. “Journal History.”
Continue Reading

Library Management (LM)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

ISSN: 0143-51241

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”2

Target audience:Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”8

Content: “The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright”9

Frequency of publication: Nine times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews, 3000 to 6000 words in Microsoft Word format.11 See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Management topics.

Submission and review process: The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Authors are asked to create an account through ScholarOne Manuscripts and submit their manuscripts there. As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly.13 Also, while the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas,” many articles have a practical tone when addressing individual libraries.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Management is a highly informative publication which explores topics pertaining to libraries all over the world. For instance, in volume 39, issue 3/4, the topics covered include the economic crisis as it pertains to public libraries in Greece, agricultural libraries in Northern India, and a SWOT analysis of Jamaican academic libraries.16 The journal should also be of particular interest to Chinese authors, due to its annual Chinese supplement.17

LIS authors, whether professional librarians or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into current issues in library management and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, however, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English and published in the UK but is international in scope.19 The editor lives in Australia, while the editorial board members live in various countries throughout the world, including the UK, Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and South Africa.20

To ensure international voices have an opportunity to be heard, Emerald offers an editing service, Peerwith, which offers help with “language editing and translation.”21

Also, the aforementioned annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”22 with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”23

Reader characteristics: Most readers are senior managers and academics. Due to the journal’s international scope, its audience will have diverse cultural experiences. However, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because of this publication’s primary focus on LIS managers, readers are likely to have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LM’s audience is a knowledgeable, diverse, and academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough, and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience. Ideally, authors should hold LIS managerial positions themselves to enhance their credibility in the eyes of their readers.

Last updated: March 3, 2018


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  2. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  4. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  5. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  6. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  7.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  8. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  10. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  13.  Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  14. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Steve O’Connor, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library Management 39, no. 3/4 (2018).
  17.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  18. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  19. Library Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 3, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520112361456/117078
  20. “Editorial Team,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  21. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  22. “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  23.  “Emerald Launches Chinese Website,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  24.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  25.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 3, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

ISSN: 1052-5726 (print), 1052-5722 (online)

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian “is a forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS), featuring articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”1

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive “discourse and action on library issues.” Progressive Librarians Guild (PLG) members receive a subscription, or individuals can subscribe without joining the guild.2

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, by the editorial board.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online. Full text of complete issues and individual articles are available online.5

Content: Progressive Librarian publishes “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”6 Articles cover topics such as sexual violence, social justice, sustainability, youth empowerment, intellectual freedom, international activism, and a wide variety of progressive critiques and analyses of national and international LIS issues.

Frequency of publication:  Two times a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: A Call for Papers for future issues of Progressive Librarian asks for “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, documents, artwork and poetry that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”8

Submission and review process: All manuscripts submitted to Progressive Librarian are reviewed by each member of the editorial board. Manuscripts outside the expertise of board members are sent to outside reviewers for comment and evaluation. The journal also welcomes prints and digital images. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions before publication. For book reviews, please contact the book review editor.9

Editorial tone: The articles are innovative and present alternative views to those of other LIS publications. The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.

Style guide used: Authors may use their preferred citation style “for in-text (parenthetical) citations, footnotes, and endnotes, as well as a bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian), works cited (MLA), and references (APA & Harvard) sections.” The citation style has to be used consistently throughout the manuscript.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Progressive Librarian is a innovative and welcoming journal for LIS authors who write about any issue related to progressive librarianship or the relationship of library and information science to issues of social justice and responsibility. Articles are international in scope and are often focused on current events and actions. LIS professionals and students may submit artwork and poetry, as well as documents, reports, and bibliographies, on progressive issues.

Prospective authors should read the editorial in issue 45 for an understanding of the journal’s philosophy and perspective,11 as well as the Progressive Librarians Guild Statement of Purpose.12

For LIS graduate students, each year the PLG awards the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize “for the best paper about some aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. Papers related to archivists, archives, and archival work are also eligible.” The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian, and the winner receives a $500 stipend toward travel costs to the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, where the award is presented.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal as an international readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, although there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.14 As with any scholarly writing, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.15 The readership is made up of librarians, librarian graduate students, and library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and in how politics informs LIS practices.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals, or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have an understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about news and events in the LIS world, and about national and international politics and current events, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues, or events others may not be familiar with.

 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Broadly speaking, the readers of Progressive Librarian are LIS professionals, scholars, and students who consider themselves socially and politically progressive and who bring their passion for social justice and action to their work in various library and information settings. PLG works against the current idea that “the library is merely a neutral institutional mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society of atomized information consumers.” Rather,  a “progressive librarianship demands the recognition of the idea that libraries for the people has been one of the principal anchors of an extended free public sphere which makes an independent democratic civil society possible, something which must be defended and extended.”16

 

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml.
  2. “Subscription,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_subscribe.shtml.
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml.
  5. “Archive,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml.
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Call for Papers,” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017): verso, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45.pdf.
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. Elaine Harger, “Editorial: Why PLG? Why Paper? Why Bridge Generations?” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017),  http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45/003.pdf.
  12. “Statement of Purpose,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml.
  13. “The Braverman Award,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml.
  14. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  15. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  16. “PLG’s History,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/history.shtml.
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