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Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”1

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,2 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.3

Publisher: Georgia Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.5 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.6

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.7 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,8 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online9

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.10

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”11

Frequency of publication: Quarterly12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.13

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”14

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”15

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.16

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.17

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,19 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.21 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,22 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,23 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia24 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.25 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,26 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  4. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  7. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  9. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  10. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  11. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  12. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  13. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  14. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  15. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  16. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  17. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  18.  (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  19. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  20. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  21. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  23. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
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Library Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”1

Target audience: “Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”7

Content: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”8

Included in every subscription is an annual Chinese supplement.9

Frequency of publication: 9 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 3000 and 6000 words in length.11

The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

Emerald publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that your submission is complete.14

As per the Author Guidelines: “Each paper is reviewed by the Editor and, if it (is) judged suitable for publication, is evaluated using a double-blind peer review process.”15

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. There is a strong international component to the selection of articles in each issue. While the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas”, there is a practical tone in the sharing of issues concerning individual libraries.16

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.17

References should be written in Harvard style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a highly informative publication in the field of library management. The articles in this journal explore a wide range of issues in various types of libraries worldwide. In the current issue alone (Volume 36 Issue 4/5), articles topics include: e-reserves in a Manila library; social welfare information management in Nigerian libraries; academic library leadership; and promotion and tenure for academic librarians.19

LIS authors, whether professional librarians, or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into  current issues in library management, and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

International authors also have an excellent opportunity to publish research on issues important to their particular geographical area.20 Of particular interest to Chinese authors is the annual Chinese supplement — an excellent avenue for publication.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English23, yet is international in scope. While the editor and book review editor are located in Australia, the editorial advisory board comprise professionals worldwide; including, the U.K., Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand and South Africa.24

Emerald offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, that offers “expert Language Editing services for non-native English-speaking authors, and…discounts to authors planning to submit to Emerald’s journal(s).”25

The annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”26, with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”27

Reader characteristics: Readers are senior managers and academics from across the globe. As this journal has an international scope, the audience will have diverse cultural experiences. Despite this, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior managers and academics.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a knowledgeable, diverse, academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience.

Last updated: June 24, 2015


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  10. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  15. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  19. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  22. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Editorial Team. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  27. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  28. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  29. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table 

Website: http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Endnotes Committee is part of the ALA’€™s New Members Round Table (NMRT), a which consists of ALA members with fewer than ten years’ membership. The committee’s mission is to provide support for librarians who want or need to publish scholarly articles, and to publish peer-reviewed research by NMRT members and directed at new librarians.1

The committee oversees publication of Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table.2

Target audience: American Library Association new members, specifically those who are part of the New Members Round Table (ALA NMRT)3

Publisher: American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: According to the Endnotes Committee Charge, “Each edition of the journal will contain 2-4 scholarly articles written by members of NMRT, as well as web site reviews and scholarly book reviews of titles relevant to new librarians.”8

Frequency of publication: One issue per year, with the possibility of more issues if there is interest. The editor welcomes suggestions for special themed issues from NMRT members.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-endnotes-committee

Types of contributions accepted: Original research, practitioner-based research, case studies, book and media reviews. Articles range between 2000-4000 words; book and media reviews 300-500.10

Submission and review process: Endnotes accepts article submissions on a rolling basis, but NMRT members are encouraged to contact the editor about proposals to determine if it fits the journal’€™s scope.11

Send typed, double-spaced MS word docs to nmrtendnotesjournal@gmail.com.12

The committee reviews manuscripts via an double-blind peer-review process. Accepted manuscripts will be returned with committee suggestions for edits, and authors will have about a month to revise the manuscript for publication.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly, but not too formal. The articles and reviews are almost conversational.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

To submit a manuscript for publication, register with the ALA and then join the NMRT, whose mission is to provide support for librarians with that specific goal. The publication is for NMRT members and directed at new librarians.€“ Endnotes is the perfect place for LIS students and new authors to submit a query to supportive editorial staff and among a group of peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Endnotes is an open-access journal available online for anyone to read, but is primarily for members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALA is based in Chicago, IL, but the website and newsletter are online open access, available to anyone with internet access, or through a library. œA network of affiliates, chapters, and other organizations enables the ALA to reach a broad audience. Although it is written in American English and published by the American Library Association, the ALA does not limit itself to U.S. library concerns.17

Reader characteristics: Most readers of Endnotes, and all authors, are members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.18 ALA members include “librarians, library trustees, and other interested people from every state and many nations. The association serves public, state, school, and academic libraries, as well as special libraries for people working in government, commerce and industry, the arts, and the armed services or in hospitals, prisons, and other institutions.”19 The ALA’€™s mission is “€œto provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this scholarly journal are part of the ALA’€™s New Members Roundtable, so they may be expected to be aware of current LIS trends and terminology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are primarily new members to the ALA, and are interested in reading the most recent LIS scholarly research, news, reviews and updates in order to further their education or careers, and to inspire their own research and writing. This is an ideal publication for new authors to consider, and as it’€™s part of the ALA, has built-in credibility and respect, as well as readership.

Last updated: April 22. 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “About NMRT,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-nmrt
  2. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  3. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  4. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  5. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  6. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  7. American Library Association. (2014). Endnotes Committee. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  8. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  9. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  10. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  11. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  12. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  13. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  14. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  15. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  16. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  17. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  18. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  19. “Membership,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  20. “Mission,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  21. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
Continue Reading

base line

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: base line

Website: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: base line is the official publication of the Map and Geospatial Information Round Table (MAGIRT). MAGIRT “leads and inspires information professionals at all levels of expertise in their work with map and geospatial information resources, collections and technologies in all formats, through community, education and advocacy.”1 “The purpose of base line is to provide current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”2

Target audience: As per MAGIRT’s site: “People interested or involved in any aspect of map or geospatial librarianship.”3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Each issue “provide(s) current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: On the first page of each issue: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Types of contributions accepted: base line calls itself “a medium of communication for members of MAGIRT and information of interest is welcome.”10 Articles related to cartography, geography, “related governmental activities, and map librarianship ” would be welcome.11

Submission and review process: Depending on article content, contributions can be sent to one of four editors: Editor, John Olson, jaolson@syr.edu; Cataloging Editor, Tammy Wong, twon@loc.gov; Electronic Mapping Editor, Carol McAuliffe, carolmc@uflib.ufl.edu; or New Maps and Books Editor, David Bertuca, dbertuca@buffalo.edu12

Editorial tone: Articles tend towards an informal, but professional voice.13

Style guide used: Not specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although there is an informality in tone to this publication, there is still room for a more professional article related to geospatial information. This publication offers a good opportunity for a writer with experience in this field of librarianship to be published.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As a benefit of membership in MAGIRT, base line reaches 319 people.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in the U.S. and is written in American English.15 As members hail from across North America, authors should avoid using local terminologies or dialects, and should be tailored to a national audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers are members of MAGIRT. As such, one can assume that the majority of readers are “involved in the geospatial librarianship world.”16

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized LIS knowledge can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of base line are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to MAGIRT committee work and topics related to geospatial librarianship. Members of MAGIRT seem eager to “connect with like-minded people, to learn, or to impart…knowledge.”17 Although the pool of readers is relatively small, the LIS author who is interested in geospatial information will find a supportive and interested readership in base line.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2016). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  2. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  3. American Library Association. (2016). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  4. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  5. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  6. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  7. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  8. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  9. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  10.  American Library Association. (2015). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  11. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  12. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  13. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  14. American Library Association. (2016). MAGIRT Map & Geospatial Resources: About MAGIRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://magirt.ala.libguides.com/resources
  15.  ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  16. American Library Association. (2016). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
Continue Reading

Feliciter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Feliciter

Website: http://www.community.cla.ca

Purpose, objective, or mission: Feliciter is the publication of the Canadian Library Association (CLA) whose mission is to serve as “champion library values and the value of libraries, influence public policy impacting libraries, inspire and support member learning, [and] collaborate to strengthen the library community.”1 Feliciter is “the only national magazine dedicated to serving the Canadian library and information services community.”2

Target audience: Members of the Canadian Library Association. Members of the association include “€œthe staff and boards of public, college and university, special and school libraries.”3

Publisher: Canadian Library Association/Association Canadienne des Bibliothéques.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online only.7

Content: “€œEach issue of Feliciter contains opinion pieces, columns, and feature articles on professional concerns and developments, along with news of the Canadian Library Association.”8 Each issue has a theme, which have included the following: library services for children and young adults, security, information literacy, second careers, and e-resources and the digital divide. Many issues focus on association business, such as conferences and initiatives.9

2014 themes and guest editors are listed on the home page.

Frequency of publication: Six issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=10804

Types of contributions accepted: Articles and contributions should primarily be related to the corresponding theme, but contributions on other information-related topics are also welcome. Articles should be 1,000 to 1,500 words while smaller works, such as reviews, should be about 400 words. Works should be relatively quick to read and provide clear how-to information when applicable.11

You may also suggest a theme for an issue, or volunteer to be a guest editor of Feliciter. The Author Guidelines page lists Guest Editor Guidelines as well as Author Guidelines.12

Submission and review process: Submit full manuscripts by email (publishing@cla.ca), fax or postal service. Theme related submissions must be received 6 weeks prior to publication deadline. Editorial calendar with themes and deadlines included in Author Guidelines. There is no peer-review process and authors work with editors of each issue.13

To submit a theme or apply to be a guest editor, email Feliciter editor Judy Green at CLA (jgreen@cla.ca).14

Editorial tone: Contributions should be “€œinformal but informative. Conclusions should follow logically and statements should be supported.”15 The submission guidelines also note that “€œarticles should not be overly dense or scholarly, but rather written to pique the interest of the readers/audience.”16

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Feliciter is geared toward information professionals who work and reside in Canada and especially members of the Canadian Library Association. There are no restrictions as to the location of contributors, but there may be regional and/or cultural differences regarding LIS topics that should be addressed. Feliciter has been in print for over 50 years and is a credible publication that represents the Canadian Library Association to its members and the world. Students, educators, and practitioners might all have appropriate ideas to contribute. Possible topics include the themes discussed above, and previous themes include “Library Technicians” and “Publishing in Canada.”18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Feliciter serves the Canadian Library Association, which is made up of 2,236 members, including individual, institutional, and library board members. Others may also subscribe to Feliciter and the total circulation of the CLA, as of 2012, is 394.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Out of a circulation of 3942, excepting 47 subscriptions from the United States and 7 foreign subscriptions, all subscriptions are to readers residing in Canada. Readers are spread out among the country’€™s various territories and provinces.20 Feliciter is published in English with many references and information needs specific to Canadians. Issues such as publishing in Canada and the state of Canadian public libraries are common topics. The Canadian Library Association is also known as the Association Canadienne des Bibliothéques, showing that French culture and language contributes to the culture of the association and its publication. Authors should ensure that their content and contributions can resonate with the publication’€™s Canadian readers, possibly doing research on libraries in Canada and using a minimum of regional and cultural references found outside the country.21

Reader characteristics: The website does not provide any gender, ethnic, or other demographic information regarding its readership and membership beyond the types of libraries in which they work and the provinces in which they live. Members of the Canadian Library Association “œwork in college, university, public, special (corporate, non-profit and government) and school libraries. Others sit on boards of public libraries, work for companies that provide goods and services to libraries, or are students in graduate level or community college programs.”22 Most readers will have an MLS or MLIS. Readers will have a strong interest in library and information science issues. Because the readership is predominantly Canadian, authors should ensure that values and ideas expressed are in line with those of Canadian librarians. The publication also produces lots of association news, so content should include information relevant to the association and its members when possible. A look at published articles reveals that news and factual information are published more often than opinions and editorials, showing that the publication has a more objective slant regarding library issues.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The publication is aimed at readers with extensive and growing knowledge of LIS-related issues. These issues will take a variety of foci based on the type of library discussed, the departments and needs within that library, and the clientele served there. In general, readers will understand and relate to LIS jargon, but authors should avoid jargon specific to a certain type of library.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers would benefit most from information and news specific to issues found in Canadian libraries. There are many topics and ideas general to libraries throughout both the United States and Canada, including providing reference service to children and the increased usage of the internet and other electronic avenues. Content should steer clear of cultural references except where those references relate to Canadian libraries. Authors should remember that circulation for this publication is relatively small and insular with a focus on the association and its members.25

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Mission, Values, & Operating Principles. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Mission_Values_andamp_Operating_Principles&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=13985
  2. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter1&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15480
  3. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Membership. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Membership&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=14&ContentID=3221
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  8. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter1&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15480
  9. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Past Issues. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=20141&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15478
  10. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  11. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  12. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  13. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  14. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  15. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  16. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  17. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  18. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter1&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15480
  19. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter Advertising Opportunities. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter2&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=28&ContentID=3756
  20. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter Advertising Opportunities. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter2&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=28&ContentID=3756
  21. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter1&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15480
  22. Canadian Library Association. (2016). About CLA. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=About_CLA
  23. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Archives. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=20141&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15478
  24. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Mission, Values, & Operating Principles. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Mission_Values_andamp_Operating_Principles&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=13985
  25. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Archives. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=20141&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15478
Continue Reading

DttP or Documents to the People

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Dttp or Documents to the People

Website: http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP

Purpose, objective, or mission: The official publication of the Government Documents Round Table (GODORT) of the American Library Association (ALA). This publication disseminates information to ALA and GODORT members about government information and activities on a local, state, national, and international level, and provides information on the professional activities of GODORT.1

Target audience: ALA and GODORT members as well as individuals interested in the global and national environments, and government information and activities.2

Publisher: American Library Association.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news magazine.5

Medium: Print and online (as a pdf)6

Content: From their site, they publish articles on government information and government activities at local, state, national, and international, and intergovernmental levels, and documents the professional activities of GODORT.7

Of particular interest to students, DttP publishes a Student Papers Issue, “designed to showcase the talents and interests of current library school students.”8 Faculty members nominate and forward student papers focusing on government information in all levels of librarianship to the current editor.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors11

Types of contributions accepted: Accepts full-length articles (prefer 1,500-3,000 words in length), news items, letters and other information intended for publication encompassing subjects within DttP‘s scope.12

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted via email to the Co-Lead Editors at dttp.editor@gmail.com, and reviewed for acceptance by editorial staff. Email attachments preferred, in MS Word.13

Editorial tone: The Instructions for Authors ask for articles written “in a grammatically correct, simple, readable style.”14

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed. The website lists more detailed instructions for formatting in the Instructions for Authors document, linked on the Information for Authors page (above).15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Within the scope of this publication’s focus there is considerable potential for LIS authors interested in writing to increase their visibility. While this publication is not peer-reviewed they offer informative works covering a variety of topics. While it may seem that government documents is a narrow field with limited audience, a previous issue contained these articles: Remembering the Forgotten Internment-Attempts at Redress for the Japanese Latin American Internees of World War II, Inventing Nature-The History and Impact of Plants as Intellectual Property, and By the Authority Vested in Me-The Healthy Marriage Initiative and the Federal Government’™s Historical Love Affair with Marriage.16

The Student Papers Issue in particular would be an ideal place for students to have work submitted. 2012 editor Greg Curtis notes, of this year’s student papers issue, “The breadth of topics reaffirms that government information sources cover most, if not all, current research areas. The articles presented here are about government information, but they also are about relevant topics that the reader might find in other journals and periodicals across the intellectual spectrum.”17 DttP‘s December 2012 Student Papers Issue included articles titled Delicate Balance: National Security, Government Transparency, and Free Speech and Historical Data Recovery through Crowdsourcing.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 1,350 (per DttP advertising info page).19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because DttP covers local, state, national, and international government information, it is safe to assume that a majority of its subscribers are U.S. LIS professionals and its circulation is limited to the United States. Additionally, DttP is sent to subscribing ALA/GODORT members on an annual basis.20 Because it deals primarily with information that affect the United States, DttP is published in English. And like most trade and scholarly journals published in English in the United States, the articles are free of all colloquialisms and accessible to the country’s diverse population. Although most articles deal with issues within the LIS field, they are written in language that is comprehensible to the layperson, informal, and straightforward.21

Reader characteristics: GODORT does not have any demographic information specified on their circulation information but, because they stress the subject scope of DttP, we might assume that most subscribers are LIS professionals within a law library or government setting and also include LIS students and laypersons interested in government records. The majority of DttP readers are ALA/GODORT members and are likely to be LIS professionals.22 The scope of the magazine being what it is, most subscribers are probably documents librarians or librarians with an interest in government information. According to the ALA website, GODORT works to “provide a nexus for initiating and supportng programs to increase the availability, use and bibliographic control of documents.”23 Readers of DttP, GODORT’s official publication, most likely support equal access and oppose restrictions of any kind to government documents and, as most of them are probably librarians, are advocates of the free exchange of ideas.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers are most likely ALA/GODORT members, the DttP audience is probably knowledgeable about general LIS issues and topics. They would be especially familiar with subject matters that involve government information use and dissemination, as well as national efforts to restrict as well as to promote access to these types of information.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

A majority of the readers of DttP are GODORT members that are documents librarians or interested in local, state, national, and international government information, however, this publication is also available to non-GODORT or ALA members and, because it is a trade and not a scholarly publication, it is also made accessible to non-LIS professionals. Authors who want to contribute to the journal should opt for an informal yet informative tone and avoid discussing specialized LIS issues that the layperson would not immediately understand, such as bibliographic organization. Although it does pay attention to LIS issues, the primary focus of the journal is on documenting government information and the professional activities of GODORT.25

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
  2. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
  3. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  4. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  5. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  6. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  7. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
  8. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Student Papers Issue. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Student_Papers_Issue
  9. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Student Papers Issue. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Student_Papers_Issue
  10. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  11. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  12. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  13. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  14. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  15. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Information for Authors. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Information_for_Authors
  16. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Full Text. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Full_Text
  17. Curtis, G. (2012). Editor’s Corner. DttP, 40(4) 6. Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/images/7/72/DttP_40n4.pdf
  18. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Full Text. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Full_Text
  19. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Advertising Rates. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Advertising_Rates
  20. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Subscription Information. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Subscription_Information
  21. ProQuest. (2016). DTTP. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412011463189/608091
  22. American Library Association. (2016). DttP Subscription Information. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP_Subscription_Information
  23. American Library Association. (2016). GODORT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/godort/
  24. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
  25. American Library Association. (2016). Documents to the People. Government Documents Round Table (GODORT). Retrieved from http://wikis.ala.org/godort/index.php/DttP
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Bayline

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bayline

Website: To read posts: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/. For information: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/bayline/ and for Archives: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/issues/.

Purpose, objective, or mission: Bayline is the “official bulletin of the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter” of the Special Libraries Association (or the SLA), according to their website. It presents information of interest to librarians in special libraries throughout the Bay Area.1

Target audience: The target audience is comprised of members of Special Libraries Association, an association for libraries who are not in traditional settings. These libraries can be at museums, corporations, law firms, botanical gardens, etc. “SLA serves more than 12,000 members in 83 countries in the information profession, including corporate, academic and government information specialists.”2

Publisher: The San Francisco Bay Region Chapter of the SLA.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news magazine.5

Medium: Online. In 2013, Bayline shifted from a web magazine to a blog that’s incorporated into SF chapter’s website.6

Content: Profiles of member libraries (which can be very interesting and varied), and articles presenting information librarians in nontraditional settings would find useful. It also contains business news for the professional organization, such as the treasurer’s report and information on what members are doing.7

Frequency of publication: Monthly issues, with new posts added as often as necessary. From a recent post, Bayline is updated with at least 2-3 posts per month.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no submission guidelines at the Bayline website however each newsletter contains this statement, “All article submissions must receive approval from the editor and are subject to editing. Submitting authors must sign a copyright release. Authors retain all rights to their articles and know that the full contents of Bayline will be published online at the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter web site. Articles previously published will usually not be accepted for Bayline but exceptions can be negotiated.”9

Types of contributions accepted: There are no limitations given, however the articles should be of interest to the target audience. The invitation to submit does note that Bayline prefers not to publish articles that have seen prior publication, but this is negotiable.10

Submission and review process: Articles must be submitted to the editor before the publication date of the issue they were written for. The editor will read and make sure the article is appropriate for the audience, and is an appropriate length.

To contact the editor email: mcwjrlis@gmail.com .11

Editorial tone: There are no instructions given as to editorial tone, most articles are written in the first person, or third person familiar and informal manner.12

Style guide used: None listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication would be a good venue for anyone writing an informal article on subjects of interest to almost any LIS subject, since special librarianship covers such a wide range of topics. There is no indication authors must be members of SLA to submit work for publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Bayline is a free online newsletter/magazine. It is emailed to members of the Bay Area Special Library Association, but is not printed and distributed. As an online periodical, it’s available throughout the world, but is actively read mostly in the Bay Area.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Bayline is focused on the Bay Area, and deals with subjects of interest to librarians in the Bay Area. It is possible that articles with a national focus would be accepted for publication, but the readership is almost entirely local. This periodical is written in American English. Articles may deal with librarianship in other languages or cultures as special libraries may have collections in other languages, but the articles are written in English. There is a wide variety of cultures represented in the SLA, so authors should be sensitive to other cultures and avoid stereotypes and explain information that might not be evident to someone from a different cultural background.14

Reader characteristics: The range of librarians covered by the SLA is huge. The SLA local chapter website illustrates this by saying, “Members of the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter of SLA work in diverse information environments ranging from business and technical organizations to research, government and academic institutions. We are found in public and private corporations, law firms, colleges and universities, banks and financial institutions, newspapers, hospitals, research facilities, public libraries, and engineering and architectural firms. Although many members work in corporate and special libraries, others are managers, researchers, analysts, technical services specialists, and consultants.”15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are almost entirely professional librarians or library students. A broad background in LIS subject matter can be assumed, but due to the diverse nature of the libraries represented, extremely specialized terms used in specific kinds of libraries or specializations (such as cataloging, technical services, reference) would need to be defined.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of Bayline would be interested in any library topic, especially if it’s local, especially if it involves an unusual library or an unusual librarian. Profiles of libraries, tours of libraries, information on collections, profiles of members and information on resources are all of interest. Information on marketing to the general public would be slightly less well-received here than in other publication (because of the largely corporate nature of the libraries represented) but marketing within the organization would be of great interest.

Bayline is more of a community newsletter than other professional publications, with a section on member news and neighborhood professional dinners. The long community history of the newsletter may explain this, the archive shows that newsletter publication dates back to the 1920s.17

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  2. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  3. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  4. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Bayline Issues. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/issues/
  5. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  6. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  7. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  8. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  9. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2010, February/March). Bayline Staff/Editor’s Notes. Bayline, 80(1). Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/febmar10.pdf
  10. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2010, February/March). Bayline Staff/Editor’s Notes. Bayline, 80(1). Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/febmar10.pdf
  11. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/bayline/
  12. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  13. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  14. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  15. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  16. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  17. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
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Library Connect Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Connect Newsletter

Website: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The Library Connect Newsletter offers articles about “library and information science best practices, issues, trends and events, as well as Elsevier product and service news.”1

Target audience: Librarians and other information professionals.2

Publisher: Elsevier, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Topics of interest to librarians, including LIS news, current issues in LIS, best practices, Elsevier news, and thoughts from leaders in the LIS field.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract

Types of contributions accepted: According to their website the Library Connect Newsletter “welcomes your article ideas. Articles should pertain to academic, medical, corporate and government librarianship, focusing on thought leadership, practical advice, success stories, advocacy, and emerging trends. Newsletters are often developed around a theme, e.g., March 2012 -€“ library supporting the institutional mission. Articles reflecting upcoming themes may be given priority in the print publication.”9]

Submission and review process: Submit article abstracts through the website submission form. The editor reviews and responds to all abstracts.10]

Editorial tone: Conversational and professional; most articles are written in the first person.11

Style guide used: The Library Connect Newsletter evaluates abstracts based on their content, not form or language, and provides editing support to authors.12]

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Connect Newsletter is a respected professional publication with a global audience. LIS practitioners, educators, and students are encouraged to submit work or story ideas here. Editing support is available which makes it an ideal site for new writers.13]

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Approximately 13,000 recipients worldwide receive the newsletter in print, approximately 4,000 recipients receive the digital version.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Publisher based in United States, publication has international audience and a review of the past issues finds articles written by information professionals from around the world.15 Available in English, Chinese, and Japanese. International publication; includes global coverage of LIS news and events.16

Reader characteristics: Library Connect Newsletter is read around the globe by academic, special and medical librarians “interested in library and information science best practices, issues, trends and events.” Readers are likely to be interested in library topics and sympathetic to library issues.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to be familiar with general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors should avoid highly specialized topics and language.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors are advised to submit work of a practical nature, rather than overly scholarly content, as Library Connect Newsletter serves as forum for professional news and discussion.19]

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Elsevier Inc. (2016). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  2. Elsevier Inc. (2016). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  4. Elsevier Inc. (2016). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
  5. Elsevier Inc. (2016). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  7. Elsevier Inc. (2016). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  9. Elsevier Inc. (2016). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
  10. Elsevier Inc. (2016). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
  11. Elsevier Inc. (2014). Library Connect Newsletter – Print Archive. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/newsletters
  12. Elsevier Inc. (2016). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
  13. Elsevier Inc. (2016). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
  14. Elsevier Inc. (2016). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  15. Elsevier Inc. (2016). Library Connect Newsletter – Print Archive. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/newsletters
  16. Elsevier Inc. (2016). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  17. Elsevier Inc. (2016). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  18. Elsevier Inc. (2016). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  19. Elsevier Inc. (2016). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
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CLA Insider

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CLA Insider

Website: http://www.cla-net.org/?11

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the CLA home page: “CLA (California Library Association) provides leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library services, librarianship, and the library community. We help members excel in a fast-changing job market. We’re a resource for learning about new ideas and technology, and we actively work to influence legislation affecting libraries and librarians.”1

From the CLA Newsletter Archives page, the Insider features “€œnews, articles, library/people/program spotlights, information about upcoming events.”2

Target audience: The Insider targets librarians, staff, patrons and users of California libraries.3

CLA’€™s website says that the Insider is members-only.4

Publisher: California Library Association (CLA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: E-newsletter.8

Content: CLA conference updates, member news, news items by and about CLA members, and California-library specific initiatives.9

Frequency of publication: Monthly, since August 2012.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no guidelines provided, but the newsletter’€™s home page provides some direction. See the section on the right side of the page: Comments, Questions, Contribute?11

Types of contributions accepted: News for, by, and about CLA members, member profiles, exceptional CA library services or programs, reports on research projects. Other suggestions welcome.12

Submission and review process: Email CLA Membership Associate and Newsletter Editor Lauren Takeda at laurent@socallibraries.org.13

Editorial tone: Very informal, friendly, California-library positive and CLA focused.14

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you’€™re a student in CA or plan on working in CA libraries, this is a great place for sharing information and news about CA librarian goings-on. You might need to be a CLA member to submit; it’€™s not clear from the guidelines. But this is an excellent newsletter to submit CA news, librarian profiles, initiatives, specific CA library activities, etc. CLA promotes itself as “the community for California Libraries€.” Keep in mind that it’€™s a member-oriented newsletter though, not a peer-reviewed publication, and can only be accessed by members.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently the CLA has around 3000 members. The newsletter is circulated to members; including LIS students, trustees, business memberships (to those who sell products to support library operations), and librarian memberships at all kinds of libraries.16

Geographic location: The publication is based in California.17 Written in American English, the focus is on California libraries and LIS professionals.18

Reader characteristics: The newsletter is targeted to those with an interest in California libraries: students, professionals, service providers, users and library supporters. If there is a bias, it’€™s that CA libraries are exceptional community centers, and the newsletter aims to be the source of information for the libraries.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The knowledge level should be fairly strong, since the newsletter is for California Library Association members. But keep in mind that this is written for and about all sorts of civilians involved in the CA library world, and keep LIS jargon to a minimum.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are interested in hearing positive news about CA libraries: functions, initiatives, programs, advocacy, librarians, and CLA-specific updates. This is a CA specific newsletter, open to suggestions for news, profiles, reports, research -€“ anything having to do with CA libraries. Student submissions – particularly regarding news from CA’€™s LIS programs – would most likely be well received, providing a good balance to the newsletter’€™s current member-centric articles, and giving librarians (and library donors) insider insight into what’€™s going on in the state’™s LIS student centers. CLA Insider has a very limited audience, as it is a members-only publication, yet is still a viable publishing option.21

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. California Library Association. (2016). About the California Library Association. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=A3
  2. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  3. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  4. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  5. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  6. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  7. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  8. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  9. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  10. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  11. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  12. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  13. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  14. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  15. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  16. California Library Association. (2016). History. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=29
  17. California Library Association. (2014). About the California Library Association. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=A3
  18. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  19. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  20. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  21. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
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