Wiki Tags Archives: Gaming

Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Library Philosophy and Practice (LPP)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Philosophy and Practice (LPP)

ISSN: 1522-02221

Website: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, this journal “publishes articles exploring the connection between library practice and the philosophy and theory behind it. These include explorations of current, past, and emerging theories of librarianship and library practice, as well as reports of successful, innovative, or experimental library procedures, methods, or projects in all areas of librarianship, set in the context of applied research.”2

Target audience: Library professionals (primarily employees working in academic libraries) interested in exploring the philosophy of librarianship.3

Publisher: University of Nebraska, Lincoln Libraries; University of Idaho Library4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: LPP includes research-based articles covering all aspects of philosophy and theory of librarianship. Some of the many topics the journal has covered over the years include extended library-hour service, the information-seeking behaviors of journalists, information ethics, the information needs of women in prison, the creativity of public librarians, gaming theory, the role of academic libraries in developing countries as access points to print and electronic resources, and many more.8

Frequency of publication: Annually.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/instructions.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers on all aspects of philosophy and theory of librarianship.10

Submission and review process: Authors should email their articles (in .doc, .rtf, or html format) to the editors. The editors encourage authors to query them prior to submitting an article.  The journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Lastly, authors should be aware that “all manuscripts are checked using Safe Assignment software before they are sent for peer review.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly.12

Style guide used: “Use MLA, APA, or any other style that embeds citations in the article, e.g., (Bolin, 2005), with a list of works cited at the end of the article. Do not use footnote or endnote citations. Please include links to any web resources that are mentioned.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Each issue of LPP covers an extensive variety of topics pertaining to applied research and the theory behind it. The sheer breadth of topics beneath the umbrella of applied LIS research, combined with the journal’s international scope (please see the “Audience analysis” section below) make this publication an excellent choice for new and seasoned LIS authors alike. Additionally, the journal’s flexibility regarding the style used (MLA, APA, etc.) make it an appealing choice for authors in both the humanities and scientific professions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although circulation figures are unavailable, LPP’s papers have been downloaded almost three million times. Nearly 700,000 of these downloads occurred within the past year.14

Audience location: Although LPP is published in the U.S.15, it covers topics pertaining to specific libraries and information organizations all over the world. The map on the journal’s homepage shows that readers live in New Zealand, the U.S., Jamaica, and numerous countries in between.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are educated, have an MLIS, a PhD, or are currently studying in an information and library science program. They may be students yet to work in an information organization, librarians, directors of information organizations, researchers, etc.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: In general, it’s safe to assume that most readers will have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter. However, as mentioned above, the articles vary widely, both in terms of content and complexity. Some articles are written in a less formal style while others are very scholarly, containing advanced language and foreign concepts that even a professional librarian might have trouble deciphering.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Due to the broad scope of this journal, authors should write to a specific group of people, rather than trying to please every reader. Articles tend to address very specific topics (e.g., “Information Seeking Behaviors of Journalists in North India”),19 so readers will expect authors to be experts on their chosen topic. Additionally, authors shouldn’t shy away from technical terms or library jargon, since they can safely assume that at least some of their readers will be familiar with it.

 

Last updated: March 5, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  2.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  3.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  4. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018, http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/~mbolin/lpp.htm
  5. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  6.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  7.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  8. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  9. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  10. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  11. Library Philosophy and Practice: Instructions for Authors,” University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  12.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  13.  “Library Philosophy and Practice: Instructions for Authors,” University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  14.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  15. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  16.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  17. Mary Bolin, email message to author, September 16, 2008.
  18. Mary Bolin, email message to author, September 16, 2008.
  19.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
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Library Hi Tech News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech News

ISSN: 0741-90581

Website: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn

Purpose, objective, or mission: Helps readers stay abreast of events, developments and news in the LIS industries. From their Editorial Objectives: “Readers consider LHTN as the source from which to hear what’€™s coming next in terms of technology development for academic and public libraries.”2

Target audience: Library and info science professionals, and anyone with a reason to use LIS services/technologies in their own professional workplace. The primary goal of the publication is to keep readers ahead of LIS technology developments so they’€™re in the know about what they can use to help improve library services (“€œexploit their potential”), with a nod towards improving services for library users with disabilities through the new tech updates and activities. This is all on an international scale.3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publications.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Articles of varying lengths, reporting on LIS conferences, and case studies on how tech is used in the library.8

Regular content includes technology profiles from libraries around the world; feature articles; in depth conference reviews & reports; new & noteworthy updates for librarians; and a calendar of relevant upcoming events.9

Frequency of publication: 9-10 issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn

The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist.11

Types of contributions accepted: From the website, particularly welcome topics include: New web browsers/search engines; virtual reference experiments; library uses of Skype/VOIP; integrated library systems and management; blogging; library mobile applications; social networks; virtual worlds; Twitter applications for libraries; gaming and simulations; digital textbooks; new library learning spaces; tech for library users with disabilities; crowdsourcing and open source software. The list is extensive.12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article. Upload files as a Word document o f 1000-3000 words. All submissions are reviewed by the Library Hi Tech News editors, who make the final decision on publication.13

Editorial tone: Informal, but informative. Speaks to readers in a knowledgeable, conversational tone that provides great information on new technologies without making the articles dull or so technical that readers are overwhelmed or tune out.14

Style guide used: Harvard style formatting.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech News‘s editorial objectives note that “publishing your article in LHTN can be a ‘€˜place to start,’€™ analogous to a ‘poster session in print’€™, and does not preclude publishing a more fulsome piece in a peer-reviewed journal at a later date.”16€ (A peer-reviewed journal to spring to might be Library Hi Tech.)

The list of content submissions (see Types of Contributions Accepted, above) is vast and touches on subjects that every LIS student will be familiar with, dealing with, and will most likely have an opinion about. This is an excellent place to start your LIS publishing.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International in scope, with the primary editors of the publication based out of U.S. colleges and universities.18 Submissions need to adhere to the Worldwide English language rights, and Emerald provides resources for making sure papers are written in grammatically correct standard English, for authors for whom English is not their first language.19

Reader characteristics: Readers and writers for this publication are LIS professionals and students interested in new and emerging technologies, and new uses for established technologies. The journal is part of the Committee on Publication Ethics  (COPE), “€œa forum for editors and publishers of peer reviewed journals to discuss publication ethics.”€20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as the publication is aimed at LIS professionals and students with an interest in LIS technologies.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors 

This is a wonderful publication for LIS new professionals and students, as readers and authors. The authors are seeking submissions covering such a variety of interesting topics, and seem to be open to submissions on anything that is even remotely related to technologies that can be used in libraries and the LIS field. For example, a 2013 issue provided an overview of Pinterest and how it can be used in libraries, as well as iPads, Kindles and tablets, and social media ethical issues for librarians. All issues that most students, not just LIS, can speak to, and particularly relevant for those in LIS programs currently using and evaluating these technologies, personally, professionally, and through LIS studies. There are also more technical issues covered, like open source library management systems, global development for libraries, profiles of LIS professionals, and relevant conference updates. A great place to jump in and write for.22

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Library Hi Tech News, Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., accessed March, 21, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  3. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  5. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  10. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  11. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  12. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  13. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  14. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  15. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  17. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  18. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Editorial Team. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lhtn
  19. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  20. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  22. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
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Library Success Wiki

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Success: A Best Practices Wiki

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.libsuccess.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Library Success wiki seeks to be a place for library professionals to share successes and best practices. The main page introduction states, “This wiki was created to be a one-stop shop for great ideas and information for all types of librarians.”1 All librarians and information professionals are invited to participate in the wiki to share ideas and tips.2

Target audience: The Library Success Wiki was created for librarians and information professionals of all types. This is a great resource for LIS students, as well.3

Publisher: This wiki was created by Meredith Farkas, the blogger behind Information Wants to Be Free.4

Peer reviewed? No. This wiki is meant as a collaborative effort between all information professionals. Anyone is invited to contribute, adding content without having to request permission.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: The Library Success wiki contains all types of articles and information on library topics ranging from books to gaming to standards to technology.8 Contributors are invited to share on any area of their library expertise or successes.9

Frequency of publication: Because this is a wiki, information is constantly being edited, updated and added. New articles can be added at any time.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For new contributors, the wiki contains a tips page10 and a guidelines page.11 Information about contributing to the wiki is also contained in the introduction on the main page of the Library Success wiki.12

Types of contributions accepted: All types of articles and contributions are accepted. As the introduction states, “If you’ve done something at your library that you consider a success, please write about it in the wiki or provide a link to outside coverage. If you have materials that would be helpful to other librarians, add them to the wiki.”13 Anything that may be useful to other librarians is fair game for this wiki.

Submission and review process: The only requirement for submission is that the contributor register.14 The guidelines state that anything that is published on the wiki that is considered a personal attack, vandalism, advertisement or copyright infringement will be deleted.15

Editorial tone: Since this publication is a collaborative effort and contributors are not required to go through a review process, the tone of this wiki will vary from article to article. The information provided by the creator, Meredith Farkas, is informal.16

Style guide used: There is no formal style guide used or required.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Though publication on this wiki will not get the contributor a notable amount of recognition, it is a great place to practice your writing and get used to putting it out there for others to read and comment on. Providing content for this wiki will help the contributor in their practice of writing for outside audiences. It is also a great place to get feedback from other professionals. This wiki is a great resource for writers as there is quite a bit of information for writing for the profession.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016 there are 13,938 registered users of the Library Success wiki.18 Likely there are readers who are not registered users. The site has had a total of 18,899 page edits since the wiki was set up.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Browsing through various member profiles in the list of members on the Library Success wiki shows that users come from around the United States and internationally. The member list indicated that most of the members are living and working in the United States.20 It would be easy to assume then, that the language and cultural considerations would be that of an American culture and the English language; however, there are members listed from countries such as Chile, Portugal and the UK. The author should be careful to remember that many librarians and library students are from other countries and cultures. It appears an international library viewpoint is welcomed.

Reader characteristics: A perusal of the registered members of this site shows that the members include a wide range of information professionals within the library field. Most of the registered members are librarians. However, the members are from various types of libraries, including public, academic and law libraries. The librarians also represented a wide range of specialties, from teen librarians, to children’s librarians to law librarians and academic librarians. Some members are students and some are support staff at libraries.21

It should be noted that information about the individual characteristics is obtained from the profiles of the members that are registered. The members that are registered are of course, also the authors and editors of the works that appear on the site. The Library Success wiki is a collaboration of librarians that want to share information with one another. Therefore, the authors are readers also and they are creating and editing articles for librarians and library workers like themselves.22

Since users are allowed to publish and edit freely, biases, values and attitudes can vary greatly, as long as users stay within the wiki guidelines. The wiki guidelines prohibit personal attacks and vandalism. However, there were no biases or strong attitudes detected in the various articles that were reviewed.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since most of the registered users are librarians or are library staff, it is safe to assume that the readers have working knowledge of LIS subject matter. The knowledge, of course, can vary from that of a front-line circulation staff member, who would have extensive knowledge of circulation procedures, to the scholarly knowledge of an academic librarian. This means that the knowledge of LIS subject matter will include extensive knowledge in all areas concerning libraries and librarianship.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

While readers are interested in using Web 2.0 technologies and other technologies in libraries25, they are also interested in more traditional library topics, such as weeding, fundraising, material selection and improving access.26 Based on articles and user profiles, it seems that an author may feel more comfortable writing for this publication than submitting a paper for scholarly review. The Library Success wiki would be a good place for authors to experiment with different writing styles, exchange ideas with other users and even get feedback from others. Writing for Library Success wiki could definitely help to polish an author’€™s writing and will help to build confidence in publishing works for others to view.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  2. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved October 16, 2014, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  3. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  4. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  5. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  6. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  7. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  8. Contents. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Categories
  9. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  10. Tips page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Tips_page
  11. Guidelines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/index.php?title=Guidelines
  12. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  13. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  14. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  15. Guidelines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/index.php?title=Guidelines
  16. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  17. Tips page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Tips_page
  18. Statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Special:Statistics
  19. Statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Special:Statistics
  20. Wiki user list. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Wiki_User_List
  21. Wiki user list. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Wiki_User_List
  22. Wiki user list. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Wiki_User_List
  23. Guidelines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/index.php?title=Guidelines
  24. Wiki user list. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Wiki_User_List
  25. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  26. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
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Boing Boing

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Boing Boing

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://boingboing.net/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “A Website devoted to technology and culture. We publish feature articles, links to things we find interesting online, podcasts, videos and comics created by the Boing Boing editorial team and other invited contributors. We also provide a discussion forum so you can participate in the conversation; and sell merchandise in the Boing Boing Shop.”1 Boing Boing allows users to submit interesting, cool, newsworthy links to articles, videos, and any minutia you find interesting.

Target audience: If you’re interested in anything outside the mainstream, this would be the place to look. The website is hailed as a bastion of free speech and imagine sharing; it was founded by an editor of Make Magazine, which is dedicated to all things DIY, and the four primary editors have all written for Wired Magazine.2

Publisher: Happy Mutants, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication / online forum.5

Medium: Online

Content: A blog that shares member-reader links of all sorts -informational, fun, noteworthy.

Frequency of publication: Blog updated with at least several new posts per day.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://boingboing.net/sub/

Types of contributions accepted: Any kinds. (Of note to LIS writers: a team from the American Library Association ran a Boing Boing member interest group called Library Boing Boing from 2012 to 2014. See Library Boing Boing, and their first Boing Boing post; the full collection is tagged LIBRARYLAB. To learn more, see the LibraryLab community on the ALA Connect website.)

Submission and review process:

“Find something interesting, write an informative blurb about it, and send it along.”6 Submit links via the form, never by email, and provide an explanation of what the link is and why it would interest readers. Be clear and concise in your description; don’t obscure it with humor or irrelevant information, and don’t submit content without a link.7

Editorial tone: As informal, but informative, as possible. Headlines and pictures are purposely titillating or attention grabbing. Example: under the “Science” category is the headline: “Anne of Green Gables Had Herpes (and you probably do, too),”an article about herpes. Or “The Librarian and the Hot Rod Shop,” a post about a mobile initiative that provides library resources to people who are unaware of the library, or can’t make it to the local branch.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you have any little library related tidbit to share, this is a great website on which to post it. These are non-reviewed blog posts, so it’s not a site that will help towards your tenured work or that you should cite in a scholarly article, but it’s a great source for getting and sending information to a curious, intelligent, and supportive audience. It would be a great first start for book reviews, for example, or just to write about or re-post some interesting library-related news.

Creative Commons License: non-commercial sharing, with attribution. Just make sure you say where your link/review/article originated.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: In an article in Fast Company, according to Quantcast data, it gets about 2.5 million unique visitors a month. The article also states that, in 2004-2005, it “had become one of the most-read and linked-to blogs in the world.”9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to Quantcast data, Boing Boing reaches an international audience, though 63% of its readers are in the United States.10 English is the primary language, but as the site also links to websites, videos, etc., as long as you explain the reason for submitting your article/website/repost, the language of the thing itself isn’t too strict. Culture is progressive and friendly, hacker-ish and non-mainstream.

Reader characteristics: Quantcast data reports that the majority of readers are white, male, and highly educated.11 Hackers, DIY-ers, those who like to stay current on news/gadgets/things, and anyone with an eye on web culture and interesting news of all kinds will gravitate towards the blog. The blog’s bias lies on the side of being, for the most part, uncensored and relishing in re-posting links that test freedom of speech and censorship in the online community. They are very much an “anything goes” site, as long as “anything” is interesting to readers.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: More civilian than professional; LIS jargon should be kept to a minimum, use layman’s terms and just get your point across in the least scholarly tone possible. The readership comprises a savvy group of people, but they are not all LIS aficionados, so use regular, everyday terms when describing your link and why you find it interesting.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Boing Boing would be a great place to post information relevant to the library community: its readers, while very much an online-loving group, seem to enjoy hearing about LIS-related news, particularly if it has to do with free speech, public access, or challenges to the LIS community. They are well-read, spoken, and intelligent, and, with the inclusion of the LIS-specific posting group, would appreciate links coming from the Library world. Although not scholarly in tone, the links posted can be of scholarly caliber, and the blog has garnered attention and awards, and holds a certain status in the blogosphere; posts here are likely to be reposted elsewhere and shared.

Last updated: October 10, 2018


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1. “Boing Boing Terms of Service,” BoingBoing.net, accessed September 10, 2016, http://boingboing.net/tos
  2. “Boing Boing,” Wikipedia, accessed October 24, 2014, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boing_Boing
  3. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  4. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  5. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  6. “How to Get Something Posted to Boing Boing,” Peter Shankman blog, August 15, 2007, http://shankman.com/how-to-get-   

    something-posted-to-boing-boing/

  7. How to Get Something Posted to Boing Boing
  8. Boing Boing Terms of Service
  9. “10 Tips from Boing Boing on Making Online Content Sing,” FastCompany.com, accessed September 10, 2016, http://www.fastcompany.com/3005636/10-tips-boing-boing-making-online-content-sing
  10. “boingboing.net,” Quantcast.com, accessed September 10, 2016, https://www.quantcast.com/boingboing.net
  11. boingboing.net
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Young Adult Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Young Adult Library Services (YALS)

ISSN: 1541-4302 (Print) and 2374-7706 (Online)1

Website: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/

Purpose, objective, or mission: It is the official journal of Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) and from their site, “…act[s] as a showcase for best practices, provide[s] news from related fields such as youth development, and will spotlight significant events of the organization…”2

Target audience: Librarians and library staff who serve youths, ages 12 through 18.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and limited online content.7

Content: Showcases best practices, news from related professions, reviews of professional literature, and spotlights YALSA events.8 Each issue may contain articles on important topics such as: intellectual freedom, collaboration, adolescent literacy, youth development, and leadership. There may also be interviews, speeches, or bibliographic essays.9

Frequency of publication: Four times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: News of current interest to the profession, articles on best practices, news from related professions, and reviews of professional literature. Interviews are also accepted. Manuscripts submitted should not be under consideration or accepted elsewhere.11

Submission and review process: Contact editor for specifics concerning submission and style guidelines. In general simultaneous submission or previously published work not accepted.12

Editorial tone: There is no stated tone for article submissions, and articles can range from academic to reports on field practice. A wide variety of styles is acceptable as long as the submission conforms to the themes and types of articles YALSA is interested in for their readers.13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and specific YALS defined style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is eminently suitable to anyone who has an interest in writing articles geared towards librarians serving young adults (aka “teenagers,” adolescents,” “youth”). It would be an excellent resume builder to have been published in the YALSA journal. The guidelines are direct and exact. Getting published in this journal might be difficult for a novice, but the attempt would be worth it.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: YALS reaches YALSA membership, approximately  5,000 librarians and educators.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: YALSA is centered in Chicago, IL, and the main geographic location served is the United States. However, they do outreach programs in other countries and some members are international, so the journal has a limited international scope as well. Cultural considerations do not generally enter into the journal’€™s authorship. Most authors appear to be writing solely for American librarians who serve young adults. These articles can be applicable to most any other developed country’€™s librarians serving youth (ages 12-18), however, even more than with young adult services in the U.S., there is a dearth of research and scholarship on developing nation’s youth services.16

Reader characteristics: Readers range in location, age, and gender. They are spread all over the U.S. in both public and school libraries. The vast majority of readers have MLIS degrees and work as Young Adult Specialists or youth generalists in public library librarians or School Library Media Technicians. Some readers are para-professionals or library assistants at these locations and do not have the MLIS degree. All the librarians who read YALS, however, are highly interested in services to young adults (ages 12-18) as that is the target issue for this particular journal. Some interests they all share are collection development for YA literature, programming, methods of incorporating library use into school curricula, intellectual freedom, subscription databases, and hot topic issues having to do with youth services. Since the librarians targeted by this journal work with young adults (ages 12-18), their needs tend to be a trifle more progressive than some fields. The world of youth services is constantly expanding and evolving due to YA reliance on the internet and technology. In order to keep up with the clientele they serve, the readers are going to be looking for innovative articles which will offer the ideas, experiences, and opinions of their colleagues.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that most of the readers have MLIS degrees, contributors can assume that readers will be familiar with the profession’s vocabulary, particularly that pertaining to young adult services.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important thing to keep in mind when writing for YALS is that the readership is going to be interested primarily in topics having to do with youth librarianship. They are not going to be interested in esoteric topics on archives, law libraries, etc. Some articles on cataloging or subscription databases would be acceptable, but primarily articles should be geared toward advancing, managing and delivering excellent library and information services to young people.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Young Adult Library Association, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 18, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1165334034
  2. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). About YALS. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/about_yals/
  3. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). About YALS. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/about_yals/
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406648872693/442511
  5. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406648872693/442511
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406648872693/442511
  8. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/submissions/
  9. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Young Adult Library Services. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406648872693/442511
  11. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  12. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  13. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  14. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/author-guidelines/
  15. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). Advertising. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/advertising/
  16. American Library Association. (2016). About YALSA. Young Adult Library Services Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/yalsa/aboutyalsa
  17. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). About YALS. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/about_yals/
  18. Young Adult Library Services. (2016). About YALS. Retrieved from http://www.yalsa.ala.org/yals/about_yals/
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School Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School Library Journal (SLJ)

ISSN: 0362-89301

Website: https://www.slj.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “School Library Journal aspires to be an accelerator for innovation in schools and public libraries that serve the information, literacy, and technology needs of 21st century children and young adults. SJL provides resources, services, and reviews that make library and education professionals savvier, and communities stronger.”2

Target audience: Librarians that work with students in K-12 schools as well as those in public libraries.3

Publisher: Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Professional.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Claims to be one of the most authoritative reviewers of children’s and young adult materials. It mainly focuses on books, but also includes reviews on audio and video items. The journal also contains columns, news, and feature articles.8

Frequency of publication: Monthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.slj.com/about-us/content-submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Items of interest to librarians and educators who work with children: feature articles, news articles, and specialty columns.10 Articles from the last few years include topics such as tidiness vs. a messy library, a high-tech twist on a treasure hunt called “geocaching,” bloggers, Wii, YouTube, censorship, racy reads, Web 2.0, and the joys and pitfalls of sharing literature orally.11

Submission and review process: Send article proposals (400 words or less) to the editor before submitting any complete articles. Feature articles are generally less than 2,500 words, while opinion pieces are around 600-700 words. News articles can vary in length, depending on the topic. Please include your name, location, and affiliation on your submission.12

Editorial tone: Informative, but not academic.13

Style guide used: None indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a successful and popular publication that, while they encourage submissions, may be difficult to break into as a writer. A review of the publication with attention to the authors published in their pages will give a writer a better idea if this is a good match for them.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: School Library Journal has a circulation of 24,000 in the print edition, and slj.com reaches over 95,000 subscribers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The media kit does not give a specific breakdown on the nationality of the readers. The history of the journal reveals that it is entirely geared toward schools in the United States and Canada.15 Most of the readers of this journal would be those who work with youth in libraries in the United States, so there should not be any problems with cultural references, LIS jargon, or terminology particular to education.16

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal would be those who work with K-12 students, either in the schools or the public library. They have a shared interest in promoting literacy and welcome resources that inspire student achievement.17

Bias is evident in articles regarding intellectual freedom, censoring, and filtering. For the most part these articles paint these issues as being negative aspects within school libraries. Attitudes towards other subject matter is generally positive, with overtones of cooperation and a willingness to make school libraries a integral part of the learning community.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this journal would not be limited to those with teaching credentials or MLS degrees. Some may be library media technicians who may not have an advanced degree, but would have enough education or professional training in order to understand the subject matter.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of School Library Journal have a common interest in children’€™s literature and issues regarding school libraries. Many of the readers are library technicians, so some articles are geared toward encouraging collaboration with teachers and librarians. Authors should recognize that there is an education gap as well as a wage gap between the professionals and the paraprofessionals and should refrain from using an excess of technical terms in their articles. Readers of SLJ maintain a great interest in information literacy and how this can be integrated into the curriculum, as well as increasing the technology available to the students. Introducing ideas that are on the cutting edge of technology yet are not restricted by financial or time constraints would be a way of effectively reaching the intended audience.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  School Library Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 18, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399134773/52981
  2. School Library Journal. (2016). About Us. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/
  3. School Library Journal. (2016). About Us. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). School Library Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406849317591/52981
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). School Library Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406849317591/52981
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). School Library Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406849317591/52981
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2016). School Library Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406849317591/52981
  8. School Library Journal. (2016). About Us. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2016). School Library Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406849317591/52981
  10. School Library Journal. (2016). Content Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/content-submissions/
  11. School Library Journal. (2016). School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/#_
  12. School Library Journal. (2016). Content Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/content-submissions/
  13. School Library Journal. (2016). Content Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/content-submissions/
  14. School Library Journal. (2016). School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/#_
  15. School Library Journal. (2016). School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/#_
  16. School Library Journal. (2016). About Us. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/
  17. School Library Journal. (2016). About Us. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/
  18. School Library Journal. (2016). School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/#_
  19. School Library Journal. (2016). About Us. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/about-us/
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Voice of Youth Advocates

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://www.voyamagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Focuses on library services to/with young adults (aka “teenagers” “adolescents,” typically youth of middle and high school ages). VOYA‘s policy is based on the following principles: specialize in young adult library service; intellectual freedom and equal access; and youth advocacy and youth participation.1

Target audience: Public librarians, school librarians and educators serving youth ages 12 to 18, paraprofessionals serving youth, publishers, authors of young adult books, and other young adult advocates.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional journal.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The journal includes book reviews on fiction, nonfiction, and genre titles, as well as articles about YA services, programming, space design, and lists of award winners.7

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly publication.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Literary analysis, author interviews, or practical project ideas, new YA space redesigns or makeover profiles (a regular column) are accepted. Submissions are also accepted for the “VOYA Get With the Program” column.9

Submission and review process: Short articles should be between 800 to 1,700 words and up to 3,500 words for longer pieces. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Information for specific column requirements is available on the website. Authors should query the editor before submitting manuscripts, to ensure the piece is suitable for the journal.10

Editorial tone: VOYA solicits articles written in an approachable style for practitioners serving YA users. The goal is to publish articles by authors who express enthusiasm in working with YA and who can speak from experience about YA services.11

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VOYA is a well-respected journal in the field of library and information services for young adults. The journal is written in an approachable style which may not meet tenure requirements for academic faculty. Also, this journal is intended for public and school librarians who work with YA and not academic librarians. Those interested in tenure may not want to submit manuscripts for publication to this journal.

The journal welcomes articles about new, progressive, informative, and controversial issues as they relate to youth culture. Authors who have experience in working with YAs and who can demonstrate enthusiasm for working with them through their writing are encouraged to submit manuscripts. VOYA‘s wide range of readers provides authors with a large audience which will provide them wide recognition in the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: VOYA has 7,000 subscribers. According to the last reader’€™s survey, each subscriber circulates the journal to two colleagues which means that the journal experiences a readership of 21,000 people.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published within the United States,13 but there is a possibility that there are subscribers outside of the country. The journal is printed in English.14 Due to wide readership, it is important that language remain clear of local jargon. This also means that all acronyms should be spelled out. Cultural consideration should also be taken into account. Pop culture references should be explained so that all readers will understand. This is very important for this journal since it focuses on young adults, who are very interested in pop culture.15

Reader characteristics: There is no statistical breakdown on the readers of this journal. However, the journal does say that the readers of this journal are public and school librarians, educators, authors of young adult books, publishers, and other youth advocates. The common interest among this group is young adults. However, they may not all be interested in this age group in the same way. School librarians may be more interested in the book review section and have marginal interest in programming, which public librarians are keen on. Publishers and authors might also be interested in the book review sections and the interviews with authors. The journal does not profess itself to be liberal or conservative, however, it does value intellectual freedom, young adults, literature for this group, and advocacy for YA resources. All of which lean more towards a progressive attitude. The journal often features articles about controversial topics, books, or authors.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the breadth of professions represented in this readership community, it is suggested that authors avoid using LIS specific jargon which may not be understood or interesting to lay readers.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal are a very diverse group in terms of language, geographic location, profession, and educational attainment. Authors should consider writing articles about new and interesting topics in the field of library services. However, the topics should not be scholarly in tone or esoteric. Authors should remember that the readers have different backgrounds and interests in young people.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  2. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  7. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  9. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  10. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  11. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  12. VOYA. (2016). AdvertisersRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/advertisers/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  14. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  15. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  16. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  17. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
Continue Reading

Slashdot

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Slashdot

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://slashdot.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Slashdot is an online forum that provides “News for Nerds. Stuff that Matters.” This “stuff” includes stories on various aspects of technology, from discussing user’s rights online, to sharing ideas and news on various IT subjects. Content is submitted by readers, who can also assist editors in the selection of material by utilizing the site’s collaborative moderation system called “Firehose,” which contains RSS Feeds, story submissions, and journals which have color-coding to indicate popularity. Using the color spectrum scale, “Red is hot, violet is not,” users can tag and vote on entries, in addition to providing feedback.

Target audience: “Knowledgeable and tech savvy users.”1

Publisher: BIZX, LLC.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication. This is an online forum that publishes reader’s articles on various aspects of technology, in addition to providing an interactive networking environment. Although it is likely to appeal to techie librarians, the primary target audience is not librarians; thus, it would be considered a lay publication rather than an LIS publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Story sections are self-explanatory, with some exceptions: “Apache” (news about the Apache web server); “Apple” (news on all things Mac); “Ask Slashdot” (ask the readership any questions about software problems, hardware, jobs, etc.); “BSD” (news about “modern UNIXes derived from Berkeley’s distribution [like Free, Open and NetBSD]”); “Developers” (news that affects any aspect of programming, such as language, licensing, or techniques); “Features,” “Games,” “Geeks in Space” (not currently open for submissions, this was an audio broadcast provided by the editors); “Interviews”; “IT;” “Linux;” “Politics;” “Polls” (submit “thought-provoking 4-6 question polls to share); “Science;” and “Your Rights Online” (news and information on spam, privacy, and other issues affecting our rights online). Archived articles, book reviews, and job listings complete the content.

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://slashdot.org/faq/submissions.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “The closer a submission is to featuring all the “perfect” characteristics, the better the chances are that it will run. While we will sometimes tweak submitters’ grammar, spelling and punctuation, attempt to fix broken links, and even edit with brackets and ellipses (in the interest of brevity, clarity and good taste), the nicer a submission starts out, the less tempted we are to hit “delete.” Not every Slashdot post is perfect — but the better they are, the better it is for everyone.”3 “A perfect Slashdot submission is: interesting, informative, clear, snappy, presented neutrally, submitted with appropriate topics, usually based on text and still images, labelled with an understandable, concise headline, well-linked, and grammatically correct.”4

Submission and review process: Use the Submit link located at the top right of website’s home page. Creation of an account is required first. This is a moderated site allowing administrators and editors to approve or remove posts.5

Editorial tone: Informal.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors with a technical bent will find the latest news, stories, and feeds on technology informative. This forum is an informal way to get stories submitted without a formal publishing process and allows for feedback from the target audience. Authors can pitch ideas and ask questions6, perhaps opening the discussion for more library and information science issues.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 3.2 million monthly unique visitors.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this publication is only available online, there is no central geographic location. It is likely that users are international. The publication is written in English and no information is provided on the possible cultural considerations of the audience. This matter could be important, as different countries may have varying technical standards that would need to be further investigated and considered, perhaps by reading further into archives and different sections to find out if any stories on international issues are submitted.

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers work in IT.8  The general audience of Slashdot may not seem the ideal audience for an LIS writing, as they have concerns that would not necessarily reflect the ethics, interests, or issues of LIS. However, with the future of LIS moving quickly with new technology, this audience could be a great source of objective information. The technical aspects of the profession could be introduced into this forum with a group who might have new ideas or strategies unknown to an LIS author.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This forum does not actively promote LIS subject matter, unless there is a newsworthy story to share. However, with the influx of technology influences on LIS, this would be an interesting forum to share LIS information and get feedback that might be more objective on emerging technology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writing and participating for this website would certainly not be a project for the light-hearted “LIS techie.” LIS authors with an avid interest in technology might be able to find middle ground with this publication on issues such as privacy concerns. The ability to collaborate with an audience with general technical backgrounds might open a dialog on the various ways that technology affects libraries.

Last updated: September 18, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “2016 Media Kit,” SlashdotMedia.com, accessed November 14, 2016, https://slashdotmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Slashdot-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  2. “Frequently Asked Questions,” Slashdot.org, accessed November 14, 2016, http://slashdot.org/faq/index.shtml
  3. “Submissions,” Slashdot.org, accessed November 14, 2016, http://slashdot.org/faq/submissions.shtml?source=autorefresh
  4. Submissions.”
  5. Submissions.”
  6. Frequently Asked Questions.”
  7. 2016 Media Kit.”
  8. 2016 Media Kit.”
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Wired Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Wired Magazine

ISSN: 1059-1028 (Print)1

Website: http://www.wired.com/magazine/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the website, “Wired is the ultimate authority on the people and ideas changing our world.”2 The magazine examines technology and its effect on all aspects of culture, from social and recreational to business and politics.

Target audience: Readers who have an interest in technology and its effect on our culture.

Publisher: Conde Nast Publications Inc. and Wired Ventures Ltd.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Articles on the intersection of technology and business, culture, politics, science, etc.

Frequency of publication: Monthly.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.wired.com/2016/08/how-to-submit-to-wired-opinion/

Types of contributions accepted: Op-eds which are no longer than 1,000 words, and argue a certain point of view.5

Submission and review process: Pitches and/or completed pieces should be sent to opinion [at] wired.com. If sending a pitch, clearly state your thesis and why you specifically are writing about it. Include your biographical information; they want to know who you are and why you’re writing. Mark the subject of your email as “Op-Ed Pitch: Sentence Describing Your Opinion.”6

Editorial tone: Informal but polished.

Style guide used: None noted.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Wired is for the writer with fresh, definitive ideas about how the various cultures of our world will respond, influence, and share the future of technology and science. LIS authors who are passionate about innovations in the information field and how these ideas affect people will enjoy writing for this publication. Wired allows LIS authors to release themselves from the rigid boundaries of academic styles and create anecdotes rich with cultural, moral, or institutional conflict within digital technologies. Publishing for this popular magazine will also create contacts beyond the LIS field and expand the breadth of publication opportunities for the LIS writer.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print circulation of over 870,000, with a digital monthly reach of 20 million.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is based in San Francisco, CA, but international subscriptions are available. Although the magazine is in English, international subscriptions are available.8 Audience demographic information doesn’t include geographic location.

Reader characteristics: Readership is roughly 70% male, 30% female. Most have graduated college and are fairly affluent.9 Readers are described as “globally-minded thought leaders, innovators, bloggers, and connectors” who are “constantly seeking new ideas.”10

The assumption that this audience works mainly in tech industries should not be made, as this publication covers a diverse range of subjects that are affected by technology, such as culture, cars, politics, and entertainment.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Library terminology or other discipline-specific language will need to be defined for this more general audience. This popular, civilian publication may have many LIS readers who are interested in gaining a new perspective on technology from a civilian viewpoint. However, this would not be an appropriate venue to discuss LIS subject matter in detail. The majority of readers will not be familiar with LIS issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This group of readers may be very interested to learn how technology is affecting their possibly preconceived ideas of what the library offers and represents. An interest in librarian issues may be cultivated through the technology issues. Readers might be be interested in technological innovations within libraries as well as other issues such as privacy concerns.

Last updated: September 11, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1.  Wired, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 28, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522261645312/211317
  2. “Wired Advertising,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/wired-advertising
  3. “Wired,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed December 5, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1416948580144/211317
  4. “Wired Magazine Subscription,” Subscribe.Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://subscribe.wired.com/subscribe/wired/109077?source=AMS_WIR_GLOBAL_NAVBAR&pos_name=AMS_WIR_GLOBAL_NAVBAR
  5. “Here’s How to Submit to Wired Opinion,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/2016/08/how-to-submit-to-wired-opinion/
  6. Here’s How to Submit to Wired Opinion.”
  7. “2017 Media Kit,” Wired.com, accessed December 5, 2016, https://www.wired.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/WMG_Media_Kit_2017_v3.pdf
  8. Wired Magazine Subscription.”
  9. 2017 Media Kit.”
  10. 2017 Media Kit.”
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