Wiki Tags Archives: Fiction

Information for Social Change

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information for Social Change

Website: http://libr.org/isc/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An activist librarian organization that “examines the issues of censorship, freedom and ethics amongst library and information workers.”1

Target audience: LIS workers and practitioners.2

Publisher: Information for Social Change.3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional. The topics and informal style of the content may also appeal to civilian readers.5

Medium: Online6

Content: Documenting the control of information globally and also alternatives to the control of information.7

Frequency of publication: Semi-annually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libr.org/isc/call-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles between 500 and 2500 words. Longer articles may be excerpted with the full text made available from the author, according to the guidelines. Letters, review articles and poems are also accepted for publication.9

Submission and review process: Send an email to the editor at isc-journal@libr.org.10

Editorial tone: Simple and clear English. Views are radical and thought-provoking themes that promote debate.11

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS authors who are interested in radical librarianship that examines censorship, ethics and freedom, this journal would be a good choice. The journal suggests potential authors review past and current issues in order to gauge the interest.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not stated but British English style of writing is used.13 Website is in British English but it’s not stated as to whether that is the only acceptable version. This journal addresses global issues so it is safe to assume their readers are international. The organization holds events in association with progressive groups such as Third World Book Fair.14

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely progressive in their viewpoints. Readers are LIS professionals with progressive and radical views15 who are interested in finding channels in which to allow “unfettered and unmediated ideas” to circulate.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS terms and the profession is helpful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal most likely hold progressive viewpoints and feel strongly about the issues presented such as freedom of information and radical changes to the way information is controlled and disseminated. Authors who wish to submit to this publication should hold similar views or at least be extremely open to new ideas.17


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Information for Social Change. (2016). Welcome. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/
  2. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  5. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  7. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  9. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  10. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  11. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  12. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  13. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  14. Information for Social Change. (2016). Events. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/events/
  15. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  16. Information for Social Change. (2016). Policies. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/policies-submission-guide/#1
  17. Information for Social Change. (2013). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
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Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal

Website: http://associates.ucr.edu/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Provides a voice for and promotes the exchange of information within the library support staff community.1

Target audience: The primary audience is support staff at all libraries including public, special, academic, and school. The journal is online and subscriptions are free.2

Publisher: University of California Riverside Library.3

Server and listservs are housed at the University of California, Riverside, and the website is powered through WordPress.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Professional newsletter.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Topics range from how-to articles, opinion pieces, conference information, resource updates, fiction, conference updates, and research articles.8

Frequency of publication: Published three times per year, in March, July, and November.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88

Types of contributions accepted: The newsletter discusses issues and developments related to the work of library support staff. Topics might include cataloging, collection management, public relations, technology, and personnel issues. Priority consideration will be given to submissions written by library support staff. The submission guidelines provide a list of topics for feature article consideration.10

Submission and review process: Articles of any length are accepted, however the guidelines are: no longer than 10 double-spaced typed pages for features; four double-spaced typed pages for fiction; and one double-spaced typed page for poetry. Submissions are reviewed by a member of the editorial board. “Significantly edited versions will be returned to the authors for discussion or approval. However, most editing is done for punctuation, grammar and for establishing clarity.”11

Items can be submitted any time prior to the publication months and should be submitted to the editor, Kevin Dudeney, at: associates@hotkey.net.au.12

Editorial tone: Items that are written from or focused on a support staff point of view are preferred.13 A review of previous issues indicated that a folksy and approachable style is prevalent.14

Style guide used: There are no specific style guidelines given, but the editors state that “all submissions must be written in a professional manner, with citations for researched material provided.”15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Since most LIS students have worked or are working in support staff positions, this publication may be a good place to get started writing for the field. While it is not a scholarly journal, it would allow an author to demonstrate their understanding of a staff position other than a librarian.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Per their website updated 2014, they currently have “1,700 world-wide subscribers.”16 Subscription to Associates is free, and all issues are available free online which suggests they may have an audience beyond their subscribers.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication originates in the United States however they claim to have “1,700 world-wide subscribers”, indicating an international audience.18 It is an English language publication.19 Due to international audience, avoid regionalisms and any references, for example currency or location, are clear to the reader.

Reader characteristics: Audience, as support staff in all types of libraries, most likely reflects the general public, all ages and backgrounds, with an interest in connecting with other support staff and improving their job skills. Publication values the work of support staff and aims to promote the value of library support staff.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As library support staff, the readers can be expected to have the background and education to understand topics and terminology used in work accepted by this publication.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting work to this publication would benefit from reading the current and past issues to gain a clear understanding of their audience. It seems a cooperative approach, emphasizing the value of all team members in a library, would be useful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  2. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  4. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  8. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  9. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  10. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  11. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  12. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  13. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  14. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Archives and Back Issues. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=4
  15. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  16. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  17. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  18. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  19. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  20. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  21. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
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The Atlantic

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Atlantic

Website: http://www.theatlantic.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “We constantly challenge ourselves,and our readers, to rethink just about everything, from business and politics to art and culture. At The Atlantic, we don’t just answer questions. We question answers.The result? Big, provocative ideas that get people talking—about the issues that matter most.1

Target audience: For general audiences interested in current topics and foreign affairs.

Publisher: The Atlantic Monthly Group.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: General interest magazine with varied topics from politics, foreign affairs, and culture.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: News stories, articles, fiction pieces, and interviews.

Frequency of publication: Published monthly except for two combined issues (10 times a year).3

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.theatlantic.com/faq/#submissions

Types of contributions accepted: According to their guidelines, “The Atlantic magazine is always interested in great nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. A general familiarity with what we have published in the past is the best guide to our needs and preferences.”4

Submission and review process: All manuscripts should be submitted as a Word document or PDF. Succinct pitches may be submitted in the body of an e-mail. Send nonfiction manuscripts or pitches to submissions [at] theatlantic.com, fiction manuscripts to fiction [at] the atlantic.com, and poetry to poetry [at] the atlantic.com.5

Editorial tone: Writing is sophisticated but easy to read.

Style guide used: None offered.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because The Atlantic welcomes unsolicited manuscripts, there is potential for LIS authors to inform a general audience of library news and events. This is not a scholarly journal, yet there is plenty of prestige in being published here as it is more than 150 years in publication.6 LIS professionals and novice writers have an opportunity to expound or elaborate on topics of interest and perhaps find ideas for scholarly works. Fiction and poetry submissions are also welcomed; it appears that many LIS professionals find this to be a stimulating outlet for non-scholarly writing. Topics that might be suitable for this venue are technological change in libraries, political and social issues surrounding libraries, and the paperless academic library.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print circulation is 496,000.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information regarding audience location is not provided, though international subscriptions are available.8 Content is published in English.

Reader characteristics: The ratio of readers runs 52-48%, male-female readership. The median age of digital readers is 45, with an average household income of $91, 505.9 According to the media kit, the print magazine was ranked number two for college graduates, while the website was ranked number one for “tech geeks.”

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are not likely to know a lot about LIS subject matter if they are simply reading this magazine. A recent article, “Is Google Making Us Stupid,” published here would indicate that readers have some interest in computers and technology; researching the magazine index could not locate any specific articles on library and information science. As this audience is considered affluent and well educated, they are likely to read other magazines and have formulated opinions on LIS topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Atlantic are an educated, affluent group of readers. Readers are interested in smart writing and provocative, thought-provoking conversations. LIS topics and issues that need influential advocates would certainly find them here. Articles should be well written, directed toward an educated audience, limit library jargon (or explain each thoroughly), and provide documented corroboration for their issues. References are not a requirement; however, if the author is seeking advocacy for LIS issues, articles will need facts, not just opinions, and perceptive readers will be able to distinguish between the two. Authors must be determined and resolute in their submission process, as The Atlantic receives too many submissions annually to consider them all.

Last updated: November 20, 2016


References

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The Sun Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Sun Magazine

Website: http://thesunmagazine.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The Sun is an independent, ad-free magazine that for more than forty years has used words and photographs to evoke the splendor and heartache of being human. Each monthly issue celebrates life, but not in a way that ignores its complexity. The personal essays, short stories, interviews, poetry, and photographs that appear in The Sun’s pages explore the challenges we face and the moments when we rise to meet them.”1

Target audience: The target audience is the general public; specifically, The Sun targets readers who are intelligent, educated, concerned about community and social issues, and enjoy reading stories, essays, and interviews that they might not find in more mainstream publications.

Publisher: The Sun Publishing Company, Inc.2

Peer reviewed? No.3

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Essays, interviews, fiction, poetry, and black and white photography.4

Frequency of publication: Monthly.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing

Types of contributions accepted: The Sun accepts submissions of essays, interviews, fiction, and poetry. There is no minimum word count, but submissions of longer than 7,000 words are rarely accepted. The Sun favors personal writing, but is also looking for “provocative pieces on political and cultural issues.”6 Interview pieces should focus on “innovative and provocative thinkers,” and The Sun is particularly interested in interviews with women and people of color.7 Submissions may also be made to magazine’s “Readers Write” series, in which readers respond to a given theme each month with a short, nonfiction piece.8

Submission and review process: The Sun does not accept submissions by fax or email. Submissions must be typed (single-spaced is acceptable for poetry, double-spaced for all other types) and sent with a self-addressed stamped envelope. The review process typically takes three to six months, but may be longer. Queries are suggested prior to submitting interview pieces. Interview pieces can be lightly edited prior to submission, and will be further revised upon acceptance.9

Editorial tone: Personal, provocative writing preferred.10

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Sun offers an excellent opportunity for LIS authors to reach a more mainstream audience than an industry publication. Since it appeals to people who tend to be educated, socially active, and well read, The Sun provides an audience who will likely be interested in issues facing libraries and their roles in society and community, including funding challenges, services to minorities, and trends in information literacy. Interestingly, The Sun provides subscriptions for free or at reduced rates to institutions such as prisons and homeless shelters (and often includes submissions from inmates and other “marginalized” members of society)11, so would provide a forum for submission of writing concerning library services to these populations.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 70,000.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Sun’s publication office is located in North Carolina and at one time was targeted locally.13 However, it is now read and distributed throughout the United States. At this time, The Sun is only available in English. However, it does appeal to a multicultural, multi-generational audience, often presenting viewpoints from minority and disenfranchised populations.

Reader characteristics: Reader information is unavailable. The magazine’s content would suggest that readers care about human issues and are informed about national and global politics. The Sun is available in many jails, prisons, treatment centers, and homeless shelters, so many readers are in fact currently homeless or incarcerated.14

This publication is not targeted toward any particular profession. It does attract a number of writers and other artists, as well as those who have an appreciation for good writing and photography. Many of the readers who send letters to The Sun or submit to the “Readers Write” section work in the nonprofit sector, or in various “human service” fields such as addiction treatment, counseling, health care, and services to homeless people.

The Sun is a liberal publication, with an audience that likely embraces diversity, is politically active and involved in social activism, and values creativity and artistic expression.It is likely that readers hold education, literacy, and librarianship in high esteem, but may not necessarily be well-versed in issues relating to these areas.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since The Sun is a civilian publication that does not specialize in library and information science, audience knowledge of LIS subject matter cannot be assumed. It can be assumed that readers are supporters of libraries, and may have knowledge of library services from the patron’s point of view. While it is likely that issues facing libraries may be of interest to this publication’s readership, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Sun share an interest in the arts and in creating a better world for the future. They are concerned about the environment, education, and other issues that will have a long-term impact on our world. They may be politically active, usually at the grass-roots level.

The Sun‘s audience will be interested in and responsive to articles such as those about the roles of libraries as cultural institutions; funding challenges faced by public libraries; educational opportunities offered to children through library programs; services to immigrants and other non-native English speakers; and services to populations such as homeless adults and children and inmates.

Authors who are interested in being published in The Sun will want to ensure that their submissions deal with current issues facing libraries. They will want to focus less on the technical aspects of librarianship, and more on the social and cultural implications. They may want to consider interviews with leaders in the field of library and information science who are implementing innovative programs and ideas, especially those who are working to bring library services to traditionally underserved populations.

Last updated: December 3, 2016


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “About The Sun,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/about_the_sun
  2. About The Sun.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines Writing,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016,  http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing
  4. About The Sun.”
  5. About The Sun.”
  6. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  7. “Submission Guidelines Interviews,” TheSunMagazine.org, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/interviews
  8. “Submission Guidelines Readers Write,” TheSunMagazine.com accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/readers_write
  9. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  10. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  11. “FAQ,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/faq
  12. About The Sun.”
  13. “A Brief History,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/a_brief_history
  14. FAQ.”
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The New Yorker

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The New Yorker

Website: http://www.newyorker.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission:The New Yorker is a weekly magazine offering a signature mix of reporting and commentary on politics, international affairs, popular culture and the arts, science and technology, and business, along with fiction, poetry, humor, and cartoons.”1

Target audience: General public.

Publisher: Conde Nast Publications.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Print and online.3

Content: The New Yorker features articles about various subjects concerning popular culture, world politics, and social issues, not necessarily in that order. Each issue also includes a short story, poetry, literary reviews, cartoons, and short news reports.

Frequency of publication: The New Yorker publishes weekly, except for five combined issues that count as two in February, June, July, August, and December and other combined issues, as indicated on the issue’s cover.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.newyorker.com/contact/contactus

Types of contributions accepted: Poetry, news-breaks, short stories, and letters to the editor.5

Submission and review process: Send submissions via email as a pdf attachment.6

Editorial tone: Can range from silly to erudite, depending on the piece.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

At first glance at the magazine’s submission guidelines, it would seem that there isn’t really any opportunity for LIS authors to contribute to The New Yorker, since they don’t accept nonfiction articles due to the large volume of manuscripts they would probably receive. However, this publication does accept short news reports and commentaries so there is an opportunity for everyone, LIS professionals and students included, to submit short articles that deal with interesting occurrences or developments in their own communities.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently, the total average paid circulation is 1,007,910. Limited content of the print publication as well as exclusive online articles are also available for free at www.NewYorker.com.7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although it might seem that The New Yorker primarily serves residents of New York City, its scope is diverse and wide enough for it to have become one of the best-selling magazines nationwide. The New Yorker is an English publication and primarily serves residents of the United States but it covers issues on both a national and global perspective, making it accessible to the diverse population of the U.S. that come from a variety of different backgrounds and cultures.

Reader characteristics: The readers of The New Yorker are 47% male and 53% female. 62% have graduated from college, and 52% are employed full-time, with 41% in professional or managerial positions. The average reader is around 50 years old. From the demographic statistics of its subscribers we can assume that subscribers of this publication are typically educated, middle to upper class, older adults. Almost half are employed in professional or managerial jobs.8 This publication is considered politically left leaning, and a review of the recent issues supports this assumption.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is safe to assume that the majority of subscribers are probably not LIS professionals and have little or no knowledge of LIS topics and issues. The magazine obviously has a diverse audience and LIS professionals only make up a small percentage of this group. The New Yorker sometimes prints articles about libraries or librarians and the important issues of the profession, but with an absence of, or, at least minimal, LIS jargon for the benefit of all its readers.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Statistics show that the average reader of The New Yorker is in his or her fifties, but, being a very popular magazine across the nation, its readers are still a diverse group of people, with different backgrounds and interests. Since the magazine is only soliciting poetry, fiction, news breaks, commentaries, and letters to the editor, potential authors do not have to write scholarly pieces; the tone is informal but writing should exhibit intelligence and a sophisticated mastery of language.

Although it is not a LIS-oriented magazine, LIS authors are still welcome to submit interesting commentaries or activities in their own communities and institutions.

Last updated: November 26, 2016


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” NewYorker.com, accessed November 26, 2016, http://www.newyorker.com/about/us/?src=tny-footer
  2. “The New Yorker,” NewYorker.com, accessed November 26,  2016, http://www.newyorker.com/
  3. About Us.”
  4. “Subscribe to The New Yorker,” NewYorker.com, accessed November 26, 2016, https://subscribe.newyorker.com/subscribe/newyorker/108815?source=AMS_NYR_GLOBAL_NAVBAR_GI_BlackFriday_Holiday16&pos_name=AMS_NYR_GLOBAL_NAVBAR
  5. “Contact Us,” NewYorker.com, accessed November 26, 2016, http://www.newyorker.com/contact/contactus
  6. Contact Us.”
  7. Conde Nast Publications. (2014). Media Kit. The New Yorker. Retrieved from http://www.condenast.com/brands/new-yorker/media-kit/print
  8. Conde Nast Publications. (2014). Media Kit. The New Yorker. Retrieved from http://www.condenast.com/brands/new-yorker/media-kit/print
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McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern

Website: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/books

Purpose, objective, or mission:McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern began in 1998 as a literary journal that published only works rejected by other magazines. That rule was soon abandoned, and since then the Quarterly Concern has attracted work from some of the finest writers in the country. At the same time, the journal continues to be a major home for new and unpublished writers; we’re committed to publishing exciting fiction regardless of pedigree.”1 They are committed to finding new voices, publishing work of gifted but under-appreciated writers, and pushing the literary form forward at all times.2

Target audience: Smart, open-minded readers.3

Publisher: McSweeney’s Publishing.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication, literary journal.

Medium: Print journal.6

Content: Literary and experimental fiction and nonfiction, with the format and editorial focus changing for each issue.7 Fiction pieces include short stories and screenplays, while nonfiction works include essays and journalistic pieces. The journal has won multiple literary awards, including two National Magazine Awards for fiction8, so it’s safe to say that anything published in McSweeney’s will be of high literary quality.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.mcsweeneys.net/pages/guidelines-for-quarterly-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: Fiction and nonfiction. Memoirs, poetry, book reviews, and previously published work will not be accepted.10

Submission and review process: Submission guidelines to McSweeney’s are highly informal. There are no rules or length restrictions, although they recommend reading the magazine to get a sense of what kinds of work they’re interested in.11. Submit via the website. According to the website, “We gladly consider unsolicited works, but because we are a very small organization with an even smaller editorial department, it often takes us a long time to respond to our submitters.”12 Note: as of October, 2016, submissions are temporarily closed.

Editorial tone: Offbeat, eccentric, and inventive.

Style guide used: None indicated. “It’s better if you don’t use colors or Fun Fonts or strange formatting. We discourage submissions of art or submissions containing art.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors may have as good a chance as anyone for getting a submission accepted in McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern. Their whole publication process seems to be highly informal, but the quality is certainly on par with journals that have higher subscription/circulation rates. An exploration of McSweeney’s multiple related websites is a must to see if your writing project is a match for their style. LIS authors might contribute a fiction or nonfiction piece inspired by their experience as library professionals, keeping in mind that the purpose of such pieces should ultimately be to entertain the reader, rather than function as straightforward articles on an LIS-related issue.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print journal has 8,000 subscribers, while the website receives one million unique visitors per month.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in San Francisco, California15, and in English. According to Biblio.com, “The majority of McSweeney’s audience are twenty- and thirty-something readers dedicated to creating a new kind of intellectual dialogue, one that stretches out toward the world beyond U.S. borders.”

Reader characteristics: While no information regarding reader demographics is provided, a review of publication suggests readers are intelligent, open minded, literary, and comfortable thinking outside of the box.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Limited, the same as the general public.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Eclectic and open to new and creative thought is one way to describe the readers of McSweeney’s. The journal’s readers are literary and well-read, and it’s safe to assume that they generally support and appreciate libraries. A visit to the multiple McSweeney’s various websites will give any writer interested in submitting work a better sense of whether or not their work will be a match.

Last updated: October 14, 2016


References

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Christian Science Monitor

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Christian Science Monitor

Website: http://www.csmonitor.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An independent international news organization, the aim of which is to “embrace the human family, shedding light with the conviction that understanding the world’s problems and possibilities moves us towards solutions.”1 Though owned by the Christian Science church, the Monitor purports to be secular in its reporting save for one “clearly labeled religious article” published each weekday.2

Target audience: General public. “The Monitor assumes its readers are people who care, who want to care, regardless of their religious or political mindset.”3

Publisher: The First Church of Christ, Scientist.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Printed and online.6

Content: Independent national and international news, articles, book reviews, op-eds, essays, and letters to the editor.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Independent national and international news; articles concerning current events; book reviews; personal essays via The Home Forum; and articles about the theology and practice of Christian Science.8

Submission and review process: Articles are targeted and submitted to specific section editors. Editors attempt to respond to submissions quickly but are often inundated. If your article is time sensitive please call this to the attention of the editor. Each section has their own expectations and restrictions on length, which is detailed in the contributor guidelines. Each section also includes a paragraph giving first time authors the opportunity to craft work more likely to be accepted.9

Editorial tone: Journalistic to conversational.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Due to the clear contributor guidelines, the volume of freelance work they consume, and the forward approach to covering the world’s news, the Monitor is a promising publication to consider when writing about libraries for the general public. They often cover issues of interest to information professionals and concerning information access. Past articles include a report on a library being created in a small village in Vietnam, the limits being placed on library e-books, Google Books, and membership libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print: 53,198. Online (monthly unique visitors): 10,200,000.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Data is only available for readers’ locations within the United States, so presumably the majority of readership is located in the US, although content covers international news. Readers reside throughout the country, though most readers of the print magazine hail from Pacific regions of the country, while online readers are mainly from West South Central, East North Central, and Mid Atlantic areas.11

Reader characteristics: “Monitor readers are well educated, well traveled, and well read, drawing from a wide range of thoughtful resources to build an understanding of events and issues.”12 The majority of readers are educated, financially comfortable, and vote in federal, state, or local elections.13 The median age for readers of the print magazine is 66; 48 for the website.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As much as an average person. This would not be a place to discuss the changes in MARC or to use undefined library terms.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of the Monitor, in reviewing the articles of the publication, appear to be educated, open-minded and well-read.This is the same audience that often supports and recognizes the value of libraries, making this a potentially place to promote libraries.

Last updated: September 17, 2016


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “About,” CSMonitor.com, accessed September 17, 2016, http://www.csmonitor.com/
  2. About.”
  3. About.”
  4. About.”
  5. “Contributor’s guidelines,” CSMonitor.com, accessed September 17, 2016, http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Contributor-guidelines
  6. About.”
  7. Contributor’s guidelines
  8. Contributor’s guidelines
  9. Contributor’s guidelines
  10. “Reader Profile,” CSMonitor.com, accessed September 17, 2016, http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Advertise/Print-advertising
  11. Reader Profile
  12. “Print advertising,” CSMonitor.com, accessed September 17, 2016, http://www.csmonitor.com/About/Advertise/Print-advertising
  13. Print advertising.”
  14. Reader Profile
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Harper’s Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Harper’s Magazine

Website: http://harpers.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Harper’s Magazine, the oldest general-interest monthly in America, explores the issues that drive our national conversation, through long-form narrative journalism and essays, and such celebrated features as the iconic Harper’s Index. With its emphasis on fine writing and original thought Harper’s provides readers with a unique perspective on politics, society, the environment, and culture.”1

Target audience: According to the 2016 Media Kit, Harper’s speaks to “readers looking for perspectives not generally found in mainstream media.”2 Harper’s is “written with the belief that readers still care about issues, are still willing to risk changing their views and are still willing to participate in our democracy.”3

Publisher: Harpers Magazine.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Essays, fiction, and reporting. Topics covered include politics, society, the environment, and culture. 6

Frequency of publication: Monthly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://harpers.org/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: According to their website, “writers wishing to submit nonfiction to Harper’s Magazine are invited to send queries….The magazine will neither consider nor return unsolicited nonfiction manuscripts.”8

“Harper’s will consider unsolicited fiction. Unsolicited poetry will not be considered or returned.”9

Submission and review process: All fiction submissions and nonfiction queries must be sent by mail to:

Harper’s Magazine
666 Broadway, 11th Floor
New York, NY 1001210

Editorial tone: This magazine’s tone lends itself to high literary thought. Harper’s prides itself “on (its) fine writing and original thought, (and) provides readers with a unique perspective on politics, society, the environment, and culture.”11

Style guide used: None offered.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although this publication does not accept unsolicited nonfiction, potential contributors are invited to send nonfiction queries. The LIS author may win a solicitation for nonfiction if the query is unusual and exceptional enough to pique the editor’s interest. As unsolicited fiction will be considered, this may provide a more realistic opportunity for the LIS writer. A work of fiction that involves libraries or library issues could prove to be a unique contribution to this forum. Although this is not a scholarly publication, Harper’s has been in publication for 165 years and enjoys a prestigious position in the literary publishing industry.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to its 2016 Media Kit, Harper’s  has a “total audience” of 517,500.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: It seems that the readership is primarily based in the United States, there is an international subscription option that is also available.13 The magazine is published in English.

Reader characteristics: Ratio of readership is 66% male and 34% female, with a median age of 48 years old. Mean household income is $116,200, with professional or managerial careers represented by 26.75% of readers. Readers are educated, with 39% holding post-graduate degrees. Readers are presented as more cultured and well-traveled than the average American with comparison statistics outlined in the Media Kit.14

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers are unlikely to have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter. However, as this is an affluent, informed, and intelligent audience, they have likely formed opinions on general LIS topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Harper’s Magazine are a highly educated, affluent group. They have graduate degrees, are professionals and managers, and are financially well-off. They are a politically- and civically-engaged audience.15 In its Media Kit for advertisers, Harper’s bills itself as a “tool for change, a place for ideas and the people who have them. We attract the finest writers today and encourage them to do their best.”16

For these reasons, authors’ queries and submissions should be unique, well-written, directed to a well-educated audience, and limited in library jargon. The LIS writer who can provide a different viewpoint, that challenges mainstream thinking, would find an engaged audience at Harper’s Magazine.

Last updated: September 29, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” Harpers.org, accessed September 28, 2016, http://harpers.org/history/
  2. “2016 Media Kit,” Harpers.org, accessed September 28, 2016, http://harpers.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/2016-Media-Kit.pdf
  3. 2016 Media Kit.”
  4. “Harper’s Magazine,” Amazon.com, accessed September 29, 2016, https://www.amazon.com/Harpers-Magazine/dp/B00005N7QO
  5. “Submissions Information,” Harpers.org, accessed September 29, 2016, http://harpers.org/submissions/
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submissions Information.”
  9. “Submissions Information.”
  10. “Submissions Information.”
  11. “About.”
  12. 2016 Media Kit.”
  13. “Subscribe,” Harpers.org, accessed September 29, 2016, https://w1.buysub.com/pubs/HS/PRS/Intl_Subscription
  14. 2016 Media Kit.”
  15. 2016 Media Kit.”
  16. 2016 Media Kit.”
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