Wiki Tags Archives: Environment

Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

ISSN: 1052-5726 (print), 1052-5722 (online)

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian “is a forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS), featuring articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”1

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive “discourse and action on library issues.” Progressive Librarians Guild (PLG) members receive a subscription, or individuals can subscribe without joining the guild.2

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, by the editorial board.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online. Full text of complete issues and individual articles are available online.5

Content: Progressive Librarian publishes “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”6 Articles cover topics such as sexual violence, social justice, sustainability, youth empowerment, intellectual freedom, international activism, and a wide variety of progressive critiques and analyses of national and international LIS issues.

Frequency of publication:  Two times a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: A Call for Papers for future issues of Progressive Librarian asks for “articles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, documents, artwork and poetry that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”8

Submission and review process: All manuscripts submitted to Progressive Librarian are reviewed by each member of the editorial board. Manuscripts outside the expertise of board members are sent to outside reviewers for comment and evaluation. The journal also welcomes prints and digital images. The editors reserve the right to edit all submissions before publication. For book reviews, please contact the book review editor.9

Editorial tone: The articles are innovative and present alternative views to those of other LIS publications. The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.

Style guide used: Authors may use their preferred citation style “for in-text (parenthetical) citations, footnotes, and endnotes, as well as a bibliography (Chicago Manual of Style & Turabian), works cited (MLA), and references (APA & Harvard) sections.” The citation style has to be used consistently throughout the manuscript.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Progressive Librarian is a innovative and welcoming journal for LIS authors who write about any issue related to progressive librarianship or the relationship of library and information science to issues of social justice and responsibility. Articles are international in scope and are often focused on current events and actions. LIS professionals and students may submit artwork and poetry, as well as documents, reports, and bibliographies, on progressive issues.

Prospective authors should read the editorial in issue 45 for an understanding of the journal’s philosophy and perspective,11 as well as the Progressive Librarians Guild Statement of Purpose.12

For LIS graduate students, each year the PLG awards the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize “for the best paper about some aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. Papers related to archivists, archives, and archival work are also eligible.” The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian, and the winner receives a $500 stipend toward travel costs to the American Library Association’s Annual Conference, where the award is presented.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal as an international readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, although there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.14 As with any scholarly writing, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.15 The readership is made up of librarians, librarian graduate students, and library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and in how politics informs LIS practices.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals, or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have an understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about news and events in the LIS world, and about national and international politics and current events, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues, or events others may not be familiar with.

 

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Broadly speaking, the readers of Progressive Librarian are LIS professionals, scholars, and students who consider themselves socially and politically progressive and who bring their passion for social justice and action to their work in various library and information settings. PLG works against the current idea that “the library is merely a neutral institutional mediator in the information marketplace and a facilitator of a value-neutral information society of atomized information consumers.” Rather,  a “progressive librarianship demands the recognition of the idea that libraries for the people has been one of the principal anchors of an extended free public sphere which makes an independent democratic civil society possible, something which must be defended and extended.”16

 

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml.
  2. “Subscription,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_subscribe.shtml.
  3. “About.”
  4. “Submissions,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml.
  5. “Archive,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml.
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Call for Papers,” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017): verso, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45.pdf.
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. Elaine Harger, “Editorial: Why PLG? Why Paper? Why Bridge Generations?” Progressive Librarian 45 (winter 2016/2017),  http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL/PL45/003.pdf.
  12. “Statement of Purpose,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml.
  13. “The Braverman Award,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml.
  14. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  15. Elaine Harger, personal communication, 2008.
  16. “PLG’s History,” progressivelibrariansguild.org, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/history.shtml.
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Electronic Green Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Electronic Green Journal

ISSN: 1076-79751

Website: http://escholarship.org/uc/uclalib_egj

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The main goal of the EGJ is to assist in international scholarly communication about environmental issues. In order to meet this goal, the journal strives to serve as an open and active forum of communication about environmental issues, as well as an educational environmental resource, including both practical and scholarly articles, bibliographies, reviews, editorial comments, and announcements.”2

Target audience: Electronic Green Journal is geared toward information consultants, environmentalists, ecologists, regional planners, publishers, booksellers, educators, librarians, students, and others interested in environmental issues.3

Publisher: University of California at Los Angeles Library4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Environmental Studies and LIS, scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: International environmental information8

Frequency of publication: Semiannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions may not be previously published or simultaneously submitted to another publication. Scholarly manuscripts from all fields and countries related to environmental issues are accepted. No specific information is given as to length of manuscripts.10 Book reviews of up to 600 words are also accepted.11

Submission and review process: Authors must register with the website first. Manuscripts are to be written in English and submitted online. Specific requirements for manuscript submission including abstract and formatting instructions can be found at http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines. Before submitting a manuscript, potential authors should ensure it complies with preparation checklist on the Submission Guidelines page. All feature articles are reviewed by experts in the particular field. If necessary, articles will be edited by journal staff.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition. Authors are advised to consult the Purdue Online Writing Lab for additional assistance.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an interdisciplinary publication with a broad readership that includes librarians and students. LIS authors whose research encompasses environmental concerns and who wish to reach a global audience should consider submitting to this journal.15

Authors interested in writing book reviews are invited to choose from a selection of titles and produce a review of no more than 600 words.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated. As the Electronic Green Journal has been an open-access publication since 1994, it likely serves a fairly large international audience.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As an open-access online journal written in American English, Electronic Green Journal serves a diverse, well-educated, and professional  international community interested in environmental topics.18

Reader characteristics: This journal serves the global community and is written for information consultants, environmentalists, librarians, educators, students and all who are interested in “worldwide environmental topics.” According to the website, environmental issues cross disciplines and borders, so readers will likely be progressive and liberal, and come from a variety of backgrounds.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since readers come from a variety of disciplines, authors are well-advised to include descriptions of any specific LIS terms and subject.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

By publishing in the Electronic Green Journal, authors may expect to reach a politically liberal, professionally diverse, and international audience interested in environmental issues.21

Last updated: April 22, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523472187676/202120
  2. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  3. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  4. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  5. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  6. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  7. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  8. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  9. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  10. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  11. “Guide for Reviewers,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=guidelinesforreviewers
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  13. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  15. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  16. “Guide for Reviewers,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=guidelinesforreviewers
  17. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  18. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  19.  “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  20. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  21. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
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GOOD

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

ISSN: 1935-1488 (Print)1

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “GOOD is a global media brand and social impact company. Our collective mission is to help people and organizations be forces for good. Through award-winning media and creative partnerships, we connect deeply and authentically with this generation’s desire for purpose.”2 The magazine and website cover stories on business, environment, politics, culture, technology, education, etc.

Target audience: Millennials who want to make a difference in the world.3

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and print magazine.6

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.good.is/about/faq

Types of contributions accepted: According to the site’s FAQ, “We work with artists, designers, photographers and writers on a freelance basis.”8

Submission and review process: Send your story pitch to submissions@goodinc.com to be considered for publication in the magazine or on the website. Due to the high volume of submissions, editors will only respond to pitches they are considering for publication. Allow two weeks for review.9

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD€™’s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and a recent piece on the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 50,000 for the print magazine, 10 million monthly unique visits to the website.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English.11

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy,13 they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’€™s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: September 28, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1.  Good, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521897393214/626468
  2. “About,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/about
  3. “Audience,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/community/audience
  4. About.”
  5. About.”
  6. About.”
  7. About.”
  8. “General Inquiries,” Good.is, accessed September 27, https://www.good.is/about/faq#general-questions
  9. “GOOD Magazine (print),” Good.is, accessed September 27, 2016, https://www.good.is/about/faq#print-questions
  10. “GOOD Media Kit 2016,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  11. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  12. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  13. GOOD Worldwide, Inc. (2014). About Us. GOOD. Retrieved from http://community.good.is/about
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Stanford Social Innovation Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR)

ISSN: 1542-7099 (Print)1

Website: http://www.ssireview.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “To advance, educate, and inspire the field of social innovation by seeking out, cultivating, and disseminating the best in research- and practice-based knowledge.”2 The goal is to bring together academic theory and practice to create ideas for achieving social change, and to inform and inspire new social change.

Target audience: Leaders in nonprofit organizations, foundations, or other philanthropic institutions, along with people working in business, government, academia, and other fields.3

Publisher: Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society at Stanford University.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The website is extensive, and includes links to past issues as well as original content:blogs, webinars, podcasts, SSIR events. The Review covers people and organizations whose work has an impact on business, nonprofit, and government sectors, particularly those with cross-sector ideas and solutions to global issues. Subjects include social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management, and philanthropic strategies, as well as educational reform, poverty alleviation, and environmental protection.7

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: External authors (anyone outside SSIR’s editorial team) can submit articles under Features, which run 4000-4500 words; 3500-4500 word Case Studies; 1500-word Viewpoint articles; 800-word Books (formerly called Reviews); or blog posts for the website, running between 600-800 words.9 The guidelines list specific details for each submissions category that writers should take into consideration.

Submission and review process: Submissions are sent via a brief email pitch, Word format, to SSIR editors covering the specific section you’re submitting under. Submission guidelines list the current editor of each section and how to contact them, and detail the questions to cover in the pitch.10

You’ll get acknowledgement of your proposal within 1-2 weeks. The review process takes up to two months, as each editor (including managing and academic editors, depending on the proposal) participates in the review, and then sends the proposal to the editorial committee, who makes the final decision. A list of criteria for submissions is found in the guidelines.11

Additionally, SSIR editors and stable freelance journalists write articles under What Works, What Didn’t Work, What’s Next, Reviews of books, Q&A and Research. You can submit pitches for these categories as well, for a particular person, organization, trend or research. The website also details what the editors want to see for ideas for these sections.12

Editorial tone: Easy to read, thoughtful articles chock full of information and interesting ideas, theories, suggestions, and solutions to global challenges.

Style guide used: If the submission is accepted, SSRI editors will work closely with the author on style guides and citations.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Submissions on LIS issues would do well in the Review, if approached from an innovative, thought-provoking way, such as describing grass-roots LIS efforts and their outcomes, or discussing LIS in a global setting, or how LIS practices can be used to promote social change. Writers need to make sure the topic submitted would be relevant or interesting to all the Review’s readers, so it should not be too LIS specific. Real-world examples described through research or firsthand experience are ideal. LIS efforts on providing information to mass populations, particularly under served, or information technologies that bridge communities and allow information sharing would most likely do well in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print magazine has a circulation of 13,000, while the website averages 165,000 unique visitors per month.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is published by Stanford University, which is located in Santa Clara County, CA, and the print magazine is sold in newsstands across the United States and Canada. English is the primary language of this Silicon Valley publication, but the Review is written for an audience of change makers around the world.15

Reader characteristics: Per the submission guidelines: “SSIR’s readers are highly educated, widely read, and well informed about the field of social innovation. They want to be provoked, surprised, and presented with memorable information and rigorous analysis. They don’t want long-winded arguments, insider jargon, or excessively narrow and technical writing.”

Readers are overwhelmingly CEO’s, presidents, or senior executives of their organization. Half work for nonprofits, and a small group are philanthropists or foundation leaders.16

The writing is smart and well researched, and poses interesting questions and theories to readers, assuming that everyone is at the same high level of education, and that readers are interested in viewing challenges from a global perspective.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Not a publication specifically aimed at the LIS community, and, per their submission guidelines, readers don’t want “insider jargon.”17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Articles submitted to the Review should be timely, forward thinking, and offer solutions as well as pose questions for readers, who are thought leaders and executives looking for new ways to lead their organizations and foster social change. The LIS field is ripe for this type of exploration, and Review readers would most likely benefit from learning about innovations in the LIS world.

Last updated: October 9, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Stanford Social Innovation Review, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522204526301/455334
  2. “Overview,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/about/overview
  3. “Submission Guidelines,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines
  4. Overview.”
  5. Submission Guidelines.”
  6. Overview.”
  7. Submission Guidelines.”
  8. “All Issues,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/issue
  9.  “Submission Guidelines.”
  10. Submission Guidelines.”
  11. Submission Guidelines.”
  12. Submission Guidelines.”
  13. Submission Guidelines.”
  14. “Information for Advertisers,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/advertising
  15. Overview.”
  16. Submission Guidelines.”
  17. Submission Guidelines.”
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Municipal World

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Municipal World

ISSN: 0027-35891

Website: http://www.municipalworld.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Canada’s municipal magazine,” Municipal World is “devoted to promoting effective municipal government.”2 Founded in 1891, it is the oldest continuously published monthly municipal magazine in the world.3

Target audience: This publication is aimed at elected and appointed officials involved in municipal government interested in providing effective service to their constituents.4

Publisher: Municipal World, Inc., Ontario, Canada.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: Civilian publication for those involved in the municipal sector.

Medium: Print, with current issue TOC, keyword, and article search available online at their website.7

Content: According to their website, “articles addressing the pressing problems of the municipal sector” and regular features concerning the environment, governance, management, and procurement. Contents also include upcoming events, Canadian Municipal Code, professional directory, job board, and sources for forms and supplies.8

Frequency of publication: Monthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://municipalworld.com/magazine/editorial-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Per their website, “any subject area that will be of interest to municipal elected officials and administrators in Canada” and states contributors should be working in municipal government or an aligned field.10 It is essential that contributors “clearly and explicitly establish the relevance to municipal governments.”11 Municipal World does publish theme issues (contact editor for more information). Average article length 1000-200 words. “Our best advice: brevity enhances the prospect of publication.”12

“As topics for each issue are selected on a “what’s hot” basis, we cannot guarantee a definite date for publication of articles. Periodically, we schedule special feature issues. For example energy, heritage, technology, environment, or economic development. These factors also determine our selection of articles.”13

Submission and review process: Contributions submitted by email to the editor. “The editor ultimately decides upon the content of the publication, including your article, and reserves the right to reject any submission, or to edit your submission for length, content that may have been covered in a previous article, inappropriate information for the interest of our readership, or style.”14

Editorial tone: As noted in style guide entry, publication prefers “streamlined and straightforward” writing.15 Authors are encouraged to “present convincing documentation to prove the point” and nothing else.16

Style guide used: No style guide specified. This guidance provided: “Our preferred style is streamlined and straightforward, to minimize legal and technical jargon, and to spell out all acronyms on the first reference. Use the simplest word that makes the point. For example: “use” instead of “utilize”; “rain” instead of “precipitation event.” Articles should be as specific as possible, and use active voice, rather than passive voice. Articles written in the first person (e.g., using “I” or “we” throughout) are generally inappropriate. Contractions should be avoided as well.”17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This magazine, like others of its kind, offers great potential for increasing the visibility of Canadian public libraries with the government administrators who fund and support them (or not). As library leader Ken Haycock pointed out in a blog post, public librarians have much to gain by writing for such publications “to ensure that their celebrations and concerns are front and center with those who make decisions affecting their future.”18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Unkown.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Canada. Given the geographic location, English speaking authors from outside Canada would be best served respecting the Canadian spelling of English words. While municipal governments throughout the world bear similarities, contributors should have an understanding of issues specific to Canadian municipal government.

Reader characteristics: As appointed and elected officials in Canadian government and others working in municipal government, readers would share a strong sense of service to their community and are likely proud of being a Canadian. Readers will likely possess education beyond high school, often a professional degree in law, accounting, engineering, architecture, planning, or management. Workplace likely a government agency or entity. Interest would likely be broad, any topic that effects their community and constituents including: election process, environmental concerns, provision of social services, and changes in legislation.

The first line of the contributor’s guidelines states they welcome articles from “individuals working in the municipal sector or aligned to the field. For our readership, it will be essential to clearly and explicitly establish the relevance to municipal governments,”19 indicating a clear preference for learning from their peers. Authors will need to ensure they establish their link to the municipal government world, their authority on the article topic as well as the relevance to the readership of this publication. The editor stresses the readers appreciate brevity, articles that inform and help them effectively serve their constituents.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS subject matter will vary widely and authors should not assume any LIS background. As professor emeritus and former director at San Jose School of Library and Information Science Ken Haycock often reminded SLIS students, our LIS degree could support a number of job titles and careers beyond “librarian;” librarians, information professionals, and individuals with LIS degrees, due to the economy and the ever changing LIS field, are finding themselves in leadership positions in civil service.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Given that the readership of Municipal World is, by and large, an educated group committed to serving the public, they would likely have an understanding of the needs of other organizations, such as libraries, that serve the public. LIS authors could exploit this common understanding and promote the value of libraries when writing for Municipal World, as long as they also ensure the topic of their article is relevant and their authoritative voice is well grounded in experience.

Last updated: October 7, 2018


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Municipal World, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521936758490/17162
  2. “About Municipal World,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed October 16, 2016, https://municipalworld.com/about_us
  3. About Municipal World.”
  4. About Municipal World.”
  5. About Municipal World.”
  6. “Editorial Guidelines,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed October 16, 2016,  http://www.municipalworld.com/magazine/editorial-guidelines/
  7. “Municipal World Magazine,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed October 16, 2017, https://municipalworld.com/magazine
  8. Municipal World Magazine.”
  9. Municipal World Magazine.”
  10. “Editorial Guidelines,” MunicipalWorld.com, accessed October 16, 2016, https://municipalworld.com/magazine/editorial-guidelines/
  11. Editorial Guidelines.”
  12.  “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. Editorial Guidelines.”
  14. Editorial Guidelines.”
  15. Editorial Guidelines.”
  16. Editorial Guidelines.”
  17. Editorial Guidelines.”
  18. “One Way to Raise Your Profile,” Ken Haycock Blog, April 16, 2012, http://kenhaycock.com/one-way-to-raise-your-profile/
  19.  “Editorial Guidelines.”
  20. Editorial Guidelines.”
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The Sun Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Sun Magazine

ISSN: 0744-96661

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The Sun is an independent, ad-free magazine that for more than forty years has used words and photographs to evoke the splendor and heartache of being human. Each monthly issue celebrates life, but not in a way that ignores its complexity. The personal essays, short stories, interviews, poetry, and photographs that appear in The Sun’s pages explore the challenges we face and the moments when we rise to meet them.”2

Website: http://thesunmagazine.org

Target audience: The target audience is the general public; specifically, The Sun targets readers who are intelligent, educated, concerned about community and social issues, and enjoy reading stories, essays, and interviews that they might not find in more mainstream publications.

Publisher: The Sun Publishing Company, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Essays, interviews, fiction, poetry, and black and white photography.5

Frequency of publication: Monthly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing

Types of contributions accepted: The Sun accepts submissions of essays, interviews, fiction, and poetry. There is no minimum word count, but submissions of longer than 7,000 words are rarely accepted. The Sun favors personal writing, but is also looking for “provocative pieces on political and cultural issues.”7 Interview pieces should focus on “innovative and provocative thinkers,” and The Sun is particularly interested in interviews with women and people of color.8 Submissions may also be made to magazine’s “Readers Write” series, in which readers respond to a given theme each month with a short, nonfiction piece.9

Submission and review process: The Sun does accepts submissions online via Submittable. They also accept mailed submissions. Submissions must be typed (single-spaced is acceptable for poetry, double-spaced for all other types) and sent with a self-addressed stamped envelope. The review process typically takes three to six months, but may be longer. Queries are suggested prior to submitting interview pieces. Interview pieces can be lightly edited prior to submission, and will be further revised upon acceptance.10

Editorial tone: Personal, provocative writing preferred.11

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Sun offers an excellent opportunity for LIS authors to reach a more mainstream audience than an industry publication. Since it appeals to people who tend to be educated, socially active, and well read, The Sun provides an audience who will likely be interested in issues facing libraries and their roles in society and community, including funding challenges, services to minorities, and trends in information literacy. Interestingly, The Sun provides subscriptions for free or at reduced rates to institutions such as prisons and homeless shelters (and often includes submissions from inmates and other “marginalized” members of society)12, so would provide a forum for submission of writing concerning library services to these populations.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 70,000.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Sun’s publication is read and distributed throughout the United States. At this time, The Sun is only available in English. However, it does appeal to a multicultural, multi-generational audience, often presenting viewpoints from minority and disenfranchised populations.

Reader characteristics: Reader information is unavailable. The magazine’s content would suggest that readers care about human issues and are informed about national and global politics. The Sun is available in many jails, prisons, treatment centers, and homeless shelters, so many readers are in fact currently homeless or incarcerated.14

This publication is not targeted toward any particular profession. It does attract a number of writers and other artists, as well as those who have an appreciation for good writing and photography. Many of the readers who send letters to The Sun or submit to the “Readers Write” section work in the nonprofit sector, or in various “human service” fields such as addiction treatment, counseling, health care, and services to homeless people.

The Sun is a liberal publication, with an audience that likely embraces diversity, is politically active and involved in social activism, and values creativity and artistic expression.It is likely that readers hold education, literacy, and librarianship in high esteem, but may not necessarily be well-versed in issues relating to these areas.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since The Sun is a civilian publication that does not specialize in library and information science, audience knowledge of LIS subject matter cannot be assumed. It can be assumed that readers are supporters of libraries, and may have knowledge of library services from the patron’s point of view. While it is likely that issues facing libraries may be of interest to this publication’s readership, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Sun share an interest in the arts and in creating a better world for the future. They are concerned about the environment, education, and other issues that will have a long-term impact on our world. They may be politically active, usually at the grass-roots level.

The Sun‘s audience will be interested in and responsive to articles such as those about the roles of libraries as cultural institutions; funding challenges faced by public libraries; educational opportunities offered to children through library programs; services to immigrants and other non-native English speakers; and services to populations such as homeless adults and children and inmates.

Authors who are interested in being published in The Sun will want to ensure that their submissions deal with current issues facing libraries. They will want to focus less on the technical aspects of librarianship, and more on the social and cultural implications. They may want to consider interviews with leaders in the field of library and information science who are implementing innovative programs and ideas, especially those who are working to bring library services to traditionally underserved populations.

Last updated: September 18, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1.  The Sun Magazine, WorldCat, accessed March 28, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/sun/oclc/243522787
  2. “About The Sun,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/about_the_sun
  3. About The Sun.”
  4. “Submission Guidelines Writing,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016,  http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing
  5. About The Sun.”
  6. About The Sun.”
  7. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines Interviews,” TheSunMagazine.org, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/interviews
  9. “Submission Guidelines Readers Write,” TheSunMagazine.com accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/readers_write
  10. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  11. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  12. “FAQ,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/faq
  13. About The Sun.”
  14. FAQ.”
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Mother Jones

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Mother Jones

ISSN: 0362-8841 (Print) and 2169-7396 (Online)1

Website: http://www.motherjones.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: As a nonprofit news organization, Mother Jones “goes deep on the biggest stories of the moment, from politics and criminal and racial justice to educationclimate change, and food/agriculture.”2

Target audience: Readers who are interested in politics, environmental issues, and social justice. Per their media kit, readers are “educated, affluent, and influential, engaged in the lives of their communities and passionate about how they can serve them.”3

Publisher: The Foundation for National Progress.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian news magazine.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Investigative journalism covering politics, the environment, and culture.6

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://motherjones.com/about/writer-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: “Solidly reported, hard-hitting, groundbreaking news stories,” as well as “thought-provoking, timely opinion and analysis pieces on important current issues.”8 They are particularly interested in national politics, environmental issues, corporate wrongdoing, human rights, and political influence in all spheres. No local issues unless they have national interest or implications. They will consider cultural essays, but not travel pieces or “polemical screeds.”9 They suggest reviewing the website or magazine before sending a query.10

Submission and review process: Per their guidelines, “Best bet is to query us by mail, regular or e. Tell us in no more than a few paragraphs what you plan to cover, why it’s important and interesting, and how you will report it. The query should convey your approach, tone, and style, and should answer the following: What are your specific qualifications for writing on this topic? What ins do you have with your sources? If other major stories have been done on this topic, how will yours be different (and better)? Send pitch to query [at] motherjones.com.”11

Include a résumé and two or three relevant clips (or the complete URLs, if the clips are online.)12

“Web pieces are generally less than 1,500 words. Because we have staff reporters it is extremely rare that we will pay for a piece whose timeliness or other qualities work for the Web only. Magazine pieces can range up to 5,000 words. There is at least a two-month lead time.”13

Editorial tone: Informational.14

Style guide used: No style guide is mentioned.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although first-time authors will may a difficult time getting published with Mother Jones, the magazine has a large base of politically conscious readers, which would provide a wonderful stage for any LIS authors who have a very specific library agenda.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 215,199 paid and verified print subscribers, with 1,300,000 unique monthly visitors to the website. 15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in the United States.16 Per the guidelines, “Our readership is nationwide, so please, no local issues unless they have national interest or implications.”17 Published in English. “Over the last several years, Mother Jones has experienced tremendous growth in readership. Overall, 2012 was our highest traffic year ever with 98 million pageviews and over 30 million unique visitors coming from around the world.”18

Reader characteristics: Per their media kit, 52% are women, 52% over 50 years of age, 82% college educated, 85% voted in the last election, and 97% have purchased non-fiction books in the last year. Their media kits reports 91% of readers have read books in the last year.19 The majority of readers identify as Democrat.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Though it is likely there are a number of LIS professionals that read this publication, the primary audience would not be informed about LIS issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors need to keep in mind the readers of Mother Jones are well educated and expect straightforward, thoughtful writing that broadens their knowledge of the world. Readers care about social issues and will most likely be receptive to stories about libraries and library advocacy.

Last updated: September 12, 2018


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  Mother Jones, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-1846825318
  2. “What is Mother Jones?,” MotherJones.com, accessed September 12, 2018, http://www.motherjones.com/about
  3. “Media Kit,” MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, http://www.motherjones.com/files/motherjonesmediakit_20110215.pdf
  4. What is Mother Jones?
  5. “Freelance Writer: Mother Jones Magazine,” MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, http://www.motherjones.com/about/writer-guidelines
  6. What is Mother Jones?
  7. “Subscribe to Mother Jones,” MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, https://secure.motherjones.com/fnx/?action=SUBSCRIPTION&pub_code=MJM&term_pub=MJM&list_source=SEGYN4&base_country=US&t=56a8542e6110i46a9cabb2nb5b36511888a
  8. Freelance Writer: Mother Jones Magazine.”
  9. Freelance Writer: Mother Jones Magazine.”
  10. Freelance Writer: Mother Jones Magazine.”
  11. Freelance Writer: Mother Jones Magazine.”
  12. Freelance Writer: Mother Jones Magazine.”
  13. Freelance Writer: Mother Jones Magazine.”
  14. What is Mother Jones?
  15. Media Kit.”
  16. “Contact Us,” MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, http://www.motherjones.com/about/contact
  17.  “Freelance Writer: Mother Jones Magazine.”
  18. “2012 Annual Report,” MotherJones.com, accessed October 15, 2016, http://assets.motherjones.com/about/MotherJones_AnnualReport_2012.pdf
  19. Media Kit.”
  20. Media Kit.”
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