Wiki Tags Archives: Distance learning

Online Learning Journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Learning

ISSN: 2472-5730 (online) – 2472-5749 (print)

Website: http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/journals/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Online Learning Consortium is a community of higher education leaders seeking to improve and advance the quality of digital and online teaching.1

Formerly the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, the goal of Online Learning is to “promote the development and dissemination of new knowledge at the intersection of pedagogy, emerging technology, policy and practice in online environments.”2

Target audience: “Scholars, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers in online education.”3

Publisher: Online Learning Consortium.

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a traditional double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Both online and in print.5

Content: Online Learning is looking for papers that “investigate how online environments amplify, shape, and contain teaching and learning.”6

They also welcome submissions on the following topics:

  • “online interaction
  • collaboration
  • individualized instruction
  • multimedia
  • adaptive environments
  • blended learning
  • issues of learning at scale (in both MOOCs and “traditional” online learning environments)
  • emerging technologies
  • analysis of large data sets in understanding online educational processes
  • effective approaches and interventions that promote online student engagement, persistence and improvement”7

Frequency of publication: “Online Learning is published 4 times a year, and entire issues are published from time-to-time around a single topic or disciplinary areas. Calls for papers for special issues include specific due dates, but general submissions are accepted year-round.”8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/guide-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: 6,000 to 8,000 word papers.9

“Papers building on and/or developing theory and supported by rigorous methods are the norm. Occasionally, papers reviewing broad areas are published, including critical reviews of thematic areas.”10

Submission and review process: Email the journal’s managing editor for more information: sturdy.knight@onlinelearning-c.org. Papers are submitted via the Open Journal System on the Submit a Paper page.

The acceptance rate for papers is 25%.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: APA Style 6th Edition Style except where otherwise indicated.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The OLJ is not limited to the LIS field, but covers online learning across all academic subjects. This gives authors room to work outside of the realm of librarianship. OLJ could be a fitting journal for authors who have done extensive research on a topic, considering the standards that the journal upholds. Be sure to keep an eye out for calls for articles to be published in special, single topic journal issues.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: OLJ can be found in the following databases: EBSCO, ERIC, H.W. Wilson Company, Cabell Publishing Inc., ERA Online, Ulrichs Web, Index Copernicus. The Online Learning Consortium is also a supporter of the Directory of Open Access Journals.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Worldwide, but focused in the U.S.

Reader characteristics: Readers come from many different backgrounds, with a common interest in the dissemination of new research on online learning. The journal is written for “scholars, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers” so the journal’s audience is well versed in the online learning environment and the literature written about it.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering that OLJ is read by professionals from many different fields, it may be best to leave out LIS-specific jargon. Readers are interested in new knowledge and well researched topics, therefore in depth, scholarly articles may be best received.

Last updated: April 5, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed April 2, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/about/
  2. “Journals,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/journals/
  3. “Journals.”
  4. “Journals.”
  5. “Journals.”
  6. “Journals.”
  7. “Journals.”
  8. “Journals.”
  9. “Guide for Authors,” OnlineLearningConsortium.org, accessed April 2, 2018, https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/guide-authors/
  10. “Journals.”
  11. “Journals.”
  12. “Guide for Authors.”
  13. “Journals.”
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Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning

ISSN: 1533-290X (Print) and 1533-2918 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/WLIS

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning €addresses the issues and concerns of librarians and information specialists in the rapidly growing field of distance education.”2

Target audience: The journal primarily targets scholars, librarians, and library students.3

Publisher: Routledge.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The journal reports that it “€addresses a wide variety of subjects that are vital to the field, including but not limited to: collection development strategies, faculty/librarian partnerships or collaborations, cutting edge instruction and reference techniques, document delivery, remote access, evaluation, etc.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.UxCmcYVUPpw

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning is comprised of “€original research, theoretical papers, substantive articles, essays, book and literature reviews, and research reports that cover programs and innovations throughout the international community.”10€ Submissions should include an abstract with a maximum of 100 words, while the main text should be between 3,000 and 5,000 words. Additionally, submissions cannot be previously published and cannot be simultaneously submitted to another publication. Authors should provide 3-10 keywords for indexing purposes.11

Submission and review process: Both editorial screening and peer review are conducted anonymously.12Authors should submit manuscripts electronically via ScholarOne Manuscripts at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/wlis.13

Editorial tone: While the journal is scholarly in nature, many of the articles cover practical subjects, such as reference techniques.14

Style guide used: APA Publication Manual.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles in the specific and emerging field of distance learning. In particular, library instructors with experience using Web 2.0, virtual reference, LibGuides, etc. in conjunction with distance learning will feel right at home with this journal’s subject matter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation figures not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The primary audience for this publication is the United States, and–to a slightly lesser degree–other English-speaking countries such as Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa.16

Reader characteristics: Although the journal does not provide information about its readers, its website reports that it covers “€programs and innovations throughout the international community.”17€ The journal’s focus on distance learning contributes to its international reach. Readers consist mainly of librarians, LIS instructors, and LIS students who value education, specifically programs and innovations in distance learning relating to LIS education. Workplaces for these readers primarily include academic libraries and institutions.18€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning addresses a wide variety of subjects relating to distance learning within the field of LIS. Because most readers will have familiarly with the LIS field, LIS authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.19€

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that that the readers of this journal have extensive knowledge of distance learning specifically within the LIS field. As long as they are aware of the specialized nature of this journal, potential authors can use this forum to make valuable connections and establish professional rapport.

Last updated: January 29, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wlis20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  3.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  4.  Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  5. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  6. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  7. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  9. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  14. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wlis20&page=instructions#.U739VrGdROg
  16. Journal of Library and Information Services in Distance Learning, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 29, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404960028822/367486
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 29, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wlis20#.U739XLGdROg
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Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

Websitehttp://acrl.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the About page: ACRL is a professional association dedicated to enhancing the ability of academic library and information professionals to serve the information needs of the higher education community and to improve learning, teaching and research.”1 From the ACRL Guidelines & Standards, “ACRL is the source that the higher education community looks to for standards, guidelines and frameworks on academic libraries.”2

Target audience: Academic Libraries and the LIS field practitioners.3

Owner: Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the ALA.4

Are published books peer reviewed? ACRL Publications in Librarianship is a peer reviewed series of monographic volumes.5

Types of books published: LIS Professional Development. Monographs of interest to the LIS field and academic libraries: books are research studies, theoretical monographs, or practical tools-based volumes for the practitioner. These are primarily to assist academic librarians in career development, managing their institutions, and keeping abreast of developments in librarianship.6

Medium: Print. There are currently a handful of digital publications available in pdf format, but that is not ACRL’s primary publishing method.7

Topics covered: Information literacy, copyright and scholarly communication, research in academic librarianship, trends in academic libraries, leadership and organizational development, management, collection development, information access, and information literacy.8

Number of titles published per year: 8–169

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals, completed manuscripts, or dissertations, accompanied by a Publication Proposal Form. See the Call for Book Proposals for specifics on suggested topics.10

Submission and review process: From the guidelines: “Ideally authors/editors will send one or more chapters with a proposal. Each proposal is then read by the editorial board and ACRL staff.”11 The review process takes around two months, and reviewers will send comments back to the author if they would like to move forward with the project. “The editor will then work with authors or editors to establish a timetable for development and publication.”12

Editorial tone: Professional and, where warranted, more immediate and casual.13

Style guide usedWebster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 10th edition, for spelling, and The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition, for style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors with a proposal for an academic library topic, or a proposal for furthering the professional development of any librarian or information professional would do well to consider ACRL for publication. The group is an outstanding ALA group with a large member base,15 and reaches hundreds of libraries. In addition, the editorial staff is able to provide dedicated support and editing assistance to authors to ensure the most professional product possible.16 ACRL publications are promoted through its catalog,17 and at the ALA store,18 meetings and conferences, with articles and promotional notices appearing in C&RL at the time of publication. ACRL is a trusted organization, excellent to consider for publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Smallish, with 15 new books published in 2016-17, per the Annual Report.19

ACRL has a large automatic audience: “hundreds of libraries have blanket ACRL acquisition orders and many librarians order their own copies, or buy them at conferences.”20

In addition, ACRL is the largest division of the ALA, with more than 11,000 members.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: National and, on occasion, global. ACRL is based, like ALA, in Chicago, IL.22 American English, leaning towards issues in American academic libraries.

Reader characteristics: The association, as an ALA organization and publisher, is interested in continuing the education and providing professional development for academic librarians and information professionals.23 Academic libraries and scholarly research. Strongly dedicated to providing high quality LIS information.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Not only is ACRL devoted to academic libraries, but it is part of the ALA.25 Expect editors and eventual readers to be very knowledgeable about LIS topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Any publishing group that calls the ALA home is a good place to query your LIS proposal, and ACRL is no exception. The largest division of the ALA,  ACRL currently has a membership of more than 11,000 members, accounting for nearly 20% of the total ALA membership.26 Readers will be keen to hear of new titles from this small, discriminating imprint.

Last updated: January 28, 2018


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. “About”, ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  2. “Standards,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “Publications,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  6. “Publications.”
  7. “Digital Publications,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/digital
  8. Publications.”
  9. “Publications.”
  10. “Proposals,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/PILproposals
  11. “Publications”
  12. “Publications”
  13. “Publications”
  14. “Publications”
  15. “About.”
  16. “Publications.”
  17. “Digital Publications”
  18. “ALA Store,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.alastore.ala.org/
  19. “Annual Report,” ACRL.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://crln.acrl.org/content/72/11/659.full.pdf+html
  20. “Book Proposals,” ALA.org, accessed January 28, 2018, http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/PILproposals
  21. “About”
  22. “About”
  23. “About.”
  24. “About.”
  25. “About.”
  26. “About.”
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ALA Editions

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: ALA Editions

Websitehttp://www.alaeditions.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Publishing resources for librarians and LIS professionals worldwide to “improve programs, build on best practices, develop leadership, and for personal development.”1 ALA Editions focuses on publishing professional library tools and resources, and also publishes textbooks and materials for LIS programs.2

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals.3

Owner: American Library Association (ALA)4

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.5

Types of books published: Books, digital content, online workshops, textbooks and materials for LIS programs.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Topics covered: From the website’s About page: “if you have ideas about improving library services and a desire to share your expertise, you might just have a book in you.”8

ALA Editions strongly encourages authors to consider diversity issues as part of a proposal or manuscript, noting that “Throughout the country, our communities are changing, and diversity is integral to library service and professionalism.”9 Authors should include information on how diversity plays a role in their proposed topic.10

Number of titles published per year: In 2012, there were 137 new titles published by ALA Editions.11

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.alaeditions.org/writers / 

Types of submissions accepted: From the proposal guidelines, ALA Editions is interested in:

  • Standards and guidelines used broadly in the library/information field
  • Basic approaches to major new developments in the field
  • Handbooks, manuals, primers, deskbooks, encyclopedias, textbooks
  • Projects that go “beyond information,” adding practical applications and other values to serve a broader audience
  • Specialized but high-value information12

Types of submissions the publisher is not interested in:

  • Fewer than one hundred doublespaced manuscript pages
  • Arcane topics or approaches and dated information
  • Theoretical treatment of practical topics
  • Dated information
  • Bibliographies without useful annotations
  • Conference proceedings
  • Historical treatments13

Submission and review process: It is highly recommended that you start with a query that describes your topic of interest, why it’s relevant/necessary, how it fits the publications’ readers needs, and a brief bit about yourself.14 Email query to appropriate staff member (see the About page for a complete list)15:  if they like it they’ll request a full proposal.16

You may also send a complete 2-3 page proposal or complete manuscripts for consideration, but ALA Editions prefers the initial query.17

If your query/proposal is not a fit for ALA Editions, you will be notified promptly.18

If accepted, ALA assigns the proposal to a “acquisitions editor” for consideration; this “sponsoring editor” prepares more information on the proposal and passed it along to a group of ALA Publishing staff to evaluate the project.  If ALA Publishing staff accept the project, then you move into the publication process. The normal publishing cycle is seven to ten months to publication after a manuscript is approved.19

For more information please see the Author Guidelines.20

Editorial tone: Professional but readable. Tailored specifically to the library community, publications can range from books for professional development to books for young adults and children, so the tone will vary depending on the nature of the publication.21

Style guide used: General style: The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition, for punctuation, capitalization, quotation, abbreviation, source citation, use of italic, etc. The two types of source documentation that ALA Editions accepts are Chicago humanities style and Chicago author-date style.22

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

The ALA is a widely recognized and respected LIS resource, consulted by librarians and information professionals worldwide. ALA authors are leaders in their field, and so having a manuscript accepted for ALA Publication would provide authors with a large market for potential readership, amongst LIS professionals and peers. ALA works closely with authors on the marketing side, which includes potential to present material in ALA webinars, presentations and “meet the author” events at ALA conferences, listings in the ALA Online Store and several international and general catalog listings, and targeted media release events. From the Writer Guidelines: “Your work is in the hands of seasoned publishing pros and professional librarians. We develop, manufacture, and market your project in a way that draws good reviews and customer interest worldwide.”23

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: This is a very large, encompassing publishing house. ALA Editions markets every title to at least 100,000 customers.24

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although based in Chicago, IL, ALA Editions publishes and reaches librarians and LIS professionals worldwide.25 ALA Editions “develop, manufacture, and market your project in a way that draws good reviews and customer interest worldwide.”26 ALA titles are written in English, but marketed to a worldwide audience.27

Reader characteristics: This is the more professional ALA publishing imprint, focusing on LIS professional development and improving library services. Readers are interested in library and information science, with backgrounds varying from librarian, educator,  LIS administrators and professionals. ALA is the premier Library and Information Science group around, and it would be well worth any author’s time to try to work with them. Their bias is simply pro anything LIS, rather than other publishing houses who have an LIS focus. With ALA, LIS is everything.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as this is the imprint of the American Library Association.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

You’re guaranteed a knowledgeable audience eager for new LIS material when you publish with ALA. Not only are ALA Editions books marketed on the ALA website (including ALA Store), but they’re promoted at ALA conferences and events, emailed to a huge mailing list, and heavily marketed through a partnership with Amazon. Readers of ALA Editions books are seeking LIS material specifically, and will most likely be up to date on your subject matter or, if not, curious to learn from like-minded professionals in the field. This is the first stop publisher and organization for anyone seeking LIS reading material, and is an excellent group to be a part of.

Last updated: January 25, 2018


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. “About,” AmericanLibraryAssociation.com, accessed January 25, 2018, http://www.alaeditions.org/about
  2. “About.”
  3. “About”
  4. “Home,” ALAEditions.org, accessed January 25, 2018, http://alaeditions.org
  5. “About.”
  6. “Home.”
  7. “Home.”
  8. “About.”
  9. “Writing for ALA Editions,” ALAEditions.org/Writers, accessed January 25, 2017, http://alaeditions.org/writers
  10. “Writing.”
  11. “Annual Report, ALAIR.org/AboutALA/AnnualReport12/Publishing, accessed January 25, 2018, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/annualreport12/publishing
  12. “Writing.”
  13. “Writing.”
  14. “Writing.”
  15. “About.”
  16. “Writing.”
  17. “Proposal Guidelines, ALAEditions.org/Proposal-Guidelines, accessed January 25, 2018, http://www.alaeditions.org/proposal-guidelines
  18. “Writing.”
  19. “Writing.”
  20. “Writing.”
  21. “About.”
  22. “Manuscript Preparation Guidelines,” ALAEditions.org/Files/MS_Prep_Guide.doc,” accessed January 25, 2018, http://www.alaeditions.org/files/MS_Prep_Guide.doc
  23. “Writing.”
  24. “Writing.”
  25. “About.”
  26. “Writing.”
  27. “About.”
  28. “About.”
  29. “About.”
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Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals

ISSN: 1361-32001

Purpose, objective, or mission: Ariadne is based in the U.K. and aims to “keep the busy practitioner abreast of current digital library initiatives as well as technological developments further afield.”2Website: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Target audience: Information professionals working primarily in higher education; but also in libraries, archives, or museums (both in the U.K. and internationally).3

PublisherUKOLN, a research organization based at the University of Bath, which “advises on digital infrastructure, information policy and data management…and provide[s] resources and services to the higher and further education sectors including Web journals and other publications, Web services and tools, innovation support, research and development and events management.”4

Peer reviewed? No. The editor makes all decisions regarding manuscript submissions.5

Type: LIS professional news. Although Ariadne does publish some research-oriented content, it is not peer reviewed and it cannot be considered “scholarly.” ISSN is 1361-3200.6

Medium: Entirely online. Ariadne is free and open access, so the full text of all issues (current and archived) is available on the website. Content is also available as an RSS feed.7

Content: Ariadne publishes a “variety of articles in each issue, some technical, some of a more strategic nature.”8 A standard issue contains an editorial, a number of articles, an “at the event” section, and a “news and reviews” section. Prominent topics include emerging technologies and trends, digital libraries and collections, information architecture, search engines, metadata, and Web 2.0.9

Frequency of publication: Not defined. The magazine was published quarterly up through 2010; as of 2013 there are two issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines can be found on the Contact page and the About page. The publication’s website indicates that the editor will send information about the submission and editorial process once an article proposal has been accepted.11

Types of contributions accepted: Ariadne accepts a variety of contributions, including articles (i.e., scholarly papers, position pieces, and case studies), reviews, and reports on events, workshops, meetings, and conferences. The magazine also accepts proposals regarding organizations and work-related projects. There are no stated requirements for length.12

Submission and review process: Ariadne requires an initial proposal for all articles. Authors should submit an abstract, outline, or general description to the editor prior to submission of the completed manuscript. After an agreement is reached, a date for submission is set and the editor then sends out an explanation of the editorial process. No peer-review process is used.13

Proposals can be submitted via the online form or through an email to the editor: ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk.14

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for editorial tone. Main articles tend to have a more formal, scholarly tone, while reviews and other articles appear to be relatively informal (i.e., first person is acceptable).15

Style guide used: Ariadne does not use a formal style guide.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Ariadne has remained on the forefront of the open access movement and continues to focus its content on current and emerging LIS trends and technologies. Thus, although it is not peer reviewed, it is a credible and highly accessible source with great publishing potential for LIS practitioners, educators, and students. Contributors might consider writing about LIS conferences or workshops, workplace technologies, online learning, digital collections, social networking, Web 2.0./Library 2.0, or Web-based information seeking behavior.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Ariadne is an open access electronic publication that is available free to anyone with Internet access. As such, there is no formal subscription process and no readily available circulation data. Generally, though, freely accessible online resources do at least have the potential of a large audience base.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Ariadne‘s editor notes in the Submission guidelines that “despite having a global audience, and a U.S. readership twice that of our home readership, our core audience remains that which is based in the UK.” 17 Thus, although Ariadne maintains an international audience, the majority of readers are located in the U.S. and U.K., and content reflects this.

From the FAQ author profiles, authors are mostly European, with 414 from the U.K./Ireland, and 60 from the U.S. Pakistan, South Africa, and Armenia are also represented, among other countries.18

Ariadne is published solely in English, and based on geographic information, it can be assumed that the vast majority of readers are, in fact, native English speakers. However, authors should be aware of the somewhat substantial language and cultural differences that exist between the U.S. and the U.K. For example, submission guidelines indicate that “UK English” should be used rather than “US English.” Beyond spelling, colloquialisms and U.S. centered cultural references should be avoided, and authors should also consider the needs of a global audience. 19

Reader characteristics: Ariadne does not provide any detailed demographic information relating to the gender, age, or ethnicity of its readers. Because this is an international professional publication geared towards practicing information professionals, it is likely that the audience is relatively mature and experienced, but also demographically diverse. Specific workplace data for readers is not available, but the website clearly states that Ariadne is published to “inform policy-makers and practitioners in Higher Education libraries and associated sectors of developments in the online environment.”20 Although readers are therefore very likely to hold a wide variety of professional specializations, they are also very likely to share professional interests based on Ariadne‘s primary topics, which include digital libraries, technological developments, digital information management, and online learning. As a large portion of Ariadne readers work in libraries and archives, they are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship in an information society. It should be noted that Ariadne also features more opinion-based reader reviews, retrospectives, and reflections.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Ariadne readers are likely to be quite knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and jargon. As practicing information professionals, they would certainly be interested in library topics that are directly applicable to their careers. After reading through current and back issues of the publication, however, it is clear that readers might not necessarily be knowledgeable about LIS topics outside of digital initiatives and technological developments.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Ariadne is a professional publication with a very specific focus on practical articles that discuss sophisticated technological issues and developments in LIS. Overly general library articles, theoretical papers, or pieces that fail to directly address digital information systems or web technologies may not interest Ariadne readers. Submissions should be professional but not necessarily scholarly in tone, and they should focus on relating practical applications for LIS practitioners (see topic suggestions in the Publication Analysis above).

It is important for the author to note that although Ariadne is a British publication with a core following in the UK, the majority of readers actually reside in the U.S., and it is a global magazine. This allows for increased opportunities to effectively reach Ariadne readers.

Last Updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals, UKOLN, accessed March 22, 2018, http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/
  2. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  3. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  4. University of Bath. (2016). About UKOLN. UKLON. Retrieved from http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/
  5. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  6. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  8. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  9. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  10. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
  11. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  12. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  13. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  14. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  15. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
  16. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  17. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  18. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  19. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  20. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  21. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  22. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
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Spartan Daily

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Spartan Daily

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.sjsunews.com/spartan_daily/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The student newspaper for San Jose State University, covering news, sports, arts and entertainment, tech, and opinion relating to the campus and its students.1

Target audience: San José State University students and faculty.

Publisher: San José State University.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication; student newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.3

Content: Articles on recent campus news and issues, opinions, sports, and student life.

Frequency of publication: Three times a week.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sjsunews.com/site/forms/

Types of contributions accepted: Letters to the editor (opinion pieces) and news.5

Submission and review process: Use the designated form to submit a news piece or letter to the editor.

Editorial tone: Informal.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Writers interested in reaching this audience can use this publication. While an opinion piece in a school paper would not increase your chances of tenure, it would increase your reputation within the university community, and could be used to promote library issues or garner support for the library.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Daily is read by over 25,000 students and faculty.6

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in San José, California, it is safe to assume the readers (faculty, staff, and students of SJSU) are located there too. This is an English language publication and the audience, as part of an institution that requires English language skills, likely reads and speaks English.

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 Media Kit, SJSU students are 46% male and 54% female, with 57% between the ages of 20 and 24. The SJSU student population is a diverse mixture of 30% Asian, 4% African-American, 8% Foreign National, 17% Hispanic, 29% White, and 11% Other.7 As this is the publication of an educational institution, readers are likely interested in education and improving themselves. Other than possibly sharing an interest in their school, any biases, values, and attitudes would vary widely.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Slightly better than the general public given the readers’ affiliation with the university. LIS jargon would still need to be avoided or defined if used in your writing.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readership of this publication would expect writing that concerns them or their school written with a youthful approach.

Last updated: November 16, 2016.


References

Show 7 footnotes

  1. “Spartan Daily,” Scholarworks.SJSU.edu, accessed November 16, 2016, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/spartandaily/
  2. “Spartan Daily,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed November 16, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1416273937072/556930
  3. “Spartan Daily Media Kit,” SJSUNews.com, accessed November 16, 2016, http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/sjsunews.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/41/e411e276-bf00-11e5-9427-b7fbe6066c67/56a2ab8951bb5.pdf.pdf
  4. Spartan Daily.”
  5. “Site Forms,” SJSUNews.com, accessed November 16, 2916, http://www.sjsunews.com/site/forms/
  6. Spartan Daily Media Kit.”
  7. Spartan Daily Media Kit.”
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Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS)

ISSN: 0748-5786 (Print) and 2328-2967 (Online)1

Website: http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445

Purpose, objective, or mission: “JELIS supports scholarly inquiry in library and information science (LIS) education by serving as the primary venue for the publication of research articles, reviews, and brief communications about issues of interest to LIS educators.”2

Target audience: LIS faculty and educators, and more specifically, ALISE members3

Publisher: Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE)4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS and education scholarly6 JELIS is a peer-reviewed journal that features scholarly papers, original research, reports, and studies. Although the journal does also publish brief communications, reader comments, and guest editorials, its primary purpose is the presentation of scholarly research.7

Medium: Online8

Content: JELIS publishes peer-reviewed research articles that contribute to scholarship in the field of education in library and information science and brief communications on topics important to the field. The later is not subject to peer review, but editorial approval only.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458

Types of contributions accepted: JELIS accepts submission of major articles of up to 7,000 words and more reflective, brief communications of up to 1,500 words.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted via the online submission widget. The publication acknowledges the receipt of all submissions. Major articles go through a double-blind review process.12

Editorial tone: Formal and academic.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition. Additional information on style and formatting guidelines is included in the guidelines.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal in the field of LIS education, JELIS would be a suitable publication venue for those involved in academic librarianship or graduate-level teaching. Although its readership may be relatively small, publication in JELIS would definitely help in the process of building tenure and establishing professional credibility. Ulrichsweb notes that “(JELIS) Authors are most often professors in schools of library and information science.”15 However, information professionals, LIS faculty, and even LIS students with relevant experience and strong academic writing skills should consider submitting work to JELIS.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Actual numbers are not available, but JELIS is made available to all ALISE members, both individual and institutional, as a benefit of membership.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although detailed geographic information is not available, the ALISE mission specifically mentions serving faculty in North America.17 JELIS is published solely in English, 18 and its North American base would suggest that most readers are comfortable communicating in English. Due to the prominent Canadian reader contingent, authors would definitely want to avoid colloquialisms and cultural references that are specific to the United States.19

Reader characteristics: Though demographic information on readership is not available, ALISE does note that its members are generally faculty in library and information science graduate programs.20 It is difficult to make blanket characterizations in terms of age, gender, and ethnicity, as readers range from LIS students to deans. No detailed breakdown of reader workplaces is provided by JELIS or ALISE. The ALISE membership brochure notes that its members include “All levels of faculty, administration, students, librarians, researchers, educational institutions, and others interested in library and information science education.”21 Readers likely share a high level of education and a professional interest in LIS education and graduate-level teaching.

JELIS readers, particularly LIS faculty members, are likely to have established opinions based on their area of expertise.22 They are also likely to share the core values of librarianship and view the profession as highly important and relevant in both the academic and professional spheres. Yet JELIS does also feature divergent viewpoints and constructive criticism in its reader comments and guest editorials.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: JELIS readers are extremely knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and well-versed in library jargon, particularly that which relates to education.24 Authors will want to focus their submissions on the most relevant topics for LIS educators, as this publication is quite specialized and readers might not be interested in more general or overarching library concepts.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a scholarly publication that features specialized content geared towards a relatively small audience of LIS educators and students. Successful submissions will exhibit a professional and academic tone, and should specifically address emerging issues and trends in LIS education in the United States and Canada, or internationally. Appropriate topics might include technological advances in distance learning, course management systems such as Blackboard or WebCT, the use of Web 2.0 applications (i.e., blogs, wikis, podcasts) in teaching, or a comparative analysis of international LIS education. Additionally, authors might consider including original research to more effectively connect with JELIS readers.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/738510419
  2. Journal for Library and Information Science Education, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445
  3. “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  4. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  5.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  6.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  7.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  8.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  9.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017,  https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  10.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  11. “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  12.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  13.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  14.  “JELIS Submission Guidelines,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, https://ali.memberclicks.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=458
  15.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  16. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=445
  17. “ALISE Strategic Plan 2017-2020,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/alise-strategic-plan-2017-2020
  18.  Journal of Education for Library and Information Science (JELIS), Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1494882128377/608102
  19. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
  20. Association for Library and Information Science Education. (2013). About ALISE. Retrieved from http://www.alise.org/about-alise
  21. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  22. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  23. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
  24. ALISE membership brochure, Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/assets/documents/alise_membership.pdf
  25. “About ALISE,” Association for Library and Information Science Education, accessed May 15, 2017, http://www.alise.org/about-alise-2
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Call Number

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Call Number

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: To announce and report on events sponsored by LISSTEN (Library and Information Science Students to Encourage Networking). LISSTEN’s purpose is to serve all students in San José State University’€™s School of Information.1 The association-sponsored events help students begin networking within their possible professional careers. The Call Number reports on topics of interest to students and reports with photos on all LISSTEN events.2

Target audience: All students of the School of Information at San José State University.3

Publisher: LISSTEN board of directors.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Web-based publication.7

Content: Articles which cover LISSTEN organized events, professor profiles, interviews of librarians, and articles about library school culture and librarianship.8

Following are sample article topics from recent issues: e-portfolios, professional associations, library tours, internship experiences, interview with a law librarian, Banned Books Week, government information sources, working at the Homeland Digital Library, developing a Latino thesaurus, “One Voice Makes a Difference,”9 SLIS student interviews, and “Conversations with Library Leaders: REFORMA’s Annual Career Fair,”10 LISSTEN’s resume and interview workshop, and commencement.

Frequency of publication: Biannual, published at the end of Fall and Spring semester.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://thecallnumber.blogspot.com/

Types of contributions accepted: “Tips and experiences” articles include a number of different authors for the Internship experience and e-portfolio advice articles. Brief articles with photos related to LISSTEN activities.12

Submission and review process: From their website, “At the beginning of each semester a call for articles is posted on slisadmin list and The Call Number. All interested SLIS students are encouraged to respond to the call for articles by the posted deadline. Submissions should be emailed to the editors by the deadline as Word documents (.doc or .docx files) for the articles and JPEGs (.jpg files) for the images. We recommend that articles stay within 500-1000 words so that articles are concise and busy students will have time to read them. Please include a tag line sentence to introduce yourself to our readers. Submissions must be original work and not previously published. Academic essays will not be accepted. Writing should be concise and clear to understand. First person accounts will be accepted if appropriate to the theme of the article. Pictures are welcome, but please include the following information along with the JPEG file: photographers name, the photo’s content, and a brief caption or explanation of what is happening in the photo. Articles must be approved by the editors prior to publication. Email the editors with ideas, suggestions, or any questions. Submissions will not be edited after published on the blog. If you must get approval of the article from a subject or someone you quoted, please do so before submitting to The Call Number.”13

Editorial tone: Informal.14

Style guide used: None specified, only mention is, “Writing should be concise and clear to understand. First person accounts will be accepted if appropriate to the theme of the article.”15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Call Number provides a publication opportunity for iSchool students at SJSU.

There are numerous types of contributions an LIS student can make to The Call Number. Here are a few: A description of an event hosted by LISSTEN or a page with photos. A description of the day’s events during Banned Books Week activities, including list of participants who met at the CSUF central quad. Past articles have included stories about library tours; Professional Associations Day; networking advice; interviews with faculty, librarians and students; REFORMA’s Annual Career Fair; the student commencement address; LISSTEN’s Resume and Interview program; and different types of librarianship.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Call Number’€™s circulation consists mainly of the students of School of Information (iSchool) at San José State University (SJSU). All iSchool students receive The Call Number, LISSTEN’s newsletter. The faculty and administrators also read the newsletter.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: San José State University is located in San José, California, yet all of its students complete the program online. Per the SJSU SLIS Annual Review 2011, students attend online from 45 states and 17 countries, suggesting a large, international community. SJSU has the “only ALA-accredited program in library and information science in the California State University system of 23 universities; the largest in the world.” Given the online, international nature of the program, references to San José, the campus or jargon should be limited. Cultural and bureaucratic references specific to California require brief explanation. However, SJSU SLIS jargon can be used.18

Reader characteristics: The student population reflects the field of LIS professionals, with the majority being white and female. Efforts by the leadership of the school and the emphasis on technology as part of the program has greatly reduced that majority and increased the diversity of the student population. Many SLIS students are currently employed in a variety of library settings and bring with them varied experiences. These include: academic libraries, museum archives, K-12 schools, public libraries, special libraries, corporate libraries, law libraries, medical libraries, government libraries and homeland security. SLIS’€™s multicultural, multiethnic, and multilingual student body comes from a variety of backgrounds.19 The common attitude derives from the perspective of being a student. Students want opportunities to network with professionals in professional settings. LISSTEN’s many activities accomplish this goal.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: iSchool students have a command of LIS subject matter and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although some of the readers of The Call Number are faculty, their purpose in reading this newsletter is to understand the point of view of students. Therefore, it is advisable to focus solely on the audience: School of Information students at SJSU. iSchool students author and edit the entire publication. There are faculty and professional interviews but the intention is to allow faculty to relate to student interests.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. LISSTEN. (2016). LISSTEN. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/lissten/lissten_content.html
  2. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  3. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  4. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  5. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  6. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  7. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  8. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  9. LISSTEN. (2016). November 2006 Issue. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/2006/Fall06CallNumber.pdf
  10. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  11. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  12. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  13. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number Blogspot. Retrieved from http://thecallnumber.blogspot.ca/
  14. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number Blogspot. Retrieved from http://thecallnumber.blogspot.ca/
  15. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number Blogspot. Retrieved from http://thecallnumber.blogspot.ca/
  16. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  17. LISSTEN. (2016). The Call Number. Retrieved from http://www.ellerman.org/vlasta/SLIS/LISSTEN/call_number/call_number_content.html
  18. San José State University. (2016). Innovate Magazine 2012. SJSU School of Information. Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/about-slis/publications/innovate-magazine-2012
  19. San José State University. (2016). Innovate Magazine 2012. SJSU School of Information. Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/about-slis/publications/innovate-magazine-2012
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