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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.1 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”2

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.3

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.6

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.9

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.10

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.11

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members12; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  3. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  4.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  5. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  13.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”1

Target audience: Academic library staff2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.5 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”10 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.11

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .12

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”13

Editorial tone: Academic14, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.15

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”17 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,19 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”20

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”21 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”22 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”24

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”25

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  7.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  9. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  11. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  13. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  14. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  18. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  19. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  21. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  22. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  24. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  25. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (JERML)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (JERML)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/werm20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the publication website: “The Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries is a peer-reviewed professional journal devoted to the access, evaluation, and management of electronic resources in the medical library environment.”1

Target audience: Users of libraries in medical schools, hospitals, and other health sciences libraries2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor & Francis3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and medical sciences, scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: “The material in the Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries will complement articles published in Medical Reference Services Quarterly, which highlights the reference and bibliographic instruction aspects of electronic resources.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks articles with “practical, up-to-date information about important developments and issues related to the provision, selection, and use of electronic resources in health sciences libraries.”9

“Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Collection development and selection of electronic resources
  • Electronic document delivery in medicine and health care
  • Enhancing electronic resource user services
  • Print versus electronic or combination formats
  • Site licensing-what librarians need to know
  • Delegating work that involves electronic/digital acquisitions
  • Cataloging-e-books, e-journals, and other electronic formats
  • The merger of serial and book formats in the electronic library
  • Coping with electronic misinformation, fraudulence, and shams on the Internet
  • “E-core” lists in medicine, allied health, nursing, pharmaceutical science, mental health, and other health care fields
  • The role of medical libraries with Electronic Health Records
  • Cost analyses of digital resources”10

Submission and review process: Submissions are uploaded using the ScholarOne Manuscripts site located at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jerml.”11 Any other requests should be directed to Justin Robertson, editor-in-chief, at justincrobertson@gmail.com.12 Detailed submission instructions are included at the submission guidelines link provided above.

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As this is a journal “aimed at the practicing librarian,”15 and is described as a “source for practical, up-to-date information,”16 any librarian with knowledge of current issues and developments in electronic resources in the broader LIS field would be a welcome contributor to JERML.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JERML is published in English in the United States.17

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely well-educated and work in “academic medical school libraries, hospital libraries, and other health sciences libraries.”18 Readers expect well-researched, academic articles19 that provide practical knowledge that will inform the service they provide.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be well-versed in LIS subject matter, specializing in the medical LIS field, with a special interest in electronic resources.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As the readership for this journal is specialized, potential contributors should tailor their articles to an academic, knowledgeable audience. Readers will be looking for rigorously researched papers that provide new information on access, evaluation and management of electronic sources.21 This is a go-to journal for medical librarians to obtain up-to-date information about electronic resource management for their libraries. The potential LIS authors to reach a extensive and engaged audience it great.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  2.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  3. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  4.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  5.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  6.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  7.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  8.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  10.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  17.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  18. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20#.VRahFeEYFZI
  19.  ProQuest. (2015). Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  20.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  21.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
Continue Reading

Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
Continue Reading

Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIST)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology (JASIS&T) (Previously the American Society for Information Science and Technology)

Website: http://www.asis.org/jasist.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website the stated purpose of JASIST is a “leading international forum for peer-reviewed research in information science.”1

Target audience: LIS professionals who are involved in or interested in the tools and techniques of information management.2

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Subject to single blind review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: This journal publishes original research on “…the production, discovery, recording, storage, representation, retrieval, presentation, manipulation, dissemination, use, and evaluation of information and on the tools and techniques associated with these processes.”7

Frequency of publication: Monthly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal welcomes rigorous work of an empirical, experimental, ethnographic, conceptual, historical, socio-technical, policy-analytic, or critical-theoretical nature.”9 Submitted articles should not exceed 36 pages. However, if an author has a longer paper, it may be submitted to the editor with a justification for the longer length which will be taken under consideration.10

Submission and review process: From the website: “Types of manuscripts: Various contributions are considered for publication: full-length research articles, occasional opinion papers (2,000-3-000 words on a topic that will stimulate debate), brief communications of 1,000-2,000 words, and letters to the editor. Letters and brief communications can generally be published sooner than full-length articles. All materials submitted will be acknowledged on receipt and (except for letters) subject to peer review. Opinion papers may be sent for review at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief. Articles are subjected single blind refereeing. Copies of the referees’ comments will be forwarded to the author, along with the editor’s decision.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly writing with properly formatted and cited references. A brief review of recently published articles indicate that the writing is formal and very informative.12

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (current edition).13

Conclusion: Evaluation of the publication’s potential for LIS authors

This site appears to be an excellent choice for LIS authors who have prepared in-depth original research papers on the evaluation and dissemination of information. Recently published articles include the “effects of time delays and information presentation on search behavior” and subject terms for classificatory metadata.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Circulation: No information available on circulation numbers. This is the journal for the Association for Information Science & Technology which states “ASIS&T counts among its membership some 4,000 information specialists from such fields as computer science, linguistics, management, librarianship, engineering, law, medicine, chemistry, and education…”15

Geographic location: This is an international publication; however, the journal is published in American English.16

Language or cultural considerations: “Authors for whom English is a second language may choose to have their manuscript professionally edited before submission or during the review process.”17

Individual characteristics: Members of the Association for Information Science & Technology (formerly American Society for Information Science and Technology) are readers along with other interested LIS professionals.18

Professional interests and workplaces: Readers will, no doubt, come from a technical LIS background who have a strong interest in original research in emerging areas of interest.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are most likely LIS professionals with an interest in research and who have a thorough background in LIS terminology.20

Biases, values, and attitudes: Geared toward intellectual, educated readers.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As the journal is the publication for the Association for Information Science and Technology members who are described as “individuals who share a common interest in improving the ways society stores, retrieves, analyzes, manages, archives and disseminates information, coming together for mutual benefit,”22 authors who wish to write for this journal will need to be well-versed in information technology and interested in emerging trends in this field. Readers expect original research that “pushes the boundaries of knowledge in emerging areas of interest,”23 according to the JASIS&T website.

Last updated: October 10, 2014


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  2. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  3. ProQuest. (2014). Association for Information Science and Technology. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412979904237/41862
  4. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). JASIST. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/jasist.html
  5. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). JASIST. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/jasist.html
  6. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). JASIST. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/jasist.html
  7. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  8. ProQuest. (2014). Association for Information Science and Technology. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412979904237/41862
  9. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  10. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  11. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  12. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  13. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  14. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  15. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). About ASIS&T. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/about.html
  16. ProQuest. (2014). Association for Information Science and Technology. Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412979904237/41862
  17. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Author Guidelines. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ForAuthors.html
  18. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  19. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  20. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  21. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
  22. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). About ASIS&T. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://www.asis.org/about.html
  23. John Wiley & Sons Inc. (2014). Overview. ASIS&T. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/%28ISSN%291532-2890/homepage/ProductInformation.html
Continue Reading

Library Hi Tech

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht

Purpose, objective, or mission: This international-scope journal focuses on computing and technology issues specifically for the library community, defining technology “€œto include the full range of tools employed by librarians and their customers”€.1

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals, as well as LIS researchers and lecturers; library senior management; LIS students and academics.2

Readers of the journal will be able to learn more about the potential of LIS technologies while finding out how to use the new technologies; explore the implications of tech changes; and stay informed of the latest LIS technology trends and developments.3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing, LTD.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online,7 with access available as part of a paid subscription to Emerald Library Studies eJournals.8

Content: From their website, topics covered in the journal include articles about integrated library systems, networking, strategic planning, policy implementation, security, automation systems, the role of consortia, resource access initiatives, architecture and technology, electronic publishing, library tech in specific countries, user perspectives on technology, how technology can help disabled library users, and library-related websites.9

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht

The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist.11

Types of contributions accepted: Original manuscripts/articles, 4000-8000 words, submitted in MS Word. See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Hi Tech topics.12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

The editor reviews each submission and decides whether it’s a good fit for Library Hi Tech. The submission is then sent to two independent referees for double-blind peer review. Based on the three recommendations and consultation with the Editorial Board members, the decision is made whether to accept, revise or reject the submission.14

A 2013 editorial reveals how long it takes a Library Hi Tech manuscript to go through peer review, and how authors can speed up the review time for their article by following the strict author guidelines.15

Editorial tone: Very professional and often technical, written in grammatically correct English with an emphasis on writing towards an intelligent, knowledgeable LIS audience.16

Style guide used: Harvard style guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech is a wonderful resource for staying abreast of the latest tech developments in the LIS world, and for learning about how the technology is used in a variety of LIS settings, worldwide. It is professional and very interesting to read, working with LIS professionals and students to provide an in-depth perspective on the applications of these new and emerging technologies. Recent articles detail the “€œAccessibility of academic library websites in North America”, covering 56 library websites, design methods and accessibility; virtual reference and the link to librarian job satisfaction; and increasing content findability with SEO.18 The journal has a reputation for discovering hot topic items before they become mainstream: for LIS students, that means potential to write from personal knowledge and experience, while providing updates into current tech trends and issues. The journal is part of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE),  “€œa forum for editors and publishers of peer reviewed journals to discuss all aspects of publication ethics.”19 The journal takes a positive attitude towards LIS technologies, but thoroughly researches the pros and cons of systems and their applications in libraries and helpfulness in fulfilling library goals.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: More than 100,000 downloads per year on the Emerald site. Per the Library Hi Tech co-editor, the publication has “a worldwide audience with a strong focus in North America”.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although written in English,22 the journal is international in scope, with the editor hailing from Humboldt Universitat zu Berlin, Germany, and the co-editor from the Royal School of LIS, Denmark. The editorial advisory board is comprised of LIS professionals from universities across the globe, including the U.S., Spain, South Africa, Australia and Canada.23 Submissions need to adhere to the Worldwide English language rights, and Emerald provides resources for making sure papers are written in grammatically correct standard English, for authors for whom English is not their first language.24

Reader characteristics: Subscribers, writers and editorial staff are primarily LIS professional academics at universities across the world, and interested in how technology can work in LIS settings, trends and case study examples.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as the publication is aimed at LIS professionals and students with an interest in LIS technologies. Articles are thoroughly researched and highly technical, written by professionals in the LIS field.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are passionate about technology in the LIS workplace, and would be interested to hear of emerging technologies from an LIS student point of view, case studies/examples on how technologies are being used in classrooms (virtual or not), and in library communities. If you have an example or a technology you’d like to research, this would be the perfect place to share your knowledge and experience.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  2. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  3. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  8. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  9. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  15. Greifeneder, E. (2013). 30 days to first decision: Time span in Library Hi Tech from submission to first decision. Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=17082842
  16. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Table of Contents: Volume 31 Issue 1. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0737-8831&volume=31&issue=1
  19. Committee on Publication Ethics. (2014). Home. Retrieved from http://publicationethics.org/
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  21. E. Greifeneder, personal communication, 2013
  22. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  23. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Editorial Team. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lht&
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
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D-Lib Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: D-Lib Magazine

Website: http://www.dlib.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The primary goal of the magazine is timely and efficient information exchange for the digital library community to help digital libraries be a broad interdisciplinary field, and not a set of specialties that know little of each other.”1 The publisher’s goal is to make the magazine available for “the advancement of knowledge and practice on digital library research and related matter.”2

Target audience: Technical and professional individuals interested in digital library research and development.3

Publisher: Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI). From its launch in 1995 until April 2006 it was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), the National Science Foundation (NSF). It is currently funded by the D-Lib Alliance and other contributors.4

Peer reviewed? No. Articles are reviewed and selected by an editorial committee.5

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. While many articles are research driven, there is no peer-review process.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Coverage of digital library research and development, includes “new technologies, applications, and contextual social and economic issues.”8 Besides full articles, D-Lib publishes “brief notices, book-reviews, opinions, letters, clippings, and pointers of broad interest about innovation and research in digital libraries.”9 The articles should be of interest to a broad (non-specialist) community and should “reflect work that has been completed, rather than just beginning.”10

Frequency of publication: Six times a year, with bi-monthly release dates.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Per the author guidelines, “Full articles, brief notices, book-reviews, conference reports, project briefings, opinions, letters, clippings, and pointers of broad interest about innovation and research in digital libraries. Full articles should: be of interest to a broad community (specialist literature should be published where specialists will see it), and reflect work that has been completed, rather than just beginning.”12 “Articles 1,500 to 3,000 words in length are preferred and those over 5,000 words are usually not accepted. They should be written in English, or accompanied by an English translation. Articles must include a 100-200 word abstract, without hyperlinks. Items submitted for the “In Brief” section have a 500-word limit. Letters to the editor are also welcomed.”13

Submission and review process: Completed manuscripts are accepted, but the editors prefer to be contacted before a work is finished so they “can determine whether the topic, style, and approach is appropriate for D-Lib Magazine.”14 Only electronic submissions are accepted.15

Submissions and queries should be emailed to editor@dlib.org.16

Editorial tone: The author guidelines make a point to emphasize that they are indeed guidelines and note that, “The above guidelines are suggestions only, and they are open for further dialogue. The most important thing is to write the article you want to write in the way that you want it to appear!”17

Style guide used: “References may be in any consistent format (e.g., MLA, Chicago, etc.), and authors are encouraged to include DOI® names (Digital Object Identifier) for sources where appropriate.”18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The history and support of recognized organizations supports credibility for this widely referenced and widely read publication. The publication is a fine source for keeping up-to-date with trends and activities. As part of this role, each issue includes several announcements of conferences and meetings and frequently posts calls for submissions to publish or present in a variety of venues. Along with submissions for these sorts of events, the editors welcome articles highlighting topics such as teaching, training, best practices, research and development reports.19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: UlrichsWeb does not provide circulation information, likely because this is solely an online electronic publication without advertising revenue.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: UlrichsWeb gives the country of publication as the United States. All of the current sponsoring bodies are located in the United States, but the affiliations of the contributors indicates that readership is worldwide.20 D-Lib Magazine is distributed in English. Being an online ASCII text-based product, it is conceivable that someone could “€œrun it through”€ an online automated translator, but it is more likely that most readers are comfortable with reading English. The content tends to run toward research, practical applications, and news items, so it should be possible to provide this with a minimum of culture-specific references. If they are needed to make or clarify a point, they should be explained and contextualized for all readers.21

Reader characteristics: No demographic data was found. It may be assumed that most readers have Internet access and comfort with the electronic information environment. D-Lib’€™s website says it “€œappeals to a broad technical and professional audience”22 with the understanding that most of this audience is within the LIS community. Since it is largely oriented to research and development, it is reasonable to assume that readers have interests and positions that engage them in activities such as analysis, design, assessment, project management, programming, systems administration, digitization, and metadata. Most of the abstracting and indexing services that cover this publication relate to LIS, computer science, or applied information systems. The publication’€™s Author Guidelines, which advise that articles “€œshould reflect work that has been completed, rather than just beginning,”23 reflect the orientation towards research and development and a high value placed on reporting of practical methods and applications.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Similar to above, we can expect much of this readership to have very high knowledge of LIS subject matter, but more oriented to practical matters and applications than to the theoretical and abstract. On the other hand, a significant portion of library employees who work in these areas do not have LIS degrees and are not necessarily concerned with nor exposed to the societal issues and academic endeavors that motivate some of their colleagues. Nonetheless, most will be conversant with the jargon of their library domain, with digitization, and with applicable standards.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Due to the nature of their work, these readers tend to be busy, creative, and solutions oriented. This, along with the 1,500 to 3,000 word limit, suggests that articles should be snappy, relevant, and to-the-point.

The D-Lib Alliance supports the magazine, and is always open to new contributors: “We know from our own experience and from talking with others that the digital library community relies on D-Lib Magazine, and now the magazine relies on the digital library community for its continuing existence.”25

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  2. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  3. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  4. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  5. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  6. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  7. ProQuest. (2016). D-Lib Magazine. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411943307442/261541
  8. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  9. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  10. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  11. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  12. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  13. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  14. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  15. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  16. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  17. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  18. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  19. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  20. ProQuest. (2016). D-Lib Magazine. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411943307442/261541
  21. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  22. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  23. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  24. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  25. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). D-Lib Alliance Participants. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/alliance-participants.html
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First Monday

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: First Monday

Website: http://www.firstmonday.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-€“reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to research about the Internet.”1 First Monday believes the impact of digitization on society is universal and ubiquitous, and seeks articles about how digitization is changing our understanding of society.2

Target audience: First Monday’€™s target audience includes intelligent, independent-thinking people located in more than 180 countries. Because readers’€™ cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly, readership is diverse. The journal is not geared toward those in academia, and many readers do not speak English as a first language.3

Publisher: First Monday Editorial Group at the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library4 First Monday was originally designed in Copenhagen and published by Munksgard, a Danish publisher.5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: Computers and Internet, scholarly7 (First Monday is published in conjunction with the university library at the University of Illinois-Chicago, which indicates that the LIS community has a vested interest in the publication and represents a large proportion of its readership. Due to its diverse readership, we have categorized First Monday as both a “scholarly” and a “civilian” publication.)8

Medium: Online9

Content: First Monday publishes original interdisciplinary research papers about the Internet and related technologies. Articles emphasize subjects that are particularly interesting or groundbreaking. This publication’€™s strength lies in its diversity of content centered around the influence of the Internet and related technologies.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: First Monday publishes articles on interesting and novel ideas related to the history, present, and future of the Internet.12 Published topics of interest to LIS authors include: knowledge management, trends and standards, information-seeking behavior, emerging electronic classification frameworks, digital copyright, social networks, education, information society, the internet’s technological and commercial development, technical issues, and the political and social implications of the Internet. Research surveys, studies, exploratory and critical theory articles tied to the internet and related technologies would be welcome here.13 The publication also provides detailed Guidelines for Authors. These guidelines include writing tips; citation, reference, and abstract guidelines; submission format; formatting templates; and a final checklist for use in preparing manuscript submissions.14

Submission and review process: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions. Papers are subject to a double-blind peer review for originality and timeliness in the context of related research.15

Editorial tone: Articles published in First Monday are as diverse as its readership. All articles are written in an academic tone, though style varies in complexity. Many are written in an easy-to-read style, while others employ more sophisticated language. In either case, writers maintain the active voice and employ short sentences and paragraphs.16

Style guide used: First Monday provides its own style guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

First Monday publishes interdisciplinary research articles on all aspects of the internet, from highly-specialized technical issues to the internet’€™s social and political impact. Given the increasing digitization of information, this journal holds tremendous promise for LIS authors.

Because this audience is not academic, writing standards are not rigid, and an international distribution creates the potential to reach many readers. This publication’€™s diverse readership allows for writing from a variety of disciplines–LIS authors with backgrounds in engineering, literature, or history would be equally at home here. First Monday would be an excellent place to publish a thesis, or research on emerging Web technologies or trends. Additionally, the fact that the journal is peer reviewed makes it an attractive choice for those who wish to add a published article to their curriculum vitae.

Started in 1996, the journal has published 1,381 papers in 218 issues written by 1,888 authors. The journal is also abstracted in Communication Abstracts, Computer & Communication Security Abstracts, DoIS, eGranary Digital Library, INSPEC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, LISA, PAIS.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 314,559 per month.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are located in over 180 countries, concentrated in western Europe, North America, and the Pacific Rim. First Monday is published by the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, where its server is also located.20 Due to the publication’€™s international scope, many readers’€™ first language is not English. Additionally, many readers are not academics. Authors should avoid using specific cultural references or idioms unless these are explained. Simple explanations, active voice, and less complex sentences will help this diverse audience better understand your message.21

Reader characteristics: Because First Monday‘€™s focus is international and its scope is interdisciplinary, the cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly among First Monday readers. Cultural, educational, and professional interests vary greatly among readers, and this publication’€™s interdisciplinary scope is larger than library information science alone. That said, the publication’€™s focus is salient to the discipline. This, combined with the fact that it is published by a university library, makes it reasonable to presume that many readers are LIS professionals with shared professional interests and workplaces. The articles published in First Monday represent a wide variety of standpoints and approaches. The articles do not show overt bias or attitude toward any particular view, which seems indicative of the audience’s diversity.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many articles published in First Monday are not directly related to LIS, so it is reasonable to presume that many readers are involved in other aspects of Internet technology. In view of this, authors should cautiously employ LIS jargon and explain any specialized terms they use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

First Monday prides itself on its interdisciplinary scope, and publishes a wide variety of articles from multiple perspectives. Demographic information about readers’€™ professional affiliations could not be obtained, and nothing in this publication’™s submission guidelines indicates a preference toward LIS authors or topics. However, First Monday‘€™s publisher indicates that librarians have a vested interest in this publication and may represent a large proportion of its readers. First Monday’™s Audience Profile stresses that many readers are not academics, but one might conclude that many are librarians.24

Library science is an interdisciplinary field, and LIS students and professionals possess specialized knowledge of digital information collection, organization, and dissemination. This uniquely positions them as potential authors for First Monday. When writing for this publication, explain any professional terminology that would be unfamiliar to those outside the LIS field. For example, a study of library cataloging standards and information-seeking behavior on the web should explain terms like MARC21 or RDA. To be well-suited for First Monday, such an article might focus on digitization’€™s broad affects on LIS cataloging and how these are shaping practices.

While First Monday’€™s readership is not primarily academic, the content of articles is often sophisticated and complex. This may be why the editors stress simplicity and brevity in style; readers from different backgrounds will better understand a complex message through simple explanations and short sentences.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. First Monday, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 25, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  2. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  3. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  4. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  5. “Editorial Policies,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  7. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  8. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  9. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  10. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  11. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  12. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Archives,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/archive
  14. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. First Monday,  University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  19. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  20. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  21. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  22. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  23. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  24. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
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Code4Lib Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ)

Website: http://journal.code4lib.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, “the Code4Lib Journal exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.”1 It “aims to help engender collective understanding and the necessary support for improving library technology and digital services.”2

Target audience: The target audience includes anyone who is involved in the “wider library community” who has an interest in libraries and technology.3

PublisherCode4Lib. Publication began in 2007.4

Peer reviewed? Submissions to the journal are reviewed by a non-anonymous editorial committee of professional peers. The journal does not use a refereed process.5

Type: Although the editorial committee consists mainly of those involved in the academic library community, contents do not necessarily have the format of a traditional scholarly research article, and the journal does not use a traditional blind refereed review. Articles can vary in formality, and can include case studies and personal opinion pieces. Articles do not generally include extensive literature reviews. For these reasons, the journal is currently classed here as ‘professional news’. Articles tend to be focused on the practical application of the ideas presented.6

Medium: Code4Lib Journal is available online.7

Content: From the Call for Submissions, “the editorial committee is looking for content that is practical, demonstrates how to exploit technology to create digital library collections and services, or offers insight and forethought regarding the use of computers in any type of library setting.”8

The journal publishes articles on a multitude of subjects, as long as they support the mission statement, and is flexible with length (1,500 to 5,000 words is an approximate word count). The types of articles published in the journal include:

  • Case studies of projects (failed or successful), how they were done, and challenges faced.
  • Descriptions of projects in progress, project updates, and new project proposals.
  • Effective processes for project management.
  • Reviews/comparisons of software, frameworks, libraries, etc.
  • Analyses and case studies of using library metadata in technological application: novel applications or solutions, or unsolved challenges,
  • Thought pieces on the big problems associated with library and technology, ideas for new solutions, visions for the future.
  • Findings on user behavior and interaction with systems.
  • Best practices.9

Frequency of publication: It is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The types of articles the journal is looking for include:

  • Book & software reviews
  • Code snippets & algorithms
  • Conference reports
  • Opinion pieces11

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent in the form of either an abstract or a complete draft. Submit articles using the online form, or via email to journal@code4lib.org. Once submitted the article goes through an editorial process, and not a peer review.12

Editorial tone: “Writers should aim for the middle ground between, on the one hand, blog or mailing-list posts, and, on the other hand, articles in traditional journals.”13

Style guide used: From the article guidelines: “While articles in C4LJ should be of a high quality, they need not follow any formal structure or guidelines.”14 However, end notes and references should be cited using the Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style Guide.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a semiformal setting in which to discuss issues of technology in the library and information science world. It is a newer journal, which may make it less competitive than more established journals. The information in the journal is concentrated around technology, and its place within the library setting, so it would be a good place for anyone with an interest in this subject to find a home for one of their articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Since the journal is 100% online, there was no information on the exact circulation available.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editorial committee is based throughout the United States, but the writers come from both within and outside the United States.17 The journal is written in English, and although the editorial committee is American, not all of the contributors are. (Article guidelines note that articles should be written in good English, and that “American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these.”)18  Also, due to the online nature of the journal, people from anywhere in the world would have the ability to access the articles. Because of this, it would most likely be prudent to avoid the use of any language or content that was too culturally specific.

Reader characteristics: Code4Lib is a “volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff’.” From looking through the author information supplies with the articles, it appears that almost all of the contributors work in academic libraries, although their actual job titles vary quite a bit. These job titles range from web designer to information technology coordinator to systems librarian. While this information is about the writers, it goes to show that the journal is of interest to all different types of professionals involved technologies in libraries. Of course, they also all have a professional interest in the intersection of libraries and technology. Code4Lib is of interest to “technology folks in libraries, archives and museums to informally share approaches, techniques, and code across institutional and project divides.”19 The readers of this journal are likely to have established opinions about the place of technology in libraries. A look at the mission statement shows that the readers are likely to feel that technology holds a key position in the future of libraries.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of Code4Lib Journal would have a good knowledge and understanding of LIS topics and issues. They would also be familiar with library jargon. On top of that, due to the technical nature of the journal, they would also be familiar with most technical jargon.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The common thread running among these readers is an interest in, and a passion for, technology and its use within a library setting. Their level of technical knowledge would be rather high, and this would be an important thing for writers to keep in mind. In fact, it would also be a necessity for the writers of a proposed article for Code4Lib Journal to be technological experts. An important element of the journal is the inclusion of the actual coding used in the project being discussed, hence the name of the journal. That being said, the readers would most likely not only have an understanding of technology, but also experience with its application and creation.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  2. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  3. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  4. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  5. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Process and Structure. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/process-and-structure
  6. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Issue 25, 2014-07-21. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/issues/issues/issue25
  7. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  8. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  9. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  10. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  11. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  12. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  13. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  14. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  15. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  16. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  17. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Editorial Committee. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/editorial-committee
  18. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  19. Code4Lib. (2016). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
  20. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  21. Code4Lib. (2016). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
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