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SNAP Section Blog

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: SNAP (Students & New Archives Professionals) Section Blog

ISSN: N/A

Website:  https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The SNAP Section is a sub-group formed within the Society of American Archivists (SAA) to focus on student and new professional goals and issues.1 The SNAP Blog provides SNAP Section members with a forum sharing information in a more public forum, in conjunction with other social media outlets.2 The blog meets supports SNAP’s goals to “provide a forum to share concerns and learn from each other” and to “facilitate remote participation in the group through social media and other online resources.”3

Target audience: Entry level or student archivists, particularly those involved in the SAA: students, interns, new professionals, early-career archivists, and those still looking for their first professional job. Per the bylaws, any member or nonmember of SAA, including new and more experienced archives professionals, may participate in SNAP in accordance with the most current Guidelines for Roundtables as set forth by the SAA Council.4

Publisher: The Society of American Archivists (SAA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Sharing information relevant to the student and new archive professional community, including archive-relevant blogs, regional meetings or courses, project ideas, general Q&A regarding research, professional and student issues, and the Ask An Archivist Q&A section.9

Frequency of publication: Updated as often as members post online. Recently the rate has been about three times per month.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/

Types of contributions accepted: Blog reviews, accounts of regional meetings or courses, project ideas, and anything of interest to the archival community.11 Special columns offer more structured writing opportunities, and can be found here.12

Submission and review process: Authors who want to contribute to the blog should submit a contact form with information about themselves and about the topic they plan to write about.13 It can be assumed that the blog team will work with authors to develop their idea and get it posted.

Editorial tone: Informal.14

Style guide used: None listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The SNAP Section Blog is an excellent forum for sharing archival information and concerns among a like-minded group. It should be easy for novice writers to practice publishing their thoughts, ideas, and announcements in this public forum. Posting on this blog promises networking potential, as well as the possibility of becoming a strong voice in the newest generation of archivists, who may bring to light new perspectives on issues not emphasized to more established archivists.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently 218 people follow the blog,15 though the number of views that blog posts receive on the site and on linked-to social media could potentially be much greater.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience is largely North American, as the blog concerns members of the SAA. English is the primary language. Recent blog posts demonstrate comfort with social media and current internet language.16

Reader characteristics:  Since the Section focuses on students and new professionals, members are likely overall to be younger than their other SAA Section counterparts, though new archive professionals may be older individuals in the midst of a career change. Readers may also be more established archivists who want to keep up with what issues their new colleagues find important.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Some LIS terminology and understanding is expected; but this is not a professional-grade publication, just sharing among peers. Contributors writing about their personal experiences in the field are not necessarily expected to walk readers through each step of what their work entails.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The SNAP Blog offers an excellent venue for new and student archivists to share knowledge, insights, and new ideas about their profession.19 This is a very organized, enthusiastic group of students and new professionals who are addressing the needs of those LIS professionals new to archival librarianship. Readers are hoping to learn career tips, gain insight on issues they have different perspectives on, and network with other professionals. Write from personal experience and with passion for maximized readership.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-section/snap-mission-statement
  2. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/about/
  3. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement.”
  4. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  5. Society of American Archivists, “Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) Section,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://www2.archivists.org/groups/students-and-new-archives-professionals-snap-section
  6. Society of American Archivists, “SNAP Mission Statement.
  7. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  8. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  9. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  10. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section,” Accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com
  11. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  12. Students & New Professionals Section, “Series,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://snaproundtable.wordpress.com/series/.
  13. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “About.”
  14. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  15. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  16. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  17. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  18. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
  19. Students & New Archives Professionals Section, “Section.”
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EContent

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: EContent

ISSN: 1525-25311

Website: http://www.econtentmag.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From their site, “By covering the latest tools, strategies, and thought-leaders in the digital content ecosystem, EContent magazine and EContentmag.com keep professionals ahead of the curve in order to maximize their investment in digital content strategies while building sustainable, profitable business models.”2

Target audience: Per their site, “decision-makers in the media, publishing, technology, and mobile sectors.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade magazine.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: EContent delivers essential research, reporting, news, and analysis of content related issues. According to the “Writing for EContent” guidelines, “Each issue of EContent offers: news and analysis of what’s happening in the content industry, feature articles covering the latest trends and issues, and regular columns and departments written by industry experts.”8

Frequency of publication: 6 times a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.econtentmag.com/About_Us (See Writing for EContent for Author Guidelines download)10

Types of contributions accepted: Articles are accepted in the following categories: current news stories; reviews of new products; and features (narratives, art, or company profiles). See “Content” entry above for general types of articles that appear in each issue. The Editorial calendar, outlining the focus for each issue, is located in the publication’s media kit.11

Submission and review process: Authors must first send a brief query, links to samples of your work, and a brief bio to the editor. “When submitting, be sure to include particular areas of interest and expertise. If you have a specific idea for an article, submit the idea accompanied by a brief outline of the topics you expect to cover. Unacceptable unsolicited manuscripts will not be returned.”12 Check submissions thoroughly for grammatical and spelling errors. Supporting materials are required for all sources mentioned.13

Editorial tone: Editors expect authors to deliver a well written, thoroughly researched, factually correct, and on-time manuscript. Features are nonacademic in tone and must be written in a narrative style, with a beginning, middle, and an end. New product reviews should be written for a lay audience, not strictly for information professionals, as many business leaders use the magazine for exposure to new products in digital content management.14

Style guide used: No style guide is mentioned, but specific style guidelines are provided in Author Guidelines.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

EContent provides numerous opportunities for authors to publish on a variety of topics related to managing digital content. To the author’s benefit, editorial calendars are posted with specific topics to be featured in upcoming articles, along with deadlines for submission. This allows authors to either find the correct issue for a topic they are writing, or write an original article according to the publication’s editorial needs. Within each topic, the editors are looking for current news stories, new product reviews, and features that give narratives, showcase art, or profile a company.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Purpose circulation: Per their media kit, they have more than 27,000 readers. 17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States.18 Readers are primarily located in the United States, therefore American colloquialisms can be used. Culturally, EContent readers are very technologically savvy, so a high level of exposure to this aspect of American culture can be assumed.19

Reader characteristics: The most important thing to remember about EContent readers is that they are not IT professionals. Most readers hold executive-level positions, so a larger amount of responsibility can be assumed as far as decisions regarding content management solutions. According to the Author Guidelines, readers are “executives and professionals involved in content creation, acquisition, organization, and distribution in B2B or B2C environments or within their own organizations.” A survey of EContent readers revealed that they work in over 20 different industries, from the entertainment industry to the military, so avoid information or jargon specific to a certain industry. What is important to remember about EContent readers is their similarities: they are all in a position to make decisions over an organization’s digital content management systems. Readers are all familiar with the technical terms and jargon related to digital content and asset management, so in this area authors can use common terminology, yet remember not to provide overly technical information. EContent does convey a progressive stance in the sense that it tries to review the latest products and provide advice on cutting-edge resources for professionals in the position to making decisions regarding content management.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: In a limited sense, EContent readers are familiar with one aspect of library and information science, content management. Their media kit notes, “EContent readers are executives and managers who direct the digital content strategies for their organizations. Subscribers include content executives, content managers, content creators, publishers, content marketers, and anyone who deals with digital content in order to further business objectives. They’re buyers of content and technology solutions and have the power to make purchasing decisions.”21 While this description easily includes information professionals, it also include many other professionals not familiar with LIS jargon or issues.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of EContent are very diverse. What brings them together is their shared influence over digital content strategies, whether for a business or an information center. It is important to remember that although content management is a technical field, this publication is not geared toward IT professionals, but rather toward executives who make decisions regarding content management systems. The purpose of this publication is to offer resources and advice aimed at successful content management, and to provide information on products in order to help readers make informed decisions. EContent‘s readers do not want to know how digital content management products work, they want to know which ones are best for their needs, and how to best use them.22

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “EContent,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 11, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521727384219/91047
  2. Information Today Inc., “About EContent,” EContent, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.econtentmag.com/About_Us
  3. Information Today Inc., “Advertising,” EContent, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.econtentmag.com/Advertising
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  11. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  12. Information Today Inc.,  About EContent.
  13. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  14. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  15. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  16. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  17. Information Today Inc., “’19 Media Kit,” EContent, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.econtentmag.com/downloads/mediakits/2019/EC2019-MediaKit.pdf
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  20. Information Today Inc., “About EContent.”
  21. Information Today Inc., “’19 Media Kit.”
  22. Information Today Inc., “Advertising.”
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CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://cclibrarians.org/outlook/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œThe purpose of the Council of Chief Librarians is to represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education; to provide a vehicle for communication, discussion and collaboration among libraries; to provide opportunities for professional development, training and leadership development for library leaders and other librarians; and to support data collection, analysis and dissemination for the purpose of good public policy development.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: News items about events and open positions should be less than 300 words. Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (500-1,500 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.10

Submission and review process: Articles may be submitted through the CCL website. The editorial team will revise for grammar, spelling, formatting, and style.11

Editorial tone: Per the website, “Succinct, inviting and informative style of writing is preferred.” The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.12

Style guide used: There is no style guide listed, but the editorial guidelines state that endnote citations should be in accordance with the current edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of librarians, library managers, and library deans, to whom it is sent electronically.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.15

Reader characteristics: While no information is available concerning their ages, members are all supervising librarians and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.16

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be library leadership, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.19

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. “Home,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/outlook-archive
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Mailing List Information,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/mailing-list-information
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/directory
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory.”
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
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CARL Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CARL Newsletter

ISSN: 1090-99821

Website: http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: CARL is the official publication of California Academic & Research Libraries.2 The goal of California Academic & Research Libraries is to support professional growth opportunities for its members.3

Target audience: The newsletter is a benefit of membership and per their website, membership is open to “any person interested in academic or research librarianship or in academic or research libraries in California.”4

Publisher: California Academic and Research Libraries.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: News related to professional workshops and CARL business.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/

Types of contributions accepted: Per their website, “Announcements of awards, publications, presentations, retirements and relevant professional accomplishments are limited to CARL members. News of professional appointments are welcome from any member library.”11

Submission and review process: E-mail the editor or send column information to the campus liaison coordinator.12

Editorial tone: Informational.13

Style guide used: No particular style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing opportunities for first time LIS contributors are excellent if you are willing to network and attend workshops of interest to California academic librarians. The editor requests that “interest group” coordinators designate a notetaker during its programs. The newsletter will then publish the workshop or program notes. An “interest group” is one of many associations which are members of CARL and who promote through the newsletter when they sponsor a professional growth opportunity workshop.14

The SJSU SLIS Administration listserv often posts calls for volunteers for such events. The contact person designated in these postings can then be contacted. An arrangement can then be made regarding what volunteer contributions are needed. Workshop attendance also can be arranged. A volunteer may offer to create program announcements for the CARL Newsletter as well a volunteering to be the notetaker for the workshop; the story built from those notes is likely to be published in the newsletter.15

Some of the associations listed in the interest groups include: Academic Librarians’ Interest Group North (ALIGN); Collection Development Interest Group (CDIG); Diversity in Academic Libraries (DIAL);  Southern California Instruction Librarians (SCIL); Science and Engineering Academic Librarians (SEAL); and Scholarly Communication and Open Resources for Education (SCORE).16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: About 700 members receive the newsletter with membership.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is based in California and written in English.18 California is a diverse state with strong multicultural values.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians or those interested in academic libraries, usually based in college or university libraries, especially those based in California. There is a strong focus on multicultural values.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Academic.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with their professional community, interested in improving their professional skills and maintaining strong ties with their peers in the field.

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  ProQuest, “CARL Newsletter (Online),” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560283718353/665033
  2. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Newsletter,” accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/index.html
  3. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission,” accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.carl-acrl.org/about/mission.html
  4. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission.”
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Newsletter.”
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Newsletter.”
  12. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Newsletter.”
  13. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Newsletter 37 no. 2 (July 2014), http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/2014jul.html
  14. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “About CARL Interest Groups,” accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.carl-acrl.org/leadership/ig/about.html
  15.  California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “About CARL Interest Groups.”
  16. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “About CARL Interest Groups.”
  17. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission.”
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission.”
  20. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission.”
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American Indian Library Association Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Indian Library Association Newsletter

ISSN: 2152-35251

Website: https://www.ailanet.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Their website states, “An affiliate of the American Library Association, the American Indian Library Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.”2 “The American Indian Libraries Newsletter is an official publication of the American Indian Library Association. It includes information about decisions, goals, activities, and business meetings of AILA, as well as articles on programs, projects, grants, and resources relating to American Indian culture and library and information services. A column by the current president is a regular feature. In addition, you will find books reviews, interviews, and other information that furthers the goals of the association. “3

Target audience: Individuals and institutions interested in working to improve library services to American Indians and Alaska Natives in every type of library.4

Publisher: The American Indian Library Association (AILA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: This is the official publication of the American Indian Library Association. Per their website, it includes “committee and member updates and events; interviews with indigenous authors; scholarly articles; and conference program details.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines are not listed online, but you can contact the newsletter editor, George Gottschalk, for more information about submitting work to the newsletter.11

Types of contributions accepted: Their website states that the newsletter “contains information of professional interest to AILA’s members.” Contributions include updates, events, scholarly articles, author interviews, and conference program details. Book and media reviews are published on the AILA website. 12

Submission and review process: All inquiries should be directed to the current editor.13

Editorial tone: An overview of recent, archived issues suggests that articles should be informative and engaging for library professionals without relying on technical jargon.14

Style guide used: No style guidelines are listed for the newsletter.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are interested in submitting articles should consider contacting the editor, whose information appears on the AILA Publications website. Even though there are no submission guidelines listed, many of the articles are written by members. Interested authors can see the types of articles accepted by looking at previous submissions to the newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: While membership and circulation numbers are unavailable, the newsletter is mailed to all AILA members and digital copies are available to those without memberships.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Members are located throughout the United States and Canada.17 The newsletter is written in English18 and contains library terminology. Readers are aware of the different tribes and expect articles to identify specific tribes and/or bands. Some cultural considerations that authors need to consider may be using the correct term to identify American Indian people. Some readers may object to the term American Indian or Native American. This publication uses the term American Indian in their articles.19

Reader characteristics: “Members are individuals and institutions interested in the development of programs to improve Indian library, cultural, and informational services in school, public, and research libraries on reservations.” Readers are tribal librarians, are associated with tribal libraries or have an interest in issues that affect library and information services for American Indian people. Some readers may be educators in a Native community, or public librarians working with Native people. It is assumed that many readers have LIS degrees. Readers value respect of American Indian communities and their drive to be self sufficient. Factors that aid in independence, such as programs to assist under served American Indian tribal members located on the reservation are important issues and a conduit for receiving that information is the American Indian Library Association Newsletter.20€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with library terminology and the use of LIS jargon is present but does not dominate in the publication. Articles are written for a professional, educated audience.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The American Indian Library Association Newsletter is a respected publication read by librarians and other interested individuals who provide services to American Indian people. Authors writing for this publication will gain recognition within the American Indian LIS community. If published, authors will have a small but concentrated audience of American Indian library professionals. Authors have a good chance of being published if they involve tribal colleges and library-related issues in some way. When writing for this newsletter, it is suggested that authors include tribal affiliation of American Indian people.

Authors that are interested in submitting articles may consider topics such as the future for tribal libraries, improving services for traditionally underserved populations, or articles regarding reading and American Indian children.

Last updated: April 12, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  ProQuest, “American Indian Library Association Newsletter,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 12, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521736632647/124732
  2. American Indian Library Association, “About,” accessed April 12, 2109, https://ailanet.org/about/about-aila/
  3. American Indian Library Association, “Frequently Asked Questions,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/about/frequently-asked-questions/#q5
  4. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Indian Library Association, “Publications,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  9. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  12. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  13. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  14. American Indian Library Association, “Newsletters,” accessed April 12, 2019, https://ailanet.org/newsletter/
  15. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  16. American Indian Library Association, “Publications.”
  17. American Indian Library Association, About.
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  20. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
  21. American Indian Library Association, “About.”
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Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

ISSN:1911-9593

Website: http://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Partnership is the journal of The Partnership organization, which is “Canada’s national network of provincial and territorial library associations.” The journal “promotes the exchange of ideas about libraries, librarianship, and information science among practitioners across all library sectors.”1

Target audience: Canadian librarians and library workers and LIS professionals, archivists, scholars, researchers, and students. Although the journal is published by The Partnership, a network of Canadian library associations with more than 7,000 people, it is an open-access journal, so its audience is not limited to members.2

Publisher: The Partnership: The Provincial and Territorial Library Associations of Canada (Ontario, Canada).3

Peer reviewed? Manuscripts submitted to the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.5

Content: Regular sections in Partnership include Editor’s Comments, Innovations in Practice, Theory and Research, Features, Book Reviews, and News and Announcements.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Partnership accepts “original, unpublished manuscripts in French or English on a broad range of topics relevant to library and information science practitioners in all library sectors.” The editors “encourage submissions which consider the Canadian context, but this is not a necessary condition for acceptance to the journal.”8 Each section has its own editorial guidelines in terms of topic, word count, tone, and approach.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are submitted electronically to the journal’s website.10 Manuscripts for the Theory and Research and the Innovations in Practice sections undergo a double-blind peer-review process, usually within two months of submission.11

Editorial tone: The tone depends on the section; it is overall scholarly but not overly formal.

Style guide used: APA (6th edition), with a modified style for online articles and documents.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This open-access journal appears to be an excellent opportunity for Canadian LIS authors, as it is written for the Canadian LIS community. LIS authors outside of Canada are not excluded by the guidelines, but they should ensure their work meets the needs of the Canadian readers.13 The many sections–theory, pedagogy, practice, professional development, reviews, and library news–cover a huge variety of content and offer writers many opportunities for submitting work that ranges from scholarly to practical to reflective.14  There are a few must-read articles and editorials for authors submitting to Partnership, especially “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership15 and editorials reflecting on the journal’s past and future.16 Furthermore, the journal “provides a chance for librarians and library workers to be editors and reviewers.”17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to a past announcement, in 2017 the journal received over 45,000 views. They have 1500 readers registered with their website.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  This is a Canadian bilingual publication (English and French) for librarians and information professionals of Canada. Authors would need to ensure their work meets their needs and explains any cultural or language differences.

Reader characteristics: Overall, Partnership has a very broad spectrum of readers in the Canadian library and information professions: librarians, library works, scholars, researchers, practitioners, and students. It can be safely assumed the readers are interested in promoting successful libraries and acquiring knowledge to allow them to succeed in their own work. The authors and content of the publication suggests that the majority of readers are working in all types of libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The journal works to connect members of the Canadian library community,19 and the journal’s sections are variously academic, reflective, and newsy. Readers probably have a range of LIS knowledge, from the practical to the academic.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should first take into consider how their work is broadly or specifically related to libraries and library scholarship in Canada. Furthermore, readers come to this journal to read on a a wide range of current topics in the library profession: research, pedagogy, professional development, and current news and profiles. Readers work at every level of the Canadian library profession and in all types of libraries.

Last updated: April 8, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “What is The Partnership?” ThePartnership.ca, accessed February 19, 2018, http://www.thepartnership.ca/web/PARTNERSHIP/About/PARTNERSHIP/About.aspx?hkey=57981e1d-6cc7-4b09-822e-ebdfd7f2e3b2.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Submissions,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/submissions.
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Information for Authors,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/information/authors#.WouLFRPwZUM.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “Editorial Policies.”
  15. See David Fox, “Get Published! Straight Talk from the Editors at Partnership,Partnership 8, no. 1 (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v8i1.2692.
  16. See Robin Bergart, Leanne Olson, and Nathalie Soini, “Editorial: Charting the Course of Partnership,Partnership 12, no. 1 (2017): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v12i1.3976, and Jennifer Richard, “Celebrating 10 Years of Canadian Librarianship through the Partnership Journal,” Partnership 11, no. 1 (2016): http://dx.doi.org/10.21083/partnership.v11i1.3682.
  17. “Journal History,” Partnership, accessed February 19, 2018, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/about/history#.WouedhPwZUM.
  18. “Top Viewed Articles,” Partnership, December 06, 2017, https://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/announcement/view/128.
  19. “Journal History.”
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Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

ISSN: 2369-937X

Website: http://www.cjal.ca

Purpose, objective, or mission: Published by the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL), the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship seeks to publish articles that are relevant to academic librarians and the profession of academic librarianship.1

Target audience: Academic librarians, both within and outside of Canada.

Publisher: The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL).2

Peer reviewed? Yes. However, book reviews and review essays are not.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles that address academic librarianship from diverse perspectives. “Submissions must present substantive analysis of a topic. Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”4

Check the journal’s calls for papers and reviews for the latest information on special issues.

Frequency of publication: “Articles and book reviews are published on a continuous basis and combined into one volume at the end of each calendar year.”5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal welcomes submissions for book reviews and articles and review essays. Book reviews should be about 1,000 words in length, whereas articles should be 3,000 to 6,000 words, and no more than 10,000.6

Submission and review process: First, create a username and password for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. You can register here.

Once you are ready to submit, be sure to read through the Author Guidelines to make sure you have formatted your work properly and included all necessary information.

“Submissions are reviewed first by an editor to confirm that the submission is appropriate for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. This step typically occurs within two weeks of submission. This editorial review considers questions such as:

  • Is the submission within the Aims and Scope?
  • Is the submission readable and within the desired word count?
  • Has the submission been published elsewhere?
  • Has the submission document been anonymized?”

“When the editor has determined that the submission is appropriate to be considered for publication, he/she contacts potential reviewers. Editors do not also serve as reviewers. Each submission is normally reviewed by two reviewers. Reviewers are asked to submit their reviews within four weeks.”

Finally, the editor will consider any recommendations and comments made by the reviewer, and will confer with the author.7

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: The most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Keep in mind that publication submissions are not limited to Canadian librarians, but articles relevant to the country’s LIS field are encouraged and welcomed. According to the journal’s Focus and Scope section, “Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”9 Recently published articles are on topics such as the recent trend of libraries hiring consultants and 20th century postwar Canadian libraries.

The CJAL could also be a good outlet for reviews on LIS books written in the last three years. Look at the Book Review Guidelines section of the Editorial Policies for more information.
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is open access, so anyone can read current and archived issues.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: All articles are published in both English and French.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians who are members of the Canadian Association of Academic Librarians. Therefore, readers are likely well versed in current LIS topics, especially how they relate to the field of academic librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors who are interested in publishing in this journal should look into CAPAL to learn more about the journal’s readership. The association’s About page states that they differ from other library associations in that CAPAL “is an advocacy group focused on the individual and the profession.”10

Readers are librarians who are well versed in LIS topics, particularly as they relate to academic librarianship. If you have a book review or well researched LIS article that is relevant for academic librarians (particularly in Canada), then this may be a good venue for your writing.

Last updated: April 21, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Editorial policies,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial policies.”
  3. “Editorial policies.”
  4. “Editorial policies.”
  5. “Editorial policies.”
  6. “Submissions,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 17, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  7. “Editorial policies.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “About,” CAPALibrarians.org, accessed April 20, 2018, http://capalibrarians.org/contact-us/
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Journal of New Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of New Librarianship

ISSN: 2471-3880

Website: http://newlibs.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of New Librarianship editors acknowledge the “need to offer quality literature in our field in an open, independently produced journal. Beyond that, we believe that the library is meant to set an example for academia. Free and open access to information and innovation is crucial to the future of our institutions and profession. By providing an outlet that mixes both traditional and disruptive forms of scholarly and professional communication, we can change the way our profession shares and leads.”1

Target audience: The Journal of New Librarianship aims to reach all library and information science (LIS) professionals, practitioners, scholars, teachers, and graduate students, as well as those who are interested in the LIS field.

Publisher: The journal is “independently produced.” It uses the Scholastic academic journal management system.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, blind review. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and other content that is not peer-reviewed.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: The Journal of New Librarianship is a new journal, first published in 2016. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles, essays, editorials, book reviews, and columns4 on all topics in the field of LIS and seeks both “traditional and disruptive” forms of communication.5  The Columns section publishes “short pieces on topics of timely interest to information professionals covering innovations and issues for the next generation of librarians.”6

Frequency of publication: Articles are published on a rolling basis on the website; these are collected into two issues each year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Submissions may include, but are not limited to: Solicited articles; Scholarly Articles; Essays; Experience and opinion pieces; Media (i.e., podcasts, video, etc) relevant to innovative practices in librarianship; Book reviews; Technology reviews; Letters to the Editor on topics relevant to the field; Data sets; Manifestos; Extended scholarship (Greater than 15,000 words); and Interviews.”8 “We want lengthy treatises on intersectionality and library practice just as much as we want data analysis and recorded interviews with people doing awesome teen programming or video projects on the transformation of a library’s physical space and the perceived impact. All aspects of librarianship – by any name – are within the intended scope of the journal.”9

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit their articles stripped of identifying information so they are ready for peer review. They ask for a cover letter that explains “the origin of the project, whether it has been presented and if so where, and affirmation of its originality, veracity, and the author’s right to include all submitted material, data, and media.” Further, the cover letter should explain if the article has time constraints, for example, if it should be published immediately or during a particular conference. Finally, during the online submission process, authors are asked to list potential peer reviewers who are appropriate or those who should be avoided, and these suggestions should be explained in the cover letter. The editors ask authors to contact them with “preliminary pitches,” and they “encourage ideas for content in any and all forms.”10

Editorial tone: The editors encourage “submissions that we have no idea how to categorize,” so the tone should be appropriate to the piece: scholarly, conversational, casual, experimental, and so on.11

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of New Librarianship is an interesting, high-quality, experimental journal that aims to set an example in academia for free and open access to information, scholarship, and ideas.13 This is a great publication for LIS authors who want to publish traditional academic scholarship or who have novel explorations in theory or practice, timely observations, or experimental pieces, including multimedia, to contribute. LIS graduate students are encouraged to submit work and to volunteer as a part of the journal’s editorial team.14 This is an exciting new journal that is breaking new ground in the discipline’s publishing practices.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal that is produced in the United States. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.15 The journal welcomes non-English-language content and will provide translation assistance.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians in all types of libraries and institutions and LIS professionals, scholars, and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ will have both an academic and practical knowledge and understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are members of the LIS community who are looking for novel, interesting, relevant, timely, and experimental work in the LIS field. The editors, and presumably the readers, “share a steadfast commitment to recognizing and discussing intersectionality –how social categories like race, class, and gender create overlapping and situational systems of discrimination and privilege.”17 Readers of this journal look for innovative models and practices in libraries and in LIS scholarship.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/about.
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “For Authors,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/for-authors.
  4. “Issues,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/issues.
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue of the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 100, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/3/1.
  7. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue,” 100.
  8. “For Authors.”
  9.  “Policies & FAQS,” Journal of New Librarianship Blog, December 29, 2016, http://www.newlibs.org/post/55.
  10. “For Authors.”
  11. “Policies & FAQS.”
  12. “For Authors.”
  13. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: Welcome to the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/2016/1/weiter.1.
  14. “Policies & FAQS.”
  15. “Editorial Board,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/editorial-board.
  16. “For Authors.”
  17. “Policies & FAQs.”
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The Conversation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Conversation

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://theconversation.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Begun as a project in 2014, The Conversation publishes articles written by PhD candidates and university-affiliated researchers. Their aim is to promote access to high-quality information and to strive for a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues.1

For more in depth information, take a look at their charter.

While this wiki profile is for The Conversation‘s U.S.-based website, there are additional sites specific to audiences all around the globe.

Target audience: Members of the general public interested in reading high-quality based on academic research. Much of this research may not otherwise be accessible to the general public because it may be published in scholarly journals with limited circulation.

Publisher: The Conversation US, Inc.

Peer reviewed? No. Authors work with editors, who are professional journalists, to craft their articles.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles based on academic studies of varying topics—arts, culture, science, technology, medicine, and many more.

Frequency of publication: New articles published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://theconversation.com/us/pitches

Types of contributions accepted: The Conversation focuses on three priority areas:

  • “Timely, evidence-based analysis of issues making the news
  • Articles explaining new research and its significance for a non-expert audience
  • Timeless, plain English ‘explainers’ of complex issues”2

Submission and review process: There are three steps to becoming published: verification of institute, educational history/qualifications and the creation of a website account.3

Editorial tone:  “Plain English” (for “a non-expert audience”) and “evidence based.” 4

The writing style must be professional yet accessible to general readers who are not subject matter experts. A scholarly or academic tone could be off-putting for lay readers.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For authors who are are LIS researchers affiliated with an academic institution (MLIS students should keep in mind that they do not qualify), this could be a great outlet for translating scholarly work research for lay audiences and for providing well-informed content on current issues in libraries, online privacy, intellectual freedom, the digital divide, media literacy, and other LIS-oriented topics that would be significant to a nonexpert audience. A four-minute video on the benefits of writing for The Conversation is available here.

Before proposing an article, The Conversation‘s editors ask that you do a keyword search to see what has already been published on your topic.5 (Of course this is good advice for any publication you might hope to write for!) A list of articles on libraries can be found here.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This profile is geared towards readers of the U.S.-based site, but The Conversation has websites for readers in Australia, Africa, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Indonesia, as well as an additional “global perspectives” site.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Conversation has a global audience. Specific editions are geared toward readers in specific geographies, but all editions are accessible worldwide.

Reader characteristics: All published articles feature a comments section with lively debates among readers. Thoughtful, well developed comments are the norm. Anyone can sign up to comment on articles, but full names are required to help maintain a transparent forum. Click here to read about The Conversation’s community standards for readers and commenters.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied. Authors would need to assume that readers would not be part of the LIS world and would not be familiar with LIS jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

From glancing over the reader characteristics mentioned above, you can guarantee that, if published by The Conversation, your article could very well invite a lively debate among commenters from all over the world. Authors will find a higher level of engagement with readers, and will be able to see how their audience responds to their work–a feature not usually seen with publication of scholarly articles.

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 14, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/who-we-are
  2. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  3. “Become an author,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 29, 2018, https://theconversation.com/become-an-author
  4. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  5. “Pitch an article.”
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Medium

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Medium

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://medium.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Medium is a free, open platform for people to read, write and share posts easily online. Posts can be organized into publications, which anyone can set up.”1

“Medium taps into the brains of the world’s most insightful writers, thinkers, and storytellers to bring you the smartest takes on topics that matter. So whatever your interest, you can always find fresh thinking and unique perspectives.”2

Target audience: Inquiring minds on the web. Medium publishes content across a vast array of topics to interest all sorts of readers.

Publisher: A Medium Corporation.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles of varying lengths.

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Medium’s Write page has information on posting, editing, importing articles and more.

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on a plethora of topics, grouped into broad categories such as Technology, Culture, Entrepreneurship, Creativity and more. Anyone and everyone can post articles, granted they create an account on the website.

Submission and review process: This page directs authors to information on creating an account and writing and posting stories.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

See “Medium for Nonprofits, Explained” for suggestions. See also the SJSU iSchool’s Medium site. And you can search Medium for “libraries” and “librarians” to find lots of examples from other sources.

Given the sheer number of daily users on Medium, it could be a great place to submit writing, especially if you have never been published before. However, there are plenty of articles out there about how it can be difficult to get your work seen since there are so many postings per day, as well as how you can increase your viewer traffic.

The following articles may be helpful for those interested in posting on Medium:

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can read articles for free, but monthly subscribers get access to more content and curated collections.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in English, but read worldwide. The majority of readers are in the United States.4

Reader characteristics: According to statistics, the majority of Medium’s readers are college educated.5 The sheer amount of topics covered and the breadth of articles published shows that Medium readers are curious information seekers who have many interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied. There are certainly articles written by LIS professionals, but they are often geared towards the general public. Examples: Three Lessons I’ve Learned About People from Being a Librarian and Google’s Slow Fade with librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Medium is a unique platform for writers in many ways, but its ‘clapping’ feature allows for readers to respond to articles, and in turn directly shows authors how widely read their work is. It can be difficult to increase readership across Medium, but there are plenty of third party websites that give you tips and tricks to improve visibility.

Last updated: April 4, 2018


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “What is Medium?” Medium.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://help.medium.com/hc/en-us/articles/225168028-What-is-Medium-
  2. “About,” Medium.com, accessed Marc 19, 2018, https://medium.com/about
  3. “Membership,” Medium.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://medium.com/membership
  4. “Medium.com Traffic Statistics,” Alexa.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/medium.com
  5. “Medium.com Traffic Statistics.”
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