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Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

ISSN: 2369-937X

Website: http://www.cjal.ca

Purpose, objective, or mission: Published by the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL), the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship seeks to publish articles that are relevant to academic librarians and the profession of academic librarianship.1

Target audience: Academic librarians, both within and outside of Canada.

Publisher: The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL).2

Peer reviewed? Yes. However, book reviews and review essays are not.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles that address academic librarianship from diverse perspectives. “Submissions must present substantive analysis of a topic. Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”4

Check the journal’s calls for papers and reviews for the latest information on special issues.

Frequency of publication: “Articles and book reviews are published on a continuous basis and combined into one volume at the end of each calendar year.”5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal welcomes submissions for book reviews and articles and review essays. Book reviews should be about 1,000 words in length, whereas articles should be 3,000 to 6,000 words, and no more than 10,000.6

Submission and review process: First, create a username and password for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. You can register here.

Once you are ready to submit, be sure to read through the Author Guidelines to make sure you have formatted your work properly and included all necessary information.

“Submissions are reviewed first by an editor to confirm that the submission is appropriate for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. This step typically occurs within two weeks of submission. This editorial review considers questions such as:

  • Is the submission within the Aims and Scope?
  • Is the submission readable and within the desired word count?
  • Has the submission been published elsewhere?
  • Has the submission document been anonymized?”

“When the editor has determined that the submission is appropriate to be considered for publication, he/she contacts potential reviewers. Editors do not also serve as reviewers. Each submission is normally reviewed by two reviewers. Reviewers are asked to submit their reviews within four weeks.”

Finally, the editor will consider any recommendations and comments made by the reviewer, and will confer with the author.7

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: The most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Keep in mind that publication submissions are not limited to Canadian librarians, but articles relevant to the country’s LIS field are encouraged and welcomed. According to the journal’s Focus and Scope section, “Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”9 Recently published articles are on topics such as the recent trend of libraries hiring consultants and 20th century postwar Canadian libraries.

The CJAL could also be a good outlet for reviews on LIS books written in the last three years. Look at the Book Review Guidelines section of the Editorial Policies for more information.
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is open access, so anyone can read current and archived issues.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: All articles are published in both English and French.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians who are members of the Canadian Association of Academic Librarians. Therefore, readers are likely well versed in current LIS topics, especially how they relate to the field of academic librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors who are interested in publishing in this journal should look into CAPAL to learn more about the journal’s readership. The association’s About page states that they differ from other library associations in that CAPAL “is an advocacy group focused on the individual and the profession.”10

Readers are librarians who are well versed in LIS topics, particularly as they relate to academic librarianship. If you have a book review or well researched LIS article that is relevant for academic librarians (particularly in Canada), then this may be a good venue for your writing.

Last updated: April 21, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Editorial policies,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial policies.”
  3. “Editorial policies.”
  4. “Editorial policies.”
  5. “Editorial policies.”
  6. “Submissions,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 17, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  7. “Editorial policies.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “About,” CAPALibrarians.org, accessed April 20, 2018, http://capalibrarians.org/contact-us/
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Journal of New Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of New Librarianship

ISSN: 2471-3880

Website: http://newlibs.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of New Librarianship editors acknowledge the “need to offer quality literature in our field in an open, independently produced journal. Beyond that, we believe that the library is meant to set an example for academia. Free and open access to information and innovation is crucial to the future of our institutions and profession. By providing an outlet that mixes both traditional and disruptive forms of scholarly and professional communication, we can change the way our profession shares and leads.”1

Target audience: The Journal of New Librarianship aims to reach all library and information science (LIS) professionals, practitioners, scholars, teachers, and graduate students, as well as those who are interested in the LIS field.

Publisher: The journal is “independently produced.” It uses the Scholastic academic journal management system.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, blind review. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and other content that is not peer-reviewed.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: The Journal of New Librarianship is a new journal, first published in 2016. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles, essays, editorials, book reviews, and columns4 on all topics in the field of LIS and seeks both “traditional and disruptive” forms of communication.5  The Columns section publishes “short pieces on topics of timely interest to information professionals covering innovations and issues for the next generation of librarians.”6

Frequency of publication: Articles are published on a rolling basis on the website; these are collected into two issues each year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Submissions may include, but are not limited to: Solicited articles; Scholarly Articles; Essays; Experience and opinion pieces; Media (i.e., podcasts, video, etc) relevant to innovative practices in librarianship; Book reviews; Technology reviews; Letters to the Editor on topics relevant to the field; Data sets; Manifestos; Extended scholarship (Greater than 15,000 words); and Interviews.”8 “We want lengthy treatises on intersectionality and library practice just as much as we want data analysis and recorded interviews with people doing awesome teen programming or video projects on the transformation of a library’s physical space and the perceived impact. All aspects of librarianship – by any name – are within the intended scope of the journal.”9

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit their articles stripped of identifying information so they are ready for peer review. They ask for a cover letter that explains “the origin of the project, whether it has been presented and if so where, and affirmation of its originality, veracity, and the author’s right to include all submitted material, data, and media.” Further, the cover letter should explain if the article has time constraints, for example, if it should be published immediately or during a particular conference. Finally, during the online submission process, authors are asked to list potential peer reviewers who are appropriate or those who should be avoided, and these suggestions should be explained in the cover letter. The editors ask authors to contact them with “preliminary pitches,” and they “encourage ideas for content in any and all forms.”10

Editorial tone: The editors encourage “submissions that we have no idea how to categorize,” so the tone should be appropriate to the piece: scholarly, conversational, casual, experimental, and so on.11

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of New Librarianship is an interesting, high-quality, experimental journal that aims to set an example in academia for free and open access to information, scholarship, and ideas.13 This is a great publication for LIS authors who want to publish traditional academic scholarship or who have novel explorations in theory or practice, timely observations, or experimental pieces, including multimedia, to contribute. LIS graduate students are encouraged to submit work and to volunteer as a part of the journal’s editorial team.14 This is an exciting new journal that is breaking new ground in the discipline’s publishing practices.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal that is produced in the United States. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.15 The journal welcomes non-English-language content and will provide translation assistance.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians in all types of libraries and institutions and LIS professionals, scholars, and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ will have both an academic and practical knowledge and understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are members of the LIS community who are looking for novel, interesting, relevant, timely, and experimental work in the LIS field. The editors, and presumably the readers, “share a steadfast commitment to recognizing and discussing intersectionality –how social categories like race, class, and gender create overlapping and situational systems of discrimination and privilege.”17 Readers of this journal look for innovative models and practices in libraries and in LIS scholarship.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/about.
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “For Authors,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/for-authors.
  4. “Issues,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/issues.
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue of the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 100, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/3/1.
  7. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue,” 100.
  8. “For Authors.”
  9.  “Policies & FAQS,” Journal of New Librarianship Blog, December 29, 2016, http://www.newlibs.org/post/55.
  10. “For Authors.”
  11. “Policies & FAQS.”
  12. “For Authors.”
  13. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: Welcome to the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/2016/1/weiter.1.
  14. “Policies & FAQS.”
  15. “Editorial Board,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/editorial-board.
  16. “For Authors.”
  17. “Policies & FAQs.”
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The Conversation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Conversation

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://theconversation.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Begun as a project in 2014, The Conversation publishes articles written by Ph.D candidates and university-affiliated researchers. Their aim is to promote access to high quality information and to strive for a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues.1

For more in depth information, take a look at their charter.

This wiki profile is for The Conversation’s U.S.-based website, but there are additional sites specific to audiences all around the globe.

Target audience: Members of the general public interested in reading high quality, academic articles who may not otherwise have access to them.

Publisher: The Conversation US, Inc.

Peer reviewed? Yes.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Academic articles of varying topics–arts, culture, science, technology, medicine and many more.

Frequency of publication: New articles published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://theconversation.com/us/pitches

Types of contributions accepted: The Conversation focuses on three priority areas:

  • “Timely, evidence-based analysis of issues making the news
  • Articles explaining new research and its significance for a non-expert audience
  • Timeless, plain English ‘explainers’ of complex issues”2

Submission and review process: There are three steps to becoming published: verification of institute, educational history/qualifications and the creation of a website account.3

Editorial tone: Professional / scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This could be a great outlet for publishing scholarly articles and research, granted that authors are researchers affiliated with an institution. MLIS students should keep in mind that they do not qualify for publication. The Conversation asks that you do a keyword search to see what has already been published on your topic.4

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This profile is geared towards readers of the U.S.-based site, but The Conversation has websites for readers in Australia, Africa, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Indonesia, as well as an additional “global perspectives” site.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Conversation has a global audience.

Reader characteristics: All published articles feature a comments section with lively debates among readers. Thoughtful, well developed comments are the norm. Anyone can sign up to comment on articles, but full names are required to help maintain a transparent forum. Click here to read about The Conversation’s community standards for readers and commenters.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

From glancing over the reader characteristics mentioned above, you can guarantee that, if published by The Conversation, your article could very well feature a lively debate among commenters from all over the world. Authors will find a higher level of engagement with readers, and will be able to see how their audience responds to their work–a feature not usually seen with publication of scholarly articles.

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 14, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/who-we-are
  2. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  3. “Become an author,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 29, 2018, https://theconversation.com/become-an-author
  4. “Pitch an article.”
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Medium

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Medium

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://medium.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Medium is a free, open platform for people to read, write and share posts easily online. Posts can be organized into publications, which anyone can set up.”1

“Medium taps into the brains of the world’s most insightful writers, thinkers, and storytellers to bring you the smartest takes on topics that matter. So whatever your interest, you can always find fresh thinking and unique perspectives.”2

Target audience: Inquiring minds on the web. Medium publishes content across a vast array of topics to interest all sorts of readers.

Publisher: A Medium Corporation.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles of varying lengths.

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Medium’s Write page has information on posting, editing, importing articles and more.

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on a plethora of topics, grouped into broad categories such as Technology, Culture, Entrepreneurship, Creativity and more. Anyone and everyone can post articles, granted they create an account on the website.

Submission and review process: This page directs authors to information on creating an account and writing and posting stories.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

See “Medium for Nonprofits, Explained” for suggestions. See also the SJSU iSchool’s Medium site. And you can search Medium for “libraries” and “librarians” to find lots of examples from other sources.

Given the sheer number of daily users on Medium, it could be a great place to submit writing, especially if you have never been published before. However, there are plenty of articles out there about how it can be difficult to get your work seen since there are so many postings per day, as well as how you can increase your viewer traffic.

The following articles may be helpful for those interested in posting on Medium:

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can read articles for free, but monthly subscribers get access to more content and curated collections.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in English, but read worldwide. The majority of readers are in the United States.4

Reader characteristics: According to statistics, the majority of Medium’s readers are college educated.5 The sheer amount of topics covered and the breadth of articles published shows that Medium readers are curious information seekers who have many interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied. There are certainly articles written by LIS professionals, but they are often geared towards the general public. Examples: Three Lessons I’ve Learned About People from Being a Librarian and Google’s Slow Fade with librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Medium is a unique platform for writers in many ways, but its ‘clapping’ feature allows for readers to respond to articles, and in turn directly shows authors how widely read their work is. It can be difficult to increase readership across Medium, but there are plenty of third party websites that give you tips and tricks to improve visibility.

Last updated: April 4, 2018


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “What is Medium?” Medium.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://help.medium.com/hc/en-us/articles/225168028-What-is-Medium-
  2. “About,” Medium.com, accessed Marc 19, 2018, https://medium.com/about
  3. “Membership,” Medium.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://medium.com/membership
  4. “Medium.com Traffic Statistics,” Alexa.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/medium.com
  5. “Medium.com Traffic Statistics.”
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BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
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Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

ISSN: 2333-3316

Websitehttps://www.weaveux.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weave is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.”1

From it’s editorial philosophy, “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students, library User Experience professionals.

Publisher: Michigan Publishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a double-blind review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Weave UX consists of full length, scholarly articles and The Dialog Box, featuring book and media reviews.6

Frequency of publication: Issues are published twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Manuscript submission guidelines can be found in a Google Doc linked on the submissions page.

Types of contributions accepted: Weave is looking for two types of submissions:

  • Full length, scholarly articles of relevance to UX in libraries
  • The Dialog Box, a new kind of review section aiming to “extend beyond traditional book review sections and feature critical dialog not only with books but with other media that set the boundaries of UX”8

Submission and review process: Before writing an article, Weave asks that you send a short pitch about your topic, they can then help develop it into an article. If you already have something written, send them a few sentences about your article and they’ll take it from there.9

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: APA is used for in-text citations and works cited pages, and the Chicago Manual of Style is used for spelling, grammar, punctuation and all other style concerns.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Weave has a “come one, come all” approach regarding librarians and professionals who are passionate about UX. Whether you have ideas you want to explore or you have already composed a full-fledged article, Weave is an excellent place to start if you are writing about user experience in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: All editors are based in the United States and the journal is hosted by Michigan Publishing. However, this quote pulled from the Editorial Philosophy shows that the journal is not limited to only U.S.-based librarians: “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries (wherever they are, whatever their job title is) can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Weave’s audience and authors are not limited to just the United States, they have published articles from Canadian, Swedish and Australian writers.12

Reader characteristics: According to their Editorial Philosophy, “Weave’s intended primary audience consists of people in libraries who are using or are interesting in using UX.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Readers are already familiar with UX in libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Weave articles are obviously passionate about libraries and user experience in libraries. The latest issues of Weave have featured articles such as “A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility,” “How Much Research is Enough?” as well as a book review, demonstrating that Weave’s readers are interested in a broad array of topics related to User Experience.14

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Home,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/
  2. “Editorial Philosophy,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/about.html#philosophy
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Editorial Philosophy”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Weave Submissions,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  7. “Archive,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://quod.lib.umich.edu/w/weave/12535642.*
  8. “Weave Submissions”
  9. “Weave Submissions.”
  10. Submission Guidelines for Manuscript drafts,” Weave, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  11. “About.”
  12. “Archive.”
  13. “Editorial Philosophy.”
  14. “Archive.”
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Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

ISSN: 0038-3686

Website: http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn) “is the official publication of the Southeastern Library Association (SELA).” The journal publishes “articles, announcements, and news of professional interest to the library community in the southeast”1

Target audience: The library community of the southeastern United States as well as members of SELA.2

Publisher: Southeastern Library Association.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: For each volume, SELn publishes four issues that report SELA business, juried articles, book reviews, and state library/personnel news. The journal “represents a significant means for addressing the Association’s research objective.”5 Regular sections include Articles, Book Reviews, and News Articles.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions.

Types of contributions accepted: Manuscripts submitted to SELn “need not be of a scholarly nature but should address professional concerns of the library community. SELn particularly seeks articles that have a broad southeastern scope and/or address topics identified as timely or important by SELA sections, round tables, or committees.” SELn also accepts articles with a broad range of information sources, not limited to the purely scholarly: “News releases, newsletters, clippings, and journals from libraries, state associations, and groups throughout the region.”6 SELn also accepts book reviews for consideration.7

Submission and review process:

For articles, the “manuscript will be acknowledged by the editor. Incoming manuscripts are added to a manuscript bank from which articles are selected for each issue.” The editor assigns manuscripts to at least two reviewers for blind review. Following the review, the author will be notified of the publication decision; articles are usually published within twelve months.8

For book reviews, “submissions will be judged on writing style, content and perceived interest to the readership of the journal.” Those reviews solicited by the editor receive preferential consideration.9

Editorial tone: SELn publishes both juried articles and news and association items. Scholarly articles have an academic tone but a readable style, whereas news articles are more informal. Articles that are not scholarly should “address professional concerns of the library community.”10 A review of the most recent articles reveals well-researched, referenced, and academic writing.11

Style guide used: Latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a good opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and students based in the southeastern United States to publish original research and scholarship. Potential authors should consider joining SELA in order to identify topics of interest to members through the association’s sections, roundtables, and committees.13 LIS authors can also submit book reviews. Further, SELn has issued a call for volunteer reviewers; a reviewer must be a member of SELA and have two years professional experience and two published peer-reviewed articles (or equivalent).14

 

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SELA members are able to access current issues online.15 Back issues one year past are available to all through DigitalCommons.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are based in the southeastern United States. “State library associations of the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia are eligible to be constituent members of the Association.”17 As this publication focuses on a particular group of states, there will generally be a shared cultural understanding of relevant topics. However, as the SELn covers a fair number of states, specific regional terms should be explained.

Reader characteristics: SELA membership “may include any person, library or other organization . . . interested in the promotion and fostering of library and information services in the southeastern United States.”18 The audience will share a concern for the betterment of libraries in this region.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As members of SELA, readers will have knowledge of LIS subject matter and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal will have a variety of interests in LIS issues, especially those whose relevance is demonstrated in the context of the southeastern United States. SELn readers are LIS professionals and students throughout the region, so there is an interest in a wide variety of research and scholarship that will benefit and advance practices in all LIS environments .

Last updated: March 14, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Homepage, The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html.
  2. Homepage.
  3. Homepage.
  4. “Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/guidelines.html.
  5. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  6. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  7. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers,”The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/bookreviewers.html.
  8. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  9. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers.”
  10. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  11. SELn Archives, digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu, accessed March 14, 2018, https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seln/.
  12. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  13. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  14. “Call for Reviewers,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/reviewers.html.
  15. “Homepage.”
  16.  SELn Archives.
  17. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” 2014 edition, p. 9, accessed March 14, 2018, http://selaonline.org/sela//contacts/SELA_Handbook.pdf.
  18. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” p. 7.
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ALSC Matters!

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALSC Matters! (formerly ALSConnect)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly ALSConnect, ALSC Matters is a newsletter for ALSC members highlighting activities and information of interest for librarians working with children.1

Target audience: LIS professionals who work with children.

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Online.

Content: Apart from general ALSC news, ALSC Matters! also features:

  • Bright Ideas: highlights ideas in planning services and programming in libraries around the country.
    • Example: Group summer reading programs in Utah daycares and summer schools.
  • Hear Ye! Hear Ye!: discusses resources, events and honors of interest to ALSC members
    • Example: ALSC members who received the I Love My Librarian Award in 2017.
  • ALSC Voices: highlights members, showcases ALSC profiles and includes interviews with ALSC members
    • Example: Q & A profile on a senior children’s librarian in New York.

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Found on the About ALSC Matters! page. Submissions should be sent to Laura Schulte-Cooper.

Types of contributions accepted: News information to be featured in Bright Ideas, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! or ALSC Voices.

Submission and review process: Unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, children’s librarians may be interested in submitting short pieces showcasing new and interesting activities and programs they have been implementing at their local libraries. If LIS authors have been nominated or have won an award pertaining to work as a children’s librarian he or she may want to submit it to Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC receive issues of ALSC Matters!, though non-members can also subscribe using an online form.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers of ALSC Matters! are likely ALA members, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals or perhaps students working in the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of ALSC Matters! are professionals and students already involved in the field of children’s librarianship. ALSC Matters! may be a good venue for you to showcase projects that could be a source of inspiration, as well as relevant events and LIS happenings.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “About ALSC Matters!,” ALA.org, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/alsconnectonline/aboutalsconnect/aboutalsconnect
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
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Catholic Library World

Image courtesy of Catholic Library World.

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Catholic Library World

ISSN: 0008-820X

Website: http://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Catholic Library Association, an international organization established in 1921, seeks to provide professional development, promote Catholic literature and offer spiritual support. They promote the exchange of ideas and provide an inspirational source of guidance on ethical issues related to librarianship.1

Target audience: LIS professionals, both within and outside of the Catholic faith.2

Publisher: Catholic Library Association.

Peer reviewed? Yes, all submissions are subjected to a double-blind review process.3

Type: LIS scholarly.

Medium: Print.

Content: Catholic Library World publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholicism and Catholic Studies. “CLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to, academic, public, theological, parish & church libraries, and school libraries.”4

Frequency of publication: Journals are published in September, December and March.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Links to PDF files containing author guidelines can be found on CLA’s Publications page.

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews (for both children and adult works) and articles on all aspects of librarianship, particularly those that relate to Catholicism and Catholic Studies.6

For a better idea of what CLW publishes, here are two recent articles:

The Bayou Lafourche Oral History Project: Understanding Environmental Change and Religious Identity in Louisiana

Catholic Academic Libraries and Print Promotional Materials

Articles should contribute new findings to the existing literature in the field. The word count should be between 3000 and 5000 words, but may be longer if an editor gives approval.7

Submission and review process: Send manuscripts via email as an attachment including author’s full name, affiliation and email address. Manuscripts should be neither previously published nor published simultaneously elsewhere. Because of the lengthy peer review process, authors will be notified within ninety days of submission whether or not their work was accepted. 8

If published, authors keep copyrights and publication rights for their work.

Editorial tone: Accessible and well documented.9

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors should keep in mind that the Catholic Library Association does not limit their publications to works about Catholicism or Catholic librarianship. Their Publications page states that “CLW respects diverse Christian traditions as well as non-Christian. While it is a Catholic publication, CLW welcomes relevant articles from a variety of religious traditions.”10

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Catholic Library World features a wide readership within and outside of the Catholic Library Association. The journal is “indexed in Book Review, CPLI, Library Literature and Information Science, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Reference Book Review Index, Current Index to Journals in Education (ERIC), Information Science Abstract, and University des sciences humans de Strasbourg (CERDIC.)”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of Catholic Library World’s readers are likely to be American Catholics.

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to be LIS professionals. From their Publications page, “CLW is intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various libraries.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Members of the Catholic Library Association are networkers in the field of library science with a passion for the future of libraries and library trends in the U.S. and abroad.13 Considering that each issue of CLA’s award winning journal features over 100 book and media reviews, readers of Catholic Library World are interested in a wide variety of LIS topics.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Cathla.org, accessed March 6, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/About_Us/Main/About/About_Us.aspx?hkey=1d0656f5-9a4c-4436-a435-6074be93e751
  2. “Publications,” Cathla.org, accessed March 6, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  3. “Author Guidelines,” Cathla.org, accessed March 2, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  4. “Author Guidelines.”
  5. “Author Guidelines.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Publications.”
  11. “Publications.”
  12. “Publications.”
  13. “Become a Member,” Cathla.org, accessed March 13, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member.aspx?hkey=b2bcc799-8b31-4f9e-8629-f408fde31e9d
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No Shelf Required

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: No Shelf Required

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.noshelfrequired.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: NSR started as a blog run by Sue Polanka, an academic librarian at Wright State University. For librarians from all fields, it quickly became a go-to source for new information on ebooks in libraries–a burgeoning concept at the time. Sue and the current editor, Mirela Roncevic, joined forces on all sorts of writing endeavors and the blog eventually grew into its own site with regular columnists and contributors from all over the world.1

From NSR’s About page: “In 2016, NSR expanded its mission to inspire professionals inside the book industry to do more with ebooks and econtent and embarked on groundbreaking projects that challenge what we think is possible with ebooks.”2

Target audience: Publishers, writers, editors, LIS students and professionals.3

Publisher: Currently, NSR’s editor is Mirela Roncevic.4

Peer reviewed? Unknown.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: NSR features articles on all sorts of topics–academic libraries, apps, ebook readers, piracy and many more. They have recently expanded to include reviews and opinion pieces from writers in all areas of digital content.5

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/

Types of contributions accepted: Reviews and opinion pieces, news posts.6

Submission and review process: Send proposals to Editorial Director, Mirela Roncevic at mirelaronevic@gmail.com. Review process unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, but casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Given the breadth of information and the scope of topics that are covered, NSR could be a great fit for all sorts of LIS authors. Published pieces are written “by industry insiders of all walks of life: writers, editors, librarians, educators, publishers, vendors, independent authors, and tech entrepreneurs, to name a few. Some creatively draw our attention to the issues, while others offer perspectives on what various statistics tell us about the state of the larger book industry.”7

Authors covering topics regarding ebooks and the digital or technological aspects of the LIS fields may particularly be interested in looking more into NSR.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Readers and writers are primarily in the United States, though they feature contributors from all over the world.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though NSR began as a blog out of Wright State University in Ohio, its audience is found all over North America, with an additional global presence. Articles are published in English, but the website offers Google translation on all pages.8

Reader characteristics: NSR readers are students and professionals in many different areas–LIS, publishing, education and more.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers of NSR may have a library science background, but given the wide range of readers and topics covered, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

NSR strives to publish the latest news and information on the ever growing fields of ebooks and epublishing. Readers interested in these fields are advocates for improving technology and tech usage in the LIS fields and beyond. NSR has a fantastic, comprehensive list of articles and essays related to emerging trends and issues in the ebook/epublishing fields for researchers and inquiring minds. To see if their work would be a good fit, potential authors should check out Learn with NSR to read some the latest publishings.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Home,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Write for NSR,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/
  6. “Write for NSR.”
  7. “Write for NSR.”
  8. “About.”
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