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Library Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”1

Target audience: “Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”7

Content: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”8

Included in every subscription is an annual Chinese supplement.9

Frequency of publication: 9 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 3000 and 6000 words in length.11

The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

Emerald publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that your submission is complete.14

As per the Author Guidelines: “Each paper is reviewed by the Editor and, if it (is) judged suitable for publication, is evaluated using a double-blind peer review process.”15

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. There is a strong international component to the selection of articles in each issue. While the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas”, there is a practical tone in the sharing of issues concerning individual libraries.16

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.17

References should be written in Harvard style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a highly informative publication in the field of library management. The articles in this journal explore a wide range of issues in various types of libraries worldwide. In the current issue alone (Volume 36 Issue 4/5), articles topics include: e-reserves in a Manila library; social welfare information management in Nigerian libraries; academic library leadership; and promotion and tenure for academic librarians.19

LIS authors, whether professional librarians, or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into  current issues in library management, and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

International authors also have an excellent opportunity to publish research on issues important to their particular geographical area.20 Of particular interest to Chinese authors is the annual Chinese supplement — an excellent avenue for publication.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English23, yet is international in scope. While the editor and book review editor are located in Australia, the editorial advisory board comprise professionals worldwide; including, the U.K., Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand and South Africa.24

Emerald offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, that offers “expert Language Editing services for non-native English-speaking authors, and…discounts to authors planning to submit to Emerald’s journal(s).”25

The annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”26, with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”27

Reader characteristics: Readers are senior managers and academics from across the globe. As this journal has an international scope, the audience will have diverse cultural experiences. Despite this, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior managers and academics.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a knowledgeable, diverse, academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience.

Last updated: June 24, 2015


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  10. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  15. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  19. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  22. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Editorial Team. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  27. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  28. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  29. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
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First Monday

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: First Monday

Website: http://www.firstmonday.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-€“reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to research about the Internet.”1 First Monday believes the impact of digitization on society is universal and ubiquitous, and seeks articles about how digitization is changing our understanding of society.2

Target audience: First Monday’€™s target audience includes intelligent, independent-thinking people located in more than 180 countries. Because readers’€™ cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly, readership is diverse. The journal is not geared toward those in academia, and many readers do not speak English as a first language.3

Publisher: First Monday Editorial Group at the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library4 First Monday was originally designed in Copenhagen and published by Munksgard, a Danish publisher.5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: Computers and Internet, scholarly7 (First Monday is published in conjunction with the university library at the University of Illinois-Chicago, which indicates that the LIS community has a vested interest in the publication and represents a large proportion of its readership. Due to its diverse readership, we have categorized First Monday as both a “scholarly” and a “civilian” publication.)8

Medium: Online9

Content: First Monday publishes original interdisciplinary research papers about the Internet and related technologies. Articles emphasize subjects that are particularly interesting or groundbreaking. This publication’€™s strength lies in its diversity of content centered around the influence of the Internet and related technologies.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: First Monday publishes articles on interesting and novel ideas related to the history, present, and future of the Internet.12 Published topics of interest to LIS authors include: knowledge management, trends and standards, information-seeking behavior, emerging electronic classification frameworks, digital copyright, social networks, education, information society, the internet’s technological and commercial development, technical issues, and the political and social implications of the Internet. Research surveys, studies, exploratory and critical theory articles tied to the internet and related technologies would be welcome here.13 The publication also provides detailed Guidelines for Authors. These guidelines include writing tips; citation, reference, and abstract guidelines; submission format; formatting templates; and a final checklist for use in preparing manuscript submissions.14

Submission and review process: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions. Papers are subject to a double-blind peer review for originality and timeliness in the context of related research.15

Editorial tone: Articles published in First Monday are as diverse as its readership. All articles are written in an academic tone, though style varies in complexity. Many are written in an easy-to-read style, while others employ more sophisticated language. In either case, writers maintain the active voice and employ short sentences and paragraphs.16

Style guide used: First Monday provides its own style guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

First Monday publishes interdisciplinary research articles on all aspects of the internet, from highly-specialized technical issues to the internet’€™s social and political impact. Given the increasing digitization of information, this journal holds tremendous promise for LIS authors.

Because this audience is not academic, writing standards are not rigid, and an international distribution creates the potential to reach many readers. This publication’€™s diverse readership allows for writing from a variety of disciplines–LIS authors with backgrounds in engineering, literature, or history would be equally at home here. First Monday would be an excellent place to publish a thesis, or research on emerging Web technologies or trends. Additionally, the fact that the journal is peer reviewed makes it an attractive choice for those who wish to add a published article to their curriculum vitae.

Started in 1996, the journal has published 1,381 papers in 218 issues written by 1,888 authors. The journal is also abstracted in Communication Abstracts, Computer & Communication Security Abstracts, DoIS, eGranary Digital Library, INSPEC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, LISA, PAIS.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 314,559 per month.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are located in over 180 countries, concentrated in western Europe, North America, and the Pacific Rim. First Monday is published by the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, where its server is also located.20 Due to the publication’€™s international scope, many readers’€™ first language is not English. Additionally, many readers are not academics. Authors should avoid using specific cultural references or idioms unless these are explained. Simple explanations, active voice, and less complex sentences will help this diverse audience better understand your message.21

Reader characteristics: Because First Monday‘€™s focus is international and its scope is interdisciplinary, the cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly among First Monday readers. Cultural, educational, and professional interests vary greatly among readers, and this publication’€™s interdisciplinary scope is larger than library information science alone. That said, the publication’€™s focus is salient to the discipline. This, combined with the fact that it is published by a university library, makes it reasonable to presume that many readers are LIS professionals with shared professional interests and workplaces. The articles published in First Monday represent a wide variety of standpoints and approaches. The articles do not show overt bias or attitude toward any particular view, which seems indicative of the audience’s diversity.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many articles published in First Monday are not directly related to LIS, so it is reasonable to presume that many readers are involved in other aspects of Internet technology. In view of this, authors should cautiously employ LIS jargon and explain any specialized terms they use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

First Monday prides itself on its interdisciplinary scope, and publishes a wide variety of articles from multiple perspectives. Demographic information about readers’€™ professional affiliations could not be obtained, and nothing in this publication’™s submission guidelines indicates a preference toward LIS authors or topics. However, First Monday‘€™s publisher indicates that librarians have a vested interest in this publication and may represent a large proportion of its readers. First Monday’™s Audience Profile stresses that many readers are not academics, but one might conclude that many are librarians.24

Library science is an interdisciplinary field, and LIS students and professionals possess specialized knowledge of digital information collection, organization, and dissemination. This uniquely positions them as potential authors for First Monday. When writing for this publication, explain any professional terminology that would be unfamiliar to those outside the LIS field. For example, a study of library cataloging standards and information-seeking behavior on the web should explain terms like MARC21 or RDA. To be well-suited for First Monday, such an article might focus on digitization’€™s broad affects on LIS cataloging and how these are shaping practices.

While First Monday’€™s readership is not primarily academic, the content of articles is often sophisticated and complex. This may be why the editors stress simplicity and brevity in style; readers from different backgrounds will better understand a complex message through simple explanations and short sentences.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. First Monday, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 25, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  2. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  3. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  4. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  5. “Editorial Policies,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  7. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  8. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  9. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  10. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  11. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  12. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Archives,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/archive
  14. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. First Monday,  University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  19. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  20. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  21. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  22. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  23. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  24. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
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Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve

Website: http://www.informaworld.com/wild

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve is dedicated to providing the latest and most current information about interlibrary loan and electronic reserves librarianship. It combines articles about practice and research.1

The journal is dedicated to providing a forum for all cooperative library endeavors, including consortial purchasing and multilibrary digitization projects as well as more traditional resource sharing and supply services like interlibrary loan and reserves.2

In 2005 the name was changed from the Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Information Supply to the current title to reflect the changing nature of the information world.3

Target audience: The journal is targeted to librarians and staff who work in interlibrary loan and electronic reserve as well as administrators.4

Publisher: Routledge.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: This publication falls into a gray area. The content is peer reviewed, and although many articles are oriented toward practitioners, others are more research oriented. Overall, the publication could be categorized as an LIS scholarly publication. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory categorizes it as scholarly and academic.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: The journal runs the gamut from practical to research articles. Sample subject matter includes – The use of inter-library loan statistics for acquisitions and collection development purposes, copyright issues, interlibrary loan as a career specialization.9

Frequency of publication: 5 issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on innovations in interlibrary loan, document delivery, and research sharing. Scholarly articles usually adhere to same format and generally contain an abstract, keywords, and often a literature review.11

Submission and review process: This publication receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts website. No previously published or simultaneous publication accepted.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There is a great degree of potential for LIS authors, especially those focusing on academic libraries with a strong knowledge of interlibrary loan, electronic reserves, or access services in general.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not available.

Audience location: The primary audience for this publication is the United States, and then to a slightly lesser degree, other English speaking countries such as Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Most of the articles are geared towards library applications in North America. The audience are predominately English language speakers.15 Many of the articles are predicated on the principles espoused by the ALA Interlibrary Code for the United States, which would mean the laws and standard practices of North American libraries are often given space in the journal.16 However there is evidence that the audience is becoming more international evidenced by the inclusion of case studies from countries outside of North America.17

Reader characteristics: Most of the readership of this journal has a vested interest in the success of an interlibrary loan office. Often, that means the reader is a veteran staff member, but just as often it may be a newcomer seeking to learn the tricks to the trade, as interlibrary loan can be very specialized. Additionally, many of the readers are librarians or administrators who are responsible for making the overarching decisions in an interlibrary loan office. The vast majority of the readers of this journal are from the interlibrary loan or access services worlds. Because the majority of interlibrary loan offices are operated by paraprofessional staff, this comprises a good portion of the readership. In addition, the supervisors of the interlibrary loan departments, mostly librarians, would also be reading. Finally, administrators have a vested interest in the scholarship about this subject and they are most often the decision makers.18

Two issues seem to frequently come to the forefront in this journal. The worth of interlibrary loan services can be strongly felt throughout most articles. Interlibrary loan is often unknown or forgotten in many libraries, yet they provide a valuable service to the community of users. The second bias that seems to pop up again and again is the issue of position in the interlibrary loan office. Should interlibrary loan services be run by paraprofessionals or by librarians? There is a strong feeling that the position of ILL librarian is valuable and useful.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this publication usually have a high degree of library knowledge, especially in the field of interlibrary loans. A civilian with little exposure to libraries would be lost for the most part. Even staff outside of access services departments could have some difficulty with some of the material, as much is practical hands-on information about working offices, even when the subject matter is more theoretical.20 For example, in a past article, the issue of free document delivery is discussed. On the one hand, the article discussed the philosophical issues behind charging or not charging patrons, but on the other hand, the article gets into the detailed reality of actually providing articles for a large patron base.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Reader characteristics play a very large role on potential authors. Interlibrary loan and electronic reserves are both very specialized fields within the library world. Thorough knowledge of the subject is key. If an author is not confident in their subject matter, readers of this publication will see right through them. In addition the interlibrary loan portion of this journal represents a very tight knit community by nature. Interlibrary loan is collaborative by design. Any potential author needs to be very aware of this community and if they are not already part of it, become part of it.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg
  2. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666
  4. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666
  9. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Publication history and list of issues. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666
  11. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg
  12. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg
  13. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg
  14. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for authors. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg
  15. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666
  16. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg
  17. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Publication history and list of issues. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg
  18. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg
  19. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Publication history and list of issues. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg
  20. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & scope. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg
  21. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Publication history and list of issues. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg
Continue Reading

Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL)

Website: http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital

Purpose, objective, or mission: As the official publication of LITA (the Library and Information Technology Association), ITAL is primarily concerned with keeping LITA members informed about the technologies that shape their workplaces and profession.1

Target audience: Members of LITA, primarily librarians and information professionals2

Publisher: Library and Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: ITAL is an open-access, electronic-only publication.6 Full-text versions of all content published since 2004, as well as tables of contents and abstracts for earlier issues, are also available electronically.7

Content: ITAL “publishes material related to all aspects of information technology in all types of libraries. Topic areas include, but are not limited to, library automation, digital libraries, metadata, identity management, distributed systems and networks, computer security, intellectual property rights, technical standards, geographic information systems, desktop applications, information discovery tools, web-scale library services, cloud computing, digital preservation, data curation, virtualization, search-engine optimization, emerging technologies, social networking, open data, the semantic web, mobile services and applications, usability, universal access to technology, library consortia, vendor relations, and digital humanities.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

It is important to note, when perusing author information such as this, that specific types of submissions, such as book or software reviews, may require contact with someone other than the main editor. Failing to note such differences could result in a solid article or query being lost in the shuffle.

Location of submission guidelines: https://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: ITAL accepts feature articles that contain original research or in-depth analysis of 3,000 to 5,000 words or longer. Communications of 1,000 to 3,000 words are also accepted, such as “brief research reports, technical findings, and application notes,”as well as tutorials and letters to the editor.10

Submission and review process: Individuals must submit original and unpublished manuscripts only. Manuscripts that are being considered elsewhere should not be submitted. Responsibility for the accuracy of the information falls upon the author of the manuscript. This includes references, URLs, and statistics.11

Articles are to be submitted online; registration and login are required.12

Editorial tone: Formal, with most articles including an abstract. Articles are evidence and research-based, written in language that is clear and direct.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style for notes and bibliography14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals or students focusing on the technical services side of libraries who can contribute to the community’€™s knowledge of emerging technologies should consider writing for this publication. Opportunity is also ripe for those with an understanding of technical services and public services who can explain complicated technical jargon and its importance to the uninitiated. A survey of recent articles includes usability of next-generation catalogs such as VuFind, the application of geographic information systems (GIS) in LIS research, widgets, interoperable catalog models, semantic web technologies, web design for patrons with disabilities, applying CIPA regulations and other issues. Tutorials included cloud computing and digitizing documents to make them accessible on the web. Articles and tutorials are pragmatic, so topics and information presented need to be relevant to professionals in their LIS workplace.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Statistics not available, but as ITAL is an open-access, online publication a wide readership may be assumed.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LITA is a division of the American Library Association (ALA) and is therefore located in the United States,17 but subscribers come from all over the world. ITAL is published in English.18

Reader characteristics: ITAL is read by administrators, librarians, and information technologists interested in all aspects of information technology. These readers include library directors, systems managers and analysts, automation consultants, and both technical and public service librarians using technology to serve users.19

Readers are interested in subjects that include library automation, access to information through technology, digital libraries, electronic journals and electronic publishing, computer security, intellectual property rights, library consortia, technical standards, and software development. Articles display a strong emphasis on service orientation. Readers likely share this value.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This journal covers a broad spectrum of topics and issues relating to LIS subject matter, and most articles would be comprehensible to any librarian; specialized knowledge of technical services is usually not assumed.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because readers come from both technical and public services, papers should not be only technical in nature. Demonstrating how a technology can be leveraged to solve a human need, whether that is user experience or library operations, will be fundamental. In a survey of articles, many papers demonstrate the impact of technologies on libraries, the communities they serve, and on society. Authors also emphasize service orientation, a value readers likely share.

Last updated: May 7, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  2. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  3. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  4. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  5. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  6. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,  http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  7. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  8. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  9. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  10. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  11. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017,http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
  16. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  17. “Information Technology and Libraries,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital
  18. Information Technology and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405647855465/48153
  19. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  20. “Editorial Policies,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  21. “Archives,” Library and Information Technology Association, accessed May 7, 2017, http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/archive
Continue Reading

International Journal of Library Science

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: International Journal of Library Science

Website: http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the publication website, the goal of the International Journal of Library Science “. . . is to publish refereed, well-written original research articles and studies that describe the latest research and developments in the area of library science and information.”1

Target audience: LIS professionals, instructors, and students.2

Publisher: CESER Publications.3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: According to the publication’€™s website, the journal is broad-based, covering all areas of library science, technology, information, and interdisciplinary research.7

Frequency of publication: Three times a year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Scholarly research articles covering a wide range of areas including education for librarianship, information policy, information communication technologies, equity of access, sustainability, the Children’s Internet Protection Act, censorship, information literacy, decreased funding for established libraries, intellectual property rights, intellectual freedom, the digital divide, open access publishing, the Patriot Act, public lending rights, and current digital technologies.9

Submission and review process: The journal follows a double blinded peer review process.10 Along with a manuscript submission, authors are asked to submit a cover letter including contact information, an abstract of at most 250 words, the full title and running title of the submission, and up to five keywords. Manuscripts should not exceed 6,000 words.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly12

Style guide used: No editorial style is specified, though examples of the preferred reference style are provided.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The International Journal of Library Science provides an excellent opportunity for LIS authors desiring publication. The journal publishes in all areas of LIS, as demonstrated by its exhaustive subject list. This is particularly attractive venue for LIS authors wishing to have an international presence.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific circulation information is provided. The journal is available online, and expands its distribution by offering email updates on the release of new issues.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As an online journal published in English, it may be assumed that the International Journal of Library Science has an international readership.15

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide any details on reader characteristics. The authors are LIS and education instructors, students, and professionals throughout the world, so a similar readership may be assumed. The journal appears to be content neutral and objective.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers will likely be aware of current LIS issues, technologies, and jargon.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the International Journal of Library Science is wholly comprised of scholarly articles, potential authors should maintain a formal tone and approach. Potential LIS authors should also be mindful that this journal truly has international circulation and avoid regional jargon or bias.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017,  http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  2. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  3. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  4. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  5. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  6. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  7. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  8.  International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  9. “International Journal of Library Science,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=issue&op=archive
  10. “Editorial Policies,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. “Subscriptions,” CESER Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=about&op=subscriptions
  15. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405611525061/687098
  16. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
  17. International Journal of Library Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ceserp.com/cp-jour/index.php?journal=ijls&page=index
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portal: Libraries and the Academy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: portal: Libraries and the Academy

Website: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site: “A journal that presents research findings and provides regular coverage of issues in technology, publishing, and periodicals, portal is written by librarians for librarians. Peer-reviewed articles address subjects such as library administration, information technology, and information policy. The journal examines the role of libraries in meeting institutional missions, explores how technology affects librarianship and scholarship, and conveys this research to academic librarians in a timely manner.”1

Target audience: Academic librarians and Information Science scholars2

Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their site, “Each issue includes peer-reviewed articles on subjects such as library administration, information technology, new forms of support for research and teaching, and information policy. Reviews of newly published books in areas of librarianship and higher education, as well as reviews of computer and database resources, are featured. Other continuing features address technological issues, research, standards, and policy and strategic planning.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Scholarly articles and reviews. Per their guidelines, “The main categories of scholarship that are the framework for our definition are the scholarship of discovery, integration, application, and teaching.”9

Submission and review process: All submissions to portal are subject to a double-blind review process and referees are explicitly asked to indicate when a manuscript is worthy but needs mentoring in order to be fully acceptable for publication in portal. When a recommendation is made to mentor a manuscript, the author is asked if they wish to undertake such an effort. Once the author and mentor are satisfied with the additional work, the manuscript is again submitted to the double-blind review process but to different referees. Detailed manuscript requirements (need for abstract, use of tables, etc.) included in guidelines.10

Editorial tone: Scholarly.11

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As noted in their guidelines, “portal explores how technology is affecting librarianship and scholarship, as well as the role of libraries and librarians in meeting institutional missions. The information revolution presents numerous challenges to librarians, faculty, and administrators in areas including archiving, copyright, and technology-enhanced learning. portal covers these and many other topics as they relate to the rapidly changing needs of academics and the roles of libraries and librarians. portal provides an unbiased outlet for issues that have not been addressed in other venues. Work that is collaborative between librarians and those engaged in discipline based studies is of particular interest.”13

portal is one of over 300 journals published by Project Muse, a collaborative effort between libraries and publishers. These journals are available full-text online, via low-cost subscription.14 There is therefore great potential for dissemination to a large audience of LIS professionals, academics and students.

portal provides opportunities for authors new to scholarly journals. Book reviewing is a possible first step here as with many prestigious publications, but, beyond that portal provides “post submission mentoring.” The new author with a unique idea is nurtured here and has a chance to develop a collaborative relationship with an editor. This mentoring program at portal provides an opportunity for new LIS authors seeking to publish in a scholarly journal.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics not available, although the journal is available as a single-journal subscription through Project MUSE.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States and worldwide. portal is distributed through Project Muse.17 English language publication18 that possibly reaches an international audience.19 Authors should avoid the use of regionalisms.

Reader characteristics: The reader of this journal is an individual interested in the role and impact of libraries within an academic environment. The journal’s readers are aware of the importance a librarian’s work, of the need for careful and scholarly research in the LIS field. Most readers work in academic libraries, with focus on the activities that improve their workplace and contribute to the LIS field. portal is written by librarians for librarians. This publication prides itself on being “an unbiased outlet for issues that scholars have been unable or unwilling to address in other venues.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As readers, these informed, active, and professionally engaged academic librarians, will have considerable knowledge of LIS terms and subject matter.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

portal: Libraries and the Academy “is written by librarians for librarians.”22 The main audience for this journal is academic librarians, faculty, library science students, information professionals and anyone interested working in library environment in higher education. Authors with the ability to produce unique research on topics their LIS peers can use and apply in their own library, may find publishing opportunities at portal.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  2. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). portal: Libraries and the Academy. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403200296684/316139
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). portal: Libraries and the Academy. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403200296684/316139
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). portal: Libraries and the Academy. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403200296684/316139
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). portal: Libraries and the Academy. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403200296684/316139
  7. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). portal: Libraries and the Academy. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403200296684/316139
  9. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  10. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  11. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  12. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  13. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  14. Project MUSE. (2013). About Project MUSE. Retrieved from http://muse.jhu.edu/about/index.html
  15. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  16. Project MUSE. (2013). Project MUSE – Single Title Price List. Retrieved from http://muse.jhu.edu/about/order/singles.html#top2014
  17. Project MUSE. (2013). About Project MUSE. Retrieved from http://muse.jhu.edu/about/index.html
  18. SerialsSolutions. (2014). portal: Libraries and the Academy. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403200296684/316139
  19. Project MUSE. (2013). About Project MUSE. Retrieved from http://muse.jhu.edu/about/index.html
  20. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  21. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy: Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/guidelines.html
  22. Project MUSE. (2013). portal: Libraries and the Academy. Retrieved from http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/
Continue Reading

Oral History Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Oral History Review

Website: http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, the publication’s “mission is to explore the nature and the significance of oral history and advance the understanding of the field among scholars, educators, practitioners, and the general public.”1

Target audience: The publication is directed at local historians, librarians, archivists, students, journalists, teachers, and academic scholars from many fields.2

Publisher: Oxford University Press.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Available in print with online access to subscribers.6

Content: Oral History Review “publishes narrative and analytical articles and reviews…that present and use oral history in unique and significant ways and that contribute to the understanding of the nature of oral history and memory.”7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/

Types of contributions accepted: The publication includes book, website and film reviews, feature articles and bibliographies.9

Submission and review process: Specific, detailed information regarding submission of work contained in guidelines. In general, manuscripts should not be submitted simultaneously to other journals and no previously published works accepted. All work reviewed and edited by appropriate editorial staff.10

Editorial tone: Scholarly but not overly academic. Photographs welcomed.11

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS professionals to contribute to this publication. Original work can be done collecting oral histories from prominent community members with interesting stories to tell. Guidance can be provided about cataloging and preservation methodologies. LIS professionals can also weigh in on the ethics of information, including collection, copyright, distribution, and access.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation limited to Oral History Association membership, but membership numbers could not be located.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Oral History Association is located in the United States but has an international membership.14 The editorial staff represents academicians from across the United States.15 Although the journal is printed in English (and the majority of the readers are American), the association website says that the group serves a broad and diverse audience. The organization is committed to disseminating information on a variety of societies and cultures. Articles with obvious cultural, historical and/or geographic overtones are strongly encouraged.16 This commitment is evidenced by the association’€™s Committee on Diversity and International Committee, which seek to increase a minority and global presence in the organization.17

Reader characteristics: The society has six regional U.S. organizations as well as an organization for its international members.18 Readers have a high knowledge of and interest in oral history, from both a local and an international perspective. Readers will expect articles that are well-written and original. Oral History Review presents a well-balanced view of all aspects of oral history. Readers expect articles on any topic that supports good practice in gathering oral histories.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is not strictly an LIS publication, although librarians do read and contribute to its content. Articles should avoid LIS jargon and be directed toward a more broad readership base.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Oral History Review is written for an academic and international audience, so writers who contribute should be sure that their articles exhibit the knowledge and novelty that the experienced readership has come to expect. This could make it a difficult journal for oral history novices to write for. LIS students who have expert knowledge of oral history or archival techniques and exhibits would be most likely to be accepted by the journal for publication.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  2. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Oral History Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403036779660/104264
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Oral History Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403036779660/104264
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Oral History Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403036779660/104264
  6. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  7. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Oral History Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403036779660/104264
  9. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review: Submission. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/
  10. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review: Submission. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/
  11. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review: Submission. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/
  12. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review: Submission. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/
  13. Oral History Association. (2012). Join Us. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/join-us/
  14. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  15. Oral History Association. (2012). Editors and Editorial Board. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/ohr-editors-and-editorial-board/
  16. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  17. Oral History Association. (2012). Committees. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/about/committees/
  18. Oral History Association. (2012). Regional and International Organizations. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/about/regional-organizations/
  19. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  20. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
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Information Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Outlook

Website: http://www.sla.org/io/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Information Outlook is the official publication of the Special Libraries Association (SLA). The SLA “promotes and strengthens its members through learning, advocacy, and networking initiatives.”1

Target audience: Information Outlook is targeted towards their membership of information professionals, specifically those working in special libraries.

Publisher: Special Libraries Association (SLA).2

Peer reviewed? No3

Type: LIS professional news.4

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Per their website, the publication “contains articles on cutting-edge topics (such as data curation, content strategy, user experience, and value co-creation), columns about technology, library management, and copyright law, and news items about developments in the information environment and within SLA.”6

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/

Types of contributions accepted: From the “Write for IO,” “Although written primarily by SLA members, articles in Information Outlook also are contributed by futurists, attorneys, academicians, technology professionals, human resources specialists, communications experts–anyone with knowledge or ideas about how information professionals can better serve their clients.”8

Submission and review process: Interested authors should send a query email to the current editor with an outline of your topic along with your qualifications. The editor will forward your query to the advisory council for review. The guidelines encourage illustrated article of approximately 2,000 words in length.9

Editorial tone: Written in an active voice following the SLA style guide provided in the submission guidelines.10

Style guide used: Current edition of Chicago Manual of Style and U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information Outlook is an excellent forum for LIS authors writing on topics of interest to special libraries. Since there is such a wide variety of special library types, there are a number of topics that can be addressed. Despite differences among particular types of special libraries, many experiences and situations can be generalized and made applicable to all of Information Outlook readers.12

Although this is not a scholarly journal, Information Outlook is a highly respected journal, and LIS authors would benefit from having their work published by the SLA.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 9,000.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Special Libraries Association has 55 regional chapters. The majority are located in the United States, but there are also chapters in Canada, Africa, the Arabian Gulf, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean. In addition to the regional chapters, SLA boasts members in 75 countries.14 Information Outlook is published in English, but circulates to members in other countries as well (as listed above). Issues pertaining to special librarians will be of general interest to all readers, but there may be some regional/cultural specifics that might not be applicable to readers in different countries.15

Reader characteristics: The readers of Information Outlook are men and women who typically hold a library degree. Many have master’s degrees in subject specialties as well. Both men and women comprise this audience, and they range in age, typically from late 20s upwards. They may be brand new to the profession or they may be upper management with many years of experience. All readers of Information Outlook are special librarians, and therefore they have a common mission and values, and much in common within the profession. However, they work in settings that are incredibly varied, both in size and type. Readers might work alone or in large organizations, and might specialize in institutions such as government, medical, legal, and academic libraries.16 The readers of Information Outlook care specifically about issues pertaining to special libraries. According to the publication’s website, its readers are interested in articles about “administration, organization, marketing, and operations.” They value information that will help their organizations stay successful and stay informed of the latest developments and technologies.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Information Outlook are extremely knowledgeable about issues relating to library and information science. They will be at different stages of their careers, of course, with some readers having more experience and expertise than others, but writers can assume a basic level of knowledge and can expect readers to understand LIS jargon.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Outlook‘s readers are hungry for the latest information about issues that impact special libraries. They want to read articles that have practical application in their day-to-day lives and careers. As stated on SLA’s website, “readers want to read articles about new techniques, new ideas, new trends…They’re interested in growing their organizations and in planning their careers…They want to know how to confront problems and how to avoid them.” The profession is comprised of individuals who “strategically use information…to advance the mission of the organization…through the development, deployment, and management of information resources and services.”19

Potential authors can reach this audience effectively by providing case studies and real-world examples, and by focusing on what is new and innovative in the field. Most special librarians are technologically savvy and interested in cutting-edge applications that will help them accomplish their professional goals and serve their patrons. They will also likely have limited time to devote to professional reading, and will only devote that time to articles and reviews that are relevant and timely. Therefore, authors will be best served by submitting writing that is direct and to the point.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Special Libraries Association. (2016). About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  2. ProQuest. (2016). Information Outlook. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Information Outlook. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Information Outlook. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Information Outlook. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  6. Special Libraries Association. (2016). Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/
  7. Special Libraries Association. (2016). Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/
  8. Special Libraries Association. (2016). Write for Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  9. Special Libraries Association. (2016). Write for Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  10. Special Libraries Association. (2016). Write for Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  11. Special Libraries Association. (2016). Write for Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  12. Special Libraries Association. (2016). About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  13. Special Libraries Association. (2016). About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  14. Special Libraries Association. (2016). Chapters. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/get-involved/chapters/
  15. ProQuest. (2016). Information Outlook. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  16. Special Libraries Association. (2016). About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  17. Special Libraries Association. (2016). Editorial and Advertising Calendar. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/editorial-calendar/
  18. Special Libraries Association. (2016). About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  19. Special Libraries Association. (2016). About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
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