Wiki Tags Archives: Conference papers

Communications in Information Literacy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Communications in Information Literacy

ISSN: 1933-59541

Website: http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php/cil/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Communications in Information Literacy (CIL) is a research-oriented journal that considers knowledge, theory, and practice in the area of information literacy. Its editors seek to advance the “exploration and investigation of the various models of information literacy throughout the world.”2

Target audience: This publication is intended to be read by “professionals in the area of higher education who are committed to advancing information literacy.”3

Publisher: Communications in Information Literacy4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: Primarily research-oriented articles advancing information literacy. The journal also publishes essays and book reviews, but these are not open submission.8

Frequency of publication: Semiannual9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: The editors invite submissions that are  theoretical, research-based, or have a practical focus.10

Submission and review process: Although it is recommended that potential authors send queries before submitting their pieces, this step is not mandatory. Authors submit papers electronically as Word documents after registering on the website. To facilitate the blind review process, the author’s name should be confined to the title page of a submission. The process of review is estimated at 6 to 8 weeks and authors will be informed of decisions. The status of submissions can also be checked after log-on to the website.11 According to the editors of CIL, the manuscript acceptance rate hovers around 35 percent.12

Editorial tone: Academic and formal13

Style guide used: Manual of Style of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CIL offers scholars and those who work in higher education libraries the opportunity to discuss information literacy as well as to share research and knowledge about this growing field. Because this publication is relatively new and is independently published, it is unknown how credible it will prove to be. An indicator of its growth and acceptance is CIL‘s grant from the Digital Humanities Initiative at Buffalo (DHIB) to acquire and assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) to its published works. DOI will be assigned retroactively to articles already published, as well as to articles in future volumes. The DHIB grant is expected to cover the costs of DOI through publication volume nine in the year 2015.15 Due to the fact that it is less established, this journal may present a gateway for those who have not been widely published but who have strong opinions about or knowledge of information literacy.

The journal is indexed in Directory of Open Access Journals, EBSCO, Elsevier Science (SCOPUS), Google Scholar, H.W. Wilson (Library Literature & Information Science Full Text), and Proquest (Library Science). It is also cataloged by OCLC: Worldcat, Public Knowledge Project, and Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Due to the independent and open access policies of this journal, there are no paid subscribers and no advertising. In 2011 the editors  confirmed over 700 registered users.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the journal is online and open access, readers are located throughout the world.18 As this is an international publication, all potential authors should avoid using certain jargon or cultural references that others may not be able to understand. The CIL editors advise writers, “As we are a journal of information literacy, we assume our readership already has familiarity with the concept of information literacy and its application in library science. Therefore, the manuscript does not need to treat the concept of information literacy as something novel for our readers, particularly in the Introduction or the Literature Review. Unless your institutional definition of information literacy varies significantly from that of the ACRL, there is no need to provide a perfunctory definition of information literacy for our readers.”19

Reader characteristics: Though specific reader demographics are not available, authors may assume that the journal’s readers are international and the majority are employed in libraries at higher education institutions.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The primary readers of this publication are knowledgeable about library and information science issues. As noted above, readers have a clear understanding of information literacy and the issues surrounding the topic. It is likely that most readers have a firm grasp on technology, as this journal is only available online. As individuals interested in information literacy, readers probably work closely with electronic resources. It is clear that the audience of this publication values education and, above all, information literacy. They are interested in ensuring that communities have access to information and the ability to evaluate it adequately.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

It is important to note that because this publication is open access, authors’ work can be viewed for free by anyone searching the Internet, which could be a potential benefit. However, as it has an academic and research emphasis, it is most likely that the audience will be limited to those interested in higher education with a strong background in information literacy. Writers should also keep in mind the growing field of information literacy and recognize the opportunity for new studies in this field, especially those that would be of interest in college libraries and applicable internationally.

Last updated: April 13, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523471194802/634315
  2. “Focus and Scope,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  4. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  5. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  6. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  7.  Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  8. “Section Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  10. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017 http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017 http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  13. Communications in Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406232401880/634315
  14. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  16. “Editorial Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. S. Brower, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  18.  “Editorial Policies,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  20. “Submissions,” Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
  21. “Submissions, Communications in Information Literacy, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.comminfolit.org/index.php?journal=cil&page=about&op=submissions#authorGuidelines
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iSchool Descriptor

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: iSchool Descriptor

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The iSchool Descriptor is the publication of the American Library Association Student Chapter (ALASC) of San Jose State University’s School of Information.” Issues cover “specific current topics that relate to public librarianship and communities.” Contributors include “iSchool faculty, students and alumni, as well as the ALA community-at-large.”1

Target audience: SJSU iSchool students, faculty, and alumni.2

Publisher: SJSU ALASC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS student newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: News, ideas, and experiences of students, faculty, and alumni of the SJSU iSchool program. Interviews, advice, in-depth articles on particular facets of both the SJSU iSchool program and new technologies or research affecting the profession as a whole.7

Frequency of publication: Three to four times within the academic year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=2

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, opinion pieces, interviews, personal experiences, and advice are all accepted. The editor looks especially for articles dealing with particular facets of the SLIS program, or for new technologies that affect the profession as a whole. For example, “internship recaps, book and periodical reviews, job and alumni experiences, event attendee summaries, and any other LIS content that you feel is worth sharing.”9

Submission and review process: Articles can be from 250 to 1,000 words, and should be emailed in .doc, .docx, or .rtf files. There is no strict format to follow for writing. If you are writing about a personal experience, feel free to write in first person. Email visual content as JPEG files. The photo should be accompanied by information that describes “who took it, when it was taken, and what is in the picture.”10 The current submission deadline is January 9, 2015.11

Editorial tone: Personal (first person voice can be used), informal, and informative. Written mainly by students for fellow students. “Simple, straightforward language”12 is encouraged by the publication.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For beginners, writing for a student newsletter is an excellent way to get your feet wet in the world of publishing. First of all, the newsletter is less formal in tone and style, making it a less daunting task to write for. Secondly, it will familiarize the new writer with the practices of editing, rewriting, and publishing work. And lastly, there is a smaller pool of authors competing to publish in a student newsletter, so the chances of actually seeing your article in print (or online) is significantly greater. A writer can also gain experience by becoming a guest editor, a position which greatly enhances writing skills.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The vast majority of readers are students of San José State’s iSchool, and number nearly 2,000. Readership also includes iSchool staff and alumni.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in California, the publication reaches an international audience of students from 45 states in the US and over 16 countries. iSchool Descriptor is published solely in English, a common language to all students in the program.14

Reader characteristics: Over 81% of the audience is female, with an average age of 37. All the readers have at least one college degree already, and several have graduate degrees in a variety of fields as well. Overall the readers are well-educated and knowledgeable about technology, current information politics, and social service issues. They have concerns that run parallel to the concerns of the library professional.15

The readers work in a variety of fields and have a wide range of interests. Some are already gainfully employed in libraries, museums, and repositories, and some have no prior library experience. Most recent alumni found work in the following fields: academic 21%, public 35%, school 13%, special 20%, vendors 3%, other 6%, private-industry 1.5%.16 As you can see, the range of interests and specialization is quite broad, but all are based in library and information science. This doesn’t include the range of interests and expertise represented by previous occupations and university degrees.

Education and communication are the most important values of this audience. Most readers do not have time to spend hours reading an article and debating its merits. The audience values information on library issues and concerns, on new techniques and programs, job-seeking and interviewing, and issues or technologies affecting their scholarly pursuits. This publication is meant to be a mode of communication and a community bulletin board.17 Networking is very important, especially because the iSchool program is almost entirely based on distance learning, and very few students get to meet and exchange information face to face. The readership is active; many of them are already practitioners in the library field, but they also attend talks, presentations, professional seminars, and conferences.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a newsletter for LIS students, the publication assumes the reader has a firm understanding of LIS terminology, and has a general understanding of national library and information science practices and challenges. The readers are also aware of most of the concerns and issues related to the iSchool program offered by San José State. Specialized knowledge will be less familiar to the average reader.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are busy, multitasking individuals. They are interested in a a wide variety of library and information science issues, concerns, and advice. Readers are looking for brief, informative, and well-written articles concerning issues in the LIS field, and more specifically, in the iSchool program. It is a small audience (under 2000). For this publication general topics would be appropriate, or articles introducing new procedures, techniques, or technologies in the program. Advice or interviews for those seeking employment would be welcome. If an article is on a specialized topic it should assume that most readers will have only a little knowledge about it. Authors can assume the readers understand library terminology and topics, but for specialized fields or topics expect only rudimentary familiarity. The readers will also appreciate a more informal tone, as opposed to a scholarly communication.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Descriptor,” Descriptor, accessed May 8, 2018, https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=62.
  2. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). Current Submissions Information. SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=2
  3. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://slisgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/
  4. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). Current Submissions Information. SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=2
  5. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://slisgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/
  6. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://slisgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/
  7. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). Current Submissions Information. SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=2
  8. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://slisgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/
  9. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). Current Submissions Information. SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=2
  10. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). Current Submissions Information. SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=2
  11. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). Current Submissions Information. SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=2
  12. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). Current Submissions Information. SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://ischoolgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/?page_id=2
  13. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://slisgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/
  14. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://slisgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/
  15. San José State University. (2016). SJSU School of Information. Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/
  16. San José State University. (2016). Information School Alumni. SJSU School of Information. Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/people/information-school-alumni
  17. American Library Association Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU ALASC Descriptor. Retrieved from https://slisgroups.sjsu.edu/alasc/wp-descriptor/
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Chronicle of Higher Education

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Higher Education

ISSN: 0009-5982(Print) and 1931-1362 (Online)1

Website: http://chronicle.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Chronicle provides information on all facets of higher education in the United States, with international coverage, as well. Along with the general articles, book reviews, and editorials, there are features dealing with the job market as well as extensive classified ads.2

Target audience: Higher education faculty and administration.3

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian; though it does sometimes carry articles of interest to or authored by librarians, it is mainly for the general administration and faculty.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The website contains news, featured stories, opinion pieces, advice columns, job listings, and career-building tools such as online CV management and salary databases. The print magazine features two sections: the first contains news and jobs, while the second is a magazine of the arts.8

Because of its eclectic content, others working in academe will also find something interesting in The Chronicle of Higher Education. While this publication is definitely written for those with careers in higher education, LIS authors with an interest in teaching will find something of interest here as well.

Frequency of publication: The website is updated every weekday, while the print magazine is published weekly during the academic year and less frequently May through August and December, with a total of 43 issues a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Essays; reviews; opinion pieces; reporting; advice columns; and contributions to the “What I’m Reading” feature that answer the question: what have you read lately that is insightful and useful to you as you think about higher education?10 The Chronicle also accepts news pitches, the guidelines of which can be found here.11

Submission and review process: Unsolicited submissions are considered. The decision to accept or reject a manuscript rarely takes more than a week. All accepted essays and articles are rigorously edited and fact-checked. Authors have the opportunity to review and approve a manuscript before it’s published. The editors of The Review will decide where and when the piece is published, with some articles appearing only online.12 Review the submission guide carefully, as different sections have different guidelines.

Editorial tone: Journalistic and conversational.13

Style guide used: None specified. Articles should be written in a clear, informal style free of jargon. Do not use footnotes or citations.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Because of the publication frequency and the audience that this newspaper serves, this is a good place for the new author to publish. You don’t necessarily have to work in academe, but it helps. Academic librarians, along with information professionals with an interest in education or pedagogy, would be welcomed here. This publication is an informal counterpart to academic journals, a sort of cocktail hour where academics can mull over or vent about relevant issues within and outside of their field. Interested authors will be intelligent, educated and independent thinkers with something interesting to say.

Also, the wide variety of pieces found in the The Chronicle makes it very easy to find something to write about that, if written in a clear prose style, has a decent chance of being published. Book reviews are a natural, but the longer commentary pieces on some topical tempest occurring in the academy are always a good bet. Because so many write under pen names, the odds of a new author being accepted seem high.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: From the website: The Chronicle‘s is seen by more than 2 million unique visitors a month. “650 organizations across the country make our journalism available to every one of their employees and students.”15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though The Chronicle claims to be the main source of the goings on in higher education, it does tend to concentrate on the English-speaking world of the United States and sometimes Canada and the United Kingdom.16

The audience is well educated and mostly well informed about current events within and outside of academia, but the normal caution of defining extremely specialized or locally used jargon is applicable.17

Other than that, everything seems to go as long as it relates to academe in some way or another. The cosmopolitan affectations of the majority of the readers would allow a more eclectic use of language than would be found in a more mainstream newspaper.

Reader characteristics: As this is a lay publication, the makeup of its readership is somewhat important, but because it is a specialized publication the readership still has many common traits. The average reader tends to be either administration or faculty at a college or university, they can either be relatively new in their profession or at the midpoint, and though once predominately male the percentage of females is on the increase and will probably overtake the male percentage in the next few years. The readers are well educated and very interested in their profession and the culture of academe as a whole.18 Writing for The Chronicle would be an excellent way to increase understanding of library issues (such as information literacy) and market the library’s relevance to other professions. Intellectual and academic freedom, new issues in purchasing and providing content such as e-journals, information literacy, and services to disadvantaged groups would be other issues that would resonate with this readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Over all, the readership is oblivious of the complexities of the LIS profession and is most concerned with those processes that touch them in their own professions such as collection development. Of course, the readership would more than likely not fully understand the meaning of “collection development,” so such technical phrases would have to be defined.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

An LIS professional writing for this audience would not have much additional work to do, so long as he or she has something interesting and informed to write about. This is a publication for opinion pieces and reviews, and readers pick up The Chronicle to be entertained and informed. While this is not the place for scholarly work, readers do enjoy learning about new research or reading critiques of articles they’ve read in an entertaining format. They want to read shop talk, stay informed in their field, and feel connected to issues in the larger world.

This would be a good place to write an opinion piece about an LIS issue that touches on education, society or academe, or review a work that touches on these same issues. Todd Gilman, Librarian for Literature in English at Yale University and a Lecturer at San Jose State University, has published articles about distance education, special collections, research skills and information literacy, and other topics that connect libraries and academe in The Chronicle.

Last updated: September 25, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  The Chronicle of Higher Education, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/1601911248
  2. “The Chronicle of Higher Education,” www.chronicle.com, accessed September 18, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/the-chronicle-of-higher/609?cid=cheftr
  3. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  4. “The Chronicle of Higher Education,” Wikipedia, accessed September 20, 2016, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Chronicle_of_Higher_Education
  5. “Submissions,” Chronicle.com, accessed September 19, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/Submissions/638
  6. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  7. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  8. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  9. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  10. Submissions.”
  11. “How to Pitch Us,” Chronicle.com, accessed September 20, 2016, http://www.chronicle.com/page/How-to-Pitch-Us/633/
  12. Submissions.”
  13. Submissions.”
  14. Submissions.”
  15. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  16. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  17. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
  18. The Chronicle of Higher Education.”
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Information and Learning Science

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information and Learning Science (previously published as Library World and then New Library World and incorporating Asian Libraries)1

ISSN: 2398-5348 (Print) and 1758-6909 (Online)2

Website: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Information and Learning Science advances inter-disciplinary research that explores scholarly intersections shared within 2 key fields: information science and the learning sciences / education sciences. The journal provides a publication venue for work that strengthens our scholarly understanding of human inquiry and learning phenomena, especially as they relate to design and uses of information and e-learning systems innovations.”3

Target audience: The target audience is international in scope, including academics, information professionals, and librarians, along with researchers and teachers involved in the library and information community.

Publisher: Emerald Publishing.

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and Online.

Content: “We invite research that builds upon and advances theories, methods, results, innovation designs, evidence bases and frameworks for action present across both information science, and the learning/education sciences scholarly domains. We especially welcome the submission of papers that directly address, explicate and discuss the inter-disciplinary boundaries and intersections present across these two fields, and that offer new conceptual, empirical and technological syntheses. Such investigations may include but are not limited to:

  • E-learning perspectives on searching, information-seeking, and information uses and practices engaged by a full diversity of youth, adults, elders and specialized populations, in varied contexts including leisure time activities; e-learning at work, in libraries, at school, home, during playtime, in health/wellness settings, etc.
  • Design and use of systems such as MOOCs, social media, learning management systems, search systems, information systems, and other technology design innovations that contribute to human inquiry, formal and informal learning, searching, information-seeking, information uses, knowledge building and sharing, and instruction;
  • HCI, socio-technical systems research, and materiality research perspectives on information and learning systems design; social learning ecologies; and creation and use of physical objects and settings that elicit human inquiry and learning;
  • Ethnographic; emancipatory; social justice-based; feminist; critical race theory; and post-structuralist research involving information, learning, equity, design;
  • Information, communication, and technology (ICT) considerations in computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) contexts;
  • Innovations and e-learning solutions that address digital / information / media / data literacy and/or address the digital divide;
  • Innovations involving problem-, project-, and inquiry-based learning contexts and goods;
  • Learning analytics and/or data science perspectives on measurement and analysis of learning in information / search / e-learning systems;
  • Social and ethical issues in e-learning contexts such as design, measurement, and evaluation — such as privacy and security concerns around student confidentiality, data ownership and ethical data uses by researchers, teachers, institutions, etc.”5

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly (six times a year).

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Information and Learning Science accepts articles in the following categories: research paper, viewpoint, technical paper, conceptual paper, case study, literature review, and general review (between 2,500 and 6,000 words). Structured abstracts must be submitted with all articles. The journal also publishes conference reports and book reviews.6

Submission and review process: Authors submit and track manuscripts on ScholarOne Manuscripts. The editor reviews submissions and sends appropriate manuscripts to two referees for double-blind review. Conference reports and book reviews are not peer reviewed.7

Editorial tone: The editorial tone is scholarly and academic.

Style guide used: Information and Learning Science uses Harvard Style and provides examples of references and citations.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information and Learning Science is multidisciplinary and international in scope. It publishes many different types of high-quality articles on a broad range of LIS topics. Further, the journal takes account of “social, cultural, economic, ergonomic, ethical and sectoral issues,” which appeals to LIS authors worldwide.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information and Learning Science is published in English in the United Kingdom; however, its audience is international. Editorial Advisory Board members are from all over the world, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Nigeria, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Hungary,  Greece, and the United Arab Emirates.10

Reader characteristics: Due to the journal’s international reach, Information and Learning Science attracts readers from the LIS professional spectrum, including teachers, librarians, researchers, and students, from a variety of library types and information settings, who are interested in understanding LIS practices from around the world.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The average reader of Information and Learning Science has a broad understanding of LIS subject matters and issues and an understanding of library jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because the readership is international, published articles should have a broad level of interest and be applicable to LIS professionals and academics from all over the world. Information and Learning Science is a scholarly journal with a large number of academics in its audience; the articles they would be most interested in would be those based on original and novel scholarship and research.

Last updated: April 14, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Journal History,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils.
  2.  Information and Learning Science, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/901530879
  3. “Aims & Scope,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ils.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=ils.
  5. “Aims & Scope.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Aims & Scope.
  10. “Editorial Team,” Information and Learning Science, accessed February 7, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=ils.
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