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Library and Information Research (LIR)

 

Publication Analysis


About the publication

Title: Library and Information Research

ISSN: 1756-1086 (Online)1

Website: http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir

Purpose, objective, or mission:

“LIR has the following objectives:
– To provide an overview of LIS research activity and developments worldwide;
– To publish research in such a way that it is accessible to, and usable by, the LIS community;
– To publish LIS research (including informal or in-house research) by practitioners;
– To publish practical case studies that illustrate best practice;
– To encourage reflective and evidence-based practice;
– To publish papers resulting from LIRG annual awards and prizes;
– To promote the use and understanding of quality research methods;
– To raise awareness of new tools, books and funding opportunities for research;
– To comment, and provide a forum for comment, on the state of LIS research.

LIR’s strap line is Research Into Practice in Information and Library Services (RIPILS). Any contributions falling within this remit and meeting one or more of the objectives specified above are welcome.”2

Target audience: This publication is written by and for members of the Library and Information Research Group, as well as all parties interested in current research topics in library and information science.3

Publisher: Library and Information Research Group, a Special Interest Group of CILIP.4

Peer reviewed? Only refereed research articles are peer-reviewed.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6 Although most manuscripts submitted to the journal are not peer-reviewed, all submissions involve LIS research of some type.7

Medium or mode of distribution: Online only.8

Content: The journal covers a wide variety of research topics, including the values and ethics within librarianship, institutional ethnography, qualitative research in LIS, etc.9

Frequency of publication: Three times a year. 10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Refereed research articles, opinion pieces, case studies, book reviews, reports on conferences, etc.11

Submission and review process:Length depends on the type of submission, although the maximum word count for any submission is 7,000 words. Manuscripts should be formatted according to a template available at the “Author Guidelines” page.12 Free registration is required for authors who wish to submit articles for consideration.13 All manuscripts must be unpublished and submitted in Microsoft Word or RTF format.14

As for the review process, refereed research articles are reviewed by a minimum of two double-blind peer reviewers.15

Editorial tone: Formal, scholarly, very technical.16

Style guide used: APA-style references.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library and Information Research is an excellent publication for LIS researchers, including students. Graduate students who have taken a research methods course, for instance, could adapt one of their papers to meet the journal’s standards. Additionally, as an open-source journal, Library and Information Research has the potential to reach a large audience. Its status as a “research into practice”18 journal allows authors to present both new information and future possibilities through long and short articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is an open-access, online-only journal,19 and thus, circulates daily. An estimate of circulation numbers is unavailable.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is produced in the UK,20 so more likely than not, a large percentage of readers will be British. Readers will be more likely to use British English than American English.21 However, since the journal is open access22 it’s safe to assume it enjoys readership worldwide. Due to its international reach, colloquialisms and unexplained cultural references should be omitted.

Reader characteristics: Readers will likely work in libraries or other research institutions in some capacity. Since Library and Information Research has such a strong focus on research, readers will favor objectivity over opinion, except when a piece is specifically intended to be opinion-based.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers must possess a high level of LIS subject matter knowledge to appreciate all the journal has to offer. Highly technical terms, e.g., phenomenography, are common, so it’s safe to assume that readers have graduate or post-graduate-level knowledge.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Library and Information Research will expect meticulous attention to detail and in-depth knowledge of LIS research. Although not required for publication, readers will appreciate authors with professional and scholarly experience in LIS research, as well as those who have a background in sociological issues, e.g., social equality. Additionally, readers will expect writing to be technical and free of unnecessary fluff.

Last updated: February 27, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  2. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4.  Diane M. Rasmussen Pennington, email message to author, February 28, 2018
  5. “Peer Review Process,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  6. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  7. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  9.  Judith Broady-Preston, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library and Information Research 41, no. 125 (2017).
  10.  Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  11. “Section Policies,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  12. “Author Guidelines, Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Online Submissions” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submission Preparation Checklist,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. “Author Guidelines,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  17. “Attribution Policy,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  18. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Focus and Scope,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  21. Library and Information Research, Library and Information Research Group, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/658167
  22. “Open Access Policy,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#openAccessPolicy
  23. “Section Policies,” Library and Information Research Group, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  24. Judith Broady-Preston, ed., “Table of Contents.” Entire issue, Library and Information Research 41, no. 125 (2017).
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Journal of Information Literacy (JIL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Information Literacy (JIL)

ISSN: 1750-59681

Website: https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Information Literacy (JIL) is the professional journal of the CILIP Information Literacy Group. The journal “publishes innovative and challenging research articles and project reports which push the boundaries of information literacy thinking in theory, practice and method, and which aim to develop deep and critical understandings of the role, contribution and impact of information literacies in everyday contexts, education and the workplace.”2

Target audience: The target audience includes members of the UK-based CILIP Information Literacy Group and LIS professionals, scholars, students, and teachers, and those working in any field related to information literacy instruction and scholarship.

Publisher: JIL is published by the CILIP Information Literacy Group and hosted by Loughborough University Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: JIL “aims to investigate information literacy in all its forms to address the interests of diverse IL communities of practice.”5 Regular sections include Peer-Reviewed Articles, Articles from LILAC (Librarians’ Information Literacy Annual Conference), Book Reviews, Conference Updates, Project Reports, and Students’ View of IL.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JIL accepts research articles that are “informed and evidence based, designed around an arguable research question, contextualised with reference to previous and current advances in IL thinking, [and] methodologically robust with a demonstrable research design.8 For the Students’ View of IL section, submissions should be “papers drawn from research (theoretical or applied) undertaken by students as part of a postgraduate course in LIS or other cognate disciplines, such as education or media.”9 Authors may also submit reviews of books, media, websites, and software relevant to information literacy practices; conference updates; and project reports “related to information, digital and learning literacies.10

Submission and review process: JIL‘s Submission page includes a section titled The Route to Publication that provides a helpful overview of the submission, review, and acceptance process. Authors need to format manuscripts according to the journal’s article template and verify that manuscripts conform to each item on the Submission Preparation Checklist. After manuscripts are submitted online, they are peer reviewed with comments on suitability and suggestions for revision; authors receive feedback and may resubmit for review if substantial changes are made.11

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly, and writers should use UK spelling. The journal’s Submission page provides helpful guidelines and templates for expected style, structure, and argument.12

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).13 

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JIL “publishes articles from both established and new authors” in the field of information literacy. Furthermore, JIL “welcomes contributions that push the boundaries of IL beyond the educational setting and examine this phenomenon as a continuum between those involved in its development and delivery and those benefiting from its provision.”14 This journal is a good fit for LIS authors who conduct original research and novel scholarship in any area of information literacy. LIS graduate students and recent graduates have a great opportunity to publish in the journal’s Students’ View of IL section. JIL accepts 44% of articles submitted for publication.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JIL is published by CILIP Information Literacy Group, which “works across the UK and represents a UK workforce of 87,000 information professionals working across the private, public and third sectors to unlock the value of information.”16 Authors should keep in mind that readers are information professionals throughout the UK, but as an open-access journal for a large organization, it can have an international reach.

Reader characteristics: Readers are information professionals throughout the UK. CILIP explains that information professional “is an umbrella term for librarians, information managers, knowledge managers and data professionals.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Based on membership in CILIP, readers are UK information professionals in a wide range of libraries and institutions. Members are interested in staying up-to-date on the most current developments in information literacy and in advancing scholarship of and practice in the field. Authors should keep in mind the journal’s focus on innovative research, scholarship, and practice in the field of information literacy.

Last updated: April 10, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523821255563/626763
  2. Homepage, Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/.
  3. “About the Journal,” Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/about.
  4. “Submissions,” Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/about/submissions.
  5. “About the journal.”
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About the Journal.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “About the Journal.”
  15. “About the Journal.”
  16. “Who We Represent,” cilip.org.uk, accessed April 10, 2018, http://www.cilip.org.uk/page/who_we_represent.
  17. “Who We Represent.”
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LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research e-journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research e-journal

ISSN: 1058-6768

Website: https://www.libres-ejournal.info/

Purpose, objective, or mission: LIBRES, an international refereed e-journal, publishes research and scholarly articles in library and information science and services (LIS). “It has a particular focus on research in emerging areas of LIS, synthesis of LIS research areas, and on novel perspectives and conceptions that advance theory and practice.”1

Target audience: LIBRES is for information science professionals and librarians interested in all aspects of LIS research and scholarship, but especially in emerging areas, novel perspectives, and new understandings of LIS theory and practice.2

Publisher: LIBRES is jointly published by the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information and the NTU Libraries at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. It was previously published by the Department of Information Studies at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia.3

Peer reviewed? At least two referees blind review each paper.4

Type:  LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: LIBRES is an online, open-access journal.

Content: This journal has three main sections, Research Papers, Synthesis & Perspectives, and Special Sections. The journal publishes research papers on studies that advance LIS, synthesis papers that survey areas of LIS for new or better understandings, and scholarly opinion or perspective papers that explore new conceptions of LIS.5 Each Special Section is devoted to papers from conferences from around the globe, promoting the journal’s commitment to regional LIS scholarship.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year, in June and December.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: LIBRES accepts scholarly research, synthesis, and perspective papers on any aspect of LIS, especially in emerging areas or with novel conceptions that advance theory and practice. 8

Submission and review process: Submissions should be sent in Microsoft Word documents to the editor at LIBRESeditor@ntu.edu.sg. Submissions are usually reviewed within 60 days of receipt. Papers should not be under review or published elsewhere. “The reviews will pay particular attention to whether the papers are interesting, useful, thoughtful, and a significant contribution to knowledge in the LIS field.”9

Editorial tone: The journal uses a formal academic style. The journal’s official language is English, but the editor encourages submissions from developing countries and countries where English is not the native language; revision and editing for readability are part of the publication process.10

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIBRES is focused on new research and novel perspectives from the LIS international academic community. Authors can submit to either the Research Papers section or to the Synthesis & Perspectives section. The journal’s authorship is international, and it publishes articles from developed and developing countries; LIBRES takes “a nurturing attitude towards papers and authors,” and the editorial board provides “substantive guidance to the authors,” especially those who are not native English speakers.12 “In subject coverage, it has a particular strength in library/information service,” and it promotes worldwide regional LIS community scholarship by publishing conference papers.13 It publishes high-quality research, often on technology and service, from a many different countries, pushing LIS regional and international innovation forward.


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  LIBRES is published in English and is international in scope,14 and the editorial board is especially interested in linking up with “regional LIS research communities worldwide.”15

Reader characteristics: The audience of LIBRES is LIS academics and professionals from around the world,16 and papers are published by authors from the United States, Mexico, Cuba, Qatar, India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and Malaysia, to name a few. The conference papers in the Special Sections expand its international scope in terms of research and readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a professional and scholarly understanding of LIS practice and research.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This scholarly journal’s readers will expect formal research and high-level syntheses. Topics for submission include current and emerging LIS research areas, emerging technology, and library service. For LIS professional and student researchers, LIBRES is a good place to research that investigates practices within library and information science environments and advances in new and emerging technology. For LIS scholars, LIBRES encourages synthesis papers that consider theory and practice in a new light and opinion and perspective pieces that explore new ideas in LIS.

Last updated: January 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About LIBRES,” LIBRES, accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/about-libres/.
  2. “About LIBRES.”
  3. “About LIBRES.”
  4. “About LIBRES.”
  5. “Author Guidelines,” LIBRES, accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/author-guidelines/.
  6. For example, Special Section: Digital Curation Projects and Research in Asia, LIBRIS 26, no. 1 (2018), accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/all-issues/volume-26-issue-1/.
  7. “About LIBRES.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. Chris Khoo, “Editorial,” LIBRIS 25, no. 1 (2015), accessed January 31, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/1621/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. Chris Khoo, “Editorial,” LIBRIS 24, no. 1 (2014), accessed January 31, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/1369/.
  13. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
  16. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
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The Crab

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Crab

ISSN: 0300-75611

Website: http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/ecrab.asp

Purpose, objective, or mission: This is the official publication of the Maryland Library Association (MLA). The Crab is published quarterly and is the official Maryland Library Association publication. On the MLA Website, the association’s purpose is given as, “[to provide] leadership for those who are committed to libraries by providing opportunities for professional development and communication and by advocating principles and issues related to librarianship and library service.”2

Target audience: The primary target audience is the association’s membership, which includes “library staff and trustees, library school students, libraries, and friends of libraries representing the full spectrum of librarianship in Maryland.”3 The library staff component includes members from public, school, academic, and special libraries. Public librarians are the largest constituency.

Publisher: Maryland Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Coverage of the MLA annual conference; program and workshop reports; news about Maryland libraries and library people; articles on issues concerning libraries and librarianship in Maryland; reviews of books and other materials with local or state interest; letters to the editor.8

Frequency of publication: Four times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp

Types of contributions accepted: From the submission guidelines, The Crab seeks coverage of the following topics: MLA conference; MLA division, committee or interest group news; reports on programs and workshops of interest to librarians in Maryland; news about Maryland libraries and people; articles on issues concerning libraries and librarianship in Maryland; reviews of books and other materials, based on their local and state interest will be considered for publication; letters to the editor – these must be signed, although names may be withheld from publications upon request.10

Advertising will be accepted for The Crab – priority will be given to library-related services or products.11

Articles accompanied by photos are strongly encouraged.12

Submission and review process: Submissions should be via e-mail to editor Annette Haldeman, Legislative Librarian, Maryland General Assembly Department of Legislative Services, Office of Policy Analysis, at: Annette.Haldeman@mlis.state.md.us.13
Articles may be keyed into the body of the e-mail or may be sent as attachments. Photos should be in .GIF or .JPG formats and should not exceed 200K. Submission deadlines for each issue available on website.14

Editorial tone: Varies somewhat by author, but tone is generally newsy, chatty, and friendly. Even the short fact-based items often attempt to convey some sense of excitement.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication, as indicated by the their mission, focuses on local Maryland library organizations, people and events.15 An author with local knowledge or connections will find it easier to place a variety of material than an out of the area author. On the other hand, there are examples of articles that address larger LIS sector trends and activities. There are publishing opportunities for an author who can can write in an accessible manner with a local connection to the Maryland audience. As with any publication, reviewing the past issues will provide a solid sense of what type of article the editor and readers would find interesting. Another source of information on the associations focus is the MLA’s Strategic Plan that is posted on their website.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The print publication is available for a subscription fee from the MLA (membership numbers not available) and is also available online for any visitor to read.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Primarily the State of Maryland, with additional reach to members in the vendor community that are not located in Maryland.18 Articles are written in English. The vocabulary is light on jargon, perhaps partly due to the wide variety of background of potential readers (see below).19

Reader characteristics: Association members include professionals, paraprofessionals, LIS students, and a large number of non-librarian staff members. Members/readers come from the full variety of library types and the full variety of jobs in those institutions. Some LIS vendors are included. It may be assumed that most readers will be sympathetic to libraries, understand their various missions, and will view themselves as important to their organizations and the achievement of their organizations’ goals.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A significant portion of the MLA membership is within the paraprofessional category, so while most readers will be well-informed about their local issues and practices, some will not have the perspective gained from professional study and work.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the diversity of background, skills, professional duties, missions, and interests of the readers, authors should consider presenting material that is practical, general in scope, accessible in tone and language, and appealing to the interests of readers in the Maryland area.22

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  The Crab, Maryland Library Association, accessed March 18, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521391280468/56713
  2. Maryland Library Association. (2014). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
  3. Maryland Library Association. (2016). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
  4. ProQuest. (2016). The Crab. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411937604570/56713
  5. ProQuest. (2016). The Crab. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411937604570/56713
  6. ProQuest. (2016). The Crab. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411937604570/56713
  7. Maryland Library Association. (2016). The Crab Home. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/ecrab.asp
  8. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  9. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  10. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  11. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  12. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  13. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  14. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  15. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Submissions. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/submit.asp
  16. Maryland Library Association. (2016). MLA Strategic Plan. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/splan.asp
  17. Maryland Library Association. (2016). Join MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/join.asp
  18. Maryland Library Association. (2016). About The Crab. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/about.asp
  19. Maryland Library Association. (2016). The Crab Home. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/ecrab/ecrab.asp
  20. Maryland Library Association. (2016). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
  21. Maryland Library Association. (2016). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
  22. Maryland Library Association. (2014). About MLA. Maryland Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.mdlib.org/about/default.asp
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Library Hi Tech News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech News

ISSN: 0741-90581

Website: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn

Purpose, objective, or mission: Helps readers stay abreast of events, developments and news in the LIS industries. From their Editorial Objectives: “Readers consider LHTN as the source from which to hear what’€™s coming next in terms of technology development for academic and public libraries.”2

Target audience: Library and info science professionals, and anyone with a reason to use LIS services/technologies in their own professional workplace. The primary goal of the publication is to keep readers ahead of LIS technology developments so they’€™re in the know about what they can use to help improve library services (“€œexploit their potential”), with a nod towards improving services for library users with disabilities through the new tech updates and activities. This is all on an international scale.3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publications.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Articles of varying lengths, reporting on LIS conferences, and case studies on how tech is used in the library.8

Regular content includes technology profiles from libraries around the world; feature articles; in depth conference reviews & reports; new & noteworthy updates for librarians; and a calendar of relevant upcoming events.9

Frequency of publication: 9-10 issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn

The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist.11

Types of contributions accepted: From the website, particularly welcome topics include: New web browsers/search engines; virtual reference experiments; library uses of Skype/VOIP; integrated library systems and management; blogging; library mobile applications; social networks; virtual worlds; Twitter applications for libraries; gaming and simulations; digital textbooks; new library learning spaces; tech for library users with disabilities; crowdsourcing and open source software. The list is extensive.12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article. Upload files as a Word document o f 1000-3000 words. All submissions are reviewed by the Library Hi Tech News editors, who make the final decision on publication.13

Editorial tone: Informal, but informative. Speaks to readers in a knowledgeable, conversational tone that provides great information on new technologies without making the articles dull or so technical that readers are overwhelmed or tune out.14

Style guide used: Harvard style formatting.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech News‘s editorial objectives note that “publishing your article in LHTN can be a ‘€˜place to start,’€™ analogous to a ‘poster session in print’€™, and does not preclude publishing a more fulsome piece in a peer-reviewed journal at a later date.”16€ (A peer-reviewed journal to spring to might be Library Hi Tech.)

The list of content submissions (see Types of Contributions Accepted, above) is vast and touches on subjects that every LIS student will be familiar with, dealing with, and will most likely have an opinion about. This is an excellent place to start your LIS publishing.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International in scope, with the primary editors of the publication based out of U.S. colleges and universities.18 Submissions need to adhere to the Worldwide English language rights, and Emerald provides resources for making sure papers are written in grammatically correct standard English, for authors for whom English is not their first language.19

Reader characteristics: Readers and writers for this publication are LIS professionals and students interested in new and emerging technologies, and new uses for established technologies. The journal is part of the Committee on Publication Ethics  (COPE), “€œa forum for editors and publishers of peer reviewed journals to discuss publication ethics.”€20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as the publication is aimed at LIS professionals and students with an interest in LIS technologies.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors 

This is a wonderful publication for LIS new professionals and students, as readers and authors. The authors are seeking submissions covering such a variety of interesting topics, and seem to be open to submissions on anything that is even remotely related to technologies that can be used in libraries and the LIS field. For example, a 2013 issue provided an overview of Pinterest and how it can be used in libraries, as well as iPads, Kindles and tablets, and social media ethical issues for librarians. All issues that most students, not just LIS, can speak to, and particularly relevant for those in LIS programs currently using and evaluating these technologies, personally, professionally, and through LIS studies. There are also more technical issues covered, like open source library management systems, global development for libraries, profiles of LIS professionals, and relevant conference updates. A great place to jump in and write for.22

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Library Hi Tech News, Emerald Group Publishing Ltd., accessed March, 21, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  3. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  5. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  10. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  11. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  12. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  13. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  14. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  15. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  17. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  18. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Editorial Team. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lhtn
  19. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  20. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  22. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
Continue Reading

D-Lib Magazine

Note: D-Lib announced that it would cease publication in 2017. See http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july17/07editorial.html.

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: D-Lib Magazine

ISSN: 1082-98731

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The primary goal of the magazine is timely and efficient information exchange for the digital library community to help digital libraries be a broad interdisciplinary field, and not a set of specialties that know little of each other.”2 The publisher’s goal is to make the magazine available for “the advancement of knowledge and practice on digital library research and related matter.”3Website: http://www.dlib.org/

Target audience: Technical and professional individuals interested in digital library research and development.4

Publisher: Corporation for National Research Initiatives (CNRI). From its launch in 1995 until April 2006 it was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), the National Science Foundation (NSF). It is currently funded by the D-Lib Alliance and other contributors.5

Peer reviewed? No. Articles are reviewed and selected by an editorial committee.6

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. While many articles are research driven, there is no peer-review process.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Coverage of digital library research and development, includes “new technologies, applications, and contextual social and economic issues.”9 Besides full articles, D-Lib publishes “brief notices, book-reviews, opinions, letters, clippings, and pointers of broad interest about innovation and research in digital libraries.”10 The articles should be of interest to a broad (non-specialist) community and should “reflect work that has been completed, rather than just beginning.”11

Frequency of publication: Six times a year, with bi-monthly release dates.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: Per the author guidelines, “Full articles, brief notices, book-reviews, conference reports, project briefings, opinions, letters, clippings, and pointers of broad interest about innovation and research in digital libraries. Full articles should: be of interest to a broad community (specialist literature should be published where specialists will see it), and reflect work that has been completed, rather than just beginning.”13 “Articles 1,500 to 3,000 words in length are preferred and those over 5,000 words are usually not accepted. They should be written in English, or accompanied by an English translation. Articles must include a 100-200 word abstract, without hyperlinks. Items submitted for the “In Brief” section have a 500-word limit. Letters to the editor are also welcomed.”14

Submission and review process: Completed manuscripts are accepted, but the editors prefer to be contacted before a work is finished so they “can determine whether the topic, style, and approach is appropriate for D-Lib Magazine.”15 Only electronic submissions are accepted.16

Submissions and queries should be emailed to editor@dlib.org.17

Editorial tone: The author guidelines make a point to emphasize that they are indeed guidelines and note that, “The above guidelines are suggestions only, and they are open for further dialogue. The most important thing is to write the article you want to write in the way that you want it to appear!”18

Style guide used: “References may be in any consistent format (e.g., MLA, Chicago, etc.), and authors are encouraged to include DOI® names (Digital Object Identifier) for sources where appropriate.”19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The history and support of recognized organizations supports credibility for this widely referenced and widely read publication. The publication is a fine source for keeping up-to-date with trends and activities. As part of this role, each issue includes several announcements of conferences and meetings and frequently posts calls for submissions to publish or present in a variety of venues. Along with submissions for these sorts of events, the editors welcome articles highlighting topics such as teaching, training, best practices, research and development reports.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: UlrichsWeb does not provide circulation information, likely because this is solely an online electronic publication without advertising revenue.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: UlrichsWeb gives the country of publication as the United States. All of the current sponsoring bodies are located in the United States, but the affiliations of the contributors indicates that readership is worldwide.21 D-Lib Magazine is distributed in English. Being an online ASCII text-based product, it is conceivable that someone could “€œrun it through”€ an online automated translator, but it is more likely that most readers are comfortable with reading English. The content tends to run toward research, practical applications, and news items, so it should be possible to provide this with a minimum of culture-specific references. If they are needed to make or clarify a point, they should be explained and contextualized for all readers.22

Reader characteristics: No demographic data was found. It may be assumed that most readers have Internet access and comfort with the electronic information environment. D-Lib’€™s website says it “€œappeals to a broad technical and professional audience”23 with the understanding that most of this audience is within the LIS community. Since it is largely oriented to research and development, it is reasonable to assume that readers have interests and positions that engage them in activities such as analysis, design, assessment, project management, programming, systems administration, digitization, and metadata. Most of the abstracting and indexing services that cover this publication relate to LIS, computer science, or applied information systems. The publication’€™s Author Guidelines, which advise that articles “€œshould reflect work that has been completed, rather than just beginning,”24 reflect the orientation towards research and development and a high value placed on reporting of practical methods and applications.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Similar to above, we can expect much of this readership to have very high knowledge of LIS subject matter, but more oriented to practical matters and applications than to the theoretical and abstract. On the other hand, a significant portion of library employees who work in these areas do not have LIS degrees and are not necessarily concerned with nor exposed to the societal issues and academic endeavors that motivate some of their colleagues. Nonetheless, most will be conversant with the jargon of their library domain, with digitization, and with applicable standards.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Due to the nature of their work, these readers tend to be busy, creative, and solutions oriented. This, along with the 1,500 to 3,000 word limit, suggests that articles should be snappy, relevant, and to-the-point.

The D-Lib Alliance supports the magazine, and is always open to new contributors: “We know from our own experience and from talking with others that the digital library community relies on D-Lib Magazine, and now the magazine relies on the digital library community for its continuing existence.”26

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  D-Lib Magazine, Corporation for National Research Initiatives, accessed March 22, 2018, http://www.dlib.org/
  2. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  3. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  4. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  5. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  6. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  7. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  8. ProQuest. (2016). D-Lib Magazine. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411943307442/261541
  9. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  10. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  11. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  12. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  13. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  14. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  15. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  16. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  17. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  18. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  19. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  20. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  21. ProQuest. (2016). D-Lib Magazine. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411943307442/261541
  22. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  23. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  24. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). Author Guidelines. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/author-guidelines.html
  25. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). About D-Lib Magazine. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/about.html
  26. Corporation for National Research Initiatives. (2016). D-Lib Alliance Participants. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.dlib.org/dlib/alliance-participants.html
Continue Reading

Feliciter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Feliciter

ISSN: 0014 98021

Website: http://www.community.cla.ca

Purpose, objective, or mission: Feliciter is the publication of the Canadian Library Association (CLA) whose mission is to serve as “champion library values and the value of libraries, influence public policy impacting libraries, inspire and support member learning, [and] collaborate to strengthen the library community.”2 Feliciter is “the only national magazine dedicated to serving the Canadian library and information services community.”3

Target audience: Members of the Canadian Library Association. Members of the association include “€œthe staff and boards of public, college and university, special and school libraries.”4

Publisher: Canadian Library Association/Association Canadienne des Bibliothéques.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online only.8

Content: “€œEach issue of Feliciter contains opinion pieces, columns, and feature articles on professional concerns and developments, along with news of the Canadian Library Association.”9 Each issue has a theme, which have included the following: library services for children and young adults, security, information literacy, second careers, and e-resources and the digital divide. Many issues focus on association business, such as conferences and initiatives.10

2014 themes and guest editors are listed on the home page.

Frequency of publication: Six issues per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=10804

Types of contributions accepted: Articles and contributions should primarily be related to the corresponding theme, but contributions on other information-related topics are also welcome. Articles should be 1,000 to 1,500 words while smaller works, such as reviews, should be about 400 words. Works should be relatively quick to read and provide clear how-to information when applicable.12

You may also suggest a theme for an issue, or volunteer to be a guest editor of Feliciter. The Author Guidelines page lists Guest Editor Guidelines as well as Author Guidelines.13

Submission and review process: Submit full manuscripts by email (publishing@cla.ca), fax or postal service. Theme related submissions must be received 6 weeks prior to publication deadline. Editorial calendar with themes and deadlines included in Author Guidelines. There is no peer-review process and authors work with editors of each issue.14

To submit a theme or apply to be a guest editor, email Feliciter editor Judy Green at CLA (jgreen@cla.ca).15

Editorial tone: Contributions should be “€œinformal but informative. Conclusions should follow logically and statements should be supported.”16 The submission guidelines also note that “€œarticles should not be overly dense or scholarly, but rather written to pique the interest of the readers/audience.”17

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Feliciter is geared toward information professionals who work and reside in Canada and especially members of the Canadian Library Association. There are no restrictions as to the location of contributors, but there may be regional and/or cultural differences regarding LIS topics that should be addressed. Feliciter has been in print for over 50 years and is a credible publication that represents the Canadian Library Association to its members and the world. Students, educators, and practitioners might all have appropriate ideas to contribute. Possible topics include the themes discussed above, and previous themes include “Library Technicians” and “Publishing in Canada.”19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Feliciter serves the Canadian Library Association, which is made up of 2,236 members, including individual, institutional, and library board members. Others may also subscribe to Feliciter and the total circulation of the CLA, as of 2012, is 394.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Out of a circulation of 3942, excepting 47 subscriptions from the United States and 7 foreign subscriptions, all subscriptions are to readers residing in Canada. Readers are spread out among the country’€™s various territories and provinces.21 Feliciter is published in English with many references and information needs specific to Canadians. Issues such as publishing in Canada and the state of Canadian public libraries are common topics. The Canadian Library Association is also known as the Association Canadienne des Bibliothéques, showing that French culture and language contributes to the culture of the association and its publication. Authors should ensure that their content and contributions can resonate with the publication’€™s Canadian readers, possibly doing research on libraries in Canada and using a minimum of regional and cultural references found outside the country.22

Reader characteristics: The website does not provide any gender, ethnic, or other demographic information regarding its readership and membership beyond the types of libraries in which they work and the provinces in which they live. Members of the Canadian Library Association “œwork in college, university, public, special (corporate, non-profit and government) and school libraries. Others sit on boards of public libraries, work for companies that provide goods and services to libraries, or are students in graduate level or community college programs.”23 Most readers will have an MLS or MLIS. Readers will have a strong interest in library and information science issues. Because the readership is predominantly Canadian, authors should ensure that values and ideas expressed are in line with those of Canadian librarians. The publication also produces lots of association news, so content should include information relevant to the association and its members when possible. A look at published articles reveals that news and factual information are published more often than opinions and editorials, showing that the publication has a more objective slant regarding library issues.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The publication is aimed at readers with extensive and growing knowledge of LIS-related issues. These issues will take a variety of foci based on the type of library discussed, the departments and needs within that library, and the clientele served there. In general, readers will understand and relate to LIS jargon, but authors should avoid jargon specific to a certain type of library.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers would benefit most from information and news specific to issues found in Canadian libraries. There are many topics and ideas general to libraries throughout both the United States and Canada, including providing reference service to children and the increased usage of the internet and other electronic avenues. Content should steer clear of cultural references except where those references relate to Canadian libraries. Authors should remember that circulation for this publication is relatively small and insular with a focus on the association and its members.26

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  Feliciter, Canadian Library Association, accessed March 21, 2018, http://community.cla.ca/
  2. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Mission, Values, & Operating Principles. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Mission_Values_andamp_Operating_Principles&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=13985
  3. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter1&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15480
  4. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Membership. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Membership&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=14&ContentID=3221
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  9. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter1&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15480
  10. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Past Issues. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=20141&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15478
  11. ProQuest. (2016). Feliciter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412016425477/340451
  12. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  13. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  14. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  15. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  16. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  17. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  18. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Author/Guest Editor Guidelines. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Author_Guest_Editor_Guidelines&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=14966
  19. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter1&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15480
  20. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter Advertising Opportunities. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter2&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=28&ContentID=3756
  21. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter Advertising Opportunities. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter2&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=28&ContentID=3756
  22. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Feliciter. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Feliciter1&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15480
  23. Canadian Library Association. (2016). About CLA. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=About_CLA
  24. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Archives. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=20141&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15478
  25. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Mission, Values, & Operating Principles. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Mission_Values_andamp_Operating_Principles&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=13985
  26. Canadian Library Association. (2016). Archives. Canadian Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla.ca/AM/Template.cfm?Section=20141&Template=/CM/HTMLDisplay.cfm&ContentID=15478
Continue Reading

Code4Lib Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ)

ISSN: 1940-57581

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, “the Code4Lib Journal exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.”2 It “aims to help engender collective understanding and the necessary support for improving library technology and digital services.”3Website: http://journal.code4lib.org/

Target audience: The target audience includes anyone who is involved in the “wider library community” who has an interest in libraries and technology.4

PublisherCode4Lib. Publication began in 2007.5

Peer reviewed? Submissions to the journal are reviewed by a non-anonymous editorial committee of professional peers. The journal does not use a refereed process.6

Type: Although the editorial committee consists mainly of those involved in the academic library community, contents do not necessarily have the format of a traditional scholarly research article, and the journal does not use a traditional blind refereed review. Articles can vary in formality, and can include case studies and personal opinion pieces. Articles do not generally include extensive literature reviews. For these reasons, the journal is currently classed here as ‘professional news’. Articles tend to be focused on the practical application of the ideas presented.7

Medium: Code4Lib Journal is available online.8

Content: From the Call for Submissions, “the editorial committee is looking for content that is practical, demonstrates how to exploit technology to create digital library collections and services, or offers insight and forethought regarding the use of computers in any type of library setting.”9

The journal publishes articles on a multitude of subjects, as long as they support the mission statement, and is flexible with length (1,500 to 5,000 words is an approximate word count). The types of articles published in the journal include:

  • Case studies of projects (failed or successful), how they were done, and challenges faced.
  • Descriptions of projects in progress, project updates, and new project proposals.
  • Effective processes for project management.
  • Reviews/comparisons of software, frameworks, libraries, etc.
  • Analyses and case studies of using library metadata in technological application: novel applications or solutions, or unsolved challenges,
  • Thought pieces on the big problems associated with library and technology, ideas for new solutions, visions for the future.
  • Findings on user behavior and interaction with systems.
  • Best practices.10

Frequency of publication: It is published quarterly in March, June, September, and December.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions

Types of contributions accepted: The types of articles the journal is looking for include:

  • Book & software reviews
  • Code snippets & algorithms
  • Conference reports
  • Opinion pieces12

Submission and review process: Submissions can be sent in the form of either an abstract or a complete draft. Submit articles using the online form, or via email to journal@code4lib.org. Once submitted the article goes through an editorial process, and not a peer review.13

Editorial tone: “Writers should aim for the middle ground between, on the one hand, blog or mailing-list posts, and, on the other hand, articles in traditional journals.”14

Style guide used: From the article guidelines: “While articles in C4LJ should be of a high quality, they need not follow any formal structure or guidelines.”15 However, end notes and references should be cited using the Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a semiformal setting in which to discuss issues of technology in the library and information science world. It is a newer journal, which may make it less competitive than more established journals. The information in the journal is concentrated around technology, and its place within the library setting, so it would be a good place for anyone with an interest in this subject to find a home for one of their articles.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Since the journal is 100% online, there was no information on the exact circulation available.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editorial committee is based throughout the United States, but the writers come from both within and outside the United States.18 The journal is written in English, and although the editorial committee is American, not all of the contributors are. (Article guidelines note that articles should be written in good English, and that “American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these.”)19  Also, due to the online nature of the journal, people from anywhere in the world would have the ability to access the articles. Because of this, it would most likely be prudent to avoid the use of any language or content that was too culturally specific.

Reader characteristics: Code4Lib is a “volunteer-driven collective of hackers, designers, architects, curators, catalogers, artists and instigators from around the world, who largely work for and with libraries, archives and museums on technology ‘stuff’.” From looking through the author information supplies with the articles, it appears that almost all of the contributors work in academic libraries, although their actual job titles vary quite a bit. These job titles range from web designer to information technology coordinator to systems librarian. While this information is about the writers, it goes to show that the journal is of interest to all different types of professionals involved technologies in libraries. Of course, they also all have a professional interest in the intersection of libraries and technology. Code4Lib is of interest to “technology folks in libraries, archives and museums to informally share approaches, techniques, and code across institutional and project divides.”20 The readers of this journal are likely to have established opinions about the place of technology in libraries. A look at the mission statement shows that the readers are likely to feel that technology holds a key position in the future of libraries.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of Code4Lib Journal would have a good knowledge and understanding of LIS topics and issues. They would also be familiar with library jargon. On top of that, due to the technical nature of the journal, they would also be familiar with most technical jargon.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The common thread running among these readers is an interest in, and a passion for, technology and its use within a library setting. Their level of technical knowledge would be rather high, and this would be an important thing for writers to keep in mind. In fact, it would also be a necessity for the writers of a proposed article for Code4Lib Journal to be technological experts. An important element of the journal is the inclusion of the actual coding used in the project being discussed, hence the name of the journal. That being said, the readers would most likely not only have an understanding of technology, but also experience with its application and creation.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Code4Lib Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521729571530/658750
  2. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  3. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  4. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  5. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  6. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Process and Structure. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/process-and-structure
  7. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Issue 25, 2014-07-21. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/issues/issues/issue25
  8. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  9. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  10. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  11. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Call for Submissions. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/call-for-submissions
  12. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  13. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  14. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  15. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  16. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  17. ProQuest. (2016). The Code4Lib Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411489602963/658750
  18. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Editorial Committee. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/editorial-committee
  19. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Article Guidelines. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/article-guidelines
  20. Code4Lib. (2016). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
  21. Code4Lib Journal. (2016). Mission. Code4Lib Journal. Retrieved from http://journal.code4lib.org/mission
  22. Code4Lib. (2016). About. Code4Lib. Retrieved from http://code4lib.org/about/
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Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal

ISSN: 1077-66131

Website: http://associates.ucr.edu/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Provides a voice for and promotes the exchange of information within the library support staff community.2

Target audience: The primary audience is support staff at all libraries including public, special, academic, and school. The journal is online and subscriptions are free.3

Publisher: University of California Riverside Library.4

Server and listservs are housed at the University of California, Riverside, and the website is powered through WordPress.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: Professional newsletter.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Topics range from how-to articles, opinion pieces, conference information, resource updates, fiction, conference updates, and research articles.9

Frequency of publication: Published three times per year, in March, July, and November.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88

Types of contributions accepted: The newsletter discusses issues and developments related to the work of library support staff. Topics might include cataloging, collection management, public relations, technology, and personnel issues. Priority consideration will be given to submissions written by library support staff. The submission guidelines provide a list of topics for feature article consideration.11

Submission and review process: Articles of any length are accepted, however the guidelines are: no longer than 10 double-spaced typed pages for features; four double-spaced typed pages for fiction; and one double-spaced typed page for poetry. Submissions are reviewed by a member of the editorial board. “Significantly edited versions will be returned to the authors for discussion or approval. However, most editing is done for punctuation, grammar and for establishing clarity.”12

Items can be submitted any time prior to the publication months and should be submitted to the editor, Kevin Dudeney, at: associates@hotkey.net.au.13

Editorial tone: Items that are written from or focused on a support staff point of view are preferred.14 A review of previous issues indicated that a folksy and approachable style is prevalent.15

Style guide used: There are no specific style guidelines given, but the editors state that “all submissions must be written in a professional manner, with citations for researched material provided.”16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Since most LIS students have worked or are working in support staff positions, this publication may be a good place to get started writing for the field. While it is not a scholarly journal, it would allow an author to demonstrate their understanding of a staff position other than a librarian.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Per their website updated 2014, they currently have “1,700 world-wide subscribers.”17 Subscription to Associates is free, and all issues are available free online which suggests they may have an audience beyond their subscribers.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication originates in the United States however they claim to have “1,700 world-wide subscribers”, indicating an international audience.19 It is an English language publication.20 Due to international audience, avoid regionalisms and any references, for example currency or location, are clear to the reader.

Reader characteristics: Audience, as support staff in all types of libraries, most likely reflects the general public, all ages and backgrounds, with an interest in connecting with other support staff and improving their job skills. Publication values the work of support staff and aims to promote the value of library support staff.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As library support staff, the readers can be expected to have the background and education to understand topics and terminology used in work accepted by this publication.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting work to this publication would benefit from reading the current and past issues to gain a clear understanding of their audience. It seems a cooperative approach, emphasizing the value of all team members in a library, would be useful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal, University of California Riverside Library, accessed March 22, 2018, http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/
  2. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  3. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  5. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  9. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  10. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  11. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  12. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  13. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  14. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  15. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Archives and Back Issues. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=4
  16. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  17. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  18. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  19. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  20. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  21. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  22. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
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Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals

ISSN: 1361-32001

Purpose, objective, or mission: Ariadne is based in the U.K. and aims to “keep the busy practitioner abreast of current digital library initiatives as well as technological developments further afield.”2Website: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Target audience: Information professionals working primarily in higher education; but also in libraries, archives, or museums (both in the U.K. and internationally).3

PublisherUKOLN, a research organization based at the University of Bath, which “advises on digital infrastructure, information policy and data management…and provide[s] resources and services to the higher and further education sectors including Web journals and other publications, Web services and tools, innovation support, research and development and events management.”4

Peer reviewed? No. The editor makes all decisions regarding manuscript submissions.5

Type: LIS professional news. Although Ariadne does publish some research-oriented content, it is not peer reviewed and it cannot be considered “scholarly.” ISSN is 1361-3200.6

Medium: Entirely online. Ariadne is free and open access, so the full text of all issues (current and archived) is available on the website. Content is also available as an RSS feed.7

Content: Ariadne publishes a “variety of articles in each issue, some technical, some of a more strategic nature.”8 A standard issue contains an editorial, a number of articles, an “at the event” section, and a “news and reviews” section. Prominent topics include emerging technologies and trends, digital libraries and collections, information architecture, search engines, metadata, and Web 2.0.9

Frequency of publication: Not defined. The magazine was published quarterly up through 2010; as of 2013 there are two issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines can be found on the Contact page and the About page. The publication’s website indicates that the editor will send information about the submission and editorial process once an article proposal has been accepted.11

Types of contributions accepted: Ariadne accepts a variety of contributions, including articles (i.e., scholarly papers, position pieces, and case studies), reviews, and reports on events, workshops, meetings, and conferences. The magazine also accepts proposals regarding organizations and work-related projects. There are no stated requirements for length.12

Submission and review process: Ariadne requires an initial proposal for all articles. Authors should submit an abstract, outline, or general description to the editor prior to submission of the completed manuscript. After an agreement is reached, a date for submission is set and the editor then sends out an explanation of the editorial process. No peer-review process is used.13

Proposals can be submitted via the online form or through an email to the editor: ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk.14

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for editorial tone. Main articles tend to have a more formal, scholarly tone, while reviews and other articles appear to be relatively informal (i.e., first person is acceptable).15

Style guide used: Ariadne does not use a formal style guide.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Ariadne has remained on the forefront of the open access movement and continues to focus its content on current and emerging LIS trends and technologies. Thus, although it is not peer reviewed, it is a credible and highly accessible source with great publishing potential for LIS practitioners, educators, and students. Contributors might consider writing about LIS conferences or workshops, workplace technologies, online learning, digital collections, social networking, Web 2.0./Library 2.0, or Web-based information seeking behavior.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Ariadne is an open access electronic publication that is available free to anyone with Internet access. As such, there is no formal subscription process and no readily available circulation data. Generally, though, freely accessible online resources do at least have the potential of a large audience base.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Ariadne‘s editor notes in the Submission guidelines that “despite having a global audience, and a U.S. readership twice that of our home readership, our core audience remains that which is based in the UK.” 17 Thus, although Ariadne maintains an international audience, the majority of readers are located in the U.S. and U.K., and content reflects this.

From the FAQ author profiles, authors are mostly European, with 414 from the U.K./Ireland, and 60 from the U.S. Pakistan, South Africa, and Armenia are also represented, among other countries.18

Ariadne is published solely in English, and based on geographic information, it can be assumed that the vast majority of readers are, in fact, native English speakers. However, authors should be aware of the somewhat substantial language and cultural differences that exist between the U.S. and the U.K. For example, submission guidelines indicate that “UK English” should be used rather than “US English.” Beyond spelling, colloquialisms and U.S. centered cultural references should be avoided, and authors should also consider the needs of a global audience. 19

Reader characteristics: Ariadne does not provide any detailed demographic information relating to the gender, age, or ethnicity of its readers. Because this is an international professional publication geared towards practicing information professionals, it is likely that the audience is relatively mature and experienced, but also demographically diverse. Specific workplace data for readers is not available, but the website clearly states that Ariadne is published to “inform policy-makers and practitioners in Higher Education libraries and associated sectors of developments in the online environment.”20 Although readers are therefore very likely to hold a wide variety of professional specializations, they are also very likely to share professional interests based on Ariadne‘s primary topics, which include digital libraries, technological developments, digital information management, and online learning. As a large portion of Ariadne readers work in libraries and archives, they are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship in an information society. It should be noted that Ariadne also features more opinion-based reader reviews, retrospectives, and reflections.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Ariadne readers are likely to be quite knowledgeable about LIS subject matter and jargon. As practicing information professionals, they would certainly be interested in library topics that are directly applicable to their careers. After reading through current and back issues of the publication, however, it is clear that readers might not necessarily be knowledgeable about LIS topics outside of digital initiatives and technological developments.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Ariadne is a professional publication with a very specific focus on practical articles that discuss sophisticated technological issues and developments in LIS. Overly general library articles, theoretical papers, or pieces that fail to directly address digital information systems or web technologies may not interest Ariadne readers. Submissions should be professional but not necessarily scholarly in tone, and they should focus on relating practical applications for LIS practitioners (see topic suggestions in the Publication Analysis above).

It is important for the author to note that although Ariadne is a British publication with a core following in the UK, the majority of readers actually reside in the U.S., and it is a global magazine. This allows for increased opportunities to effectively reach Ariadne readers.

Last Updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals, UKOLN, accessed March 22, 2018, http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/
  2. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  3. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  4. University of Bath. (2016). About UKOLN. UKLON. Retrieved from http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/
  5. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  6. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  8. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  9. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  10. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
  11. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  12. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  13. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  14. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  15. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
  16. ProQuest. (2016). Ariadne(Online). Urichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410383864655/259370
  17. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  18. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  19. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  20. University of Bath Library. (2016). About Ariadne. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/about
  21. University of Bath Library. (2016). Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/faq?faq-category=content
  22. University of Bath Library. (2016). Overview of Back Issues Archive. Ariadne: A Web Magazine for Information Professionals. Retrieved from http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issues
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