Wiki Tags Archives: Conference papers

Marketing Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Library Services

ISSN: 0896-39081

Website: www.MarketingLibraryServices.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Marketing Library Services (MLS) emerged in 1987 and is the longest-running publication that regularly delivers how-to articles and case studies for marketers in all types of libraries. They’re written by practitioners from around the world and curated by a respected expert who has 25+ years in the field. These detailed, vetted articles deliver more value than the brief ideas and advice offered via social media.2

Target audience: Information professionals in any type of library who need to learn to do better marketing, promotion, and advocacy.3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: MLS covers strategies and tactics for all marketing-related topics: advocacy, outreach, branding, segmentation, social media, funding initiatives, long-term campaigns, assessment, ROI, partnerships, promotional materials, program publicity, communications, PR, advertising, etc. Subscribers will also benefit from interviews with marketing masters, conference coverage, book reviews, and news.8

Frequency of publication: Six times a year (January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December).9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: The editor of Marketing Library Services, Kathy Dempsey, does not accept blind submissions; instead, it is preferable to email her first (see Editor below) with an article idea, so that she can see if it fits in with upcoming issues, or whether or not something similar has already been published. In a personal correspondence she asserts that if the topic is something useful to Marketing Library Services readership, she will send the author a desired length and deadline. Writers will be sent guidelines, and all graphics (photos, charts, etc.) must be in color and high resolution.10

The site itself says very little about submissions. Editorial communications should be directed to the editor, Kathy Dempsey, at kdempsey@infotoday.com.11

Types of contributions accepted: From a correspondence with the editor: “Marketing Library Services covers a wide range of marketing-related topics, including these: advocacy, outreach, programming, fundraising, event planning, dealing with the media, getting votes for library issues, proving your value, making good promotional materials, community promotion, online promotion, winning related awards, studying demographics for target marketing, innovations, surveys and focus groups, strategic communication, etc. And, of course, true marketing (plans for full campaigns).” Also, “in addition to the case studies, Marketing Library Services carries news, reviews of books and videos, conference coverage, and links to library articles and culture.” 12

Submission and review process: Authors first should send correspondence to Kathy Dempsey stating their idea. Because Marketing Library Services is published often, timely articles are strongly recommended. Also, authors must have been directly involved in the projects they are writing about, and must write in the first person. Ms. Dempsey states that authors’ specific titles do not matter.13

Editorial tone: Marketing Library Services should not be written in third-person or academic tones. The newsletter’s tone is conversational, professional, and should inspire readers. According to the editor, “Articles should be written as if you’€™re sitting down with a colleague and explaining your project over lunch.”14

The editor will correspond with the author about this after the author’s idea has been accepted.15

Style guide used: Associated Press.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Marketing Library Services is a very good resource for LIS authors interested in writing on community outreach and marketing of library services. Many topics can fall under this umbrella, so it is important for potential authors to be creative and open in how they frame their content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Marketing Library Services has 700 subscribers. Most of these are in North America, but some are in Europe and in other English-speaking countries.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the content of the newsletter is in English and about a broad topic (marketing), the geographic location of the newsletter’s readership is assumed to reside across the United States. There are some readers from outside the United States, but because marketing can be culturally specific, those readers are likely already doing the work of cultural translation. English is used entirely throughout Marketing Library Services and, for the most part, readers are American or from Europe.18 Because of this spread, colloquialisms should be avoided (as in most professional writing).

Reader characteristics: According to Kathy Dempsey, the editor, most of the readership is comprised of librarians who market for their organization, while others are managers and directors. She also states that some are professors specializing in marketing. Because Marketing Library Services readership is comprised of professionals directly involved in marketing, it may be safely assumed that jargon specific to marketing is fine. As well, because this is a trade journal, readers will be interested in practical information. Kathy Dempsey states from a personal correspondence that, “MLS is written for a wide horizontal market that covers all types of libraries: public, academic, special (medical, gov’€™t, etc.), corporate, and to a lesser extent, K-12 school. It welcomes article queries from all of these librarians. What they all have in common is the need to promote their services. Many case studies about how one lib accomplished a goal can be used as models to doing similar things in other types of libraries. Articles on projects that have this ability to be widely replicated are especially valuable.”19

Readers of Marketing Library Services work in many types of libraries, so it may be safely assumed that they all value libraries’ continuing prosperity. That said, this does not mean that their values are identical. However, the newsletter’s tone is conversational, not argumentative. Articles written arguing strongly for one thing or another probably will not fit in Marketing Library Services.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Marketing Library Services is a newsletter informing LIS professionals the best practices and valuable ideas regarding LIS marketing. Professionals reading this newsletter are looking for good ideas and solidly practical plans and instances of good marketing. Marketing Library Services is not a dry tome of theoretical research written in an hermetic tone. Nonetheless, most of the readers are deeply engaged with marketing their organization, and are working professionals whose time and attention is valuable. Writers should consider their readers as interested colleagues who are deeply interested in successful programs and campaigns, and how they may learn from writers’ experiences and implement similar strategies in their own organizations.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Proquest, “MLS: Marketing Library Services,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521418800307/153039
  2. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Marketing Library Services,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/
  3. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  8. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  9. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  10. Dempsey, K., 27 June 2019, personal communication.
  11. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Subscription & Editorial Info,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/mls-subs.shtml
  12. Dempsey, personal communication.
  13. Dempsey, personal communication.
  14. Dempsey, personal communication.
  15. Dempsey, personal communication.
  16. Dempsey, personal communication.
  17. Dempsey, personal communication.
  18. Dempsey, personal communication.
  19. Dempsey, personal communication.
  20. Dempsey, personal communication.

    Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this newsletter have a high degree of LIS subject matter. Marketing Library Services caters to the LIS profession, so references to library specific trends, ideas, and concepts will be well received and will not require a high degree of explanation. However, because the readership is broadly based across the LIS professional spectrum some terms and knowledge specific to one group may not be appropriate for all readers.[21. Dempsey, personal communication.

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Knowledge Quest

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Knowledge Quest

ISSN: 1094-9046 (Print) and 2163-5234 (Online)1

Website: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Knowledge Quest supports the American Association of School Librarians’ mission to empower leaders “to transform teaching and learning.”2 The journal is devoted to offering substantive information to assist building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school libraries and school library services.3

Target audience: “Building-level school librarians, supervisors, library educators, and other decision makers concerned with the development of school library programs and services.”4

Publisher: American Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: Per their site, “Articles address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.”9 Emerging trends, literacy, co-teaching, leadership, and makerspaces are some encouraged topics.10

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly, September through June.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/ (Scroll down to the link to the PDF Author Guidelines.)

Types of contributions accepted: Knowledge Quest seeks “original, unpublished manuscripts that address the integration of theory and practice in school librarianship and new developments in education, learning theory, and relevant disciplines.” The editors are not interested in “basic primers” on the role of school librarians or press releases and vendor news.12 Articles should be 2500 words or less.13

Submission and review process: Articles may be emailed to the editor14 or through an online submission form.15 “Unsolicited manuscripts undergo blind review by the Knowledge Quest editorial advisory board. The process takes approximately 3-4 weeks. When the review is completed, the author will be notified of the outcome.”16

Editorial tone: Professional. Through well-written articles, the journal provides information in a helpful and supportive manner.17

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.).18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although this publication has numerous readers, over half of its readership is comprised of elementary school, middle school, and high school librarians.19 The fact that its content does not apply to all aspects of library science limits the reader base and therefore, the scope of articles covered. Professionals working in school libraries are encouraged to submit their work for review. Knowledge Quest desires to be part of the library community and provide support for members of this community through its articles and reviews. Publishing in this journal represents the authors’ dedication to the school library community.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication is distributed to 7,000 members and and additional 150 readers. The online component reports over 1,200 visits per day.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This magazine is a publication of the American Association of School Librarians. The material provided in the magazine is designed to support the curriculum in United States public and private schools. The print version of the magazine can be shipped anywhere, but the typical readers reside and work in the United States. Readers can also access the journal via the online component KQ Web and this website can be accessed world wide over the internet.22 This magazine is presented in English and uses terminology relevant to elementary and secondary school librarians. As a publication of the AASL, the magazine has the same vision statement as the organization. This vision statement highlights the magazine’s and the association’s goal to support and embrace cultural and ethnic diversity.23

Reader characteristics: The readers of the magazine are comprised of professionals and supervisors working in library media centers. Readers can be expected to embrace and be familiar with the ethics and values present in school library programs today. By subscribing to the magazine, readers are demonstrating their stance as advocates of literacy and supporters of intellectual freedom. Media specialists are closely related to teachers as they are active members of the learning community. These individuals are well aware of the resources available to them and are always working towards learning new ways to use these resources in better and more productive ways. Most of the readers work in elementary and secondary school libraries both public and nonpublic schools, and will be interested in issues and programs such as library funding, student achievement, student internet use, literacy, intellectual freedom, and technology that effect or involve the readers. Knowledge Quest is interested in producing a quality publication that presents ideas in a friendly and inclusive manner.24

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: With 87% of readers reporting possession of a Master’s degree, it is probable that many have LIS degrees. Readers can be expected to know about school curriculum and are knowledgeable about the technologies and issues relevant to school media centers today.25

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since Knowledge Quest is a publication of the AASL, the readers expect that the publication will have the same guidelines and requirements characterized by an AASL publication. The readers expect the magazine to publish works which are balanced, relevant to the field, accurate, and up-to-date on issues pertinent to school libraries. 78% of readers report that Knowledge Quest is “essential professional reading,” so authors should expect to produce content that meets that description. 26

Last updated: June 21, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Knowledge Quest,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 19, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560951075174/52980
  2. American Library Association, “About AASL,” accessed June 19, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/about
  3. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ,” accessed June 19,  2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/about-kq/
  4. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/KQ_mediakit_201920_WEB.pdf
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ,” accessed June 19, 2019, https://knowledgequest.aasl.org/write/
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  10. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  11. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  12. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  13. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines,” accessed June 20, 2019, http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/Author%20Guidelines%20REVISED.pdf
  14. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  15. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  16. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  17. American Association of School Librarians, “Write for KQ.”
  18. American Library Association, “Knowledge Quest Author Guidelines.”
  19. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  20. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  21. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  22. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  23. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  24. American Association of School Librarians, “About KQ.”
  25. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
  26. American Association of School Librarians, “2019-2020 Media Planner.”
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Community & Junior College Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Community & Junior College Libraries

ISSN: 1545-2522[1 ProQuest, “Community & Junior College Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728955023/484756]

Website: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjcl20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Through research and insightful interviews with professionals in the field, Community & Junior College Libraries provides a coherent voice for community college librarians. It addresses the need to define and enhance the leading edge of LRC planning and practice in the United States and abroad. Readers receive information on pertinent topics such as information literacy, collection development, programming initiatives, proven policies, conference reports, and networks and consortia.”1

Target audience: Librarians and educators who deliver information resources to community college students and other lower-division undergraduates.2

Publisher: Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group).3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS professional news publication. Although submissions are peer-reviewed, the content is news oriented rather than research oriented, so the publication isn’t considered scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, “news of special relevant legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges” and also “Book reviews, editorials, letters to the editor, and ongoing columns with specific focus are also included.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (4 issues per volume).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their Instructions for Authors, “Theoretical research and practical studies dealing with the broad general topic of the delivery of information resources to lower division undergraduate students. This unique publication specifically targets issues concerning community college libraries and learning resource centers. Contributors to this fundamental resource present profiles of learning resource centers (LRCs) around the country and address news of special relevance: €”legislation, systems development, and various concerns faced by professionals in the libraries and information centers of two-year colleges.”9 Topics for submission include information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming or initiatives which involve the library and the academy at large.10

Submission and review process: The journal provides MS Word templates for authors to properly format their submissions. All submissions and reviews are completed and managed through Editorial Manager, which requires authors to create an account.11

Editorial tone: Academic.12

Style guide used: An in-house style guide based on The Chicago Manual of Style. The guide can be found here.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS authors, especially those who work in two-year colleges. Since both theoretical research and practical studies are welcomed on the many topics covered in the journal, LIS authors in any stage of their careers may publish their works on the topics covered in the journal.14

Topics for possible articles include: information literacy, collection development, reference service and resources, bibliographic instruction, LRC administration, and joint programming and initiatives that involve the library and the academy at large.15

The focus on community and junior college libraries creates varied opportunities for LIS authors, as it encourages dialogue regarding the new challenges in the library science field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication focuses primarily on learning resource centers in two-year colleges throughout the United States. The current editor-in-chief is affiliated with the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC.16 The publication is aimed at educated, LIS-focused readers involved in the community colleges of the United States, indicating a familiarity with LIS jargon without any special consideration for language other than the courtesy of avoiding regionalism. Readers are most likely familiar with diverse cultures due to the varied population that often makes up urban community and junior colleges.17

Reader characteristics: No specific information was found on gender and ethnicity for this specialized group of librarians. The workplace similarity is the tie that binds together the professional librarians in libraries and learning resource centers within community junior colleges.18 Safely assume readers have a commitment to accessibility of information and to providing it to the public, given the open admissions policies and low tuition of two-year colleges that help to create a rich diversity of people of all ages, cultural backgrounds, and socioeconomic backgrounds.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The professionals would have working knowledge of most LIS subject matter related to academic and school library settings. Use of jargon and acronyms of associations would be familiar to the reader.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Community & Junior College Libraries has a readership that works with a wide variety of patrons. Each type of patron or student has different reasons for being at the community college. The librarians try to fulfill the information needs of many different kinds of patrons including those with low incomes, those who need adult school, a GED or remedial education. Some students are prepared for college and their transition to four-year institutions. Some students are enrolled in high school but are taking accelerated programs at the college. There are also many certificate programs that prepare students for a specific career. The librarian must meet the information needs of all of these groups. Author’s writing for this publication must take all this in to consideration.21

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjcl20#.VChU1xawS3M
  2. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  3. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors,” Community & Junior College Libraries, accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjcl20&page=instructions#.VChZShawS3M
  10. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  11. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  12. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  13. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  14. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Instructions for Authors.”
  16. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group). 2019. Editorial Board. Community & Junior College Libraries. Retrieved from https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjcl20
  17. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  18. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  19. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  20. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
  21. Routledge (Taylor and Francis Group), “Aims and Scope.”
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Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Pacific Northwest Library Association (PNLA) Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pacific Northwest Library Association (PNLA) Quarterly

ISSN: 0030-8188

Website: http://www.pnla.org/quarterly

Purpose, objective, or mission: Pacific Northwest Library Association promotes increased communication, joint advocacy, open debate, networking and support and information sharing through its many special projects and initiatives including an annual conference, leadership institute, quarterly journal, job board, and a Young Readers Choice Award.1

The PNLA’s journal, published since 1936, focuses on regional content, open access and discoverability.2

Target audience: PNLA members are anyone with an interest in the library and information profession primarily from Alaska, Alberta, British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, and Washington.3

Publisher: Pacific Northwest Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: PNLA Quarterly is “a combination of peer-reviewed and editor-reviewed articles, focused on the region and its librarianship. The Fall issue is a conference issue.6

Articles are 1,000 to 6,000 words.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: PNLA Quarterly welcomes submissions in four out of five sections: articles, peer-reviewed articles, conference program (each Fall) and announcements.9

Submission and review process: Authors should check the Author Guidelines to ensure correct formatting and to read through the submission preparation checklist. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions for ensuring a blind review should be followed. Send your submissions to pqeditors@gmail.com10

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: 6th edition of the Manual of Style of the American Psychological Association (APA).11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The PNLA Quarterly provides a unique regional and multinational perspective to the issues of intellectual freedom, literacy, continuing education, and library leadership. Articles may be theoretical, research-based, or practice-focused. If your topic could be relevant beyond the Pacific Northwest, another journal to consider might include the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Science.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though readers are focused in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. and Canada, the journal is open access for anyone to read.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PNLA Quarterly’s audience is primarily U.S. and Canadian. Readers will mostly be English and French speaking.

Reader characteristics: Readership is varied—according to PNLA’s Membership page, the association is open to “anyone with an interest in the library and information profession.”12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–readers are LIS professionals from all different areas of the profession.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of PNLA Quarterly come from across the LIS spectrum, but are united by a regional focus and a passion for librarianship. If you have a well researched article with a scholarly bend that focuses on this region of North America, PNLA Quarterly readers will be an eager audience.

Last updated: May 2, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” PNLA.org, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.pnla.org
  2. “Journal History,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/history, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/history
  3. “Membership,” PNLA.org, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/.
  4. “Journal Sponsorship,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/journalSponsorship, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/journalSponsorship
  5. “Editorial Policies,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Guidelines for Submission,” PNLA.org, accessed April 27, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/guidelines-for-submission
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Submissions,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines, accessed April 27, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Membership,” PNLA.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/membership
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Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (JLIS.it)

ISSN: 2038-1026

Website: https://www.jlis.it/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information (JLIS.it) is an international academic journal that publishes research and theory in library, archives, and information science.1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, academics, and students from around the world who are interested in research and theory in both LIS and archival science.

Publisher: JLIS.it is published by the Università di Firenze Dipartimento di Storia, Archeologia, Geografia, Arte e Spettacolo and is hosted by the University of Macerata, CSIA.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: JLIS.it publishes research articles, contributions, and reports on various topics of interest to the library, archives, and information science international communities. Regular sections are Essays, Contributions, and Reports & Reviews.4 The journal also publishes conference proceedings, such as EURIG2017,5 and special issues, such as a 2017 issue on classification.6

Frequency of publication: JLIS.it publishes three issues a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JLIS.it publishes innovative research relevant to the library, archives, and information science fields; brief contributions on a variety of related topics; and conference reports and reviews. The 2015 Manifesto states that the journal aims to “emphasize the integration between LIS and Archival science on the level of projects and profession” nationally and internationally and to consider the theoretical and methodological traditions of each discipline.8 The 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal encourages stepping away from the strictly academic and “mixing knowledge, methods, and different scientific and technical languages.” The journal also encourages writing that theorizes beyond the institutional and traditional.9

Submission and review process: JLIS.it uses OJS, an automated web-based system, for manuscript submission, tracking, and review.10 Authors should check that their manuscripts comply with the Submission Preparation Checklist11 and follow the Section Policies.12 Each manuscript is reviewed by an editor and if appropriate is sent to two reviewers for double-blind peer review; authors are usually contacted within nine weeks of submission.13

Editorial tone: The tone is academic, and articles are in Italian or English.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) citations and references.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JLIS.it is a highly regarded international journal that publishes articles in LIS and archival science and in the intersection of the two disciplines; the journal pushes for new and nontraditional approaches to these disciplines in theory, research, and practice. LIS authors that study the international stage of LIS or archives, or who perform research that resonates internationally and pushes traditional boundaries, may find a good fit here. Further, the 2010 Manifesto indicates that the journal is an “ideal place” for contributions from those new to the profession, so student writers may have a chance at publishing in a prestigious journal. The journal is “a sort of lab for studying and researching what is new in LIS; a place for militant librarianship, with strong observations on the changes that the digital culture is bringing to cognitive processes and to professional practices.”15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article displays metrics.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JLIS.it publishes articles in Italian and English. It is written for an international audience, so regional terms or practices should be explained. The editors and editorial board members are mostly from Italian universities and institutions, but the Scientific Committee members are from all over the world.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are professionals, scholars, and students in the fields of LIS and archival science.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a solid knowledge of LIS and archival science; however, readers are from all over the world and from many different types of institutions in LIS and archival science.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should consider that readers are LIS and archival science professionals and scholars from all over the world who are interested in the latest developments in both fields as well as how the disciplines relate to each other and how they are shaping and responding to profound changes brought on by the new digital culture. The audience probably expects high-level research and interesting, novel approaches to theory and practice.

Last updated: April 7, 2017


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Journal Sponsorship,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/about/journalSponsorship.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 9, no. 1 (2018), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/787.
  6.  Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science 8, no. 2 (2017), https://www.jlis.it/issue/view/775.
  7. “Editorial Policies.”
  8. “Manifesto” (2015), Italian Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science no. 1 (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.4403/jlis.it-11080.
  9. “Manifesto” (2010), JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/pages/view/manifesto.
  10. “Submissions,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018 https://www.jlis.it/about/submissions.
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Editorial Policies.”
  13. “Editorial Policies.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. “Manifesto,” 2010.
  16. “Editorial Team,” JLIS.it, accessed April 6, 2018, https://www.jlis.it/index.php/jlis/about/editorialTeam.
Continue Reading

Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
Continue Reading

International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleInternational Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

ISSN: 2474-3542

Websitehttp://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol

Purpose, objective, or mission: The International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL) “is a peer­-reviewed open access journal dedicated to publishing articles on as broad an array of topics as possible from all aspects of librarianship in all types of libraries.”1

Target audience: IJoL‘s primary audience is members of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA) that provides a forum for discussion and development among Chinese American librarians and information professionals.2 However, as an international and open-access journal, IJoL‘s scope and reach is worldwide.

Publisher: IJoL is published by CALA, an affiliate of the ALA.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Articles deemed suitable by the editors are double-blind peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: “IJoL publishes original research papers, practical developments, reviews, and commentaries of value to professional practice in librarianship in general. It encourages communication on librarianship within and among relevant professional and academic communities.”5 Regular columns include Featured Articles, Reports from the Field, LIS Education around the World, Commentaries, Reviews, and News.

Frequency of publication: Twice each year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: IJoL accepts Featured Articles, which are original research or comprehensive, in-depth analyses; Reports from the Field, which “describe the implementation and assessment of innovative practices in libraries of all types” and report on distinguished Chinese librarians; Reviews of books, articles, or conference papers; and Commentaries offering perspectives on current topics.7 The journal publishes on all topics related to libraries and librarianship, including “academic, research, public, school and special libraries” and other information institutions; it is focused on, but not limited to, “major development of Chinese librarianship throughout the world.”8

Submission and review process: IJoL uses the Open Journal Systems9 online portal for submissions and offers guidelines and a submission checklist, which authors should follow to ensure that processing and publishing is not delayed.10 Each section has its own policies, so authors should check that their submissions meet these requirements as well. The editor sends suitable articles to two referees for blind review, and articles may be accepted as is, with revisions, or declined.11

Editorial tone: The tone is overall scholarly but also appropriate to each column and topic.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

IJoL‘s first issue was in 2016, so it is a very new scholarly journal. It is the official journal of CALA, which was established in the 1970s.13 In the first editorial, Editor-in-Chief Guoying Liu introduces the journal as “a forum for librarians and other researchers from Canada, China, the UK, the US and other countries to share their research, best practices and perspectives in international librarianship, international collaboration and academic exchange, library spaces and services, library technology and innovation, and other aspects of information science and studies.”14 This journal is a great fit for scholars, professionals, and students whose work or research focuses on Chinese librarianship, but the journal publishes on all topics of library and information science, including all types of libraries and information institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: IJoL statistics show that there are 131 registered users and 113 registered readers in 2018.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: IJoL readership is most likely Chinese and Chinese American librarians and information professionals. However, this is an English-language international journal that publishes on all LIS topics, and its readership is similarly international. Authors should keep in mind this international readership and explain regionalisms and particular terms and practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and information professionals, scholars, and students interested in Chinese librarianship and information communities, as well as broader topics and current trends affecting LIS professionals throughout the world. The editors of IJoL are from universities and libraries in the United States, China, and Canada.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a strong understanding of LIS subject matter; however, writers should explain regional or particular terms, concepts, and practices for an international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that the readership for this journal is global but there is a particular interest in Chinese librarianship throughout the United States, Canada, and China. Readers of the journal are LIS scholars, professionals, and graduate students who are interested in developments particular to Chinese user populations and research and practices that can be extended to a similarly global population. As a new, open-access journal, LIS authors can peruse what types of articles are being published and editorials that explain the journal’s direction.17

Last updated: April 6, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Membership,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/membership.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Submissions,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/submissions.
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “About This Publishing System,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/aboutThisPublishingSystem.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Editorial Policies.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/about.
  14. Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Message from Editor-in-Chief,” International Journal of Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2016.vol1.1.17.
  15. “Statistics,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/statistics?statisticsYear=2018.
  16. “Editorial Team,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialTeam.
  17.  Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Celebrating One Year Anniversary and Introducing the Third Issue,” International Journal of Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 1-2, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2017.vol2.2.54.
Continue Reading

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

ISSN: 1944-9682

Website: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ULJ “addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.” The journal was formerly titled Urban Academic Librarian.1

Target audience: ULJ’s audience includes librarians, LIS students, and other professionals working in urban libraries, those serving diverse and urban populations, and those interested in these and related fields.

Publisher: ULJ is published by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY)2 and is sponsored by the Office of Library Services at CUNY Central.3 The journal is hosted by CUNY Academic Works.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: ULJ publishes research, theory, and practice articles addressing “all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.”7 The journal has a regular book review section. Furthermore, the journal publishes Selected Proceedings from the 2017 LACUNY Institute, which regularly appear in one issue of each volume.8

Frequency of publication: ULJ “is published online on a rolling basis, and will be collected into issues twice per year.” 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: ULJ “welcomes articles dealing with academic, research, public, school, and special libraries in an urban setting”10 The journal’s scope is broad, as it invites manuscripts on “areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources.” Further, the editors invite recommendations for columns or special issues.11 The website lists the most popular articles, according to full-text download statistics.12

Submission and review process: ULJ accepts submissions via the journal’s website.13 Authors can submit manuscripts at any time. Manuscripts that the editors determine to be in the journal’s scope are sent to at least two reviewers for double-blind peer review, and authors receive reviewers’ comments. The editors strive to make decisions on manuscripts, including peer review, within sixty days of receipt.

Editorial tone: Articles exhibit a formal, academic style.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ULJ is a long-established leading journal, and its peer-review process, emphasis on research, and scholarly tone make it a viable option for LIS professionals and scholars with experience in urban libraries or whose research focuses on theories and practices in urban and diverse settings. It may not be suitable for beginning or student authors, but those with workable ideas should not be discouraged from submitting.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available for ULJ. LACUNY, the journal’s publisher, has about 150 members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LACUNY members are City University of New York faculty and staff, as well as library employees from affiliated institutions.16 ULJ editorial board members are mostly from CUNY campuses. However, the journal’s reach and relevance are broad because it is an open-access journal and its articles are of interest to LIS professionals throughout the United States and in other countries. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Overall, readers have master’s degrees in educational technology, computer science, and library science, and are associated with urban academic libraries. The journal is also relevant to librarians, library staff members, and other LIS professionals in a variety of libraries in urban settings or with diverse populations. Academic librarians and practitioners in other types of libraries, including school, public, and special, contribute to the journal, showing that the interest in urban libraries is emphasized more than the library type.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will possess considerable knowledge about LIS topics and subjects, with many readers knowledgeable about the inner workings of academic libraries. However, specialized jargon should be avoided or explained, in order to appeal to a wide range of librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

ULJ is a scholarly journal that publishes theoretical, practical, and heavily researched articles. Readers are from academic, public, school, and special libraries serving urban and diverse populations. Topics including services to immigrants, services to students, affordability and open educational resources, libraries as community spaces, advocacy, and the urban library setting are all suitable.

Last updated: March 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About This Journal,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/about.html.
  2. “Publications,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Publications.
  3. “About This Journal.”
  4. CUNY Academic Works, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/.
  5. “About This Journal.”
  6. “About This Journal.”
  7. “About This Journal.”
  8. For example, Urban Library Journal 23, no. 2 (2017), https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/vol23/iss2/.
  9. “About This Journal.”
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html.
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Most Popular Papers,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/topdownloads.html.
  13. “Submit Article,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=https%3A%2F%2Facademicworks.cuny.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dulj&context=ulj.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Paid Members,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Paid-Members.
  16. “Join Us,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Membership.
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Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

ISSN: 0038-3686

Website: http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn) “is the official publication of the Southeastern Library Association (SELA).” The journal publishes “articles, announcements, and news of professional interest to the library community in the southeast”1

Target audience: The library community of the southeastern United States as well as members of SELA.2

Publisher: Southeastern Library Association.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: For each volume, SELn publishes four issues that report SELA business, juried articles, book reviews, and state library/personnel news. The journal “represents a significant means for addressing the Association’s research objective.”5 Regular sections include Articles, Book Reviews, and News Articles.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions.

Types of contributions accepted: Manuscripts submitted to SELn “need not be of a scholarly nature but should address professional concerns of the library community. SELn particularly seeks articles that have a broad southeastern scope and/or address topics identified as timely or important by SELA sections, round tables, or committees.” SELn also accepts articles with a broad range of information sources, not limited to the purely scholarly: “News releases, newsletters, clippings, and journals from libraries, state associations, and groups throughout the region.”6 SELn also accepts book reviews for consideration.7

Submission and review process:

For articles, the “manuscript will be acknowledged by the editor. Incoming manuscripts are added to a manuscript bank from which articles are selected for each issue.” The editor assigns manuscripts to at least two reviewers for blind review. Following the review, the author will be notified of the publication decision; articles are usually published within twelve months.8

For book reviews, “submissions will be judged on writing style, content and perceived interest to the readership of the journal.” Those reviews solicited by the editor receive preferential consideration.9

Editorial tone: SELn publishes both juried articles and news and association items. Scholarly articles have an academic tone but a readable style, whereas news articles are more informal. Articles that are not scholarly should “address professional concerns of the library community.”10 A review of the most recent articles reveals well-researched, referenced, and academic writing.11

Style guide used: Latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a good opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and students based in the southeastern United States to publish original research and scholarship. Potential authors should consider joining SELA in order to identify topics of interest to members through the association’s sections, roundtables, and committees.13 LIS authors can also submit book reviews. Further, SELn has issued a call for volunteer reviewers; a reviewer must be a member of SELA and have two years professional experience and two published peer-reviewed articles (or equivalent).14

 

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SELA members are able to access current issues online.15 Back issues one year past are available to all through DigitalCommons.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are based in the southeastern United States. “State library associations of the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia are eligible to be constituent members of the Association.”17 As this publication focuses on a particular group of states, there will generally be a shared cultural understanding of relevant topics. However, as the SELn covers a fair number of states, specific regional terms should be explained.

Reader characteristics: SELA membership “may include any person, library or other organization . . . interested in the promotion and fostering of library and information services in the southeastern United States.”18 The audience will share a concern for the betterment of libraries in this region.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As members of SELA, readers will have knowledge of LIS subject matter and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal will have a variety of interests in LIS issues, especially those whose relevance is demonstrated in the context of the southeastern United States. SELn readers are LIS professionals and students throughout the region, so there is an interest in a wide variety of research and scholarship that will benefit and advance practices in all LIS environments .

Last updated: March 14, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Homepage, The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html.
  2. Homepage.
  3. Homepage.
  4. “Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/guidelines.html.
  5. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  6. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  7. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers,”The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/bookreviewers.html.
  8. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  9. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers.”
  10. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  11. SELn Archives, digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu, accessed March 14, 2018, https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seln/.
  12. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  13. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  14. “Call for Reviewers,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/reviewers.html.
  15. “Homepage.”
  16.  SELn Archives.
  17. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” 2014 edition, p. 9, accessed March 14, 2018, http://selaonline.org/sela//contacts/SELA_Handbook.pdf.
  18. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” p. 7.
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