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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.1 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”2 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”3

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.4

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.8

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope9

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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Rowman & Littlefield

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Rowman & Littlefield

Website: http://rowman.com/RLPublishers

Purpose, objective, or mission: Rowman & Littlefield “publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.”1 Its range of subject areas include library and information services, linguistics, communication, education, psychology, sociology, among others.2

Target audience: Rowman & Littlefield offers “serious works of scholarship; core textbooks for introductory courses; supplemental, affordable paperbacks for alternative approaches to teaching; and general interest and trade books for the curious reader.”3 LIS books are targeted toward practitioners, undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars.

Owner: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing group4 which also owns one of the largest book distributors in the United States, National Book Network (NBN).5 The publishing group encompasses several imprints, including Lexington Books (specialized and scholarly research), and trade imprints such as Rowman & Littlefield Trade, Globe Pequot, Falcon Guides, TwoDot, Taylor Trade, and Down East Books.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Authors are asked to provide a list of four to seven potential peer reviewers when submitting a book proposal.6

Types of books published: LIS-specific books run the gamut from primers and practical guides to both introductory and advanced textbooks.7

Medium: Titles are published simultaneously in print and e-book editions.8 Many books are supplemented with multimedia content.9

Topics covered: A range of disciplines across humanities and social sciences, government data, and education.10 LIS-specific topics cover management, archival studies, cataloging and classification, collection development, information technology, literacy instruction, and school librarianship. LIS series include The Practical Guides for Librarians, Library Technology Essentials, and Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections.11

Number of titles published per year: Approximately 1,500 academic, reference, professional, and trade books annually (all subjects).12 The number of LIS titles published per year is unknown.

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes13

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for publication should be submitted to the appropriate acquisitions editor,14 and include a prospectus, outline (annotated table of contents), author’s CV or resume, one to two brief writing samples, and a list of potential peer reviewers.15 Full book manuscripts are not accepted unless requested by the acquisitions editor. See the publisher’s website for detailed submission guidelines.

Submission and review process: The publisher will acknowledge receipt of a proposal within two weeks, and aims to render a decision on acceptance within three months.16

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors include leading academics and respected practitioners. Formal book proposals require a detailed description, author qualifications, previously published works, writing samples, competitive analysis, and potential markets for a book.17 The publisher is well established in its subject areas, and maintains a presence at academic conferences and conventions.18 Rowman & Littlefield is a highly reputable publisher for LIS authors with a proposal for an academic or professional development topic.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)A 2015 catalog listed approximately 150 LIS books geared toward students, professionals, and academics.19 Print runs for titles are not publicly available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Rowman & Littlefield is based in the United States, and titles are published in English. Authors are experts and scholars based mostly in the U.S., UK, and Canada, and this may be reflected in the content of material.20 However, as Rowman & Littlefield is an international publisher, books are available to a worldwide audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers have varying backgrounds within LIS, from management to technology, to instruction and research. Rowman & Littlefield texts are typically used in graduate and professional development courses, though many titles may be of interest to non-LIS readers.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics, and professionals with a strong knowledge of or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With diverse backgrounds, skills, professional duties, and interests, readers are likely seeking specialized LIS knowledge or best practices. Material is theoretical and practical, and provides professional learning for the LIS community.

Last updated: September 3, 2015


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  2. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Subjects. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/SubjectsMain
  3. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  4. Publishers Global. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from http://www.publishersglobal.com/directory/publisher-profile/6304/
  5. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  6. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  7. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  8. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  9. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  10. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  11. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  12. Net Galley. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/publisher/pub_id/29645
  13. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  14. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Editors. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/RLPGAE
  15. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  16. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  17. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  18. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Conventions schedule. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/ConventionsSchedule
  19. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  20. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  21. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  22. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.1 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”2

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.3

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.6

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.9

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.10

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.11

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members12; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  3. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  4.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  5. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  13.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”1

Target audience: Academic library staff2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.5 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”10 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.11

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .12

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”13

Editorial tone: Academic14, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.15

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”17 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,19 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”20

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”21 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”22 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”24

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”25

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  7.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  9. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  11. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  13. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  14. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  18. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  19. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  21. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  22. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  24. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  25. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
Continue Reading

Collection Building

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Building

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/cb

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection Building provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”1

Target audience: LIS academics and professionals2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system.10 To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.11 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”12

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”13

Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Building is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal.15 As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development. The Book Review section of each issue offers an alternative to the research article for publication.

Collection Building is indexed in Academic Search Alumni Edition, Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Premier, Current Abstracts, Current Awareness Abstracts, Education Full Text, Emerald Management Reviews, Information Management & Technology Abstracts, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, INSPEC, Library & Information Science Abstracts, Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts, Library Literature and Information Science, Library Literature and Information Science Full Text, OmniFile Full Text Mega, OmniFile Full Text Select, The Informed Librarian, Scopus, zetoc.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.17 This is a primarily North American publication, with the majority of the Editorial Team based in the United States.18

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development and management. Many of the readers are collection managers with purchasing responsibilities.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are library and information science academics, students, and professionals who study or work in access services, interlibrary loan, special collections, and collection services. They all have a knowledge of LIS subjects and jargon. This audience is looking for specialized information about collection development, and will expect technical language.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  2. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  3. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  4. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  5. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  6. “Features of an Emerald Subscription” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/subs/index.htm
  7. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  8. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  9. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  11.  “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017 http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  13. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  15. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  16. “Collection Building/Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  17.  Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  18. “Editorial Team,” http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=cb
  19. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  20. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
Continue Reading

Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
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Strategic Library

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Strategic Library

Website: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Strategic Library assists administrators and managers in all types of libraries as they deal with day-to-day and strategic challenges”1 by focusing on “innovation, best practices, and emerging trends in the complex and rapidly evolving library landscape.”2

Target audience: LIS managers and administrators.3

Publisher: LibraryWorks, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: As per their website, Strategic Library offers “in-depth articles, written by highly regarded professionals in the field, (that) focus on leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, (and) funding.8

An “Editorial Forecast” is accessible through their website that includes topics to “spark ideas”9 for possible submission. Broad topic areas include: Collections/Circulation, Community Leadership, Emerging Technologies, Fundraising/Budgeting, Legal Issues, and Strategic Planning.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly, from January to October.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/Write-for-Strategic-Library

Types of contributions accepted: Strategic Library encourages and welcomes submissions from librarians in management positions who have stories to tell and expertise to share.12

Editors offer these basic guidelines:

  • Draw story ideas from personal experience and expertise. Use the Editorial Forecast as a guide.
  • Organize thoughts by preparing an outline.
  • Write around 2500 words.
  • Focus on strategic planning through trends and solutions.
  • Include charts, graphs, photos, and links.
  • Put footnotes, references, and a brief bio at the end.13

A sample outline is also available to guide the author.14

Submission and review process: Articles should be sent in a Word file to the publisher, madavidson@charter.net15

According to the writer’s guidleines: “Once received, the article will be edited and formatted for Strategic Library style and clarity. It will be returned to the author for review and for answers to any questions posed in the text during editing. Once in a final version, the article will be assigned to an issue.”16

Editorial tone: Informal, yet professional. Editors are looking for professional stories that “cover concepts, strategies, and technologies”17 that are important to the writers and their colleagues.18

Style guide used: While no specific style guide is mentioned, editors prefer submissions to be in Microsoft Word document format. “Footnotes, references, and further readings should be formatted as endnotes in any standard style.”19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers a forum for a variety of writers with an interest and experience in current best practices in the library landscape. A recent issue (Issue 17, May 15, 2015) features articles written by public librarians, academic librarians, a private consultant, and representatives of a technology integration company.20

Examples of possible topics for the potential author are:

  • Has your library completed a five-year strategic plan in a new format?
  • Does that plan include renovations, new construction, or consolidations?
  • Have you embarked on an outreach program to the communities you serve?
  • How are you positioning next year’s library fundraising campaign based on what you learned last time?21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the website, subscribers number approximately 8,000, “although that number is an estimate since many of (their) subscriptions are institutional.”22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a North American publication written in English.23 Because the majority of the readership spans North America, regional colloquialisms should be avoided.

Reader characteristics: Readers are “executive decision makers at all types of libraries: academic, public, and specialty.”24 As such, readers are “experienced managers who are looking for the latest strategies and best practices on a range of topics to help them plan for the future.”25

Strategic Library strives to offer a forum for the sharing of information and experience among the decision makers in LIS settings.26 Authoritative, instructive and innovative ideas and practice will appeal to this particular audience.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These are experienced LIS professionals who will understand LIS jargon and expect authoritative writing on the subject of library management.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This audience is looking for ways to improve service in innovative, cost-effective ways. Authors who would like to share successes can effectively communicate by using a first-person narrative of their own experiences. Case studies or others’ experiences with best practices are another option for the potential author to explore. Above all, the author must remember that these are motivated, experienced LIS professionals eager for current knowledge in the field of library management.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  2. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  3. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  4. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). About Us. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775992
  5. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  6. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  7. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  8. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  9. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  10. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Editorial Forecast. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Editorial-Forecast.pdf
  11. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  12. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  13. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  14. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Outline. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Outline.pdf
  15. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  16. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  17. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  18. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  19. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  20. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Issue 17. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://user-94545020520.cld.bz/SL-May15-1#9/z
  21. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  22. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  23. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Contact. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775945
  24. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  25. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  26. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  27. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
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Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (JERML)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (JERML)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/werm20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the publication website: “The Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries is a peer-reviewed professional journal devoted to the access, evaluation, and management of electronic resources in the medical library environment.”1

Target audience: Users of libraries in medical schools, hospitals, and other health sciences libraries2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor & Francis3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and medical sciences, scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: “The material in the Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries will complement articles published in Medical Reference Services Quarterly, which highlights the reference and bibliographic instruction aspects of electronic resources.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks articles with “practical, up-to-date information about important developments and issues related to the provision, selection, and use of electronic resources in health sciences libraries.”9

“Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Collection development and selection of electronic resources
  • Electronic document delivery in medicine and health care
  • Enhancing electronic resource user services
  • Print versus electronic or combination formats
  • Site licensing-what librarians need to know
  • Delegating work that involves electronic/digital acquisitions
  • Cataloging-e-books, e-journals, and other electronic formats
  • The merger of serial and book formats in the electronic library
  • Coping with electronic misinformation, fraudulence, and shams on the Internet
  • “E-core” lists in medicine, allied health, nursing, pharmaceutical science, mental health, and other health care fields
  • The role of medical libraries with Electronic Health Records
  • Cost analyses of digital resources”10

Submission and review process: Submissions are uploaded using the ScholarOne Manuscripts site located at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jerml.”11 Any other requests should be directed to Justin Robertson, editor-in-chief, at justincrobertson@gmail.com.12 Detailed submission instructions are included at the submission guidelines link provided above.

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As this is a journal “aimed at the practicing librarian,”15 and is described as a “source for practical, up-to-date information,”16 any librarian with knowledge of current issues and developments in electronic resources in the broader LIS field would be a welcome contributor to JERML.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JERML is published in English in the United States.17

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely well-educated and work in “academic medical school libraries, hospital libraries, and other health sciences libraries.”18 Readers expect well-researched, academic articles19 that provide practical knowledge that will inform the service they provide.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be well-versed in LIS subject matter, specializing in the medical LIS field, with a special interest in electronic resources.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As the readership for this journal is specialized, potential contributors should tailor their articles to an academic, knowledgeable audience. Readers will be looking for rigorously researched papers that provide new information on access, evaluation and management of electronic sources.21 This is a go-to journal for medical librarians to obtain up-to-date information about electronic resource management for their libraries. The potential LIS authors to reach a extensive and engaged audience it great.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  2.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  3. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  4.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  5.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  6.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  7.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  8.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  10.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  17.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  18. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20#.VRahFeEYFZI
  19.  ProQuest. (2015). Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  20.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  21.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
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Against the Grain

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

This website provides more than 3,500 pages with continuously updated content, including full-text access to articles from the print Against the Grain publication (access is limited to subscribers), along with a additional free, available, web-only content like breaking industry news, blog posts, job openings, conference announcements, and an online version of the popular “If Rumors Were Horses” column by editor Katina Strauch.1

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. It is a unique collection of reports on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals.”2

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.3

Publisher: Against the Grain.4

Peer reviewed? All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.5

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.6

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.7 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.8

Content: Articles. The ATG website also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.9

Frequency of publication: Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews and people profiles, Reviews, Legal Issues, International Dateline, Publishing, Bookselling and Vending, and Technology and Standards.11 Some issues have specific focuses, such as the December 2013/January 2014 issue, “eBook Platforms for Academic Librarians.”12 Articles should be approximately 2000 words, although the editors allow authors to make a piece as long or short as needed by their subject. They like a minimum of 200 dpi for charts and graphs and 300 dpi for photos.13

Submission and review process: Contact Leah Hinds at leah@katina.info or Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.14

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,15 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.16

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.18 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.19 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (ATG’s current editors are affiliated with College of Charleston or the Charleston Conference).21 Written in American English.22

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.23 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”24 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics0 and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

Last updated: April 20 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  2. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  3. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  4. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  5. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  6. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  7. Against the Grain. (2014). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  8. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  9. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  10. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  11. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  12. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  13. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  14. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  15. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  16. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  17. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  18. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  19. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  20. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  21. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  22. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  23. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  24. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  25. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  26. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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Huron Street Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Huron Street Press

Website: http://www.ipgbook.com/huron-street-press-publisher-HUS.php

Purpose, objective, or mission: A new (as of 2012) imprint of the ALA, Huron Street Press: “will publish a variety of titles designed to appeal to a broad consumer and library market. Its publications will harness the expertise of the Association, while encouraging library use among the public, joining other initiatives such as @ your library and ILoveLibraries.”1

Target audience: With Huron Street, ALA seeks to appeal to a more broad audience of information seekers and those in need of professional development. This is not just for LIS professionals.2

Owner: American Library Association; ALA Editions.3

Are published books peer reviewed? Not certain, but most likely, if Huron Street follows ALA Edition’s guidelines.4

Types of books published: LIS reference and professional development.5

Medium: Print and online.6 Huron Street press titles are available through Independent Publishers Group as well as traditional retail outlets.7

Topics covered:  The imprint is new, and aims to reach a wider audience.8 In 2012 the titles released include:

Number of titles published per year: 5 in 2012, the first year of the imprint.10

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: See ALA Editions.11

Types of submissions accepted: The imprint strives to encourage library use among the public, and seems to aim to educate the layperson rather than just provide information to LIS professionals.12  Titles are geared towards high school students and provide information on alternatives to college; books for pre-schoolers, which can be used by educators or parents; advice on building your own app; and searching for family genealogical roots.13

Submission and review process: See ALA Editions.14

Editorial tone: Educational and easygoing. Books are geared towards high school age students, entrepreneurs, professionals and educators, so the tone will vary based on the subject matter and audience.15

Style guide used: See ALA Editions.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Huron Street Press is backed by the ALA17; which has a huge built-in LIS audience. However, this imprint is marketed towards all sorts of people seeking information on a wide variety of subjects18, which gives authors an even bigger reading base to reach. If your topic is not specific to LIS professionals – if you have a proposal that is appropriate to those not studying or working in the LIS fields, people who are just regular information-seekers, this is a great publisher to work with, most likely discriminating in what it publishes, based on the small number of titles so far.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Small, with 12 titles published since 2012.19 But again, part of ALA Editions, which is a large ALA publishing house.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based out of Chicago, IL.20 American English, and seemingly geared primarily towards an US based audience.

Reader characteristics: ALA Editions holds itself to high standards21 and expects the same of authors.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varying; this is an imprint of the ALA and will be marketed to that group, however, this imprint seeks to reach an audience outside of just librarians and information professionals22, so do not assume they will understand LIS terms and history.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers seeking ALA, and by extension, Huron Street Press books might be associated with the LIS world, but not necessarily. Huron Street is still too new to know specifics about its readership (as compared to ALA Editions, for example).

Last updated: November 27, 2014


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  2. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  3. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  4. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  5. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  6. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  7. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  8. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  9. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  10. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  11. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  12. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  13. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  14. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  15. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  16. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  17. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  18. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
  19. Chicago Review Press. (2014). Huron Street Press. IPG. Retrieved from http://www.ipgbook.com/huron-street-press-publisher-HUS.php
  20. Chicago Review Press. (2014). Huron Street Press. IPG. Retrieved from http://www.ipgbook.com/huron-street-press-publisher-HUS.php
  21. American Library Association. (2012). Writing for ALA Editions. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alaeditions.org/writers#AfterReceived
  22. American Library Association. (2012). ALA News. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/01/huron-street-press-furthers-ala%E2%80%99s-mission-public
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