Wiki Tags Archives: Collaboration

Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
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Letters to a Young Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Letters to a Young Librarian

ISSN: 2330-11711

Website: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This blog offers “advice to those who are new (or even not so new) to librarianship from someone who has been doing this work for a while now.”2 The objective is to “break down the barriers between library schools & students and professional librarians.”3

Target audience: Library science graduate students and new professional librarians.4

Publisher: Jessica Olin.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Articles (ideas! advice! pep talks!) on all areas of librarianship. Examples from the last two months (March and April, 2015) include: a discussion of management vs. leadership, a reminder about patron privacy, and a description of and tips for whiteboard polling.9 Interspersed with the professional advice are “just for fun” posts.10 Guest posts are also included and welcomed.11

Frequency of publication: Very frequent, averaging 7-9 posts per month.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html

Types of contributions accepted: Olin poses this question to potential contributors: “Is there something you wish you’d known when you were a graduate student and/or a brand new to libraries?”13 “In some posts, you see the author’s philosophy of an aspect of librarianship. In others, the piece is about developing job skills. So long as it answers that basic question, pretty much everything is germane to this blog.”14

Writing on exactly the same topics that have already been covered, or approaching topics in the same way, will not be published.15

Submission and review process: Casual tone is required (no footnotes allowed). Posts should be between 500-750 words. Submissions will be edited by Jessica Olin. Send topic ideas to librarianjessica@gmail.com16

Editorial tone: Tone is casual and welcoming.17 “This isn’t an academic, refereed publication. It’s a conversation. That means personal pronouns are encouraged and footnotes/endnotes/etc. are not allowed.”18

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If this is your first foray into writing for your peers, this blog is an excellent place to start. As this is a blog specifically written for new librarians and library school students, you will be writing for peers and like-minded individuals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016, this blog has 254 followers.19 In addition, Olin has 2,222 followers on Twitter.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This blog is written in American English for a mostly North American audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers seem to be mostly students or recent graduates with many and varied interests in the LIS world. As per the guest post guidelines, “this is a conversation.”22 Readers will expect informative and thoughtful posts written in an informal manner. As “posts need to be geared toward a general audience”23, readers represent all areas of librarianship.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS issues could range from the first year LIS graduate student, to a professional librarian starting a career in the field. Don’t assume that the reader will understand LIS-speak; keep jargon to a minimum.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Letters to a Young Librarian want to learn about the profession in a way that is not taught at their graduate schools. They want first-hand accounts of first-time librarians. They are interested in everything from your philosophy of librarianship, to tips on networking. The possible topics are as varied as the profession.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Letters to a Young Librarian, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 21, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521668447302/777397
  2.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  3. Olin, J. (2016). Why I Decided to Start a Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2011/06/why-i-decided-to-start-blog.html
  4.  Olin, J. (2016). About This Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-this-blog.html
  5.  Olin, J. (2016). About Me. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-me-with-contact-information.html
  6.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  7.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  8.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  9. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  10.  Olin, J. (2016). Just for Fun: Big Hero 6. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2015/04/just-for-fun-big-hero-6.html
  11. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  12. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  13.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  14. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  15. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  16. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  17. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  18. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  19.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  20. Twitter. (2016). Jessica Olin. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/olinj
  21. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  22. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  23. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  24. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

ISSN: 1712-44411

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”2

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”3

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”4

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Online8

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”11

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”12 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.13

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”14

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”15

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”16

Editorial tone: Academic17

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,19, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”20

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26921

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.22

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”23 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”24, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.25 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523478909052/597635
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  9. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  18. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  19. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  21. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  22. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  25. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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Collaborative Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collaborative Librarianship

ISSN: 1943-75281

Website: http://www.collaborativelibrarianship.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The publication website identifies three mission points: To “promote sharing of ideas, best practices, opportunities, challenges and successes involving collaborative librarianship; sustain an open-access journal where professional librarians can publish articles (peer- and non-peer-reviewed) on a range of subjects relevant to librarianship, but that involve collaboration at their core; to promote sharing of ideas, opportunities, challenges and successes involving new kinds of partnerships, joint projects, and innovative approaches to collaboration that benefit all members within in the information supply chain.2

Target audience: LIS professionals, LIS instructors, and LIS students3

Publisher: Independently published, and sponsored by the Colorado Library Consortium, the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Regis University, and the University of Denver4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The publication’€™s website indicates that it provides articles relating to a wide range of issues including library-to-library cooperation; sharing resources and expertise; library-to-business partnerships; local, regional, national, and international collaboration; professional, consortium and association partnerships; the history of library collaboration; open access and online availability; better and best practices.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts for submission field reports that focus on innovative collaborations and address best practices. Field reports are usually 2,500 to 4,000 words in length. The journal also accepts scholarly articles on library collaborations at the local, national, or international level that approach their topics historically, quantitatively, qualitatively, analytically, theoretically, philosophically, or practically. Published scholarly articles are usually of at least 5,000 words.10

Submission and review process: Individuals submitting articles for review must first register with the journal.11 The submission may not be under consideration for publication by another publisher nor have been previously published. Submissions should include an abstract of approximately 200 words, a title, list of authors and affiliations, an introduction, the body of the paper, conclusions, and references. Submissions should adhere to the style guidelines provided on the website and uploaded as Microsoft Word files. 12

Editorial tone: Depending on the section, articles may be scholarly or more professionally informal.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors will find Collaborative Librarianship an appealing avenue for publication. Because collaboration is increasing across the LIS community,  professional interest in innovative ideas on this topic is high. Since the publication is a venue for both practical and scholarly articles, authors may expect to reach both professional and academic audiences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication does not provide details on circulation.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is sponsored by library consortiums and universities in Colorado, and part of its mission is to meet goals identified at the June 2008 general meeting of the Colorado Academic Library Consortium, including the promotion of the knowledge infrastructure of Colorado; the maintenance and development of the Colorado library system; and the transmission of lessons learned in the Colorado library community to the rest of the United States.15 The publication is written in English.16

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide information about individual characteristics about the readers. Persons of interest can subscribe via email to receive notification of new issues. The publication is geared toward librarians located in both the education and professional fields. The journal appears to be content neutral, appealing to readers interested in the collaborative aspect of the LIS field.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers work in the LIS field, authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because collaboration exists over practically, if not entirely, all fields in the LIS profession, potential authors can view Collaborative Librarianship as a great source for potential publication. While some readers may not be directly involved in an author’s particular LIS field, collaborative ideas can be shared and valued.

Last updated: March 20, 2017


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523415071648/668432
  2. “About this Journal/Mission Points,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  3. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  4.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  5. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  6. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  7. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  8. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  9. “About this Journal/Publication Frequency,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  10. “About this Journal/From-the-Field Reports and Scholarly Articles” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  11. “About this Journal/Submit Article” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=http%3A%2F%2Fdigitalcommons.du.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dcollaborativelibrarianship&context=collaborativelibrarianship
  12.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  13.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  14.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  15. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  16. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  17. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  18. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
Continue Reading

GOOD

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

ISSN: 1935-1488 (Print)1

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “GOOD is a global media brand and social impact company. Our collective mission is to help people and organizations be forces for good. Through award-winning media and creative partnerships, we connect deeply and authentically with this generation’s desire for purpose.”2 The magazine and website cover stories on business, environment, politics, culture, technology, education, etc.

Target audience: Millennials who want to make a difference in the world.3

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and print magazine.6

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.good.is/about/faq

Types of contributions accepted: According to the site’s FAQ, “We work with artists, designers, photographers and writers on a freelance basis.”8

Submission and review process: Send your story pitch to submissions@goodinc.com to be considered for publication in the magazine or on the website. Due to the high volume of submissions, editors will only respond to pitches they are considering for publication. Allow two weeks for review.9

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD‘s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and a recent piece on the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 50,000 for the print magazine, 10 million monthly unique visits to the website.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English.11

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy,13 they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: October 17, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1.  Good, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521897393214/626468
  2. “About,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/about
  3. “Audience,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/community/audience
  4. About.”
  5. About.”
  6. About.”
  7. About.”
  8. “General Inquiries,” Good.is, accessed September 27, https://www.good.is/about/faq#general-questions
  9. “GOOD Magazine (print),” Good.is, accessed September 27, 2016, https://www.good.is/about/faq#print-questions
  10. “GOOD Media Kit 2016,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  11. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  12. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  13. GOOD Worldwide, Inc. (2014). About Us. GOOD. Retrieved from http://www.goodinc.com/community/audience
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ALCTS News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALCTS News

ISSN: “ALCTS News is an official publication of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association. It replaced the ALCTS Newsletter Online (ISSN 1523-018X) in September 2013; that publication replaced the ALCTS Newsletter (ISSN 1047-949X) in December 1998.”1

 Website: http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ALCTS Newsletter Online is the official newsletter of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. The Newsletter is, from the ACLTS’ Publications & Resources: the “voice that reports ALCTS news and activities with summaries as well as brief articles focusing on problem solving and other topics of interest arising from members’ day-to-day activities on the job.”2

The ALCTS, according to their bylaws, “…will provide its members, other ALA divisions and members, and the library information and community” with “leadership and a program for action on the access to, and identification, acquisition, description, organization, preservation, dissemination of information resources in a dynamic, collaborative environment.”3

Target audience: ALA members and members of ALCTS.4

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

TypeALCTS Newsletter is a LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Online, with an archive of past issues.8

Content: Information and news on topics for those involved in library collections and technical services as well as events, updates, practices and developments in the field. Newsletters typically include letters from the editor, ALCTS news, ALA news, and calls for papers from related journals. There are frequent announcements for web courses and workshops at various sites and online.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about

Types of contributions accepted: Per the submission guidelines, “The primary focus…is to report the news and activities of ALCTS and its members.11 The secondary focus is “reporting activities of interest to the membership relating to practice and developments in the fields of library collections and technical services.”12

Submission and review process: From the Author Guidelines: submit manuscripts in Word format, single spaced (double spaced between paragraphs), with no highlighting, special fonts, or text effect other than bold or italic. Do not use page numbers, headers, or footers. Submissions may be sent as email attachments to alctsnews@ala.org. Most articles and reports are about 300-500 words; longer articles will be considered on an individual basis.13

Editorial tone: Tone appropriate for a professional publication.14

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.)15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, there is a reasonable assumption that non-members are permitted to submit written materials for publication on the newsletter. There certainly is potential for LIS writers to expand the knowledge in the areas of library collections and technical services.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ALCTS, as of 2013, has a membership of 3826, according to ALA Membership Statistics.16 However, the newsletter is open to anyone with access to the internet.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALCTS is a division of ALA, with a majority of its members located in the United States and smaller numbers in as many as 42 countries.18 ALCTS Newsletter is published in English19 and is written primarily for American librarians. It is an informal newsletter written for a more general audience of librarians with less jargon or scholarly terminology.20

Reader characteristics: No specific information could be located; however, since a majority of Library Resources & Technical Services readers are members of ALCTS, their characteristics would be similar: the majority work in academic and public libraries.21 Most members of ALCTS are particularly interested in collections, acquisitions, cataloging, classification, and preservation.22 Readers of this newsletter will have established opinions on library issues but are generally more interested in seeking scheduling information on workshops, seminars, etc. There is not much opportunity in this newsletter for sharing opinions or biases; short essays relevant to ALCTS might provide an opportunity for sharing values and attitudes on technical services functions.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is a highly informed and educated audience of technical services and collections librarians. They will have a full knowledge of library issues relating to cataloging, collections, preservation, and all the encompassing technical jargon.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of ALCTS Newsletter are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to ALCTS committee work, and other topics related to ALCTS, and have the skills necessary for writing book reviews on highly technical topics.

Last updated: April 20, 2016


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “About ALCTS News,” American Library Association, accessed March 18, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  2. American Library Association. (2014). Publications & resources. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources
  3. American Library Association. (2014). Bylaws. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about/governance/bylaws#3
  4. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  5. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  6. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  7. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  9. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  10. American Library Association. (2014). ALCTS Newsletter Online: Index of Issues. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/ano/
  11. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  12. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  13. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  14. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  15. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  16. American Library Association. (2014). ALA’s Membership Statistics by Division, 2000-Present. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/divisionstats#alcts
  17. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  18. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
  19. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  20. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  21. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  22. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
  23. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  24. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
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Stanford Social Innovation Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Stanford Social Innovation Review (SSIR)

ISSN: 1542-7099 (Print)1

Website: http://www.ssireview.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “To advance, educate, and inspire the field of social innovation by seeking out, cultivating, and disseminating the best in research- and practice-based knowledge.”2 The goal is to bring together academic theory and practice to create ideas for achieving social change, and to inform and inspire new social change.

Target audience: Leaders in nonprofit organizations, foundations, or other philanthropic institutions, along with people working in business, government, academia, and other fields.3

Publisher: Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society at Stanford University.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The website is extensive, and includes links to past issues as well as original content:blogs, webinars, podcasts, SSIR events. The Review covers people and organizations whose work has an impact on business, nonprofit, and government sectors, particularly those with cross-sector ideas and solutions to global issues. Subjects include social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management, and philanthropic strategies, as well as educational reform, poverty alleviation, and environmental protection.7

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: External authors (anyone outside SSIR’s editorial team) can submit articles under Features, which run 4000-4500 words; 3500-4500 word Case Studies; 1500-word Viewpoint articles; 800-word Books (formerly called Reviews); or blog posts for the website, running between 600-800 words.9 The guidelines list specific details for each submissions category that writers should take into consideration.

Submission and review process: Submissions are sent via a brief email pitch, Word format, to SSIR editors covering the specific section you’re submitting under. Submission guidelines list the current editor of each section and how to contact them, and detail the questions to cover in the pitch.10

You’ll get acknowledgement of your proposal within 1-2 weeks. The review process takes up to two months, as each editor (including managing and academic editors, depending on the proposal) participates in the review, and then sends the proposal to the editorial committee, who makes the final decision. A list of criteria for submissions is found in the guidelines.11

Additionally, SSIR editors and stable freelance journalists write articles under What Works, What Didn’t Work, What’s Next, Reviews of books, Q&A and Research. You can submit pitches for these categories as well, for a particular person, organization, trend or research. The website also details what the editors want to see for ideas for these sections.12

Editorial tone: Easy to read, thoughtful articles chock full of information and interesting ideas, theories, suggestions, and solutions to global challenges.

Style guide used: If the submission is accepted, SSRI editors will work closely with the author on style guides and citations.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Submissions on LIS issues would do well in the Review, if approached from an innovative, thought-provoking way, such as describing grass-roots LIS efforts and their outcomes, or discussing LIS in a global setting, or how LIS practices can be used to promote social change. Writers need to make sure the topic submitted would be relevant or interesting to all the Review’s readers, so it should not be too LIS specific. Real-world examples described through research or firsthand experience are ideal. LIS efforts on providing information to mass populations, particularly under served, or information technologies that bridge communities and allow information sharing would most likely do well in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Print magazine has a circulation of 13,000, while the website averages 165,000 unique visitors per month.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The magazine is published by Stanford University, which is located in Santa Clara County, CA, and the print magazine is sold in newsstands across the United States and Canada. English is the primary language of this Silicon Valley publication, but the Review is written for an audience of change makers around the world.15

Reader characteristics: Per the submission guidelines: “SSIR’s readers are highly educated, widely read, and well informed about the field of social innovation. They want to be provoked, surprised, and presented with memorable information and rigorous analysis. They don’t want long-winded arguments, insider jargon, or excessively narrow and technical writing.”

Readers are overwhelmingly CEO’s, presidents, or senior executives of their organization. Half work for nonprofits, and a small group are philanthropists or foundation leaders.16

The writing is smart and well researched, and poses interesting questions and theories to readers, assuming that everyone is at the same high level of education, and that readers are interested in viewing challenges from a global perspective.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Not a publication specifically aimed at the LIS community, and, per their submission guidelines, readers don’t want “insider jargon.”17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Articles submitted to the Review should be timely, forward thinking, and offer solutions as well as pose questions for readers, who are thought leaders and executives looking for new ways to lead their organizations and foster social change. The LIS field is ripe for this type of exploration, and Review readers would most likely benefit from learning about innovations in the LIS world.

Last updated: October 9, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Stanford Social Innovation Review, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522204526301/455334
  2. “Overview,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/about/overview
  3. “Submission Guidelines,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/about/submission_guidelines
  4. Overview.”
  5. Submission Guidelines.”
  6. Overview.”
  7. Submission Guidelines.”
  8. “All Issues,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, https://ssir.org/issue
  9.  “Submission Guidelines.”
  10. Submission Guidelines.”
  11. Submission Guidelines.”
  12. Submission Guidelines.”
  13. Submission Guidelines.”
  14. “Information for Advertisers,” SSIR.org, accessed November 17, 2016, http://www.ssireview.org/advertising
  15. Overview.”
  16. Submission Guidelines.”
  17. Submission Guidelines.”
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Education Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Education Libraries

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Websitehttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Education Libraries is an electronic, refereed journal of the Special Libraries Association’s (SLA) Education Division.  It offers a forum for new and challenging ideas in education, and library and information science. It also explores the effect of new technologies on the library profession and library and information curriculum.”1

Target audience: The target audience is the membership of the Special Libraries Association, which includes those employed at “a variety of venues, including special libraries and information centers, academic libraries, public libraries, and school libraries.”2

Publisher: Special Libraries Association, Education Division3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and Education; scholarly5

Medium: Online, open access since 20156

Content: Education Libraries publishes scholarly articles, book reviews, member profiles, and case studies.7 Recent feature articles include faculty-librarian collaboration, 3-D printing in education libraries, collection development, and school library advocacy.8

Frequency of publication: Biannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Education Libraries accepts “research studies, descriptive narratives, or other thoughtful considerations of topics of interest to the education information professional. Manuscripts focusing on issues relevant to more general concerns either in the field of education or in the field of library and information science are also welcome provided they include a significant component specifically germane to education, libraries and librarianship.”10

Submission and review process: Authors submitting manuscripts are required to register using a link provided on the publication website.11 All submissions will be considered for publication and are subject to the double-blind peer review process. Inquiries about particular manuscripts may be sent via email to the editor. See the publication website for details.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) style manual, most recent edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Education Libraries presents an interesting opportunity for LIS writers from different types of libraries to discuss and share information that is related to education. This journal is well established, which means writers can be assured that they are submitting their work to a credible source and contributing to the scholarly conversation.

The journal is indexed in Education Libraries is indexed in ERIC, EBSCOhost’s Education Collection, and Library Literature.15

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the SLA’s website there are more than 9,000 association members based in more than 75 countries.16 Information about exactly how many are a part of the Education Division is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Just as members of the Special Libraries Association are located around the world, the readers of Education Libraries are also international.17 Because this is an international publication, differences in language and cultural practice should be considered.

Reader characteristics: It is safe to assume the readers of this publication are interested in academic libraries and their role in education. Due to the professional focus of this publication the readership is largely comprised of individuals already working in academic libraries with considerable experience in the field. The readers of this publication are likely to value education and research. They are likely to be interested in learning about new technologies as well as in innovative teaching methods. Recent articles demonstrate a general acceptance of new technologies and changes in librarianship.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is likely that, as library employees, a  majority of readers are very familiar with LIS subject matter. Additionally, we can assume that the readers are familiar with new information technologies issues as well as issues surrounding the growth of digital content in library collections.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important characteristic of the Education Libraries audience is its interest in education and technology related to instruction and learning. Authors must keep in mind the fact that this journal is scholarly, and the widest audience is those who work in higher education libraries, therefore well researched studies are particularly important. Potential contributors writing book or technology reviews as well as opinion pieces may want to relate their subject back to its value to learning in order to appeal to the audience.

Last updated: April 13, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017,  http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  3.  “Journal Sponsorship,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/journalSponsorship
  4.  “Peer Review Process,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  5. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  7. “Section Policies,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  8.  “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  9. “Publication Frequency,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#publicationFrequency
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Online Submissions,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  14. “Submission Preparation Checklist,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  17. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  18. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  19.  “Author Guidelines, Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
Continue Reading

San Francisco Business Times

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: San Francisco Business Times

ISSN: 0890-0337 (Print)1

Website: https://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/

Purpose, objective, or mission: San Francisco Business Times is a publication focused on the business community and business news in San Francisco and the Bay Area.2

Target audience: This publication is aimed at businesses, corporations, and executives in the San Francisco Bay Area. They tend to publish rankings and lists of prominent corporations, so are very popular with marketing personnel.

Publisher: American City Business Journals, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication; local business journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: San Francisco Business Times publishes articles on businesses and business news in the San Francisco Area. They also compile a book of lists (ranking companies in various sectors by size and prominence) which is heavily used by marketing professionals.4

Frequency of publication: Weekly.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.bizjournals.com/about-us/help (Scroll down to “Can you accept press releases, news tips or story ideas?”)

Types of contributions accepted: “You can send press releases, news about your company, news about your local industry or a news tip.”6

Submission and review process: You can fill out the form found on the Contact page, or use email, mail, fax, or telephone. “If you’re not certain of the person to contact, send it in care of the Editor. Please remember to include the name of a contact person and a business phone number.”7

Editorial tone: The San Francisco Business Times uses a traditional newspaper structure, leading with the most interesting information and following with more detail. The articles are generally short, punchy, and to the point.

Style guide used: Not listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS authors could contact the editors to pitch ideas for stories about how libraries benefit the business community. There could be potential to highlight special libraries or public libraries: for example, a case study on how a special library’s research and information services supported a company, or a story about how public libraries support job skill development or entrepreneurship. In addition, any writer seeking better exposure in the business community may want to post comments on the site.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 15,974 paid subscribers, with 681,613 unique monthly visitors to the website.8

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: It is available nationwide through its website, but the target audience is Northern California, Bay Area. The cultural make-up of readership is as diverse as the city itself, but the newspaper does not go out of its way to cover cross-cultural issues, except as they relate to business opportunities.

Reader characteristics: Readers are educated: 85% are college graduates. 80% of readers influence purchasing decisions at their company, while 62% are top management.9

The readers of the SF Business Times are generally people doing business in the Bay Area (or looking to expand into the Bay Area). The businesses they work in are a mix, judging from the news coverage in the paper itself. There are articles on restaurants, office space, new construction, major retailers, employers relocating, and profiles of major local employers, and businesses that serve all these demographics.

This paper is businesslike in tone and subject matter. The people reading it may have a cross-section of political leanings, personal beliefs and values, etc, but they are not interested in exploring them in this format. Any commentary outside of introducing business resources should be kept to a minimum, as it may alienate the readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This audience is not knowledgeable about LIS subject matter, beyond what you would learn as part of a regular college education. Any library-oriented terminology should be explained. However, this would be a wonderful forum for marketing library resources to business people. People look to this newspaper for business opportunities, and new information resources would be a natural outgrowth of that.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of the San Francisco Business Times are primarily interested in expanding their businesses; that is their motivation for reading this publication. Any writing that would help them with this goal would be well received. Authors should strive to write in a clear, businesslike tone, and to impart as much information as possible.

Last updated: September 27, 2018


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1.  San Francisco Business Times, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522201530883/188323
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  4. “San Francisco Business Times Book of Lists,” Bizjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016,   http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/research/bol-marketing/
  5. “Subscribe Now,” Bizjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016, https://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/subscribe?iana=csnav&csrc=6310
  6. “Help,” Bizjournals.com, accessed November 3, 2016, http://www.bizjournals.com/about-us/help
  7. Help.”
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  9. “Print and Digital Subscriber Profile,” Bizjournalsmediakit.com, accessed September 27, 2018, https://advertise.bizjournals.com/audience/
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