Wiki Tags Archives: Collaboration

Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

ISSN: 2333-3316

Websitehttps://www.weaveux.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weave is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.”1

From it’s editorial philosophy, “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students, library User Experience professionals.

Publisher: Michigan Publishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a double-blind review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Weave UX consists of full length, scholarly articles and The Dialog Box, featuring book and media reviews.6

Frequency of publication: Issues are published twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Manuscript submission guidelines can be found in a Google Doc linked on the submissions page.

Types of contributions accepted: Weave is looking for two types of submissions:

  • Full length, scholarly articles of relevance to UX in libraries
  • The Dialog Box, a new kind of review section aiming to “extend beyond traditional book review sections and feature critical dialog not only with books but with other media that set the boundaries of UX”8

Submission and review process: Before writing an article, Weave asks that you send a short pitch about your topic, they can then help develop it into an article. If you already have something written, send them a few sentences about your article and they’ll take it from there.9

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: APA is used for in-text citations and works cited pages, and the Chicago Manual of Style is used for spelling, grammar, punctuation and all other style concerns.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Weave has a “come one, come all” approach regarding librarians and professionals who are passionate about UX. Whether you have ideas you want to explore or you have already composed a full-fledged article, Weave is an excellent place to start if you are writing about user experience in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: All editors are based in the United States and the journal is hosted by Michigan Publishing. However, this quote pulled from the Editorial Philosophy shows that the journal is not limited to only U.S.-based librarians: “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries (wherever they are, whatever their job title is) can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Weave’s audience and authors are not limited to just the United States, they have published articles from Canadian, Swedish and Australian writers.12

Reader characteristics: According to their Editorial Philosophy, “Weave’s intended primary audience consists of people in libraries who are using or are interesting in using UX.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Readers are already familiar with UX in libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Weave articles are obviously passionate about libraries and user experience in libraries. The latest issues of Weave have featured articles such as “A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility,” “How Much Research is Enough?” as well as a book review, demonstrating that Weave’s readers are interested in a broad array of topics related to User Experience.14

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Home,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/
  2. “Editorial Philosophy,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/about.html#philosophy
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Editorial Philosophy”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Weave Submissions,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  7. “Archive,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://quod.lib.umich.edu/w/weave/12535642.*
  8. “Weave Submissions”
  9. “Weave Submissions.”
  10. Submission Guidelines for Manuscript drafts,” Weave, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  11. “About.”
  12. “Archive.”
  13. “Editorial Philosophy.”
  14. “Archive.”
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No Shelf Required

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: No Shelf Required

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.noshelfrequired.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: NSR started as a blog run by Sue Polanka, an academic librarian at Wright State University. For librarians from all fields, it quickly became a go-to source for new information on ebooks in libraries–a burgeoning concept at the time. Sue and the current editor, Mirela Roncevic, joined forces on all sorts of writing endeavors and the blog eventually grew into its own site with regular columnists and contributors from all over the world.1

From NSR’s About page: “In 2016, NSR expanded its mission to inspire professionals inside the book industry to do more with ebooks and econtent and embarked on groundbreaking projects that challenge what we think is possible with ebooks.”2

Target audience: Publishers, writers, editors, LIS students and professionals.3

Publisher: Currently, NSR’s editor is Mirela Roncevic.4

Peer reviewed? Unknown.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: NSR features articles on all sorts of topics–academic libraries, apps, ebook readers, piracy and many more. They have recently expanded to include reviews and opinion pieces from writers in all areas of digital content.5

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/

Types of contributions accepted: Reviews and opinion pieces, news posts.6

Submission and review process: Send proposals to Editorial Director, Mirela Roncevic at mirelaronevic@gmail.com. Review process unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, but casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Given the breadth of information and the scope of topics that are covered, NSR could be a great fit for all sorts of LIS authors. Published pieces are written “by industry insiders of all walks of life: writers, editors, librarians, educators, publishers, vendors, independent authors, and tech entrepreneurs, to name a few. Some creatively draw our attention to the issues, while others offer perspectives on what various statistics tell us about the state of the larger book industry.”7

Authors covering topics regarding ebooks and the digital or technological aspects of the LIS fields may particularly be interested in looking more into NSR.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Readers and writers are primarily in the United States, though they feature contributors from all over the world.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though NSR began as a blog out of Wright State University in Ohio, its audience is found all over North America, with an additional global presence. Articles are published in English, but the website offers Google translation on all pages.8

Reader characteristics: NSR readers are students and professionals in many different areas–LIS, publishing, education and more.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers of NSR may have a library science background, but given the wide range of readers and topics covered, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

NSR strives to publish the latest news and information on the ever growing fields of ebooks and epublishing. Readers interested in these fields are advocates for improving technology and tech usage in the LIS fields and beyond. NSR has a fantastic, comprehensive list of articles and essays related to emerging trends and issues in the ebook/epublishing fields for researchers and inquiring minds. To see if their work would be a good fit, potential authors should check out Learn with NSR to read some the latest publishings.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Home,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Write for NSR,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/
  6. “Write for NSR.”
  7. “Write for NSR.”
  8. “About.”
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ALSC Matters!

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALSC Matters! (formerly ALSConnect)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly ALSConnect, ALSC Matters is a newsletter for ALSC members highlighting activities and information of interest for librarians working with children.1

Target audience: LIS professionals who work with children.

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Online.

Content: Apart from general ALSC news, ALSC Matters! also features:

  • Bright Ideas: highlights ideas in planning services and programming in libraries around the country.
    • Example: Group summer reading programs in Utah daycares and summer schools.
  • Hear Ye! Hear Ye!: discusses resources, events and honors of interest to ALSC members
    • Example: ALSC members who received the I Love My Librarian Award in 2017.
  • ALSC Voices: highlights members, showcases ALSC profiles and includes interviews with ALSC members
    • Example: Q & A profile on a senior children’s librarian in New York.

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Found on the About ALSC Matters! page. Submissions should be sent to Laura Schulte-Cooper.

Types of contributions accepted: News information to be featured in Bright Ideas, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! or ALSC Voices.

Submission and review process: Unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, children’s librarians may be interested in submitting short pieces showcasing new and interesting activities and programs they have been implementing at their local libraries. If LIS authors have been nominated or have won an award pertaining to work as a children’s librarian he or she may want to submit it to Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC receive issues of ALSC Matters!, though non-members can also subscribe using an online form.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers of ALSC Matters! are likely ALA members, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals or perhaps students working in the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of ALSC Matters! are professionals and students already involved in the field of children’s librarianship. ALSC Matters! may be a good venue for you to showcase projects that could be a source of inspiration, as well as relevant events and LIS happenings.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “About ALSC Matters!,” ALA.org, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/alsconnectonline/aboutalsconnect/aboutalsconnect
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
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Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleJournal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS)

ISSN: 2572-1364

Website: http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (JCLIS) “aims to showcase innovative research that queries and critiques current and prevailing paradigms in library and information studies, in theory and practice through critical approaches and perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences. JCLIS is committed to supplying a platform for the publication of rigorous inter-/multi-/trans-disciplinary research that might be otherwise marginalized from dominant discourses.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) and archival science scholars, practitioners, and students, especially those interested in critical and multidisciplinary research, theory, and practice.

Publisher: Library Juice Press.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: Each issue of JCLIS is focused on a theme.4 JCLIS announces themes and deadlines for upcoming issues on its Announcements page.5 The inaugural issue examined why a journal that focuses on critical LIS studies is necessary, and the editors reviewed each article to illustrate the new journal’s scope and purpose.6 The second issue focuses on critical archival studies.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: Within the scope of each issue’s theme, the journal welcomes research articles, literature reviews, interviews, perspectives, and book or exhibition reviews.9

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts on the JCLIS online submission system, which requires that manuscripts be submitted in separate stages to ensure that the review process is anonymous and that manuscripts are appropriately formatted. Authors must also ensure that manuscripts comply with each item of the Submission Preparation Checklist.10

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The editors of JCLIS encourage submissions from “senior and junior faculty, students, activists, and practitioners working in areas of research and practice at the intersection of critical theory and library and information studies.”12 Potential authors should read the announcements of upcoming issues to guide their submissions or to explore if their work might fit in any of the themes.13 Graduate students may find that JCLIS is quite receptive to their work, and it could prove to be an excellent opportunity for current students and recent graduates.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal published in the United States. JCLISprovides immediate open access to its published content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.14

Reader characteristics: The journal’s readers are LIS and archival science professionals, scholars, practitioners, and students. According to the inaugural issue’s Editors’ Note, JCLIS “is a community of scholars and practitioners who share interests and investments in the vitality of critical perspectives and approaches within and with respect to our institutions, organizations, and educational programs. As such, JCLIS requires and relies upon the critical observations of librarians, archivists, museum professionals, educators, and researchers, as well as their critical imaginations and re-imaginings.”15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong understanding, in theory and practice, of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

JCLIS describes its authors and readers as a community. Readers value critical analyses of LIS and new explorations and theorizations of how LIS research can critique current paradigms and support nondominant discourses.16 The journal’s readers expect new, interesting, and perhaps unexpected examinations of LIS in the context of “critical approaches and perspectives that originate from across the humanities and social sciences.”17

Last updated: April 8, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about.
  2. “Contact,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about/contact.
  3. “About the Journal.”
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “Announcements,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/announcement.
  6. Andrew J. Lau, Alycia Sellie, and Ronald E. Day, “Why Is the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies Needed Today?” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies 1, no. 1 (2017), https://doi.org/10.24242/jclis.v1i1.48.
  7. Michelle Caswell, Ricardo Punzalan, and T-Kay Sangwand, “Critical Archival Studies: An Introduction,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies 1, no. 2 (2017), https://doi.org/10.24242/jclis.v1i2.50.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. “Submissions,” Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies, accessed April 8, 2018, http://libraryjuicepress.com/journals/index.php/jclis/about/submissions.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Announcements.”
  14. “About the Journal.”
  15. Lau, Sellie, and Day, “Why Is the Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies Needed Today?” 6.
  16. “About the Journal.”
  17. “About the Journal.”
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International Information & Library Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: International Information & Library Review

ISSN: Print ISSN: 1057-2317, Online ISSN: 1095-9297

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ulbr20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The overall mission of the International Information & Library Review is the provision of knowledge that will assist in the success of libraries and information-related institutions around the world.”1

Target audience: The target audience for International Information & Library Review is “library and information professionals and paraprofessionals in public, academic, special, government, and corporate environments” from around the world.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All papers in International Information & Library Review have undergone editorial screening and peer review.”4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: With a global perspective and articles written by scholars and professionals from many different countries and institutions, the International Information & Library Review “focuses on three broad areas: policy and ethical issues, including digital values, around the world; the ways in which information technologies and policies are used to help in decision-making, problem solving and improving the quality of people’s lives; and designing and implementing information systems and services in libraries and other organizations around the world.”5

Besides original articles, regular columns include Digital Trends and the Global Library Community, Advances in Library Data and Access, The Library Workforce, Perspectives on Public Services, Global Postcards: Research, Projects, and Experiences from the Field, and Digital Heritage: Spotlight on Europe.6

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors and Invitation for Column Contributions.

Types of contributions accepted: International Information & Library Review publishes “current and anecdotal information” with an emphasis on “research, current developments, and trends related to library and information leadership and management; marketing, advancement, and development; collaborative projects and insights; scholarly communication and publication; collection development and management; technology and digitization; public and technical services; physical and virtual environments, and organizational behavior.”8 Besides original articles, the journal welcomes proposals and articles for its regular columns.9

Submission and review process: International Information & Library Review uses an online submission system for manuscript management and the peer-review process.10 The Taylor & Francis Authors Services website offers an overview of the publishing process and detailed instructions for authors.11 The journal uses Editorial Manager for the peer-review process, with detailed guidelines for authors.12

Editorial tone: The overall editorial tone is scholarly, especially for the original articles. Each column has its own guidelines and topics, so authors should read these and sample articles carefully if submitting an article or proposal to a particular column.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.14 Taylor & Francis provides a document outlining APA style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

International Information & Library Review is a well-established, highly regarded journal in the worldwide library and information science (LIS) community. LIS scholars and professionals who are conducting original research that appeals to a worldwide audience and who can contribute to the journal’s regular columns are a good fit for this journal. The journal’s authorship is from within and beyond the LIS community: “Contributions to the journal have come from staff or members of many different international organizations, including the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL, and from library and information scientists in academia, government, industry, and other organizations.”16 The journal does not court student authors, and contributors seem to be well-established professionals in LIS and related organizations, but column editors do invite proposals, which may be a way for LIS students to explore publishing in this high-level journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International Information & Library Review has a worldwide scope and reach. Its audience includes “information scientists, librarians and other scholars and practitioners all over the world.”17 The journal is written in English for an international audience. Regional terms and practices should be explained.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS scholars, professionals, and practitioners from around the world, as well as stakeholders in international organizations, such as the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL,18 who may not be in the LIS field but who are interested in international information-sharing practices and standards.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Overall, readers will have an advanced understanding of LIS subject matter, but because readers are from all over the world and sometimes from outside of the field, jargon, regionalisms, and novel practices should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting to the International Information & Library Review are writing for an international readership. Readers expect “timely articles on research and development in international and comparative librarianship, information sciences, information policy and information ethics, digital values and digital libraries.”19 They are interested in how LIS practice and theory are evolving around the world–on the international stage and in particular regions–and how this might have an impact on their own policies and practices.

Last updated: April 2, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ulbr20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Invitation for Column Contributions,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/iilr-columns.
  6. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  7. “Journal Information,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=ulbr20.
  8. “Aims and Scope.”
  9. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ulbr20&page=instructions.
  11. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Editorial Manager: Tutorial for Authors,” version 14.1-Q4/2017, www.ariessys.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.ariessys.com/wp-content/uploads/EM-Author-English.pdf.
  13. See “Invitation for Column Contributions,” for links to each column’s guidelines.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” tandf.co.uk, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandf.co.uk//journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  16. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  17. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  18.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  19.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

ISSN: 2379-95281

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.2 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”3 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”4

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.5

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: LIS professional news.8

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.9

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Active Librarian, Michael J. Carlozzi, accessed March 18, 2018, http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
Continue Reading

Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
Continue Reading

BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: Not applicable.

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
Continue Reading

Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

 

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
Continue Reading

Letters to a Young Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Letters to a Young Librarian

ISSN: 2330-11711

Website: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This blog offers “advice to those who are new (or even not so new) to librarianship from someone who has been doing this work for a while now.”2 The objective is to “break down the barriers between library schools & students and professional librarians.”3

Target audience: Library science graduate students and new professional librarians.4

Publisher: Jessica Olin.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Articles (ideas! advice! pep talks!) on all areas of librarianship. Examples from the last two months (March and April, 2015) include: a discussion of management vs. leadership, a reminder about patron privacy, and a description of and tips for whiteboard polling.9 Interspersed with the professional advice are “just for fun” posts.10 Guest posts are also included and welcomed.11

Frequency of publication: Very frequent, averaging 7-9 posts per month.12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html

Types of contributions accepted: Olin poses this question to potential contributors: “Is there something you wish you’d known when you were a graduate student and/or a brand new to libraries?”13 “In some posts, you see the author’s philosophy of an aspect of librarianship. In others, the piece is about developing job skills. So long as it answers that basic question, pretty much everything is germane to this blog.”14

Writing on exactly the same topics that have already been covered, or approaching topics in the same way, will not be published.15

Submission and review process: Casual tone is required (no footnotes allowed). Posts should be between 500-750 words. Submissions will be edited by Jessica Olin. Send topic ideas to librarianjessica@gmail.com16

Editorial tone: Tone is casual and welcoming.17 “This isn’t an academic, refereed publication. It’s a conversation. That means personal pronouns are encouraged and footnotes/endnotes/etc. are not allowed.”18

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If this is your first foray into writing for your peers, this blog is an excellent place to start. As this is a blog specifically written for new librarians and library school students, you will be writing for peers and like-minded individuals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016, this blog has 254 followers.19 In addition, Olin has 2,222 followers on Twitter.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This blog is written in American English for a mostly North American audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers seem to be mostly students or recent graduates with many and varied interests in the LIS world. As per the guest post guidelines, “this is a conversation.”22 Readers will expect informative and thoughtful posts written in an informal manner. As “posts need to be geared toward a general audience”23, readers represent all areas of librarianship.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS issues could range from the first year LIS graduate student, to a professional librarian starting a career in the field. Don’t assume that the reader will understand LIS-speak; keep jargon to a minimum.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Letters to a Young Librarian want to learn about the profession in a way that is not taught at their graduate schools. They want first-hand accounts of first-time librarians. They are interested in everything from your philosophy of librarianship, to tips on networking. The possible topics are as varied as the profession.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Letters to a Young Librarian, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 21, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521668447302/777397
  2.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  3. Olin, J. (2016). Why I Decided to Start a Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2011/06/why-i-decided-to-start-blog.html
  4.  Olin, J. (2016). About This Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-this-blog.html
  5.  Olin, J. (2016). About Me. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-me-with-contact-information.html
  6.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  7.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  8.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  9. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  10.  Olin, J. (2016). Just for Fun: Big Hero 6. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2015/04/just-for-fun-big-hero-6.html
  11. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  12. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  13.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  14. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  15. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  16. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  17. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  18. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  19.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  20. Twitter. (2016). Jessica Olin. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/olinj
  21. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  22. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  23. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  24. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
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