Wiki Tags Archives: Collaboration

The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.1 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”2 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”3

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.4

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.8

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope9

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
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Letters to a Young Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Letters to a Young Librarian

Website: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This blog offers “advice to those who are new (or even not so new) to librarianship from someone who has been doing this work for a while now.”1 The objective is to “break down the barriers between library schools & students and professional librarians.”2

Target audience: Library science graduate students and new professional librarians.3

Publisher: Jessica Olin.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Articles (ideas! advice! pep talks!) on all areas of librarianship. Examples from the last two months (March and April, 2015) include: a discussion of management vs. leadership, a reminder about patron privacy, and a description of and tips for whiteboard polling.8 Interspersed with the professional advice are “just for fun” posts.9 Guest posts are also included and welcomed.10

Frequency of publication: Very frequent, averaging 7-9 posts per month.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html

Types of contributions accepted: Olin poses this question to potential contributors: “Is there something you wish you’d known when you were a graduate student and/or a brand new to libraries?”12 “In some posts, you see the author’s philosophy of an aspect of librarianship. In others, the piece is about developing job skills. So long as it answers that basic question, pretty much everything is germane to this blog.”13

Writing on exactly the same topics that have already been covered, or approaching topics in the same way, will not be published.14

Submission and review process: Casual tone is required (no footnotes allowed). Posts should be between 500-750 words. Submissions will be edited by Jessica Olin. Send topic ideas to librarianjessica@gmail.com15

Editorial tone: Tone is casual and welcoming.16 “This isn’t an academic, refereed publication. It’s a conversation. That means personal pronouns are encouraged and footnotes/endnotes/etc. are not allowed.”17

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If this is your first foray into writing for your peers, this blog is an excellent place to start. As this is a blog specifically written for new librarians and library school students, you will be writing for peers and like-minded individuals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016, this blog has 254 followers.18 In addition, Olin has 2,222 followers on Twitter.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This blog is written in American English for a mostly North American audience.20

Reader characteristics: Readers seem to be mostly students or recent graduates with many and varied interests in the LIS world. As per the guest post guidelines, “this is a conversation.”21 Readers will expect informative and thoughtful posts written in an informal manner. As “posts need to be geared toward a general audience”22, readers represent all areas of librarianship.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS issues could range from the first year LIS graduate student, to a professional librarian starting a career in the field. Don’t assume that the reader will understand LIS-speak; keep jargon to a minimum.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Letters to a Young Librarian want to learn about the profession in a way that is not taught at their graduate schools. They want first-hand accounts of first-time librarians. They are interested in everything from your philosophy of librarianship, to tips on networking. The possible topics are as varied as the profession.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  2. Olin, J. (2016). Why I Decided to Start a Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2011/06/why-i-decided-to-start-blog.html
  3.  Olin, J. (2016). About This Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-this-blog.html
  4.  Olin, J. (2016). About Me. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-me-with-contact-information.html
  5.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  6.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  7.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  8. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  9.  Olin, J. (2016). Just for Fun: Big Hero 6. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2015/04/just-for-fun-big-hero-6.html
  10. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  11. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  12.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  13. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  14. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  15. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  16. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  17. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  18.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  19. Twitter. (2016). Jessica Olin. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/olinj
  20. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  21. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  22. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  23. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”1

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”2

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”3

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”10

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”11 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.12

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”13

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”14

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”15

Editorial tone: Academic16

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,18, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”19

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26920

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.21

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”22 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”23, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.24 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  5.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  10. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  13. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  20. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  21. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  22. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
Continue Reading

Internet@Schools

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Internet@Schools

The original publication, Multimedia & Internet @ Schools, is no longer in print; it’€™s now Internet@Schools: An Educator’€™s Guide to Technology and the Web€™. Archives of the original, from 2000–2003, can be found here. Archives prior to 2000 can be found here.

Website: http://www.internetatschools.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A practical guide for educators on how to get high-performance learning from internet-based school products, services, and resources.1

Per the 2015 Media Kit: Internet@Schools is aimed at “tech-savvy and tech-curious K–12 educators of all stripes.”2 “Our mission is to keep these educators informed on internet-related ed tech news, products, services, trends, and tacticsthey need to accomplish their mission of preparing today’s students to become productive citizens in our increasingly technology-impacted world”3

€œTarget audience: €œEducators, including school librarians, technology specialists, teachers, and K-12 administrators. From their website: “€œfor our internet-savvy, information-hungry, technology-minded educator readers.”4

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS Professional/Trade publication that provides information and news for LIS school librarians.7

Medium: Print & online.8

Content: Features, columns, and product reviews. Columns include Victor Rivero’s Tools for Learning Roundup, Stephen Abram’s Pipelines, Johanna Riddle’s Tech Effect, Mary Alice Anderson’s New Media Center, and Mary Ann Bell’s Belltones.9

Recent articles look at specific digital-textbooks; tools that help educators navigate the Common Core State Standards; a column on teacher-librarian instruction in LIS programs (pros and cons); online learning experiences; and Makerspaces -€“ open community labs where members gather to share resources, knowledge, networking, etc.10

Frequency of publication: Five times per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs

Types of contributions accepted: Letters to the editor, case studies, white papers and product reviews.12

Submission and review process: Contact the editor, David Hoffman: 10000 NE 7th Ave, Suite 330G, Vancouver, WA 98685
Phone: (360) 882-0988
Fax: (360) 882-9174
Email: hoffmand@infotoday.com13

Editorial tone: “€œThe magazine is written in plain talk by and for K-12 educators.”14

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Internet@Schools is particularly relevant for LIS authors studying or working in a school library setting, or for teacher-librarians. The publication covers a broad range of internet-based teaching tools, technologies and topics, and is a very informational and engaging publication that reaches educators, administrators, and decision makers in schools and school districts across the country.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Approximately 15,000 people per issue. From the Media Kit: “€œThe typical Internet@Schools subscriber shares his/her copy with at least two other educators.”16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not specific to any one location: articles cover all sorts of internet-based education topics, and reference U.S. and Canadian universities and LIS programs, as well as technology from other countries. Written in Standard English, easily readable.17

Reader characteristics: Subscribers of this publication are highly influential in the purchasing process, for schools and districts that plan to include technology-related products in their budgets. Internet@Schools readers are drawn from the whole spectrum of K-12 education and include state, district, and school level administrators; tech coordinators; media specialists; and classroom teachers. Directed towards educators and decision makers in their schools; content is written by practicing educators who have hands-on experience with the technologies they write about. Additional sponsored content is provided via case studies, white papers and product reviews that are also advertisements for specific companies or products.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: A good number of readers will have LIS-specific knowledge as librarians and teacher librarians, but the educator/administrative/tech component might not be up on all the specifics. In any case, this is not a publication to flaunt LIS terminology -“ just make articles easily understood by any educator or administrator, and use “plain talk.”19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Internet@Schools is a valuable resource of the latest “internet-based” technologies for a variety of educators including, “directors/teachers, department chairs, district/school administrators, directors of A/V media service, directors of technology/technology coordinators, [and] library media specialists.”20 Authors will need to steer clear of LIS terminology by using “plain talk” that can be easily understood by the wide range of professions represented in the readership.21

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  2. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  3. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  4. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  9. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  10. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  11. ProQuest. (2016). Internet at Schools. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412521425021/230216
  12. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  13. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  14. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  15. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  16. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Archives. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/Archives/4739-Sep-Oct-2014.htm
  18. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  19. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
  20. Information Today Inc. (2016). Internet@Schools 2015 Media Kit. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/downloads/2015/2015-Internet-at-Schools-Media-Kit.pdf
  21. Information Today Inc. (2016). About Us. Internet@Schools. Retrieved from http://www.internetatschools.com/About/AboutUs
Continue Reading

Journal of Library Innovation

Per the Journal of Library Innovation (JOLI) website, “The editors of JOLI ceased publication of the journal following the publication of the fall 2015 issue. Articles will remain discoverable and available as PDFs through aggregated databases, and the site will be available for an undetermined time.”

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Library Innovation

Website: http://www.libraryinnovation.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “[The journal’s] mission is to disseminate research and information on innovative practice in libraries of all types.”1

Target audience: Librarians in all types of libraries.2

Publisher: Journal of Library Innovation.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4 Articles that appear in the “Featured Article”€ and “€œInnovative Practice”€ sections are peer reviewed. In some cases, invited submission may undergo editorial revision but not peer review. Book reviews and editorials are not peer reviewed.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6JOLI is an open access journal. Authors retain the copyright to their work under the terms of the following Creative Commons license: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 (United States).”7

Medium: Online.8

Content: Publishes “original research, literature reviews, commentaries, case studies, reports on innovative practices, and book, conference and product reviews…The journal also welcomes provocative essays that will stimulate thought on the current and future role of libraries in an Internet Age.”9

Frequency of publication: This journal premiered in 2010. It is published semi-annually.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: English language manuscripts for “Feature Articles” and “Innovations in Practice” sections covering topics of interest to library and information professionals committed to exploring innovative ideas and practices. Original research, literature reviews, commentaries, case studies, reports on innovative practices, and book, conference and product reviews. Articles may be theoretical, research-based, or of a practical nature. Editorials and reviews are written by invited authors.11

“Innovation in libraries can include, but is not limited to the following:

  • The discovery of unmet user needs.
  • The introduction of new services or the retooling of traditional services resulting in a better user experience.
  • Creative collaboration between libraries, or between libraries and other types of institutions, resulting in demonstrable improvements in service to users.
  • Implementing new technologies to improve and extend library service to meet user needs.
  • Explorations of the future of libraries.
  • Pilot testing unconventional ideas and services.
  • Redefining the roles of library staff to better serve users.
  • Developing processes that encourage organizational innovation.
  • Reaching out to and engaging library users and non-users in new and creative ways.
  • Creative library instruction and patron programming.
  • Finding new ways to make library collections or library facilities more useful to users.”12

Submission and review process: The editors recommend that prospective authors query before submitting work. No previously published submissions.13

Submit files in Microsoft Word or RTF files. Submissions should be double-spaced, 12-point Arial font, and employ italics rather than underlining (other than URLs). Where available, provide URLs for references provided. All illustrations, figures, and tables should be placed within the text at appropriate points, rather than at the end.14

The review process takes a minimum of six to eight weeks. Authors are notified when a decision has been made.15

The section editors and managing editors evaluate submissions to determine that the content and topic are aligned with the scope and purpose of JOLI. Submissions that clear the initial review are subject to a single-blind review process, performed by at least two referees selected by the editorial board. Once referees complete their reviews, the section editor makes a recommendation to the managing editor before the author is notified of the decision.16

Editorial tone: No stated guidelines. Upon examination of several articles, “€œFeature” articles are written in clear, scholarly language. “Innovative Practice” articles are written in professional, clear language that is less formal.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition (2009).17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This young scholarly journal would be a good choice for unpublished graduate students with fresh, well-researched articles about innovative ideas, services, products, or programs in libraries. It would also be a good choice for information professionals interested in publishing articles on unconventional ideas or services implemented at their libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Because this journal is not subscription-based, circulation is difficult to determine. As of 2012 there were 1,296 registered readers.18

This journal is indexed in Directory of Open Access Journals, Google Scholar, The Informed Librarian Online, Library Literature and Information Full Text, and Library Literature, Information Science and Technology Abstracts (LISTA).19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is international, but most reside in the U.S.20 This journal accepts submissions in English. Because this journal is open access and available for an international readership, avoid regionalisms and be sure references to currency and location are clear.21

Reader characteristics: Most readers are librarians and are interested in innovative, thought-provoking theory and practices that stimulate thought about the library’€™s current and future role in an Internet Age. They value independent thinking and forward-looking practices that embrace technology.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because readers may be specialists in different areas within different types of libraries, technical jargon should be used moderately and terms should be explained when they are included in articles.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

No demographic information on readership is available at this time, but a review of selected articles indicates that readers are LIS professionals with an interest in library services, programs, and products that are exciting, different, and effective.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  5. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  7. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  9. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Journal of Library Innovation. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404955462623/686258
  11. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  18. P. Jones, personal communication, 9 May 2013
  19. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. P. Jones, personal communication, 9 May 2013
  21. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  22. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  23. Journal of Library Innovation. (2014). Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinnovation.org/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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Collaborative Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collaborative Librarianship

Website: http://www.collaborativelibrarianship.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The publication website identifies three mission points: To “promote sharing of ideas, best practices, opportunities, challenges and successes involving collaborative librarianship; sustain an open-access journal where professional librarians can publish articles (peer- and non-peer-reviewed) on a range of subjects relevant to librarianship, but that involve collaboration at their core; to promote sharing of ideas, opportunities, challenges and successes involving new kinds of partnerships, joint projects, and innovative approaches to collaboration that benefit all members within in the information supply chain.1

Target audience: LIS professionals, LIS instructors, and LIS students2

Publisher: Independently published, and sponsored by the Colorado Library Consortium, the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, Regis University, and the University of Denver3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: The publication’€™s website indicates that it provides articles relating to a wide range of issues including library-to-library cooperation; sharing resources and expertise; library-to-business partnerships; local, regional, national, and international collaboration; professional, consortium and association partnerships; the history of library collaboration; open access and online availability; better and best practices.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: The journal accepts for submission field reports that focus on innovative collaborations and address best practices. Field reports are usually 2,500 to 4,000 words in length. The journal also accepts scholarly articles on library collaborations at the local, national, or international level that approach their topics historically, quantitatively, qualitatively, analytically, theoretically, philosophically, or practically. Published scholarly articles are usually of at least 5,000 words.   9

Submission and review process: Individuals submitting articles for review must first register with the journal.10 The submission may not be under consideration for publication by another publisher nor have been previously published. Submissions should include an abstract of approximately 200 words, a title, list of authors and affiliations, an introduction, the body of the paper, conclusions, and references. Submissions should adhere to the style guidelines provided on the website and uploaded as Microsoft Word files. 11

Editorial tone: Depending on the section, articles may be scholarly or more professionally informal.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors will find Collaborative Librarianship an appealing avenue for publication. Because collaboration is increasing across the LIS community,  professional interest in innovative ideas on this topic is high. Since the publication is a venue for both practical and scholarly articles, authors may expect to reach both professional and academic audiences.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication does not provide details on circulation.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is sponsored by library consortiums and universities in Colorado, and part of its mission is to meet goals identified at the June 2008 general meeting of the Colorado Academic Library Consortium, including the promotion of the knowledge infrastructure of Colorado; the maintenance and development of the Colorado library system; and the transmission of lessons learned in the Colorado library community to the rest of the United States.14 The publication is written in English.15

Reader characteristics: The journal does not provide information about individual characteristics about the readers. Persons of interest can subscribe via email to receive notification of new issues. The publication is geared toward librarians located in both the education and professional fields. The journal appears to be content neutral, appealing to readers interested in the collaborative aspect of the LIS field.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because most readers work in the LIS field, authors will not have to explain familiar LIS concepts.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because collaboration exists over practically, if not entirely, all fields in the LIS profession, potential authors can view Collaborative Librarianship as a great source for potential publication. While some readers may not be directly involved in an author’s particular LIS field, collaborative ideas can be shared and valued.

Last updated: March 20, 2017


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About this Journal/Mission Points,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  2. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  3.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  4. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  5. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  6. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  7. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  8. “About this Journal/Publication Frequency,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  9. “About this Journal/From-the-Field Reports and Scholarly Articles” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  10. “About this Journal/Submit Article” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=http%3A%2F%2Fdigitalcommons.du.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dcollaborativelibrarianship&context=collaborativelibrarianship
  11.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  12.  “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  13.  “Author Guidelines,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/author_guidelines.pdf
  14. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  15. Collaborative Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 20, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406298992064/668432
  16. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
  17. “About this Journal/Focus and Scope,” Collective Librarianship, accessed March 20, 2017, http://digitalcommons.du.edu/collaborativelibrarianship/about.html
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Library Success Wiki

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Success: A Best Practices Wiki

Website: http://www.libsuccess.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Library Success wiki seeks to be a place for library professionals to share successes and best practices. The main page introduction states, “This wiki was created to be a one-stop shop for great ideas and information for all types of librarians.”1 All librarians and information professionals are invited to participate in the wiki to share ideas and tips.2

Target audience: The Library Success Wiki was created for librarians and information professionals of all types. This is a great resource for LIS students, as well.3

Publisher: This wiki was created by Meredith Farkas, the blogger behind Information Wants to Be Free.4

Peer reviewed? No. This wiki is meant as a collaborative effort between all information professionals. Anyone is invited to contribute, adding content without having to request permission.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: The Library Success wiki contains all types of articles and information on library topics ranging from books to gaming to standards to technology.8 Contributors are invited to share on any area of their library expertise or successes.9

Frequency of publication: Because this is a wiki, information is constantly being edited, updated and added. New articles can be added at any time.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For new contributors, the wiki contains a tips page10 and a guidelines page.11 Information about contributing to the wiki is also contained in the introduction on the main page of the Library Success wiki.12

Types of contributions accepted: All types of articles and contributions are accepted. As the introduction states, “If you’ve done something at your library that you consider a success, please write about it in the wiki or provide a link to outside coverage. If you have materials that would be helpful to other librarians, add them to the wiki.”13 Anything that may be useful to other librarians is fair game for this wiki.

Submission and review process: The only requirement for submission is that the contributor register.14 The guidelines state that anything that is published on the wiki that is considered a personal attack, vandalism, advertisement or copyright infringement will be deleted.15

Editorial tone: Since this publication is a collaborative effort and contributors are not required to go through a review process, the tone of this wiki will vary from article to article. The information provided by the creator, Meredith Farkas, is informal.16

Style guide used: There is no formal style guide used or required.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Though publication on this wiki will not get the contributor a notable amount of recognition, it is a great place to practice your writing and get used to putting it out there for others to read and comment on. Providing content for this wiki will help the contributor in their practice of writing for outside audiences. It is also a great place to get feedback from other professionals. This wiki is a great resource for writers as there is quite a bit of information for writing for the profession.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016 there are 13,938 registered users of the Library Success wiki.18 Likely there are readers who are not registered users. The site has had a total of 18,899 page edits since the wiki was set up.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Browsing through various member profiles in the list of members on the Library Success wiki shows that users come from around the United States and internationally. The member list indicated that most of the members are living and working in the United States.20 It would be easy to assume then, that the language and cultural considerations would be that of an American culture and the English language; however, there are members listed from countries such as Chile, Portugal and the UK. The author should be careful to remember that many librarians and library students are from other countries and cultures. It appears an international library viewpoint is welcomed.

Reader characteristics: A perusal of the registered members of this site shows that the members include a wide range of information professionals within the library field. Most of the registered members are librarians. However, the members are from various types of libraries, including public, academic and law libraries. The librarians also represented a wide range of specialties, from teen librarians, to children’s librarians to law librarians and academic librarians. Some members are students and some are support staff at libraries.21

It should be noted that information about the individual characteristics is obtained from the profiles of the members that are registered. The members that are registered are of course, also the authors and editors of the works that appear on the site. The Library Success wiki is a collaboration of librarians that want to share information with one another. Therefore, the authors are readers also and they are creating and editing articles for librarians and library workers like themselves.22

Since users are allowed to publish and edit freely, biases, values and attitudes can vary greatly, as long as users stay within the wiki guidelines. The wiki guidelines prohibit personal attacks and vandalism. However, there were no biases or strong attitudes detected in the various articles that were reviewed.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since most of the registered users are librarians or are library staff, it is safe to assume that the readers have working knowledge of LIS subject matter. The knowledge, of course, can vary from that of a front-line circulation staff member, who would have extensive knowledge of circulation procedures, to the scholarly knowledge of an academic librarian. This means that the knowledge of LIS subject matter will include extensive knowledge in all areas concerning libraries and librarianship.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

While readers are interested in using Web 2.0 technologies and other technologies in libraries25, they are also interested in more traditional library topics, such as weeding, fundraising, material selection and improving access.26 Based on articles and user profiles, it seems that an author may feel more comfortable writing for this publication than submitting a paper for scholarly review. The Library Success wiki would be a good place for authors to experiment with different writing styles, exchange ideas with other users and even get feedback from others. Writing for Library Success wiki could definitely help to polish an author’€™s writing and will help to build confidence in publishing works for others to view.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  2. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved October 16, 2014, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  3. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  4. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  5. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  6. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  7. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  8. Contents. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Categories
  9. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  10. Tips page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Tips_page
  11. Guidelines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/index.php?title=Guidelines
  12. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  13. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  14. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  15. Guidelines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/index.php?title=Guidelines
  16. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  17. Tips page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Tips_page
  18. Statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Special:Statistics
  19. Statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Special:Statistics
  20. Wiki user list. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Wiki_User_List
  21. Wiki user list. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016 , from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Wiki_User_List
  22. Wiki user list. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Wiki_User_List
  23. Guidelines. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/index.php?title=Guidelines
  24. Wiki user list. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Wiki_User_List
  25. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
  26. Main page. (n.d.). Retrieved May 16, 2016, from the Library Success: A Best Practice Wiki: http://www.libsuccess.org/Main_Page
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GOOD

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “GOOD is a global media brand and social impact company. Our collective mission is to help people and organizations be forces for good. Through award-winning media and creative partnerships, we connect deeply and authentically with this generation’s desire for purpose.”1 The magazine and website cover stories on business, environment, politics, culture, technology, education, etc.

Target audience: Millennials who want to make a difference in the world.2

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and print magazine.5

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.good.is/about/faq

Types of contributions accepted: According to the site’s FAQ, “We work with artists, designers, photographers and writers on a freelance basis.”7

Submission and review process: Send your story pitch to submissions@goodinc.com to be considered for publication in the magazine or on the website. Due to the high volume of submissions, editors will only respond to pitches they are considering for publication. Allow two weeks for review.8

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD€™’s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and a recent piece on the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 50,000 for the print magazine, 10 million monthly unique visits to the website.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English.10

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.11

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy,12 they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’€™s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: September 28, 2016


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/about
  2. “Audience,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/community/audience
  3. About.”
  4. About.”
  5. About.”
  6. About.”
  7. “General Inquiries,” Good.is, accessed September 27, https://www.good.is/about/faq#general-questions
  8. “GOOD Magazine (print),” Good.is, accessed September 27, 2016, https://www.good.is/about/faq#print-questions
  9. “GOOD Media Kit 2016,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  10. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  11. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  12. GOOD Worldwide, Inc. (2014). About Us. GOOD. Retrieved from http://community.good.is/about
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