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Political Librarian, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Political Librarian

ISSN: 2471-3155

Website: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/ and http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Political Librarian “is dedicated to expanding the discussion of, promoting research on, and helping to re-envision locally focused advocacy, policy, and funding issues for libraries.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, scholars, practitioners, and graduate students, as well as those outside of the LIS discipline, who are interested libraries and tax and public policy.

Publisher: The Political Librarian is organized and published by EveryLibrary.2 It is hosted by the Washington University in St. Louis Open Scholarship site.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Not all articles are peer reviewed, but there is a section in most issues for those that are.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content:The Political Librarian publishes peer-reviewed articles, white papers, and editorials that focus on how funding issues, tax implications, budgeting, and broader economic policy affect libraries on the local level.4 Articles range from focused examinations, such as library budgeting strategies, to broader issues, such as tax reform and trickle-down economics.5 The journal is “at the intersection of local libraries, public policy and tax policy.”6

Frequency of publication: Two volumes each year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: PolicesFinal Manuscript Preparation Guidelines, and Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian.

Types of contributions accepted: The Political Librarian publishes opinions/first drafts, white papers, and peer-reviewed articles. The journal seeks a variety of perspectives, new voices, and lines of inquiry, and does not limit “contributors to just those working in the field of library and information science.” The journal invites “submissions from researchers, practitioners, community members, or others dedicated to furthering the discussion, promoting research, and helping to re-envision tax policy and public policy on the extremely local level.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts though the journal’s online portal. Initial submissions do not have strict guidelines to follow.8 However, accepted manuscripts need to follow the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.9

Editorial tone: The tone is professional. Clear guidelines are provided by the editorial team.10

Style guide used: The journal’s reference and citation style is explained in the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Political Librarian is a new journal (first published in 2015) that has a very particular focus: it is a “dedicated space where practitioners, researchers, and users [can] publish on frontline advocacy experiences, campaign strategy and research, and/or about tax and public policies impacting libraries on the local level.” The journal is a resource for examinations of the impact of tax and public policy locally and how policy affects library services and community outcomes and for new models of library funding and resources to educate stakeholders.12 LIS authors–professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students–who write about the intersection of libraries with tax and public policy will find a good fit with this journal.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available, but the number of downloads appears on each article’s title page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Political Librarian is written in English. The audience is mostly located in the United States, as US tax and public policy are primarily discussed.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students, as well as those outside the LIS community, who are interested in how tax and public policy affects libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a strong academic and practical understand of LIS subject matter, but there may be readers outside of the discipline for whom jargon or idiosyncratic terms should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should understand that readers have a particular interest in libraries and in public and tax policy, and they look for articles that both explain how libraries can survive and thrive in the current environment and how to advocate now for positive changes in the future. Readers also look for local analyses and examinations that may have implications on a broader scale.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


 

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Journal Home,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/.
  2.  The Political Librarian, everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/.
  3. “Browse Journals and Peer-Reviewed Series,” Washington University Open Scholarship, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/peer_review_list.html.
  4. “Journal Home.”
  5. “Most Popular Papers,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/topdownloads.html
  6. “Volume 1, Issue 1 (2015),” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/vol1/iss1/.
  7. “Aims & Scope,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/aimsandscope.html.
  8. “Policies,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/policies.html.
  9. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/styleguide.html.
  10. “Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian,” everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/editorial-team-guidelines-political-librarian/.
  11. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.”
  12. Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, and Rachel Korman, “The Political Librarian: Foundations,” The Political Librarian 1, no. 1(2015): 7, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=pollib.
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Journal of Radical Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Radical Librarianship

ISSN: 2399-956X

Website: http://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Radical Librarianship “is an open access journal publishing high quality, rigorously reviewed and innovative scholarly work in the field of radical librarianship….The scope of the journal is any work that contributes to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”1

Target audience: Librarians and library and information science (LIS) practitioners, managers, scholars, and students who are interested in “radical librarianship,” loosely defined for the purposes of the journal as “the ethical roots of librarianship.”2

Publisher: The journal is self-published by the editors.3 Its platform and workflow are supported by OJS/PKP.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, the journal has a policy for manuscripts to undergo either open or double-blind review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online and open access.

Content: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes LIS articles on a broad range of topics but emphasizes that articles should contribute “to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”6 Sections include Research Articles, Editorials and Commentary, and Reviews. The journal’s Announcements page issues calls for proposals and papers on specified topics; a 2018 call was for proposals offering a “structural critique of race and power in LIS.” 7

Frequency of publication: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is published on a continual basis: articles are published as soon as they are ready under the year’s volume number.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes research and scholarly articles that offer critical analyses of “the influence of neoliberal policy on the profession.”9 With this basis in critical LIS theory and practice, the journal covers many “traditional” topics, such as information literacy, digital rights, cataloging, and technology, but also brings nondominant discourses to the field, with topics including including politics and social justice; anti-racist theory, critical race analysis, anti-colonial studies; equity, diversity, and inclusion; gender variance, queer theory, and phenomenology; the political economy of information and knowledge; critical pedagogy; and sustainability and environmentalism.10 The editors will also consider nontextual formats.11

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online and must ensure compliance with the Submission Preparation Checklist. “Prospective authors are welcome to send outlines or drafts to the editor in advance of making a formal submission. Submissions can be sent throughout the year. Revisions may be required before a decision is made to accept or reject the paper.”12 The journal gives authors and reviewers the option of open or double-blind peer review. The authors and reviewers must all agree to an open review; if not, the manuscript undergoes double-blind review.13

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly but appropriate for the topic and type of submission.

Style guide used: “Manuscripts should be prepared according to any consistent bibliographic style.”14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Radical Librarianship is a fairly new journal (first published in 2015) that is based in the UK but has an international scope and seeks contributions from “library and information workers, researchers, and academics from anywhere in the world.”15 LIS authors, including graduate students, who are writing critically about LIS theory, research, and practices, especially in ways that engage in nondominant discourses, consider a progressive point of view, and disrupt neoliberal library policy, will find encouraging and supportive editors and a high-quality, relevant journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is based in the UK and North America and is written in English, but the journal’s scope is international and the editors hope to find “editors and authors from beyond the English-speaking world” as the journal grows and evolves.16 Authors should consider an international audience for their articles and explain jargon or region-specific practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and LIS professionals, scholars, researchers, and students from around the world in all types of libraries and information organizations. Further, readers may be members of the Radical Librarianship Collective, which is an organization “building solidarity for those critical of the marketization of libraries and commodification of information.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid academic and practical knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should keep in mind that readers expect authors to approach LIS scholarship with a consideration of critical, radical, and nonhegemonic analyses. Readers will expect traditional LIS topics to be analysed and critiqued from new, radical, or nondominant points of view, and they expect writing on newer topics crucial to the profession’s progressive advancement and a disruption of its neoliberal and market-based practices.

Last updated: April 20, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about.
  2. Stuart Lawson, “Editorial,” Journal of Radical Librarianship 1 (2015): 1, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/article/view/1.
  3. “About the Journal” lists the editors and their subject areas.
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. “About the Journal.”
  7. “Announcements,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/announcement.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  10. “About the Journal.”
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions.
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About the Journal.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  16. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  17. “Home,” Radical Librarians Collective, accessed April 20, 2018, https://rlc.radicallibrarianship.org/.
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

ISSN: 0739-5086 (Print, prior to the 2014, volume 18 issue) and 2330-2976 (Online)1

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Judaica Librarianship is the scholarly journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, an international professional organization that fosters access to information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish. The Association promotes Jewish literacy and scholarship and provides a community for peer support and professional development.”2 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”3

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish culture, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and anyone interested in Jewish library and information science.4

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL).5

Peer reviewed? Yes, using a double-blind system.6

Type: LIS scholarly.7

Medium: Online as of 2014, volume 18. Prior to that, the journal was in print.8

Content: “Judaica Librarianship, the peer-reviewed journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, provides a forum for scholarship on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive reviews of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”9

Additionally, the journal covers “LGBTQ issues, Linked Data in libraries, and digital humanities,”10, as well as the history of bookstores,11 the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library of the University of Haifa’s role in promoting information literacy,12 and public librarians’ opinions on including controversial Holocaust denial materials in library collections.13

 

The journal has also covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works, as well as children’s books.14

Frequency of publication: Annually.15

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes a wide range of articles related to Jewish studies librarianship and information studies. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conferences or chapter meetings.”16

Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”17

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • “Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.”18

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to Jewish studies librarianship. The winning essay will be considered for Judaica Librarianship publication, and the winner will receive a cash prize.19

Submission and review process: Judaica Librarianship has an Open Access policy with a 12-month moving wall. As is standard, the journal does not accept simultaneous submissions or previously published manuscripts.20

To submit an article for consideration, authors must first create an account through the site and follow the detailed submission guidelines.21

When submitting, keep in mind that the journals follows the guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with a professional, yet conversational tone. As such, while LIS terms and phrases are employed throughout, both LIS and non-LIS readers with an interest in Jewish library concerns can enjoy all this journal has to offer.23

Style guide used: For style guidelines, please follow the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition.24

For academic writing guidelines, follow Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians and Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style.25

For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino, and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; for the romanization of Yiddish, refer to the YIVO system.26

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal is an excellent place for new and established writers looking for a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal devoted to Jewish LIS studies. Additionally, this publication welcomes new ideas, as well as fresh takes on established theories. Thirdly, the editorial team works closely with writers to ensure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so unpublished and published authors alike can feel comfortable throughout the entire review process.27

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are unavailable, the journal has over 25,000 downloads since becoming an online publication in 2014.28 Additionally, it is safe to say the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) comprises a large portion of the journal’s audience. AJL is an international organization, with members from “North America and beyond, including China, the Czech Republic, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.”29

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL is headquartered in New Jersey30, and members of the journal’s editorial board are affiliated with North American universities, including Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.31

Additionally, the AJL holds a conference each year at a different location. Typically, the conference is held in North America, but in 1971, it was held in Jerusalem.32 Although the bulk of the work for the journal is done through online collaboration, the AJL conferences serve as a useful forum for the editorial board to discuss their work in person.33

The journal is published in English,34, but—as mentioned above—it promotes Jewish literacy and LIS studies worldwide.35 Thus, this journal is defined by its Jewish LIS interests, rather than by a specific geographic area.36

Lastly, articles often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, which is generally explained within the text.37

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL,38 and, whether or not they’re information professionals, tend to be interested in Jewish LIS news. Additionally, readers likely work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections; the other containing Schools, Synagogues, and Centers.39 All members receive a subscription to Judacia Librarianship.40

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this journal is published by the Association of Jewish Libraries, most readers will be familiar with LIS subject matter.41 However, because not all readers are affiliated with LIS professions42, articles use specific LIS terms sparingly and explain them where necessary.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal have a strong interest in news from a Jewish library perspective and are likely to welcome new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. This publication is also an excellent choice for learning more about and becoming part of the larger AJL community. Authors should also keep in mind that the audience of this publication encompasses readers outside the LIS profession “and includes scholars researching the history of the book,” professionals affiliated with museums and bookstores, etc.43

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 43 footnotes

  1.  “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  2. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  3. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  4. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  5. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  6. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  7. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  8. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  9.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed April 9, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  10.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  11. Rifat Bali, “Istanbul’s Jewish Bookstores: Monuments to a Bygone Era,” Judaica Librarianship 20 (2017): 159, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1213.
  12. Cecilia Harel, Yosef Branse, Karen Elisha, and Ora Zehavi, “The Younes and Soraya Nazarian Library, University of Haifa: Israel’s Northern Star,” Judaica Librarianship 19 (2016): 24, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1142.
  13. John A. Drobnicki, “Holocaust Denial Literature Twenty Years Later: A Follow-up Investigation of Public Librarians’ Attitudes Regarding Acquisition and Access,” Judaica Librarianship 18 (2015): 54, accessed April 9, 2018, https://doi.org/10.14263/2330-2976.1035.
  14.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  15. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  16. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  18. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  19. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  20. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  22. “Policies,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. “About Judaica Librarianship,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  24.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  25.  “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  26. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  27. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  28.  Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  29. “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  30. Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  31. “Editorial Board,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  32. “Conference Proceedings,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Conference_Proceedings
  33. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 16, 2014.
  34.  Judaica Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1518891580073/340702
  35.  “About AJL,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/about.php
  36. “Focus & Scope,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  37. “Submission Guidelines,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  38. “Digital Publications,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/Digital_Publications
  39. “Divisions,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, http://jewishlibraries.org/content.php?page=Divisions
  40. “Subscription Information,” Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/subscription.html
  41. Judaica Librarianship, Association of Jewish Libraries, accessed February 17, 2018, https://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  42. Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
  43.  Rachel Leket-Mor, email message to author, April 5, 2018.
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BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
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International Information & Library Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: International Information & Library Review

ISSN: Print ISSN: 1057-2317, Online ISSN: 1095-9297

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ulbr20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The overall mission of the International Information & Library Review is the provision of knowledge that will assist in the success of libraries and information-related institutions around the world.”1

Target audience: The target audience for International Information & Library Review is “library and information professionals and paraprofessionals in public, academic, special, government, and corporate environments” from around the world.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All papers in International Information & Library Review have undergone editorial screening and peer review.”4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: With a global perspective and articles written by scholars and professionals from many different countries and institutions, the International Information & Library Review “focuses on three broad areas: policy and ethical issues, including digital values, around the world; the ways in which information technologies and policies are used to help in decision-making, problem solving and improving the quality of people’s lives; and designing and implementing information systems and services in libraries and other organizations around the world.”5

Besides original articles, regular columns include Digital Trends and the Global Library Community, Advances in Library Data and Access, The Library Workforce, Perspectives on Public Services, Global Postcards: Research, Projects, and Experiences from the Field, and Digital Heritage: Spotlight on Europe.6

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for Authors and Invitation for Column Contributions.

Types of contributions accepted: International Information & Library Review publishes “current and anecdotal information” with an emphasis on “research, current developments, and trends related to library and information leadership and management; marketing, advancement, and development; collaborative projects and insights; scholarly communication and publication; collection development and management; technology and digitization; public and technical services; physical and virtual environments, and organizational behavior.”8 Besides original articles, the journal welcomes proposals and articles for its regular columns.9

Submission and review process: International Information & Library Review uses an online submission system for manuscript management and the peer-review process.10 The Taylor & Francis Authors Services website offers an overview of the publishing process and detailed instructions for authors.11 The journal uses Editorial Manager for the peer-review process, with detailed guidelines for authors.12

Editorial tone: The overall editorial tone is scholarly, especially for the original articles. Each column has its own guidelines and topics, so authors should read these and sample articles carefully if submitting an article or proposal to a particular column.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.14 Taylor & Francis provides a document outlining APA style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

International Information & Library Review is a well-established, highly regarded journal in the worldwide library and information science (LIS) community. LIS scholars and professionals who are conducting original research that appeals to a worldwide audience and who can contribute to the journal’s regular columns are a good fit for this journal. The journal’s authorship is from within and beyond the LIS community: “Contributions to the journal have come from staff or members of many different international organizations, including the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL, and from library and information scientists in academia, government, industry, and other organizations.”16 The journal does not court student authors, and contributors seem to be well-established professionals in LIS and related organizations, but column editors do invite proposals, which may be a way for LIS students to explore publishing in this high-level journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International Information & Library Review has a worldwide scope and reach. Its audience includes “information scientists, librarians and other scholars and practitioners all over the world.”17 The journal is written in English for an international audience. Regional terms and practices should be explained.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS scholars, professionals, and practitioners from around the world, as well as stakeholders in international organizations, such as the United Nations, UNESCO, IFLA, and INTAMEL,18 who may not be in the LIS field but who are interested in international information-sharing practices and standards.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Overall, readers will have an advanced understanding of LIS subject matter, but because readers are from all over the world and sometimes from outside of the field, jargon, regionalisms, and novel practices should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting to the International Information & Library Review are writing for an international readership. Readers expect “timely articles on research and development in international and comparative librarianship, information sciences, information policy and information ethics, digital values and digital libraries.”19 They are interested in how LIS practice and theory are evolving around the world–on the international stage and in particular regions–and how this might have an impact on their own policies and practices.

Last updated: April 2, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ulbr20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Invitation for Column Contributions,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/iilr-columns.
  6. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  7. “Journal Information,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=ulbr20.
  8. “Aims and Scope.”
  9. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” International Information & Library Review, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ulbr20&page=instructions.
  11. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Editorial Manager: Tutorial for Authors,” version 14.1-Q4/2017, www.ariessys.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.ariessys.com/wp-content/uploads/EM-Author-English.pdf.
  13. See “Invitation for Column Contributions,” for links to each column’s guidelines.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” tandf.co.uk, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.tandf.co.uk//journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  16. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  17. “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  18.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
  19.  “Invitation for Column Contributions.”
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VINE Journal of Information & Knowledge Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems

ISSN: 2059-5891

Website: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=vjikms

Purpose, objective, or mission: VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is an international journal publishing work that considers “information and knowledge from a content management/library science perspective.” The journal highlights “the reality and need of organizations, both governmental and private, to operate in a highly interdependent world, where collaboration and knowledge/information are the predominant assets for getting things done; and, in many cases, critical for achieving competitive advantage.” The journal was formerly titled VINE.1

Target audience: Practicing professionals in the areas of information services, knowledge management services, and library management systems.

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.4

Content:VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems provides a combination of topical themed issues, well-researched, timely, unbiased articles, and practical overviews which can be applied in the workplace.” The journal “offers lively and topical coverage of developments in the field.” 5 The journal primarily publishes research papers, but conceptual papers, literature reviews, technical papers, and case studies are published regularly. Most issues are made up of individual articles, but themed, guest-edited issues regularly appear.6

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems accepts research papers, conceptual papers, literature reviews, technical papers, case studies, and opinion pieces that “consider information and knowledge from a content management/library science perspective.” The journal aims to publish new developments in the field of information and knowledge management, helping organizations stay current and competitive. The journal is international in scope.8

Submission and review process: This publication uses the ScholarOne Manuscripts system for submissions. A first review is performed by the editor, and acceptable manuscripts are sent for double-blind peer review to at least two independent referees.9 Emerald Publishing has a guide to help authors through the publishing process.10

Editorial tone: The tone of VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is academic and focused on the technology and research of knowledge management. As such, articles are technical, specific to the subject, and backed by studies.

Style guide used: Harvard style. This publication has detailed manuscript requirements, including style of references and in-text citations, which should be read carefully prior to submission.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is a well-established, highly regarded journal in the field of information and knowledge management. LIS authors best suited to this journal work and conduct research in this field and have particular knowledge of information management and its practical applications. The journal publishes articles from studies conducted around the world.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems is published for the worldwide LIS information management community, and articles use technical terms specific to the discipline and high-level academic English. The editors are professors at universities in Hong Kong, Romania, Finland, and the United States, and editorial board members are from universities and companies from around the globe.12

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely LIS scholars and professionals working in knowledge and information management in the public and private sectors.13 Readers most likely have or are working on LIS master’s or doctoral degrees or are professionals with technical and practical information management expertise.

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: This publication is aimed at information management professionals and scholars. Readers will expect a strong emphasis on information management techniques and principles. The readers of this publication likely have a strong background in technology and knowledge management terminology.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The journal seeks to provide readers with articles, case studies, and opinion pieces that provide current, relevant insights into the issues that are shaping the future of information and knowledge management systems, enabling readers to compare their own experiences with an international audience of their peers. Readers will be highly informed, so authors should send articles that are well researched and add to the body of knowledge.

Last updated: March 26, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “Journal History,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018,
    http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=vjikms.
  2. “Recommend This Journal to Your Librarian,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/recommend.htm?id=vjikms.
  3. “Author Guidelines,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=vjikms.
  4. “Recommend This Journal to Your Librarian.”
  5. “Journal History.”
  6. For example, Special Issue: Knowledge Strategies: A New Connection between Strategic Thinking and Knowledge Management Capabilities, VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems 47, no. 4(2017), https://www.emeraldinsight.com/toc/vjikms/47/4.
  7. “Volume List,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, https://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/vjikms.
  8. “Journal History.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “For Authors,” emeraldgrouppublising.com, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/authors/index.htm.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Editorial Team,” VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, accessed March 26, 2018, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=vjikms.
  13. “Journal History.”
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Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

ISSN: 2333-3316

Websitehttps://www.weaveux.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weave is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.”1

From it’s editorial philosophy, “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students, library User Experience professionals.

Publisher: Michigan Publishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a double-blind review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Weave UX consists of full length, scholarly articles and The Dialog Box, featuring book and media reviews.6

Frequency of publication: Issues are published twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Manuscript submission guidelines can be found in a Google Doc linked on the submissions page.

Types of contributions accepted: Weave is looking for two types of submissions:

  • Full length, scholarly articles of relevance to UX in libraries
  • The Dialog Box, a new kind of review section aiming to “extend beyond traditional book review sections and feature critical dialog not only with books but with other media that set the boundaries of UX”8

Submission and review process: Before writing an article, Weave asks that you send a short pitch about your topic, they can then help develop it into an article. If you already have something written, send them a few sentences about your article and they’ll take it from there.9

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: APA is used for in-text citations and works cited pages, and the Chicago Manual of Style is used for spelling, grammar, punctuation and all other style concerns.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Weave has a “come one, come all” approach regarding librarians and professionals who are passionate about UX. Whether you have ideas you want to explore or you have already composed a full-fledged article, Weave is an excellent place to start if you are writing about user experience in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: All editors are based in the United States and the journal is hosted by Michigan Publishing. However, this quote pulled from the Editorial Philosophy shows that the journal is not limited to only U.S.-based librarians: “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries (wherever they are, whatever their job title is) can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Weave’s audience and authors are not limited to just the United States, they have published articles from Canadian, Swedish and Australian writers.12

Reader characteristics: According to their Editorial Philosophy, “Weave’s intended primary audience consists of people in libraries who are using or are interesting in using UX.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Readers are already familiar with UX in libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Weave articles are obviously passionate about libraries and user experience in libraries. The latest issues of Weave have featured articles such as “A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility,” “How Much Research is Enough?” as well as a book review, demonstrating that Weave’s readers are interested in a broad array of topics related to User Experience.14

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Home,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/
  2. “Editorial Philosophy,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/about.html#philosophy
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Editorial Philosophy”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Weave Submissions,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  7. “Archive,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://quod.lib.umich.edu/w/weave/12535642.*
  8. “Weave Submissions”
  9. “Weave Submissions.”
  10. Submission Guidelines for Manuscript drafts,” Weave, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  11. “About.”
  12. “Archive.”
  13. “Editorial Philosophy.”
  14. “Archive.”
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Teacher Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Teacher Librarian: The Journal for School Library Professionals

ISSN: 1481-1782

Website: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Teacher Librarian “is one of the leading journals designed specifically for librarians working with K-12 students” as well as classroom teachers and administrators. “The name Teacher Librarian reflects the journal’s focus on the essential role of the school librarian, or ‘teacher-librarian,’ as educator, a partner and collaborator with classroom teachers, school administrators, and others.”1

Target audience: Librarians and other information professionals, classroom teachers, and administrators working in K-12 schools.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, as appropriate to the article.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Teacher Librarian publishes several major articles in each issue which deal with major topics of current interest as well as articles addressing the very foundation of teacher-librarianship.”6 Articles address a broad spectrum of topics, including Future Ready Libraries, inquiry, equity, leadership, open educational resources, cultural responsiveness, project-based learning, advocacy, digital citizenship, STEM and STEAM, and school library design.7 Regular sections include app and website reviews; advocacy; technology and PC issues; education and library product reviews; library resources management; reviews of new books, videos, and software for children and young adults; and Internet resources.8

Frequency of publication: Five times per year: February, April, June, October, and December.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Teacher Librarian accepts articles on a broad range of topics; among the most popular are “learning commons, digital and multiple literacies, reading, professional collaboration, professional development, teaching and curriculum ideas, and makerspaces” in the context of the K-12 school library. Authors may submit proposals for articles to the editors.10 The journal accepts manuscripts that are based on research, personal experience, and practice; the column Tips & Tactics features “information that can be easily transferred to practice on a daily basis.”11

Submission and review process: Submit manuscripts as an email attachment, preferably in Word, to the editors. As appropriate, proposed articles are blind reviewed “by at least two members of the Teacher Librarian peer review board, all of whom are either scholars or recognized professionals.” The editors make the final decisions on manuscripts and reserve the right “to edit for brevity, clarity and consistency of style.”12

Editorial tone: The tone of the articles ranges from scholarly, but not overly formal, to casual and informative, depending on the article type.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an especially good journal for LIS students interested in K-12 school librarianship and the current topics that affect the field. The journal publishes both research- and practice-based articles, under a wide range of topics that are of interest to those working in the schools, so LIS writers have a choice on the type of articles they would like to submit, as long as the guidelines are followed. Potential writers can also submit proposals to the editors to make sure the topic falls within the journal’s scope.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Teacher Librarian has about 2,750 subscribers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of Teacher Librarian are mostly located in the United States and Canada, and the journal focuses on North American school libraries, although many of the issues discussed can apply to school libraries in other regions. The advisory board is made up of professionals from a range of school types from the United States, Canada, and Australia.15 Authors should not have any problems using cultural references or jargon common in schools, although regional terms and usages may need explanation.

Reader characteristics: This journal is designed specifically for library professionals, school administrators, and classroom teachers working with children and young adults in the K-12 schools. Readers expect both research-based articles and articles that have clear guidelines for immediate, practical implementation in school libraries. Readers also expect helpful reviews on new materials and articles that explore up-and-coming trends in the field of school librarianship. Teacher Librarian does not look like a “typical” scholarly journal in that it is colorful and features photos and graphics.

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this journal range from librarians with MLIS degrees, to library professionals without a master’s, to school administrators and classroom teachers.16 Some readers may be less familiar with library jargon, and so explanations may be warranted. Most readers will be familiar with the terminology and concepts of K-12 education.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Teacher Librarian are library professionals who are working with K-12 students. These professionals are looking for articles that present strategies to better manage library resources for students, or articles that review education- and library-related materials. The readers need to be kept up to date on the latest happenings in information technology, as well as resources that can be found on the Internet. Collection development is a large part of the duties of the teacher librarian, so reliable reviews of new books and other media is of great interest. Articles on collaboration, leadership, advocacy, management, or any aspect of information technology in the K-12 schools would also appeal to this group.

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/.
  2. “About.”
  3. Frontpiece, Teacher Librarian 45, no. 3 (February 2018): 6.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/.
  5. “Subscribe,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/subscribe/.
  6. “About.”
  7. “2018 Media Kit,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/TELI2018-mediakit_web.pdf.
  8. “About.”
  9. “Subscribe.”
  10. “Submissions,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Author Guidelines.”
  13. “Author Guidelines.”
  14.  “2018 Media Kit.”
  15. “Advisory Board,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/advisory-board/.
  16. “About.”
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ALSC Matters!

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALSC Matters! (formerly ALSConnect)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly ALSConnect, ALSC Matters is a newsletter for ALSC members highlighting activities and information of interest for librarians working with children.1

Target audience: LIS professionals who work with children.

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Online.

Content: Apart from general ALSC news, ALSC Matters! also features:

  • Bright Ideas: highlights ideas in planning services and programming in libraries around the country.
    • Example: Group summer reading programs in Utah daycares and summer schools.
  • Hear Ye! Hear Ye!: discusses resources, events and honors of interest to ALSC members
    • Example: ALSC members who received the I Love My Librarian Award in 2017.
  • ALSC Voices: highlights members, showcases ALSC profiles and includes interviews with ALSC members
    • Example: Q & A profile on a senior children’s librarian in New York.

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Found on the About ALSC Matters! page. Submissions should be sent to Laura Schulte-Cooper.

Types of contributions accepted: News information to be featured in Bright Ideas, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! or ALSC Voices.

Submission and review process: Unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, children’s librarians may be interested in submitting short pieces showcasing new and interesting activities and programs they have been implementing at their local libraries. If LIS authors have been nominated or have won an award pertaining to work as a children’s librarian he or she may want to submit it to Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC receive issues of ALSC Matters!, though non-members can also subscribe using an online form.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers of ALSC Matters! are likely ALA members, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals or perhaps students working in the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of ALSC Matters! are professionals and students already involved in the field of children’s librarianship. ALSC Matters! may be a good venue for you to showcase projects that could be a source of inspiration, as well as relevant events and LIS happenings.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “About ALSC Matters!,” ALA.org, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/alsconnectonline/aboutalsconnect/aboutalsconnect
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
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No Shelf Required

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: No Shelf Required

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.noshelfrequired.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: NSR started as a blog run by Sue Polanka, an academic librarian at Wright State University. For librarians from all fields, it quickly became a go-to source for new information on ebooks in libraries–a burgeoning concept at the time. Sue and the current editor, Mirela Roncevic, joined forces on all sorts of writing endeavors and the blog eventually grew into its own site with regular columnists and contributors from all over the world.1

From NSR’s About page: “In 2016, NSR expanded its mission to inspire professionals inside the book industry to do more with ebooks and econtent and embarked on groundbreaking projects that challenge what we think is possible with ebooks.”2

Target audience: Publishers, writers, editors, LIS students and professionals.3

Publisher: Currently, NSR’s editor is Mirela Roncevic.4

Peer reviewed? Unknown.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: NSR features articles on all sorts of topics–academic libraries, apps, ebook readers, piracy and many more. They have recently expanded to include reviews and opinion pieces from writers in all areas of digital content.5

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/

Types of contributions accepted: Reviews and opinion pieces, news posts.6

Submission and review process: Send proposals to Editorial Director, Mirela Roncevic at mirelaronevic@gmail.com. Review process unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, but casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Given the breadth of information and the scope of topics that are covered, NSR could be a great fit for all sorts of LIS authors. Published pieces are written “by industry insiders of all walks of life: writers, editors, librarians, educators, publishers, vendors, independent authors, and tech entrepreneurs, to name a few. Some creatively draw our attention to the issues, while others offer perspectives on what various statistics tell us about the state of the larger book industry.”7

Authors covering topics regarding ebooks and the digital or technological aspects of the LIS fields may particularly be interested in looking more into NSR.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Readers and writers are primarily in the United States, though they feature contributors from all over the world.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though NSR began as a blog out of Wright State University in Ohio, its audience is found all over North America, with an additional global presence. Articles are published in English, but the website offers Google translation on all pages.8

Reader characteristics: NSR readers are students and professionals in many different areas–LIS, publishing, education and more.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers of NSR may have a library science background, but given the wide range of readers and topics covered, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

NSR strives to publish the latest news and information on the ever growing fields of ebooks and epublishing. Readers interested in these fields are advocates for improving technology and tech usage in the LIS fields and beyond. NSR has a fantastic, comprehensive list of articles and essays related to emerging trends and issues in the ebook/epublishing fields for researchers and inquiring minds. To see if their work would be a good fit, potential authors should check out Learn with NSR to read some the latest publishings.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Home,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Write for NSR,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/
  6. “Write for NSR.”
  7. “Write for NSR.”
  8. “About.”
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