Wiki Tags Archives: Children

Facet Publishing

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Facet Publishing

Website: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Facet Publishing is “the commercial and publishing and bookselling arm of CILIP: the Library and Information Association,” with a focus on global business and attention to detail.1

Target audience: LIS professionals.

Owner: CILIP: the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes.

Types of books published: LIS professional books, textbooks, series and ebooks.

Medium: Print and electronic, though not all titles are available in both formats.

Topics covered: Over thirty LIS subjects are published by Facet, ranging from academic libraries to website & intranet management.2

Number of titles published per year: Exact number unknown, though Facet’s ‘Recently published’ page lists thirty books published between April 2017 and January 2018.3

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php

Types of submissions accepted: Facets asks potential authors to “think carefully about the intended market, the competition and the unique selling points”4 before sending in a proposal. They are looking for “a mixture of content: practice oriented books for working professionals, textbooks that particularly dovetail with the iSchools curriculum and emerging developments and thinking in research for a scholarly audience.”5 Book proposals should contain sections regarding the book’s content, market, and competition, as well as information about yourself.

The content:

  • “A synopsis of the book, including a detailed outline of the work with intended chapter headings, together with a description of each chapter and its estimated length
  • An estimate of the total length of the book
  • A rationale describing why the book is needed, what it hopes to achieve and how, and any new ideas and developments you intend to cover, or new approaches that you intend to use. Notes on additional features such as case studies, checklists, diagrams, photographs, software, etc.
  • Sample material (one or two chapters), if possible
  • An estimated date of manuscript completion”6

The market:

  • “Who is the intended reader?
  • How large do you estimate the potential readership to be?
  • A description of the potential readers (e.g., students, practising library and information professionals/managers, policy makers) with specific details about why they need this book:
    • what sectors/organizations they are working in
    • the required level of professional expertise
    • courses
  • Are there any potential secondary audiences and markets? (e.g., museums, archives, publishers, record managers)
  • Is there international potential? Where? Why?”7

The competition: “Does this book fill a gap in the market? What evidence is there for this gap? Provide a list of any competing books with price, publisher, year of publication, and any other useful information, together with a comment as to how your book differs, what makes it superior and how it will compete.”8

Yourself: “Details of yourself, your experience, related activities, and any other previous publications (whether articles, reports or books).”9

Submission and review process: All proposals should be submitted to the Commissioning Editor. If a proposal is accepted, the author and commissioning editors will work together on a realistic schedule for the book’s publication.10 Facet prides themselves on timeliness and detail, and are quick to market new publications.11

Editorial tone: None listed, but consider that Facet publishes for students and professionals already well versed in the LIS field.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Facet publishes across a wide array of LIS topics, making them a publisher to strongly consider no matter what your subject field may be. Potential authors should keep in mind that Facet requests very detailed information from each book proposal, so authors should have a clear idea of their marketability and relevance. Authors should be sure to carefully read the book submission guidelines to ensure that all questions have been addressed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s readers

Publication circulation: Based in the United Kingdom, but Facet has agents and representatives around the world.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Facet is the bookseller for CILIP, a library and science information association in the U.K., though they emphasize that their publications extend into the international LIS world. They have representatives and agents in countries all over the world, making publications available to a world wide audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Facet publications are information professionals, though there may be a secondary audience in fields such as archives and museums. Facet’s bestselling publications include titles such as Managing Records: A handbook of principles and practice and Practical Cataloging, so it can be assumed that their readers have more than a casual knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics and professionals with a strong knowledge or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Facet publishes for an audience in and outside of the United Kingdom. Their works range from LIS textbooks to simple ‘No-nonsense’ guides about topics such as archives and legal issues in Web 2.0, showing that Facet’s readers vary in their knowledge on contemporary LIS topics. This span in readership could make Facet a viable publisher for potential authors across many different subjects.

Last updated: February 26, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/
  2. “Home,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/index.php/a>
  3. “Recently published,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/category.php?category_code=38
  4. “Book proposal guidelines,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/book_proposal_guidelines.php
  5. “Write for us,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/write_for_us.php
  6. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  7. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  8. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  9. “Book proposal guidelines.”
  10. “The publishing process,” FacetPublishing.co.uk, accessed February, 20, 2018, http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/downloads/file/Guidance_for_Existing_Authors/04%20The%20publishing%20process%20Jan%202012.pdf
  11. “About us.”
  12. “About Us.”
Continue Reading

Everyday Advocacy Matters

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Everyday Advocacy Matters

ISSN: Not applicable.

Websitehttp://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/everyday-advocacy-matters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Everyday Advocacy, an initiative of ALSC (a division of ALA), was launched in May 2013 after the ALSC’s executive committee came together to discuss two major issues:

  • How can ALSC educate policy makers on the importance of children’s service?
  • How can ALSC assist youth service librarians to articulate their value within their profession and the community?

Along with the new Everyday Advocacy website, the ALSC Board of Directors approved of a newsletter promoting “20-minute” advocacy.1

Everyday Advocacy Matters is a quarterly, electronic newsletter featuring simple, effective ways to learn, share, and make a difference in local library communities.”2 Content for each issue is related to Everyday Advocacy’s five tenets: Be Informed, Engage With Your Community, Speak Out, Get Inspired and Share Your Advocacy Story.3

Target audience: The primary audience is members of ALSC and children’s librarians, the secondary audience is anyone who advocates for children and libraries.4

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Electronic.

Content: Each issue features five sections:5

  • From the Editor: A friendly welcome to each issue’s seasonal focus.
  • Everyday Advocacy Spotlight: Features to help you focus your advocacy efforts.
  • News You Can Use: The latest reports, data and stories that readers may find useful in their own libraries.
  • Get Inspired: A section that often features a “Savvy Success Story” highlighting an inspirational member of the community.
  • Calendar: Key dates and events for “learning, sharing and making a difference.”

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Send submissions to Amy Martin. Her email address can be found on EAM‘s home page.

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions that are appropriate for one of the five sections listed above. For a better example, here are the call to submissions for the October 2017 issue:

  • Everyday Advocacy Spotlight. We’re looking for short articles (250-500 words) to use as our Savvy Success Story feature.
  • News You Can Use. Help us highlight advocacy events, opportunities, and news items our colleagues can use to learn, share, and make a difference for youth and families in their library communities.
  • Get Inspired! Let us know what motivates you and helps keep you going as an Everyday Advocate so we can inspire others, too.”7

Submission and review process: Unknown, but be mindful of copy deadlines and mailing dates for upcoming issues.8

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

EAM could be a great potential outlet if you have something to say that’s more on the informal side. If you’ve been doing advocacy work at your local library, or you know someone who has, this newsletter may be a great place to showcase it.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC and ALA.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are likely members of ALA, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals and students with a passion for advocacy in libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

EAM readers are well-versed in the library world and have a passion for doing meaningful work in their communities. They are already members of ALA and ALSC, so networking and community are at the forefront of their work.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About Everyday Advocacy,” ALA.org, accessed March 20, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/about
  2. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page,” ALA.org, accessed March 12, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/everyday-advocacy-matters
  3. “Everyday Advocacy,” ALA.org, accessed March 19, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
  6. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
  7. “Everyday Advocacy Matters – July 2017,” ALA.org, accessed March 19, 2018,
  8. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
Continue Reading

ALSC Matters!

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALSC Matters! (formerly ALSConnect)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly ALSConnect, ALSC Matters is a newsletter for ALSC members highlighting activities and information of interest for librarians working with children.1

Target audience: LIS professionals who work with children.

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Online.

Content: Apart from general ALSC news, ALSC Matters! also features:

  • Bright Ideas: highlights ideas in planning services and programming in libraries around the country.
    • Example: Group summer reading programs in Utah daycares and summer schools.
  • Hear Ye! Hear Ye!: discusses resources, events and honors of interest to ALSC members
    • Example: ALSC members who received the I Love My Librarian Award in 2017.
  • ALSC Voices: highlights members, showcases ALSC profiles and includes interviews with ALSC members
    • Example: Q & A profile on a senior children’s librarian in New York.

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Found on the About ALSC Matters! page. Submissions should be sent to Laura Schulte-Cooper.

Types of contributions accepted: News information to be featured in Bright Ideas, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! or ALSC Voices.

Submission and review process: Unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, children’s librarians may be interested in submitting short pieces showcasing new and interesting activities and programs they have been implementing at their local libraries. If LIS authors have been nominated or have won an award pertaining to work as a children’s librarian he or she may want to submit it to Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC receive issues of ALSC Matters!, though non-members can also subscribe using an online form.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers of ALSC Matters! are likely ALA members, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals or perhaps students working in the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of ALSC Matters! are professionals and students already involved in the field of children’s librarianship. ALSC Matters! may be a good venue for you to showcase projects that could be a source of inspiration, as well as relevant events and LIS happenings.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “About ALSC Matters!,” ALA.org, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/alsconnectonline/aboutalsconnect/aboutalsconnect
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
Continue Reading

BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: Not applicable.

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
Continue Reading

BayViews

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayViews

ISSN: 1045-67241

Website: http://www.bayviews.org/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: BayViews is a publication of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, an “association of people interested in library work with children and young adults”2, with reviews aimed at evaluating new books to identify titles appropriate for library purchase. BayView‘s goals are “to strengthen and maintain work with youth in the libraries of Northern and Central California according to the highest standards of professional librarianship by:

  • Reviewing and evaluating children’s books and other materials produced for young people
  • Working actively to further the cause of library work with children
  • Discussing various phases and problems of this work
  • Cooperating in the solution of problems of mutual concern
  • Encouraging and stimulating the personal friendships of its members”3

Target audience: Members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, including both public librarians and school librarians.4

Publisher: The Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news. BayViews is published by a professional organization with the prime purpose of educating its own members.7

Medium: BayViews is both a print and electronic publication. Additionally, BayViews has a blog, which is updated frequently.8

Content: BayViews is a journal of book reviews and opinions with a “western perspective.”9 The members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California use its pages to review new books in the field of children’s literature (including books for babies, children, and teens), as well as meeting in person to discuss the reviews. Each copy of BayViews also contains a section called “BayNews,” which keeps a calendar of upcoming events and collects news about goings on related to children’s services at libraries within the region.10

Frequency of publication: 11 times per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Online at http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html

Reviews are submitted using an online form on the above page, which also includes sample reviews and a letter from the editors regarding content, voice, and other review considerations.12

Types of contributions accepted: Contributions are accepted by members only, including book reviews of children’s and young adult literature, as well as news about events and services in the Northern California library community.13

Reviewers are now able to choose their own review books at meetings.14

Submission and review process: Contributors must be members of the organization. Reviewers choose their own review books at meetings. Authors wishing to contribute to the BayNews section should contact the editor.15

Editorial tone: Reviews should be concise and critical. Sample reviews and guidelines can be found online in the document “A Guide for BayViews Reviewers, Revised September 2012.”16

Style guide used: Not specified, but extensive style guidelines are provided in the document referenced above, “A Guide for BayViews Reviewers, Revised September 2012.”17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is a great opportunity for writers in Northern California who are interested in reviewing children’s and young adult literature. Since authors must be members of the Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, and reviews are presented at the ACL chapter meetings, they would probably want to reside in the area to get the most out of their membership.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The membership of ACL who receive as a membership benefit both the print and electronic copy of the journal.18

Audience location and language or cultural views: Based in Northern and Central California, the publication is published in English with no special considerations.19

Reader characteristics: Children’s librarians with a desire to learn more about books than reviews in the LIS press offer. Readers are interested specifically in children’s and young adult books, and issues related to working in public and school libraries. Written by, and for, the membership.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: General LIS knowledge and possibly expertise in their area of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication for the education of the membership of ACL, authors should be well versed in the subject of children’s and young adult literature and willing to follow the membership guidelines to participate in the ACL community.21

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  BayViews, Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California, accessed March 22, 2018, http://www.bayviews.org/members/bayviews/BayViews01-07.pdf
  2. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission.html
  3. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission.html
  4. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Mission Statement. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/mission.html
  5. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  6. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  7. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  8. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  9. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  10. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayNews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/baynews.html
  11. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  12. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  13. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  14. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  15. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  16. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  17. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). ACL Review Tools. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/reviewtools.html#reviewform
  18. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). Membership. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/membership.html
  19. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  20. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
  21. Association of Children’s Librarians of Northern California. (2016). BayViews. BayViews. Retrieved from http://www.bayviews.org/
Continue Reading

Briefings

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Briefings

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.cla-net.org/displaycommon.cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=261

Purpose, objective, or mission: Briefings is an online newsletter of the California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group, providing information relevant to those who serve children and young adults in the library community.1

Target audience: Members of the California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group, as well as other interested professionals.2

Publisher: The California Library Association’s Youth Services Interest Group.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news with the prime purpose of educating its members.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: Issues of Briefings typically consist of articles about current events in the organization including professional conferences or programs, information about services and programs at California libraries, reminders about scholarships, events, awards and interviews with children’s authors.7

From the Youth Services Interest Group’s Mission Statement, Briefings “features information on interesting and insightful programs and activities for children, tweens, and teens. It also provides readers with information on CLA and other activities affecting libraries throughout the state.”8

Frequency of publication: Briefings now publishes four times per year (as of 2012), in January, May, and August and October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Each newsletter offers a call for submissions. 10

Types of contributions accepted: Upcoming topics are announced in each issue of the newsletter and in the members’ discussion list. The newsletter generally accepts any articles concerning children’s or young adult services, individual experiences at conferences, or sharing information about programs attended.11

Submission and review process: In most cases, articles are about 500 words. Contributors are usually CLA members but it is not required. Authors are asked to meet specific deadlines, usually two weeks before publication. Authors can send submissions to the editors via email.12

Editorial tone: Informational.13

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A good place to increase visibility in the California LIS community and network with other LIS professionals, especially for CLA members and first time writers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As an online-only publication, no circulation figures are available, according to the editor. The California Library Association has “nearly 3000 Individual, Business, and Institutional members. Individual members include librarians, library employees, library students, friends group members, trustees, retirees as well as members of the general public who wish to support California libraries. CLA Business members represent a wide range of library-supporting businesses, whereas Institutional members include library institutions and systems who support the association’s advocacy programs.”14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As a state professional organization, most members either reside or work in the state of California, or have a vested interest in issues affecting libraries in California.15 Briefings is published in the English language. California is a culturally diverse state, however, and the CLA and the Youth Services Interest Group reflect this diversity with attention paid to issues affecting Latino, African-American, Asian, and gay and lesbian communities, among others.16

Reader characteristics: In the absence of any officially gathered demographic data, information was gleaned from individual issues of Briefings, as well as anecdotal evidence from its past editors. It appears that contributors to the publication are overwhelmingly female,17 and past coeditor Julie Zeoli notes, “It has been my observation that there is a growing trend of young people taking young adult librarian positions.”18 From the large numbers of “20-somethings” she’s met at professional gatherings and conferences, we can surmise that the readership of Briefings is trending younger. Zeoli also notes that their readership seems to be overwhelmingly public librarians, as opposed to school librarians.19 The publication favors state and regional issues faced its membership.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As members of the CLA, we can assume that most readers have MLIS degrees or are working on MLIS degrees, and have a general knowledge base of LIS issues, and youth services specifically. Also, both the CLA and the Youth Services Interest Group have continuing education as one of its goals, and providing a place for the exchange of new ideas and technology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The characteristic with the largest impact on potential contributors to Briefings, of course, is that they usually will be CLA and Youth Services Interest Group members to contribute. With an audience of mainly public librarians, issues of concern to public libraries would probably take precedent over those concerned specifically with school libraries. And with an audience of many young librarians, the audience may be particularly interested in articles sharing information about how other libraries do things, as well as ones with a hip and trendy voice.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  2. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  3. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  4. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  5. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  6. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  7. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  8. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  9. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  10. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  11. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  12. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  13. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  14. California Library Association (CLA). (2016). History. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=29
  15. California Library Association (CLA). (2016). History. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=29
  16. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  17. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group: Briefings Newsletter. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://clanet.site-ym.com/?261
  18. J. Zeoli (personal communication, February 21, 2014)
  19. J. Zeoli (personal communication, February 21, 2014)
  20. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
  21. California Library Association (CLA) Youth Services Interest Group. (2016). Youth Services Interest Group. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?25
Continue Reading

Children and Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Children and Libraries

ISSN: 1542-9806 (Print) and 2374-7641 (Online)1

Website: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/index.cfm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Children and Libraries (CAL) is the official, refereed journal of the Association for Library Service to Children. It primarily serves as a vehicle for continuing education of librarians working with children, and showcases current scholarly research and practice in library service to children and significant activities and initiatives of the Association.”2

Target audience: Children’s librarians, school librarians, reading teachers, library directors, book reviewers, and university professors.3

Publisher: Association for Library Services to Children/American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Children and youth; LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Current scholarly research and practice in library service to children with highlights of significant activities and programs of the association8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors

Types of contributions accepted: CAL publishes full-length scholarly research articles; “best practice” pieces on children’s programming (usually 1,500 words or less); and ends each issue with a brief feature by a children’s librarian, a light essay, humorous story, interview, or interview with a children’s author (up to 300 words). 10

Submission and review process: Submissions via email as Microsoft Word attachments are preferred. Manuscripts will be acknowledged upon receipt and evaluated by at least two referees.11 Authors may expect to be notified of the editor’s decision approximately eight weeks after submission. All articles are subject to the double-blind peer review process, with the following exceptions: transcripts of speeches or articles derived from ALSC-sponsored events, news items, and interviews and articles written by or solicited by the editor.12

Editorial tone: Academic or informal, depending on the submission type.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are involved and interested in providing library services to children would benefit from submitting an article to this journal. Having an article published in Children and Libraries increases prestige for the author as the publication is distributed nationwide and in some foreign countries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are not available, Children and Libraries is delivered to members of the ALSC at a discounted rate and is a benefit of membership. In addition there are individual subscribers and copies distributed for marketing purposes.15 ALSC has a membership network of approximately 4,000.16 Children and Libraries is also available online, with the four most recent issues available only to members but older issues open to all.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the official journal of the ALSC the audience of members extends to every state in the nation and to some foreign countries.18 ALSC is conscious of different cultures and is the national home of El día de los niños – El día de los libros (Children’s Day – Book Day) program. They have also developed the ALSC Every Child Ready to Read project, which aims to promote early literacy skills in children from birth to age five.19 These programs reflect the organization’s support for diversity and dedication to service to all children.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Children and Libraries are made up of children’s librarians, including school librarians, reading teachers, library directors, book reviewers, university professors, library support staff, and retired library professionals. Readers will be familiar with the fundamentals and values of school libraries, public libraries, and community programs that serve children. Readers can be expected to be LIS professionals and to have advanced degrees. Many may work in schools or in public libraries and deal directly with children. Readers have interests in children’€™s education, literacy programs, continuing education for library professionals, and collection development of children’€™s materials in schools and libraries.20

ALSC boasts a network of “more than 4,000 children’s and youth librarians, children’s literature experts, publishers, education and library school faculty members, and other adults committed to creating a better future for children through libraries.”21€ These readers are dedicated to children around the country and promote practices that improve children’€™s library services. The ALSC supports equity of access and the continued development of multicultural, multilingual library staff.22 Cultural diversity is a value of the organization, evident in the various articles in CAL that cover service and programs to patrons of different ethnic backgrounds.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers can be expected to be familiar with LIS jargon and issues facing children and libraries. The readers of CAL have experience with current technologies and the latest trends in library services for children.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are professionals who are concerned with issues pertaining to children and libraries. Readers work in school libraries, public libraries, or have contact with children. These professionals seek out literature that is specific to library service for children and this journal meets those needs. Readers wish to be informed of the latest trends, research involving children, literacy, and collection development in order to meet the needs of their young patrons. Writers interested in writing for this publication would be most successful addressing these needs.

Last updated: January 27, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed  April 10, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/-1409899729
  2. “About Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib
  3. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  4. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  5. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  6. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  7. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  8. “About Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib
  9. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  10. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  11. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  12. “Children and Libraries Manuscript Referee Process,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/calrefereeprocess
  13. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  14. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  15.  “Children and Libraries Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/calsubinfo
  16. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  17. “Children and Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Services to Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib
  18. “Children and Libraries Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/calsubinfo
  19. “ALSC Initiatives,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/initiatives
  20. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, Accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  21. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  22.  “The Importance of Diversity in Library Programs and Material Collections for Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/ALSCwhitepaper_importance%20of%20diversity_with%20graphics_FINAL.pdf
  23. “Back Issues of Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/indices
  24. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
Continue Reading

New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship

ISSN1361-4541 (print), 1740-7885 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcll20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship “is multidisciplinary in nature, providing opportunities for the ‘€˜pure’ discussion of children’s literature, and of issues relating to one of the key places in which to find such literature — €”libraries for young people.”1

Target audience: Those working in the field of children’s and adolescent literature around the world, including public and school librarians, scholars, critics, and teachers.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship is international in scope and publishes articles on a broad range of topics in the field of children’s and adolescent literature and library services, including “the management of library services to children and adolescents; education issues affecting library services; user education and the promotion of services; staff education and training; collection development and management; critical assessments of children’s and adolescent literature; book and media selection; and research in literature and library services for children and adolescents”6

Frequency of publication: Two issues per year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship accepts “original papers of both an experimental and theoretical nature,” as well as those grounded in practical issues in children’s and adolescent literature and library services. The journal publishes original research and scholarship on a broad range of professional issues in children’s and adolescent library services as well as theoretical analyses and discussions of children’s and adolescent literature.8

Submission and review process: Manuscripts and all editorial inquiries should be directed to the editor9 for editorial screening and peer review.10 Taylor & Francis provides a general overview of the publication process.11

Editorial tone: The tone is academic and appropriate for an international audience.

Style guide used: MLA Handbook (8th ed.).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship is an appropriate outlet for LIS scholars, practitioners, and researchers from around the world who are writing about children’s and adolescent literature and library services. The journal publishes high-level research and analyses, as well as theoretical articles and those with practical application.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The New Review of Children’s Literature is international in scope and is published in English. The journal’s editor is based in the United Kingdom, as are many members of the editorial board. In addition, there are editorial board members from Ireland, France, the United States, Canada, Hong Kong, and Thailand.13

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely public and school librarians, as well as researchers in children’s library services and teachers and critics of children’s literature.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As an academic journal, it can be assumed that most readers have a solid professional knowledge of LIS subject matters.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship have a high level of knowledge of the topic and expect to read articles that further their knowledge with well-reasoned analysis and research presented in a straightforward writing style. Readers are also practicing librarians who look to the journal for “informed comment and advice.”15 The journal’s readership is international, and so authors should provide some context for regional practices.

Last updated: February 14, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=rcll20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Journal Information,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=rcll20.
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Journal Information.”
  6. “Aims and Scope.”
  7. “Journal Information.”
  8. “Aims and Scope.”
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rcll20&page=instructions.
  10. “Aims and Scope.”
  11. “Author Services,” TaylorandFrancis.com, accessed February 14, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  12. “Instructions for Authors.”
  13. “Editorial Board,” New Review of Children’s Literature and Librarianship, accessed February 14, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=rcll20.
  14. “Aims and Scope.”
  15. “Aims and Scope.”
Continue Reading

Teacher Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Teacher Librarian: The Journal for School Library Professionals

ISSN: 1481-1782

Website: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Teacher Librarian “is one of the leading journals designed specifically for librarians working with K-12 students” as well as classroom teachers and administrators. “The name Teacher Librarian reflects the journal’s focus on the essential role of the school librarian, or ‘teacher-librarian,’ as educator, a partner and collaborator with classroom teachers, school administrators, and others.”1

Target audience: Librarians and other information professionals, classroom teachers, and administrators working in K-12 schools.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, as appropriate to the article.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: Teacher Librarian publishes several major articles in each issue which deal with major topics of current interest as well as articles addressing the very foundation of teacher-librarianship.”6 Articles address a broad spectrum of topics, including Future Ready Libraries, inquiry, equity, leadership, open educational resources, cultural responsiveness, project-based learning, advocacy, digital citizenship, STEM and STEAM, and school library design.7 Regular sections include app and website reviews; advocacy; technology and PC issues; education and library product reviews; library resources management; reviews of new books, videos, and software for children and young adults; and Internet resources.8

Frequency of publication: Five times per year: February, April, June, October, and December.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: Teacher Librarian accepts articles on a broad range of topics; among the most popular are “learning commons, digital and multiple literacies, reading, professional collaboration, professional development, teaching and curriculum ideas, and makerspaces” in the context of the K-12 school library. Authors may submit proposals for articles to the editors.10 The journal accepts manuscripts that are based on research, personal experience, and practice; the column Tips & Tactics features “information that can be easily transferred to practice on a daily basis.”11

Submission and review process: Submit manuscripts as an email attachment, preferably in Word, to the editors. As appropriate, proposed articles are blind reviewed “by at least two members of the Teacher Librarian peer review board, all of whom are either scholars or recognized professionals.” The editors make the final decisions on manuscripts and reserve the right “to edit for brevity, clarity and consistency of style.”12

Editorial tone: The tone of the articles ranges from scholarly, but not overly formal, to casual and informative, depending on the article type.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an especially good journal for LIS students interested in K-12 school librarianship and the current topics that affect the field. The journal publishes both research- and practice-based articles, under a wide range of topics that are of interest to those working in the schools, so LIS writers have a choice on the type of articles they would like to submit, as long as the guidelines are followed. Potential writers can also submit proposals to the editors to make sure the topic falls within the journal’s scope.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Teacher Librarian has about 2,750 subscribers.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of Teacher Librarian are mostly located in the United States and Canada, and the journal focuses on North American school libraries, although many of the issues discussed can apply to school libraries in other regions. The advisory board is made up of professionals from a range of school types from the United States, Canada, and Australia.15 Authors should not have any problems using cultural references or jargon common in schools, although regional terms and usages may need explanation.

Reader characteristics: This journal is designed specifically for library professionals, school administrators, and classroom teachers working with children and young adults in the K-12 schools. Readers expect both research-based articles and articles that have clear guidelines for immediate, practical implementation in school libraries. Readers also expect helpful reviews on new materials and articles that explore up-and-coming trends in the field of school librarianship. Teacher Librarian does not look like a “typical” scholarly journal in that it is colorful and features photos and graphics.

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this journal range from librarians with MLIS degrees, to library professionals without a master’s, to school administrators and classroom teachers.16 Some readers may be less familiar with library jargon, and so explanations may be warranted. Most readers will be familiar with the terminology and concepts of K-12 education.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Teacher Librarian are library professionals who are working with K-12 students. These professionals are looking for articles that present strategies to better manage library resources for students, or articles that review education- and library-related materials. The readers need to be kept up to date on the latest happenings in information technology, as well as resources that can be found on the Internet. Collection development is a large part of the duties of the teacher librarian, so reliable reviews of new books and other media is of great interest. Articles on collaboration, leadership, advocacy, management, or any aspect of information technology in the K-12 schools would also appeal to this group.

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/.
  2. “About.”
  3. Frontpiece, Teacher Librarian 45, no. 3 (February 2018): 6.
  4. “Author Guidelines,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/.
  5. “Subscribe,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/subscribe/.
  6. “About.”
  7. “2018 Media Kit,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/TELI2018-mediakit_web.pdf.
  8. “About.”
  9. “Subscribe.”
  10. “Submissions,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. “Author Guidelines.”
  13. “Author Guidelines.”
  14.  “2018 Media Kit.”
  15. “Advisory Board,” teacherlibrarian.com, accessed March 19, 2018, http://teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/advisory-board/.
  16. “About.”
Continue Reading

The Sun Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Sun Magazine

ISSN: 0744-96661

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The Sun is an independent, ad-free magazine that for more than forty years has used words and photographs to evoke the splendor and heartache of being human. Each monthly issue celebrates life, but not in a way that ignores its complexity. The personal essays, short stories, interviews, poetry, and photographs that appear in The Sun’s pages explore the challenges we face and the moments when we rise to meet them.”2Website: http://thesunmagazine.org

Target audience: The target audience is the general public; specifically, The Sun targets readers who are intelligent, educated, concerned about community and social issues, and enjoy reading stories, essays, and interviews that they might not find in more mainstream publications.

Publisher: The Sun Publishing Company, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: Essays, interviews, fiction, poetry, and black and white photography.5

Frequency of publication: Monthly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing

Types of contributions accepted: The Sun accepts submissions of essays, interviews, fiction, and poetry. There is no minimum word count, but submissions of longer than 7,000 words are rarely accepted. The Sun favors personal writing, but is also looking for “provocative pieces on political and cultural issues.”7 Interview pieces should focus on “innovative and provocative thinkers,” and The Sun is particularly interested in interviews with women and people of color.8 Submissions may also be made to magazine’s “Readers Write” series, in which readers respond to a given theme each month with a short, nonfiction piece.9

Submission and review process: The Sun does not accept submissions by fax or email. Submissions must be typed (single-spaced is acceptable for poetry, double-spaced for all other types) and sent with a self-addressed stamped envelope. The review process typically takes three to six months, but may be longer. Queries are suggested prior to submitting interview pieces. Interview pieces can be lightly edited prior to submission, and will be further revised upon acceptance.10

Editorial tone: Personal, provocative writing preferred.11

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Sun offers an excellent opportunity for LIS authors to reach a more mainstream audience than an industry publication. Since it appeals to people who tend to be educated, socially active, and well read, The Sun provides an audience who will likely be interested in issues facing libraries and their roles in society and community, including funding challenges, services to minorities, and trends in information literacy. Interestingly, The Sun provides subscriptions for free or at reduced rates to institutions such as prisons and homeless shelters (and often includes submissions from inmates and other “marginalized” members of society)12, so would provide a forum for submission of writing concerning library services to these populations.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 70,000.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Sun’s publication office is located in North Carolina and at one time was targeted locally.14 However, it is now read and distributed throughout the United States. At this time, The Sun is only available in English. However, it does appeal to a multicultural, multi-generational audience, often presenting viewpoints from minority and disenfranchised populations.

Reader characteristics: Reader information is unavailable. The magazine’s content would suggest that readers care about human issues and are informed about national and global politics. The Sun is available in many jails, prisons, treatment centers, and homeless shelters, so many readers are in fact currently homeless or incarcerated.15

This publication is not targeted toward any particular profession. It does attract a number of writers and other artists, as well as those who have an appreciation for good writing and photography. Many of the readers who send letters to The Sun or submit to the “Readers Write” section work in the nonprofit sector, or in various “human service” fields such as addiction treatment, counseling, health care, and services to homeless people.

The Sun is a liberal publication, with an audience that likely embraces diversity, is politically active and involved in social activism, and values creativity and artistic expression.It is likely that readers hold education, literacy, and librarianship in high esteem, but may not necessarily be well-versed in issues relating to these areas.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since The Sun is a civilian publication that does not specialize in library and information science, audience knowledge of LIS subject matter cannot be assumed. It can be assumed that readers are supporters of libraries, and may have knowledge of library services from the patron’s point of view. While it is likely that issues facing libraries may be of interest to this publication’s readership, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of The Sun share an interest in the arts and in creating a better world for the future. They are concerned about the environment, education, and other issues that will have a long-term impact on our world. They may be politically active, usually at the grass-roots level.

The Sun‘s audience will be interested in and responsive to articles such as those about the roles of libraries as cultural institutions; funding challenges faced by public libraries; educational opportunities offered to children through library programs; services to immigrants and other non-native English speakers; and services to populations such as homeless adults and children and inmates.

Authors who are interested in being published in The Sun will want to ensure that their submissions deal with current issues facing libraries. They will want to focus less on the technical aspects of librarianship, and more on the social and cultural implications. They may want to consider interviews with leaders in the field of library and information science who are implementing innovative programs and ideas, especially those who are working to bring library services to traditionally underserved populations.

Last updated: December 3, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1.  The Sun Magazine, WorldCat, accessed March 28, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/sun/oclc/243522787
  2. “About The Sun,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/about_the_sun
  3. About The Sun.”
  4. “Submission Guidelines Writing,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016,  http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/writing
  5. About The Sun.”
  6. About The Sun.”
  7. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines Interviews,” TheSunMagazine.org, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/interviews
  9. “Submission Guidelines Readers Write,” TheSunMagazine.com accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/submission_guidelines/readers_write
  10. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  11. Submission Guidelines Writing.”
  12. “FAQ,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/faq
  13. About The Sun.”
  14. “A Brief History,” TheSunMagazine.com, accessed December 2, 2016, http://thesunmagazine.org/about/a_brief_history
  15. FAQ.”
Continue Reading