Wiki Tags Archives: Cataloging

Rowman & Littlefield

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Rowman & Littlefield

Website: http://rowman.com/RLPublishers

Purpose, objective, or mission: Rowman & Littlefield “publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.”1 Its range of subject areas include library and information services, linguistics, communication, education, psychology, sociology, among others.2

Target audience: Rowman & Littlefield offers “serious works of scholarship; core textbooks for introductory courses; supplemental, affordable paperbacks for alternative approaches to teaching; and general interest and trade books for the curious reader.”3 LIS books are targeted toward practitioners, undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars.

Owner: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing group4 which also owns one of the largest book distributors in the United States, National Book Network (NBN).5 The publishing group encompasses several imprints, including Lexington Books (specialized and scholarly research), and trade imprints such as Rowman & Littlefield Trade, Globe Pequot, Falcon Guides, TwoDot, Taylor Trade, and Down East Books.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Authors are asked to provide a list of four to seven potential peer reviewers when submitting a book proposal.6

Types of books published: LIS-specific books run the gamut from primers and practical guides to both introductory and advanced textbooks.7

Medium: Titles are published simultaneously in print and e-book editions.8 Many books are supplemented with multimedia content.9

Topics covered: A range of disciplines across humanities and social sciences, government data, and education.10 LIS-specific topics cover management, archival studies, cataloging and classification, collection development, information technology, literacy instruction, and school librarianship. LIS series include The Practical Guides for Librarians, Library Technology Essentials, and Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections.11

Number of titles published per year: Approximately 1,500 academic, reference, professional, and trade books annually (all subjects).12 The number of LIS titles published per year is unknown.

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes13

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for publication should be submitted to the appropriate acquisitions editor,14 and include a prospectus, outline (annotated table of contents), author’s CV or resume, one to two brief writing samples, and a list of potential peer reviewers.15 Full book manuscripts are not accepted unless requested by the acquisitions editor. See the publisher’s website for detailed submission guidelines.

Submission and review process: The publisher will acknowledge receipt of a proposal within two weeks, and aims to render a decision on acceptance within three months.16

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors include leading academics and respected practitioners. Formal book proposals require a detailed description, author qualifications, previously published works, writing samples, competitive analysis, and potential markets for a book.17 The publisher is well established in its subject areas, and maintains a presence at academic conferences and conventions.18 Rowman & Littlefield is a highly reputable publisher for LIS authors with a proposal for an academic or professional development topic.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)A 2015 catalog listed approximately 150 LIS books geared toward students, professionals, and academics.19 Print runs for titles are not publicly available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Rowman & Littlefield is based in the United States, and titles are published in English. Authors are experts and scholars based mostly in the U.S., UK, and Canada, and this may be reflected in the content of material.20 However, as Rowman & Littlefield is an international publisher, books are available to a worldwide audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers have varying backgrounds within LIS, from management to technology, to instruction and research. Rowman & Littlefield texts are typically used in graduate and professional development courses, though many titles may be of interest to non-LIS readers.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics, and professionals with a strong knowledge of or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With diverse backgrounds, skills, professional duties, and interests, readers are likely seeking specialized LIS knowledge or best practices. Material is theoretical and practical, and provides professional learning for the LIS community.

Last updated: September 3, 2015


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  2. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Subjects. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/SubjectsMain
  3. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  4. Publishers Global. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from http://www.publishersglobal.com/directory/publisher-profile/6304/
  5. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  6. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  7. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  8. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  9. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  10. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  11. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  12. Net Galley. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/publisher/pub_id/29645
  13. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  14. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Editors. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/RLPGAE
  15. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  16. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  17. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  18. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Conventions schedule. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/ConventionsSchedule
  19. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  20. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  21. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  22. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
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Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (JERML)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries (JERML)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/werm20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the publication website: “The Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries is a peer-reviewed professional journal devoted to the access, evaluation, and management of electronic resources in the medical library environment.”1

Target audience: Users of libraries in medical schools, hospitals, and other health sciences libraries2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor & Francis3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and medical sciences, scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: “The material in the Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries will complement articles published in Medical Reference Services Quarterly, which highlights the reference and bibliographic instruction aspects of electronic resources.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks articles with “practical, up-to-date information about important developments and issues related to the provision, selection, and use of electronic resources in health sciences libraries.”9

“Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Collection development and selection of electronic resources
  • Electronic document delivery in medicine and health care
  • Enhancing electronic resource user services
  • Print versus electronic or combination formats
  • Site licensing-what librarians need to know
  • Delegating work that involves electronic/digital acquisitions
  • Cataloging-e-books, e-journals, and other electronic formats
  • The merger of serial and book formats in the electronic library
  • Coping with electronic misinformation, fraudulence, and shams on the Internet
  • “E-core” lists in medicine, allied health, nursing, pharmaceutical science, mental health, and other health care fields
  • The role of medical libraries with Electronic Health Records
  • Cost analyses of digital resources”10

Submission and review process: Submissions are uploaded using the ScholarOne Manuscripts site located at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jerml.”11 Any other requests should be directed to Justin Robertson, editor-in-chief, at justincrobertson@gmail.com.12 Detailed submission instructions are included at the submission guidelines link provided above.

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

As this is a journal “aimed at the practicing librarian,”15 and is described as a “source for practical, up-to-date information,”16 any librarian with knowledge of current issues and developments in electronic resources in the broader LIS field would be a welcome contributor to JERML.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JERML is published in English in the United States.17

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely well-educated and work in “academic medical school libraries, hospital libraries, and other health sciences libraries.”18 Readers expect well-researched, academic articles19 that provide practical knowledge that will inform the service they provide.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be well-versed in LIS subject matter, specializing in the medical LIS field, with a special interest in electronic resources.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As the readership for this journal is specialized, potential contributors should tailor their articles to an academic, knowledgeable audience. Readers will be looking for rigorously researched papers that provide new information on access, evaluation and management of electronic sources.21 This is a go-to journal for medical librarians to obtain up-to-date information about electronic resource management for their libraries. The potential LIS authors to reach a extensive and engaged audience it great.

Last updated: May 15, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  2.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  3. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  4.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  5.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  6.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  7.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  8.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  10.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=werm20&page=instructions
  17.  Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 15, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  18. Taylor & Francis. (2015). Aims & Scope. Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20#.VRahFeEYFZI
  19.  ProQuest. (2015). Journal of Electronic Resources in Medical Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427545368851/452894
  20.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
  21.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=werm20
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Judaica Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Judaica Librarianship

Website: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) promotes Jewish literacy through enhancement of libraries and library resources and through leadership for the profession and practitioners of Judaica librarianship.”1 Membership is open to librarians, libraries, and library supporters. The journal itself is a “forum for scholarship on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies.”2

Target audience: Members of the ALA with an interest in Jewish library and info sciences, members of the Association of Jewish Libraries, members of the American Theological Library Association, and, from the publications’ about page anyone with an interest in “information and research, in all forms of media relating to all things Jewish.”3

Publisher: Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL),4 an affiliate of the ALA and American Theological Library Association.5

Peer reviewed? Yes,6 using a double-blind system.7

Type: LIS scholarly.8 The journal is the official journal of the AJL, “an international professional organization” devoted to information and all things Jewish.9

Medium: Online as of 2013, vol 18. Prior to that the journal was in print (ISSN: 0739-5086).10

Content: From their website, the journal publishes “research articles and essays on all theoretical or practical aspects of Jewish Studies librarianship and cultural stewardship in the digital age; bibliographical, bibliometric and comprehensive studies related to Jewish booklore; historical studies or current surveys of noteworthy collections; and extensive review of reference works and other resources, including electronic databases and informational websites.”11

The journal has included articles on the collection development and acquisitions techniques that are specific to Judaica, covered major changes in cataloging rules and classification schemes for Judaica, documented important local cataloging practices, described the earliest automation systems with Hebrew capability, and reviewed landmark Judaic reference works as well as children’s books.12

Frequency of publication: Annually.13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks to provide a forum on the theory and practice of Jewish studies librarianship and information studies, and welcomes a wide range of articles related to these topics. In addition to the topics below, the journal also welcomes “thoroughly revised and updated versions of papers presented at AJL Annual Conference or chapter meetings.”14 Sample article titles include “Virtual Libraries vs. Physical Libraries in Jewish Studies,” “Establishing Uniform Headings for the Sacred Scriptures,” “The Jewish Press in France: A Review of the Contemporary Scene, 1993,” and “Strongly Traditional Judaism: A Selective Guide to World Wide Web Resources in English.”15

From the Focus and Scope page the journal covers the following topics:

  • Theoretical or empirical studies integrating library and information science with aspects of Jewish studies and related fields that could stimulate the scholarly discussion about Jewish libraries (history of the book, bibliometrics, literary studies, media studies, Jewish languages and linguistics, information technology, literacy studies, or social history).
  • Best practices and policies for Jewish libraries of all kinds: school libraries (all levels); community center libraries; public libraries; Judaica collections in religious institutions; archival collections; museum and historical society libraries; research libraries; and special libraries.
  • Innovative approaches to data curation, discovery tools, or preservation of library materials in the digital age.
  • Descriptive essays and surveys of noteworthy collections.
  • Digital humanities projects relevant to Jewish studies and other digitization projects.
  • Historical or bibliographical studies pertaining to Hebraica and/or Judaica materials, libraries and librarians, or generally to Jewish booklore.
  • Library services for users, including but not limited to reference tools and instruction guidelines for teaching Jewish literacy, cultural programming, or any other outreach programs.
  • Collaborative collection development initiatives across library networks.16

The journal also sponsors a student essay contest, open to students currently enrolled in an accredited LIS program. Essays should be related to the topic of Jewish studies librarianship, with the winning essay considered for Judaica Librarianship publication and a cash reward. For more information see the journal’s About Page and you can also contact the Editor directly.17 The 2013 editor is Rachel Leket-Mor:  rachel.leket-mor@asu.edu.18

Submission and review process: Anyone can submit an original article for consideration, provided they own all copyrights to the work.19 Follow the submission guidelines  to create an account; accept the Article submission agreement; provide author information and upload the article and other attachments. You’ll receive an email confirming submission. Make sure to double-check the guidelines, which give you style and formatting notes, as well as what to include in your article query.20

Editorial tone: Articles are extremely reader-friendly, with an often professional, conversational tone. LIS terms and phrases are used as necessary. Although these are well researched, peer-reviewed articles, they are intended for an audience that might consist of non-LIS practitioners, reading because they have an interest in Jewish library concerns.21

Please note that journal editors, authors and reviewers follow the ethical guidelines of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).22

Style guide used: For style guidelines: the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, and Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 11th edition. For academic writing guidelines, follow the same dictionary, as well as Christopher Hollister’s Handbook of Academic Writing for Librarians. For romanization of non-Latin languages (Hebrew, Cyrillic, Ladino and Judeo-Arabic), consult the Library of Congress Romanization Tables; and the YIVO system for romanization of Yiddish.23

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal seeks information of all types from students, professionals and scholars in the library world who have news, updates, and research pertaining to Jewish studies. It is an excellent place to query for new and established writers, to publish in a community-oriented, peer-reviewed journal that welcomes new ideas as well as fresh takes on established theories. The editorial team works closely with writers to make sure style and content are up to the journal’s standards, so even if this is the author’s first time, it should be a good experience that you can learn from. The journal is indexed in ATLA Religion, Ethnic NewsWatch, ERIC, Genealogical Periodical Annual Index, Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (RAMBI), Index to Jewish Periodicals, Index to Social Sciences and Humanities Proceedings, Information Science Abstracts, Internationale Bibliographie der Zeitschriftenliteratur, Jewish Studies Source, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Library Literature, and the MLA International Bibliography.24

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Current AJL members (exact numbers not available)25

 Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The AJL’s headquarters are in New Jersey:26 however, the journal’s editorial team is spread amongst schools like Arizona State University, Stanford University, Yeshiva University, University of Washington, University of Toronto, and the (U.S.) Library of Congress.27 The AJL holds a conference each year at a different location.  Per 2013 editor Rachel Leket-Mor: “The journal is mostly completed through online collaboration. The editorial board meets at the annual conferences of AJL, not in any other physical location.”28 Articles are written in English.29 But the AJL promotes Jewish literacy and LIS across the world, with members represented in North America, China, Holland, Israel, Italy, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK.30 The overall theme is the Jewish LIS experience, which factors heavily into cultural  considerations for writing for this journal.31

Articles do often include Yiddish or Hebrew terminology, but it is generally explained within the text.32

Reader characteristics: Readers belong to the AJL, and, whether or not they are actually librarians or information professionals, have an interest in Jewish cultural news from the library world. For the most part, readers will be interested in all things library, information science and/or Jewish, and work in libraries, museums, and other cultural or information centers. AJL’s membership includes two divisions: one containing Research Libraries, Archives and Special Collections; the other includes Schools, Synagogues, and Centers. All receive Judacia Librarianship as part of membership. The journal adopts the attitude of promoting Jewish literacy and scholarship, and is committed to providing information to readers on what’s going on in the Jewish library and info science world. It has an open policy for writers and does not exclude anyone from submitting an article-the topic just needs to fall under the specified content.33

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. This is the journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries, so expect good knowledge of, and interest in, LIS subject matter.34

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers have a strong interest in reporting from a Jewish library perspective, and will most likely welcome hearing of new studies, research, programs, or notes from the field. Also a good publication for learning more and becoming part of the larger AJL community.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 34 footnotes

  1. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  2. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  3. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  5. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  7. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  9. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  10. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  11. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  12. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  14. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  15. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Home. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/
  16. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  17. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  18. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  19. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  20. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  21. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  22. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Policies. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/policies.html
  23. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  24. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About Judaica Librarianship. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/about.html
  25. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Member Resources. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/MemberResources.aspx
  26. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  27. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Editorial board. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/editorialboard.html
  28. R. Leket-Mor, personal communication, 16 April 2014
  29. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Judaica Librarianship. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404773257662/340702
  30. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). About AJL. Retrieved from http://www.jewishlibraries.org/main/AboutAJL.aspx
  31. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  32. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Submission guidelines. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/submission_guidelines.html
  33. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
  34. Association of Jewish Libraries. (2014). Focus & scope. Judaica Librarianship: Journal of the Association of Jewish Libraries. Retrieved from http://ajlpublishing.org/jl/aimsandscope.html
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Technical Services Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Technical Services Quarterly

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wtsq20

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to the website, Technical Services Quarterly is “dedicated to providing a forum for the presentation of current developments and future trends concerning the technical operations of libraries and information centers.”1 Its purpose is to keep on top of developments and research and “practical implementation of systems and applications of traditional and non-traditional technical services and the public operations they influence and sustain.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals, particularly those who are in technical operations of libraries and information centers. Given the technical and industry-specific nature and language of the articles, it is doubtful that readers outside of LIS would be interested. The journal features articles about “technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies,cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management”3 are written by highly regarded professionals who are on the cutting edge of these subjects.

Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc. 325 Chestnut Street, Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5 This publication requires submitted manuscripts to undergo editorial screening and anonymous peer review.6

Type: LIS Scholarly7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: From the Aims & Scope page: “The journal accepts original research, theoretical, and implementation articles pertaining to technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies, cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management.”9 Every issue has four regular columns: Technical Services Report, Tech Services on the Web, Reviews and Trending Tech Services.10

Frequency of publication: Quarterly11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.UY6vSD3nYms

Types of contributions accepted: Original, unpublished manuscripts are accepted for consideration. According to the website, Technical Services Quarterly features articles on “technical services, automation, networking, document delivery, information technology, library instruction and information literacy, reference and bibliography, case studies, cost analysis, staffing, space, organizational behavior and leadership, and collection development and management.”12

Submission and review process: Refer to submission guidelines listed under Aims and Scope for specific requirements. The preferred method of submission is electronically via email to the Editor-in-Chief, with a message specifying that it is being submitted for consideration for Technical Services Quarterly. Manuscripts must be in Microsoft Word format and include an abstract of less than 100 words and a list of keywords.13

Editorial tone: This is a scholarly journal dealing with technical aspects of LIS geared towards the professional technical operations of a library. As such, articles are technical and scholarly in tone written in American English. LIS specific terms are used with the underlying assumption that the reader is familiar with such.14 Past articles featured titles such as “Developing Tools to Calculate Space Availability, Establish Collection Distribution, and Determine Growth Rates: A Case Study” and “Using Microsoft Access 2007’s ‘Lending Library’ Template to Create a Circulation Module for Microform Materials”.15 While the language and tone are technical and scholarly, it must also be interesting and readable.16

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association – 6th edition.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Technical Services Quarterly is geared towards LIS professionals, especially those whose interests lie within the technical operations of libraries. For authors and researchers whose manuscripts are geared towards current and future trends in collection methods, technical services, OCLC, metadata, document delivery among other subjects, this journal is ideal for submission. The submission guidelines are detailed but not overwhelmingly so. Previous articles have addressed concerns specific to law librarians and map librarians as well as cataloging for children’s books so there is a wide variety of librarian roles represented.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific information given.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a print and online journal published in the United States. Although it does have appeal for international librarians due to its technical nature, Technical Services Quarterly is geared towards American libraries and uses American English.18 All the listed editors and board members are American.19

Reader characteristics: This journal is geared toward LIS professionals in the technical field who are interested in the latest trends.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are most likely to be LIS professionals and given the technical nature of this journal, will be highly knowledgeable of LIS terminology and practice.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Technical Services Quarterly are LIS professionals who are highly interested in the latest technical information available. Writers for this publication should gear their articles towards this type of reader. According to the website, cutting edge technology is what their readers look for from the journal. Writers who follow trends and understand technical concepts would be the best bet for this journal.

Last updated: October 28, 2014


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  2. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  3. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  6. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  9. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
  10. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
  11. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  12. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  13. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  14. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  15. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wtsq20#.U6xED7GdROg
  16. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  17. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wtsq20&page=instructions#.U6te5rGdROg
  18. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Technical Services Quarterly. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403794434674/135278
  19. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Editorial Board. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6xGZrGdROg
  20. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
  21. Informa UK Limited. (2014). Aims & Scope. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wtsq20#.U6w13rGdROg
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First Monday

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: First Monday

Website: http://www.firstmonday.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-€“reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to research about the Internet.”1 First Monday believes the impact of digitization on society is universal and ubiquitous, and seeks articles about how digitization is changing our understanding of society.2

Target audience: First Monday’€™s target audience includes intelligent, independent-thinking people located in more than 180 countries. Because readers’€™ cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly, readership is diverse. The journal is not geared toward those in academia, and many readers do not speak English as a first language.3

Publisher: First Monday Editorial Group at the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library4 First Monday was originally designed in Copenhagen and published by Munksgard, a Danish publisher.5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: Computers and Internet, scholarly7 (First Monday is published in conjunction with the university library at the University of Illinois-Chicago, which indicates that the LIS community has a vested interest in the publication and represents a large proportion of its readership. Due to its diverse readership, we have categorized First Monday as both a “scholarly” and a “civilian” publication.)8

Medium: Online9

Content: First Monday publishes original interdisciplinary research papers about the Internet and related technologies. Articles emphasize subjects that are particularly interesting or groundbreaking. This publication’€™s strength lies in its diversity of content centered around the influence of the Internet and related technologies.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: First Monday publishes articles on interesting and novel ideas related to the history, present, and future of the Internet.12 Published topics of interest to LIS authors include: knowledge management, trends and standards, information-seeking behavior, emerging electronic classification frameworks, digital copyright, social networks, education, information society, the internet’s technological and commercial development, technical issues, and the political and social implications of the Internet. Research surveys, studies, exploratory and critical theory articles tied to the internet and related technologies would be welcome here.13 The publication also provides detailed Guidelines for Authors. These guidelines include writing tips; citation, reference, and abstract guidelines; submission format; formatting templates; and a final checklist for use in preparing manuscript submissions.14

Submission and review process: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions. Papers are subject to a double-blind peer review for originality and timeliness in the context of related research.15

Editorial tone: Articles published in First Monday are as diverse as its readership. All articles are written in an academic tone, though style varies in complexity. Many are written in an easy-to-read style, while others employ more sophisticated language. In either case, writers maintain the active voice and employ short sentences and paragraphs.16

Style guide used: First Monday provides its own style guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

First Monday publishes interdisciplinary research articles on all aspects of the internet, from highly-specialized technical issues to the internet’€™s social and political impact. Given the increasing digitization of information, this journal holds tremendous promise for LIS authors.

Because this audience is not academic, writing standards are not rigid, and an international distribution creates the potential to reach many readers. This publication’€™s diverse readership allows for writing from a variety of disciplines–LIS authors with backgrounds in engineering, literature, or history would be equally at home here. First Monday would be an excellent place to publish a thesis, or research on emerging Web technologies or trends. Additionally, the fact that the journal is peer reviewed makes it an attractive choice for those who wish to add a published article to their curriculum vitae.

Started in 1996, the journal has published 1,381 papers in 218 issues written by 1,888 authors. The journal is also abstracted in Communication Abstracts, Computer & Communication Security Abstracts, DoIS, eGranary Digital Library, INSPEC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, LISA, PAIS.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 314,559 per month.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are located in over 180 countries, concentrated in western Europe, North America, and the Pacific Rim. First Monday is published by the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, where its server is also located.20 Due to the publication’€™s international scope, many readers’€™ first language is not English. Additionally, many readers are not academics. Authors should avoid using specific cultural references or idioms unless these are explained. Simple explanations, active voice, and less complex sentences will help this diverse audience better understand your message.21

Reader characteristics: Because First Monday‘€™s focus is international and its scope is interdisciplinary, the cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly among First Monday readers. Cultural, educational, and professional interests vary greatly among readers, and this publication’€™s interdisciplinary scope is larger than library information science alone. That said, the publication’€™s focus is salient to the discipline. This, combined with the fact that it is published by a university library, makes it reasonable to presume that many readers are LIS professionals with shared professional interests and workplaces. The articles published in First Monday represent a wide variety of standpoints and approaches. The articles do not show overt bias or attitude toward any particular view, which seems indicative of the audience’s diversity.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many articles published in First Monday are not directly related to LIS, so it is reasonable to presume that many readers are involved in other aspects of Internet technology. In view of this, authors should cautiously employ LIS jargon and explain any specialized terms they use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

First Monday prides itself on its interdisciplinary scope, and publishes a wide variety of articles from multiple perspectives. Demographic information about readers’€™ professional affiliations could not be obtained, and nothing in this publication’™s submission guidelines indicates a preference toward LIS authors or topics. However, First Monday‘€™s publisher indicates that librarians have a vested interest in this publication and may represent a large proportion of its readers. First Monday’™s Audience Profile stresses that many readers are not academics, but one might conclude that many are librarians.24

Library science is an interdisciplinary field, and LIS students and professionals possess specialized knowledge of digital information collection, organization, and dissemination. This uniquely positions them as potential authors for First Monday. When writing for this publication, explain any professional terminology that would be unfamiliar to those outside the LIS field. For example, a study of library cataloging standards and information-seeking behavior on the web should explain terms like MARC21 or RDA. To be well-suited for First Monday, such an article might focus on digitization’€™s broad affects on LIS cataloging and how these are shaping practices.

While First Monday’€™s readership is not primarily academic, the content of articles is often sophisticated and complex. This may be why the editors stress simplicity and brevity in style; readers from different backgrounds will better understand a complex message through simple explanations and short sentences.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. First Monday, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 25, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  2. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  3. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  4. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  5. “Editorial Policies,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  7. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  8. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  9. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  10. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  11. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  12. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Archives,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/archive
  14. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. First Monday,  University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  19. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  20. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  21. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  22. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  23. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  24. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
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Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal

Website: http://associates.ucr.edu/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Provides a voice for and promotes the exchange of information within the library support staff community.1

Target audience: The primary audience is support staff at all libraries including public, special, academic, and school. The journal is online and subscriptions are free.2

Publisher: University of California Riverside Library.3

Server and listservs are housed at the University of California, Riverside, and the website is powered through WordPress.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Professional newsletter.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Topics range from how-to articles, opinion pieces, conference information, resource updates, fiction, conference updates, and research articles.8

Frequency of publication: Published three times per year, in March, July, and November.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88

Types of contributions accepted: The newsletter discusses issues and developments related to the work of library support staff. Topics might include cataloging, collection management, public relations, technology, and personnel issues. Priority consideration will be given to submissions written by library support staff. The submission guidelines provide a list of topics for feature article consideration.10

Submission and review process: Articles of any length are accepted, however the guidelines are: no longer than 10 double-spaced typed pages for features; four double-spaced typed pages for fiction; and one double-spaced typed page for poetry. Submissions are reviewed by a member of the editorial board. “Significantly edited versions will be returned to the authors for discussion or approval. However, most editing is done for punctuation, grammar and for establishing clarity.”11

Items can be submitted any time prior to the publication months and should be submitted to the editor, Kevin Dudeney, at: associates@hotkey.net.au.12

Editorial tone: Items that are written from or focused on a support staff point of view are preferred.13 A review of previous issues indicated that a folksy and approachable style is prevalent.14

Style guide used: There are no specific style guidelines given, but the editors state that “all submissions must be written in a professional manner, with citations for researched material provided.”15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Since most LIS students have worked or are working in support staff positions, this publication may be a good place to get started writing for the field. While it is not a scholarly journal, it would allow an author to demonstrate their understanding of a staff position other than a librarian.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Per their website updated 2014, they currently have “1,700 world-wide subscribers.”16 Subscription to Associates is free, and all issues are available free online which suggests they may have an audience beyond their subscribers.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication originates in the United States however they claim to have “1,700 world-wide subscribers”, indicating an international audience.18 It is an English language publication.19 Due to international audience, avoid regionalisms and any references, for example currency or location, are clear to the reader.

Reader characteristics: Audience, as support staff in all types of libraries, most likely reflects the general public, all ages and backgrounds, with an interest in connecting with other support staff and improving their job skills. Publication values the work of support staff and aims to promote the value of library support staff.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As library support staff, the readers can be expected to have the background and education to understand topics and terminology used in work accepted by this publication.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting work to this publication would benefit from reading the current and past issues to gain a clear understanding of their audience. It seems a cooperative approach, emphasizing the value of all team members in a library, would be useful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  2. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  4. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Associates: The Electronic Library Support Staff Journal. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1410118090286/462559
  8. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  9. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  10. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  11. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  12. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  13. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  14. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Archives and Back Issues. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=4
  15. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). Submission Guidelines. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=88
  16. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  17. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  18. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  19. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  20. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
  21. University of California Riverside Library. (2016). About Associates. Retrieved from http://associates.ucr.edu/journal/?page_id=2
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Cataloging & Classification Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleCataloging & Classification Quarterly

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4

Purpose, objective, or missionCataloging & Classification Quarterly is an international journal providing information and discussion on the subject of bibliographic organization. It addresses the theory and practice of cataloging and classification from a historic as well as a contemporary approach. “In a rapidly changing field, it seeks out and fosters new developments in the transition to new forms of bibliographic control and encourages the innovative and the nontraditional.”1

Target audience: Library and information science professionals, specifically catalogers looking for information about current issues or librarians researching the management and use of bibliographic records or the principles of descriptive cataloging.2

Publisher: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5; however, because of its mixed content it also has characteristics of Because of its mixed content, however, it could also be classified as a hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. CCQ is a peer-reviewed journal and its contributors are researchers and experts within the cataloging and classification field which, according to Taylor & Francis website, CCQ emphasizes both “full-length research and review articles” along with “descriptions of new programs and technology relevant to cataloging and classification.”6 Most articles are research oriented, with extensive bibliographies.

Medium: Print and online. The online version will continue to be published eight times per year.7

Content: Per their website, CCQ features articles that consider “…the full spectrum of creation, content, management, and use and usability of both bibliographic records and catalogs. This includes the principles, functions, and techniques of descriptive cataloging; the wide range of methods of subject analysis and classification; provision of access for all formats of materials; and policies, planning, and issues connected to the effective use of bibliographic records in modern society.”8 Besides introducing innovations in bibliographic control, the journal also discusses theoretical backgrounds and analysis of bibliographic organization. Most volumes include both general articles and guest-edited articles that focus on specialized topics.9

Frequency of publication: The printed version is published twice annually. The online version has eight issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=0163-9374&linktype=44. This publication uses Scholar One Manuscripts for peer review. A guide to using this system is found at http://journalauthors.tandf.co.uk/pdfs/SubmitGuide_S1M_1.pdf

Types of contributions acceptedCataloging & Classification Quarterly accepts research articles and cataloging news articles of 10 to 35 pages, double spaced, as well as book reviews.11

Submission and review process: Per the publication website, CCQ “…receives all manuscript submissions electronically via their ScholarOne Manuscripts website.”12

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the tone of articles. Upon examination of several articles in an issue, it’s clear that the journal chooses formal, research-oriented features.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized publication that provides relevant news, information, and analyses of and about recent trends in cataloging and classification as well as historical perspectives of experts in the field. This journal is a very useful resource for LIS professionals who deal with bibliographic organization and technical services in their institutions. Persons who are experts in the field, archivists, or other librarians, as well as students interested in writing classification-oriented research papers may submit their work for publication. Articles involving information organization or collection management are only a small part of the breadth of literature that may be written about cataloging and classification. Other topics include “cataloging and preservation, cataloging for digital resources, cataloging for special collections and archives, classification and subject access, descriptive cataloging, education and training for cataloging and classification, the internationalization of cataloging, management of cataloging and related functions, maps and other cartographic and spatial materials, online retrieval, use and usability issues related to the catalog, use of catalog data by systems outside the OPAC.”15

This journal is abstracted in Cabells Education Technology and Library Science, CSA, EBSCOhost Online Research Databases, ERIC Education Resources Information Center, H.W. Wilson Indexes, IndexCopernicus, Informed Librarian, INSPEC, JournalSeek, Periodicals Index OnlineProQuest, SCOPUS, SwetsWise All Titles.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the editor-in-chief, Sandra K. Roe, 590 subscriptions were sold in 2008. “Of these, 350 were from institutions in the United States, 180 were from non-U.S. institutions, 55 were personal subscriptions in the U.S., and 5 were personal subscriptions outside the U.S.”17

Audience location and language or cultural considerationsCataloging & Classification Quarterly may be purchased online from Taylor & Francis and is available worldwide.18 This is an English publication and its primary readers reside in the United States. However, as evidenced by the diversity of its editorial board members based in different parts of the world, articles in the journal must also accessible to a international audience.19

Reader characteristics: No individual characteristics of the journal’s readers were available. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, however, describes its audience as, “academic; special adult.”20 Naturally, because Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal, its readers have similar interests in LIS topics and issues, particularly in bibliographic organization. The majority of subscribers are likely cataloging professionals and technical services librarians.21 As LIS professionals, subscribers of this journal likely support the development of cataloging and classification and have interests in other LIS issues.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this specialized journal are doubtless familiar with cataloging and classification, as well as other LIS issues. It may be assumed that the CCQ audience understands LIS jargon.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Cataloging & Classification Quarterly is a highly specialized journal that is geared towards the professional cataloger but is also of interest to LIS professionals or students that are particularly interested in bibliographic organization. Authors must keep in mind that these readers are most likely LIS professionals, graduates or students that are knowledgeable about issues in the field of cataloging and librarianship. They are looking for formal and scholarly articles pertaining to topics such as records description and access or classification systems used in special libraries. Research articles on such subjects are the most appropriate for this audience. The use of subheadings is recommended to focus the reader’s attention and show the author’s intention clearly. Authors are encouraged to broach other aspects of information science but, preferably, concentrate on the relationship and importance of these other subjects to cataloging and classification.

Last updated: November 20, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  4. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  5. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  6. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  7. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  8. “CCQ Journal Home,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://catalogingandclassificationquarterly.com/
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  10. “CCQ Journal Home,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://catalogingandclassificationquarterly.com/
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  13. “List of issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wccq20#.U9KDPLFiND4
  14. “Instructions for authors, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  15. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  16. “Abstracting and indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wccq20&page=instructions#.U9J08bFiND4
  17. S.K. Roe, personal communication, 4 May 2011
  18. “List of issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wccq20#.U9KDPLFiND4
  19. “Editorial board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wccq20#.U9cg5LFiND4
  20. Cataloging and Classification Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 20, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406302452416/82865
  21. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  22. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016,  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
  23. “Aims and Scope, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed November 20, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wccq20#.U9J1DbFiND4
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ALCTS News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALCTS News

 Website: http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ALCTS Newsletter Online is the official newsletter of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. The Newsletter is, from the ACLTS’ Publications & Resources: the “voice that reports ALCTS news and activities with summaries as well as brief articles focusing on problem solving and other topics of interest arising from members’ day-to-day activities on the job.”1

The ALCTS, according to their bylaws, “…will provide its members, other ALA divisions and members, and the library information and community” with “leadership and a program for action on the access to, and identification, acquisition, description, organization, preservation, dissemination of information resources in a dynamic, collaborative environment.”2

Target audience: ALA members and members of ALCTS.3

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)4

Peer reviewed? No.5

TypeALCTS Newsletter is a LIS professional newsletter.6

Medium: Online, with an archive of past issues.7

Content: Information and news on topics for those involved in library collections and technical services as well as events, updates, practices and developments in the field. Newsletters typically include letters from the editor, ALCTS news, ALA news, and calls for papers from related journals. There are frequent announcements for web courses and workshops at various sites and online.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about

Types of contributions accepted: Per the submission guidelines, “The primary focus…is to report the news and activities of ALCTS and its members.10 The secondary focus is “reporting activities of interest to the membership relating to practice and developments in the fields of library collections and technical services.”11

Submission and review process: From the Author Guidelines: submit manuscripts in Word format, single spaced (double spaced between paragraphs), with no highlighting, special fonts, or text effect other than bold or italic. Do not use page numbers, headers, or footers. Submissions may be sent as email attachments to alctsnews@ala.org. Most articles and reports are about 300-500 words; longer articles will be considered on an individual basis.12

Editorial tone: Tone appropriate for a professional publication.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.)14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, there is a reasonable assumption that non-members are permitted to submit written materials for publication on the newsletter. There certainly is potential for LIS writers to expand the knowledge in the areas of library collections and technical services.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ALCTS, as of 2013, has a membership of 3826, according to ALA Membership Statistics.15 However, the newsletter is open to anyone with access to the internet.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALCTS is a division of ALA, with a majority of its members located in the United States and smaller numbers in as many as 42 countries.17 ALCTS Newsletter is published in English18 and is written primarily for American librarians. It is an informal newsletter written for a more general audience of librarians with less jargon or scholarly terminology.19

Reader characteristics: No specific information could be located; however, since a majority of Library Resources & Technical Services readers are members of ALCTS, their characteristics would be similar: the majority work in academic and public libraries.20 Most members of ALCTS are particularly interested in collections, acquisitions, cataloging, classification, and preservation.21 Readers of this newsletter will have established opinions on library issues but are generally more interested in seeking scheduling information on workshops, seminars, etc. There is not much opportunity in this newsletter for sharing opinions or biases; short essays relevant to ALCTS might provide an opportunity for sharing values and attitudes on technical services functions.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is a highly informed and educated audience of technical services and collections librarians. They will have a full knowledge of library issues relating to cataloging, collections, preservation, and all the encompassing technical jargon.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of ALCTS Newsletter are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to ALCTS committee work, and other topics related to ALCTS, and have the skills necessary for writing book reviews on highly technical topics.

Last updated: April 20, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2014). Publications & resources. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources
  2. American Library Association. (2014). Bylaws. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about/governance/bylaws#3
  3. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  4. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  5. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  6. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  8. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  9. American Library Association. (2014). ALCTS Newsletter Online: Index of Issues. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/ano/
  10. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  11. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  12. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  13. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  14. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  15. American Library Association. (2014). ALA’s Membership Statistics by Division, 2000-Present. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/divisionstats#alcts
  16. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  17. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
  18. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  19. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  20. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  21. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
  22. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  23. American Library Association. (2014). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
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Family Tree Magazine

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Family Tree Magazine

Website: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: A how-to publication for readers interested in family history and genealogy research.1

Target audience: It is directed toward beginner genealogists and family history enthusiasts.2

Publisher: F+W Media, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication. The publication describes itself magazine as a special-interest consumer magazine.5

Medium: Print magazine with online content and research tools.6

Content: Family Tree Magazine covers all areas of family history including ethnic heritage, family reunions, scrapbooking, oral histories and memoirs.7 A typical issue might include articles, lists of resources (including apps, websites, and databases), tutorials, and tips.8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/writersguidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should appeal to a general audience: non technical enough for beginning genealogists but informative enough for seasoned researchers. New writers are encouraged to submit short pieces of new online resources for the Toolkit section, or short, amusing stories of “the lighter side of family history.” The editors caution that personal experiences or the histories of specific families are not accepted. 10

Submission and review process: Writers should query with a story idea; completed manuscripts are not accepted. Queries should be emailed or sent through the mail with a SASE, and include writing samples. Issues are planned at least six months in advance, with the December issue planned a year in advance.11

Editorial tone: The publisher says the tone is “bright, breezy, helpful and encouraging,” but warns writers never to talk down to the reader.12 The typical article has short paragraphs of two or three sentences with vocabulary that might be found in Good Housekeeping or Reader’s Digest.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be a good publication for reference librarians, adult services librarians and LIS students who are knowledgeable about genealogy and history resources. The editors specifically mention wanting articles about new reference materials, and past articles have focused on organizing research materials. They are also looking for how-to articles that will help beginners start their family history projects.13 Librarians have a good understanding of what questions patrons generally ask about family history research; those questions can be turned into simple, informative article ideas for this magazine.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 75,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This US based publication is distributed nationally on newsstands, through a retail sales program, for purchase as a download on their website, and by subscription.15 The editorial staff does not provide any statistics on geographic distribution of readers. Family Tree Magazine is printed in English.The editorial staff does not offer any information on ethnic orientation of its readers; however, they welcome articles on ethnic and cultural heritage. Feature articles on how to trace Caribbean, African American, Japanese and European roots and Latin American research have been published.16

Reader characteristics: The publisher provides a reader profile in its media kit. According to the profile, the average reader is 63 years old. The audience is largely female, and 89% of readers have education beyond high school. The readers are passionate about family history, averaging almost eleven hours per week on genealogy-related activities, with most of that time spent online.  On average they spend in excess of $500 a year on this hobby.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These readers will most likely have limited knowledge of LIS-related topics, so technical subjects as well as LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The comprehensive reader’€™s profile is a writer’€™s dream come true. That coupled with details from the editorial staff on what they are looking for should provide plenty of guidance on subject matter and writing style. LIS authors can look at the typical reader and see that the overwhelming number are well-educated women, aged 60 and older.18 Perhaps an article about organizing home office spaces (using the cataloging techniques that are familiar to a librarian) would be popular. And the fact that the majority use the Internet each day offers a whole range of possibilities for articles about researching online or how to evaluate a website. Readers who travel for their hobby will want to know about travel resource materials. The well-educated reader might want an online resource for translating family documents (like a birth certificate) that are in a foreign language. Those who are retired might be interested in historical picture books that they can read to their grandchildren to help them begin to learn about their heritage. The possibilities are endless.

Last updated: September 26, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/Info/About_Us
  2. About Us.”
  3. About Us.”
  4. “Writer’s Guidelines,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/writersguidelines
  5. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  6. About Us.”
  7.  “About Us.”
  8. “Family Tree Magazine March/April 2016,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.shopfamilytree.com/family-tree-magazine-march-april-2016
  9. About Us.”
  10. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  11. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  12.  “Writer’s Guidelines.”
  13.  “Writer’s Guidelines.”
  14. Writer’s Guidelines.”
  15. “2014 Media Planner,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://media2.fwpublications.com.s3.amazonaws.com/FTM/FTM_media_kit_2014.pdf
  16. “Article Index,” FamilyTreeMagazine.com, accessed September 26, 2016, http://www.familytreemagazine.com/ArticleIndex
  17. “2015 Media Planner,” Family Tree Magazine, accessed September 26, 2016, http://media2.fwpublications.com.s3.amazonaws.com/FTM/2015_FTM_media_kit.pdf
  18. 2015 Media Planner.”
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Education Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Education Libraries

Websitehttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Education Libraries is an electronic, refereed journal of the Special Libraries Association’s (SLA) Education Division.  It offers a forum for new and challenging ideas in education, and library and information science. It also explores the effect of new technologies on the library profession and library and information curriculum.”1

Target audience: The target audience is the membership of the Special Libraries Association, which includes those employed at “a variety of venues, including special libraries and information centers, academic libraries, public libraries, and school libraries.”2

Publisher: Special Libraries Association, Education Division3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS and Education; scholarly5

Medium: Online, open access since 20156

Content: Education Libraries publishes scholarly articles, book reviews, member profiles, and case studies.7 Recent feature articles include faculty-librarian collaboration, 3-D printing in education libraries, collection development, and school library advocacy.8

Frequency of publication: Biannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Education Libraries accepts “research studies, descriptive narratives, or other thoughtful considerations of topics of interest to the education information professional. Manuscripts focusing on issues relevant to more general concerns either in the field of education or in the field of library and information science are also welcome provided they include a significant component specifically germane to education, libraries and librarianship.”10

Submission and review process: Authors submitting manuscripts are required to register using a link provided on the publication website.11 All submissions will be considered for publication and are subject to the double-blind peer review process. Inquiries about particular manuscripts may be sent via email to the editor. See the publication website for details.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) style manual, most recent edition14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Education Libraries presents an interesting opportunity for LIS writers from different types of libraries to discuss and share information that is related to education. This journal is well established, which means writers can be assured that they are submitting their work to a credible source and contributing to the scholarly conversation.

The journal is indexed in Education Libraries is indexed in ERIC, EBSCOhost’s Education Collection, and Library Literature.15

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the SLA’s website there are more than 9,000 association members based in more than 75 countries.16 Information about exactly how many are a part of the Education Division is not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Just as members of the Special Libraries Association are located around the world, the readers of Education Libraries are also international.17 Because this is an international publication, differences in language and cultural practice should be considered.

Reader characteristics: It is safe to assume the readers of this publication are interested in academic libraries and their role in education. Due to the professional focus of this publication the readership is largely comprised of individuals already working in academic libraries with considerable experience in the field. The readers of this publication are likely to value education and research. They are likely to be interested in learning about new technologies as well as in innovative teaching methods. Recent articles demonstrate a general acceptance of new technologies and changes in librarianship.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is likely that, as library employees, a  majority of readers are very familiar with LIS subject matter. Additionally, we can assume that the readers are familiar with new information technologies issues as well as issues surrounding the growth of digital content in library collections.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The most important characteristic of the Education Libraries audience is its interest in education and technology related to instruction and learning. Authors must keep in mind the fact that this journal is scholarly, and the widest audience is those who work in higher education libraries, therefore well researched studies are particularly important. Potential contributors writing book or technology reviews as well as opinion pieces may want to relate their subject back to its value to learning in order to appeal to the audience.

Last updated: April 13, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017,  http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  3.  “Journal Sponsorship,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/journalSponsorship
  4.  “Peer Review Process,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#peerReviewProcess
  5. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  7. “Section Policies,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  8.  “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  9. “Publication Frequency,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#publicationFrequency
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Online Submissions,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  14. “Submission Preparation Checklist,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Focus and Scope,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  17. “About SLA,” Special Libraries Association, accessed April 13, 2017, http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  18. “Archives,” Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/issue/archive
  19.  “Author Guidelines, Special Libraries Association/Education Division, accessed April 13, 2017, http://educationlibraries.mcgill.ca/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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