Wiki Tags Archives: Book reviews

Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
Continue Reading

Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
Continue Reading

Pacific Northwest Library Association (PNLA) Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pacific Northwest Library Association (PNLA) Quarterly

ISSN: 0030-8188

Website: http://www.pnla.org/quarterly

Purpose, objective, or mission: Pacific Northwest Library Association promotes increased communication, joint advocacy, open debate, networking and support and information sharing through its many special projects and initiatives including an annual conference, leadership institute, quarterly journal, job board, and a Young Readers Choice Award.1

The PNLA’s journal, published since 1936, focuses on regional content, open access and discoverability.2

Target audience: PNLA members are anyone with an interest in the library and information profession primarily from Alaska, Alberta, British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, and Washington.3

Publisher: Pacific Northwest Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: PNLA Quarterly is “a combination of peer-reviewed and editor-reviewed articles, focused on the region and its librarianship. The Fall issue is a conference issue.6

Articles are 1,000 to 6,000 words.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: PNLA Quarterly welcomes submissions in four out of five sections: articles, peer-reviewed articles, conference program (each Fall) and announcements.9

Submission and review process: Authors should check the Author Guidelines to ensure correct formatting and to read through the submission preparation checklist. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions for ensuring a blind review should be followed. Send your submissions to pqeditors@gmail.com10

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: 6th edition of the Manual of Style of the American Psychological Association (APA).11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The PNLA Quarterly provides a unique regional and multinational perspective to the issues of intellectual freedom, literacy, continuing education, and library leadership. Articles may be theoretical, research-based, or practice-focused. If your topic could be relevant beyond the Pacific Northwest, another journal to consider might include the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Science.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though readers are focused in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. and Canada, the journal is open access for anyone to read.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PNLA Quarterly’s audience is primarily U.S. and Canadian. Readers will mostly be English and French speaking.

Reader characteristics: Readership is varied—according to PNLA’s Membership page, the association is open to “anyone with an interest in the library and information profession.”12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–readers are LIS professionals from all different areas of the profession.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of PNLA Quarterly come from across the LIS spectrum, but are united by a regional focus and a passion for librarianship. If you have a well researched article with a scholarly bend that focuses on this region of North America, PNLA Quarterly readers will be an eager audience.

Last updated: May 2, 2018


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” PNLA.org, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.pnla.org
  2. “Journal History,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/history, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/history
  3. “Membership,” PNLA.org, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/.
  4. “Journal Sponsorship,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/journalSponsorship, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/journalSponsorship
  5. “Editorial Policies,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies, accessed April 26, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Guidelines for Submission,” PNLA.org, accessed April 27, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/guidelines-for-submission
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “Submissions,” https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines, accessed April 27, 2018, https://arc.lib.montana.edu/ojs/index.php/pnla/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Membership,” PNLA.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://www.pnla.org/membership
Continue Reading

Public Library Quarterly (PLQ)

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitlePublic Library Quarterly (PLQ)

ISSN: 0161-6846 (print), 1541-1540 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wplq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission:Public Library Quarterly (PLQ) is addressed to leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends who believe that change is imperative if public libraries are to fulfill their service missions in the twenty-first century.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) “leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends,” especially those working in public libraries.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles undergo editorial screening and peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: PLQ focuses on how public library directors and operating officers affect change. It examines best practices and service improvement models, management case studies, library mythologies that impede development, planning and outcomes, marketing and fundraising, budget and financial management, new technology in practices, and programs for children.4 “Every issue of  Public Library Quarterly contains informative articles written by the directors and staffs of leading public libraries, news of current public library events, and book reviews covering issues of interest to those in public library work.”5

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: PLQ publishes original research, scholarship, and analyses of current issues in public libraries, from theoretical and practical perspectives. The journal “addresses the major administrative challenges and opportunities that face public libraries, providing insight and assistance to all public library workers.” Furthermore, the journal publishes surveys “that can be developed and used as national benchmarks for such administrative concerns as salaries, usage standards, and budget breakdowns.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online via Editorial Manager, a portal that manages the submission, revision, review, and publication process for authors, editors, and reviewers.8 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and peer review.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: PLQ uses the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

PLQ is a long-standing, high-quality LIS journal that publishes scholarship on all aspects of public libraries from around the world. As such, it is a a good fit for LIS authors whose scholarship is focused on public libraries or who study these libraries’ connections with other information organizations or in the realm of public policy. The journal is both practical and scholarly; many articles are written by public library directors or staff members, but the journal also looks to publish research and surveys in this domain. There is a sense that authors are highly experienced in the realm of public libraries, but this does not necessarily exclude graduate student authors with solid scholarship and novel approaches to the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article’s homepage lists number of views, citations, and Altmetric score.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLQ is published in English for a worldwide audience. Editorial board members are from universities, libraries, and information organizations in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Wales, Ireland, and Taiwan.10 Authors should consider readers from around the globe and explain jargon or regional usages.

Reader characteristics: Readers are public library directors and managers, staff members, trustees, and friends, as well as LIS researchers, scholars, professionals, and graduate students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter, but since this journal has a worldwide reach, authors should be careful to explain particular terms and practices.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

PLQ reaches a worldwide audience of public library directors, librarians, staff members, scholars, researchers, and graduate students. Readers are interested in how current events, policy, trends, and changes in the public library landscape will affect their institutions and how other libraries’ experiences and practices may inform their own practices. Readers look for evidence of positive leadership in and responses to a climate of change in the public library realm. Readers expect both theory- and practice-based articles, as well as larger scale surveys and research results.

Last updated: April 30, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wplq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission show=instructions&journalCode=wplq20.
  6. “Journal Information,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wplq20.
  7. “Instructions for Authors.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Aims and Scope.”
  10. “Editorial Board,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wplq20.
Continue Reading

Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title:  Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship

ISSN: 2369-937X

Website: http://www.cjal.ca

Purpose, objective, or mission: Published by the Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL), the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship seeks to publish articles that are relevant to academic librarians and the profession of academic librarianship.1

Target audience: Academic librarians, both within and outside of Canada.

Publisher: The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL).2

Peer reviewed? Yes. However, book reviews and review essays are not.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles that address academic librarianship from diverse perspectives. “Submissions must present substantive analysis of a topic. Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”4

Check the journal’s calls for papers and reviews for the latest information on special issues.

Frequency of publication: “Articles and book reviews are published on a continuous basis and combined into one volume at the end of each calendar year.”5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal welcomes submissions for book reviews and articles and review essays. Book reviews should be about 1,000 words in length, whereas articles should be 3,000 to 6,000 words, and no more than 10,000.6

Submission and review process: First, create a username and password for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. You can register here.

Once you are ready to submit, be sure to read through the Author Guidelines to make sure you have formatted your work properly and included all necessary information.

“Submissions are reviewed first by an editor to confirm that the submission is appropriate for the Canadian Journal of Academic Librarianship. This step typically occurs within two weeks of submission. This editorial review considers questions such as:

  • Is the submission within the Aims and Scope?
  • Is the submission readable and within the desired word count?
  • Has the submission been published elsewhere?
  • Has the submission document been anonymized?”

“When the editor has determined that the submission is appropriate to be considered for publication, he/she contacts potential reviewers. Editors do not also serve as reviewers. Each submission is normally reviewed by two reviewers. Reviewers are asked to submit their reviews within four weeks.”

Finally, the editor will consider any recommendations and comments made by the reviewer, and will confer with the author.7

Editorial tone: Professional, scholarly.

Style guide used: The most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.8

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Keep in mind that publication submissions are not limited to Canadian librarians, but articles relevant to the country’s LIS field are encouraged and welcomed. According to the journal’s Focus and Scope section, “Submissions need not have a geographical focus; however, if they do, the focus should be on Canada or have a strong connection to Canada.”9 Recently published articles are on topics such as the recent trend of libraries hiring consultants and 20th century postwar Canadian libraries.

The CJAL could also be a good outlet for reviews on LIS books written in the last three years. Look at the Book Review Guidelines section of the Editorial Policies for more information.
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is open access, so anyone can read current and archived issues.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: All articles are published in both English and French.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians who are members of the Canadian Association of Academic Librarians. Therefore, readers are likely well versed in current LIS topics, especially how they relate to the field of academic librarianship.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors who are interested in publishing in this journal should look into CAPAL to learn more about the journal’s readership. The association’s About page states that they differ from other library associations in that CAPAL “is an advocacy group focused on the individual and the profession.”10

Readers are librarians who are well versed in LIS topics, particularly as they relate to academic librarianship. If you have a book review or well researched LIS article that is relevant for academic librarians (particularly in Canada), then this may be a good venue for your writing.

Last updated: April 21, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Editorial policies,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial policies.”
  3. “Editorial policies.”
  4. “Editorial policies.”
  5. “Editorial policies.”
  6. “Submissions,” CJAL.ca, accessed April 17, 2018, http://www.cjal.ca/index.php/capal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  7. “Editorial policies.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Editorial Policies.”
  10. “About,” CAPALibrarians.org, accessed April 20, 2018, http://capalibrarians.org/contact-us/
Continue Reading

Journal of Radical Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Radical Librarianship

ISSN: 2399-956X

Website: http://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Radical Librarianship “is an open access journal publishing high quality, rigorously reviewed and innovative scholarly work in the field of radical librarianship….The scope of the journal is any work that contributes to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”1

Target audience: Librarians and library and information science (LIS) practitioners, managers, scholars, and students who are interested in “radical librarianship,” loosely defined for the purposes of the journal as “the ethical roots of librarianship.”2

Publisher: The journal is self-published by the editors.3 Its platform and workflow are supported by OJS/PKP.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, the journal has a policy for manuscripts to undergo either open or double-blind review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online and open access.

Content: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes LIS articles on a broad range of topics but emphasizes that articles should contribute “to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”6 Sections include Research Articles, Editorials and Commentary, and Reviews. The journal’s Announcements page issues calls for proposals and papers on specified topics; a 2018 call was for proposals offering a “structural critique of race and power in LIS.” 7

Frequency of publication: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is published on a continual basis: articles are published as soon as they are ready under the year’s volume number.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes research and scholarly articles that offer critical analyses of “the influence of neoliberal policy on the profession.”9 With this basis in critical LIS theory and practice, the journal covers many “traditional” topics, such as information literacy, digital rights, cataloging, and technology, but also brings nondominant discourses to the field, with topics including including politics and social justice; anti-racist theory, critical race analysis, anti-colonial studies; equity, diversity, and inclusion; gender variance, queer theory, and phenomenology; the political economy of information and knowledge; critical pedagogy; and sustainability and environmentalism.10 The editors will also consider nontextual formats.11

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online and must ensure compliance with the Submission Preparation Checklist. “Prospective authors are welcome to send outlines or drafts to the editor in advance of making a formal submission. Submissions can be sent throughout the year. Revisions may be required before a decision is made to accept or reject the paper.”12 The journal gives authors and reviewers the option of open or double-blind peer review. The authors and reviewers must all agree to an open review; if not, the manuscript undergoes double-blind review.13

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly but appropriate for the topic and type of submission.

Style guide used: “Manuscripts should be prepared according to any consistent bibliographic style.”14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Radical Librarianship is a fairly new journal (first published in 2015) that is based in the UK but has an international scope and seeks contributions from “library and information workers, researchers, and academics from anywhere in the world.”15 LIS authors, including graduate students, who are writing critically about LIS theory, research, and practices, especially in ways that engage in nondominant discourses, consider a progressive point of view, and disrupt neoliberal library policy, will find encouraging and supportive editors and a high-quality, relevant journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is based in the UK and North America and is written in English, but the journal’s scope is international and the editors hope to find “editors and authors from beyond the English-speaking world” as the journal grows and evolves.16 Authors should consider an international audience for their articles and explain jargon or region-specific practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and LIS professionals, scholars, researchers, and students from around the world in all types of libraries and information organizations. Further, readers may be members of the Radical Librarianship Collective, which is an organization “building solidarity for those critical of the marketization of libraries and commodification of information.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid academic and practical knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should keep in mind that readers expect authors to approach LIS scholarship with a consideration of critical, radical, and nonhegemonic analyses. Readers will expect traditional LIS topics to be analysed and critiqued from new, radical, or nondominant points of view, and they expect writing on newer topics crucial to the profession’s progressive advancement and a disruption of its neoliberal and market-based practices.

Last updated: April 20, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about.
  2. Stuart Lawson, “Editorial,” Journal of Radical Librarianship 1 (2015): 1, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/article/view/1.
  3. “About the Journal” lists the editors and their subject areas.
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. “About the Journal.”
  7. “Announcements,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/announcement.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  10. “About the Journal.”
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions.
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About the Journal.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  16. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  17. “Home,” Radical Librarians Collective, accessed April 20, 2018, https://rlc.radicallibrarianship.org/.
Continue Reading

Journal of New Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of New Librarianship

ISSN: 2471-3880

Website: http://newlibs.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of New Librarianship editors acknowledge the “need to offer quality literature in our field in an open, independently produced journal. Beyond that, we believe that the library is meant to set an example for academia. Free and open access to information and innovation is crucial to the future of our institutions and profession. By providing an outlet that mixes both traditional and disruptive forms of scholarly and professional communication, we can change the way our profession shares and leads.”1

Target audience: The Journal of New Librarianship aims to reach all library and information science (LIS) professionals, practitioners, scholars, teachers, and graduate students, as well as those who are interested in the LIS field.

Publisher: The journal is “independently produced.” It uses the Scholastic academic journal management system.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, blind review. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and other content that is not peer-reviewed.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: The Journal of New Librarianship is a new journal, first published in 2016. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles, essays, editorials, book reviews, and columns4 on all topics in the field of LIS and seeks both “traditional and disruptive” forms of communication.5  The Columns section publishes “short pieces on topics of timely interest to information professionals covering innovations and issues for the next generation of librarians.”6

Frequency of publication: Articles are published on a rolling basis on the website; these are collected into two issues each year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Submissions may include, but are not limited to: Solicited articles; Scholarly Articles; Essays; Experience and opinion pieces; Media (i.e., podcasts, video, etc) relevant to innovative practices in librarianship; Book reviews; Technology reviews; Letters to the Editor on topics relevant to the field; Data sets; Manifestos; Extended scholarship (Greater than 15,000 words); and Interviews.”8 “We want lengthy treatises on intersectionality and library practice just as much as we want data analysis and recorded interviews with people doing awesome teen programming or video projects on the transformation of a library’s physical space and the perceived impact. All aspects of librarianship – by any name – are within the intended scope of the journal.”9

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit their articles stripped of identifying information so they are ready for peer review. They ask for a cover letter that explains “the origin of the project, whether it has been presented and if so where, and affirmation of its originality, veracity, and the author’s right to include all submitted material, data, and media.” Further, the cover letter should explain if the article has time constraints, for example, if it should be published immediately or during a particular conference. Finally, during the online submission process, authors are asked to list potential peer reviewers who are appropriate or those who should be avoided, and these suggestions should be explained in the cover letter. The editors ask authors to contact them with “preliminary pitches,” and they “encourage ideas for content in any and all forms.”10

Editorial tone: The editors encourage “submissions that we have no idea how to categorize,” so the tone should be appropriate to the piece: scholarly, conversational, casual, experimental, and so on.11

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of New Librarianship is an interesting, high-quality, experimental journal that aims to set an example in academia for free and open access to information, scholarship, and ideas.13 This is a great publication for LIS authors who want to publish traditional academic scholarship or who have novel explorations in theory or practice, timely observations, or experimental pieces, including multimedia, to contribute. LIS graduate students are encouraged to submit work and to volunteer as a part of the journal’s editorial team.14 This is an exciting new journal that is breaking new ground in the discipline’s publishing practices.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal that is produced in the United States. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.15 The journal welcomes non-English-language content and will provide translation assistance.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians in all types of libraries and institutions and LIS professionals, scholars, and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ will have both an academic and practical knowledge and understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are members of the LIS community who are looking for novel, interesting, relevant, timely, and experimental work in the LIS field. The editors, and presumably the readers, “share a steadfast commitment to recognizing and discussing intersectionality –how social categories like race, class, and gender create overlapping and situational systems of discrimination and privilege.”17 Readers of this journal look for innovative models and practices in libraries and in LIS scholarship.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/about.
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “For Authors,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/for-authors.
  4. “Issues,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/issues.
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue of the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 100, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/3/1.
  7. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue,” 100.
  8. “For Authors.”
  9.  “Policies & FAQS,” Journal of New Librarianship Blog, December 29, 2016, http://www.newlibs.org/post/55.
  10. “For Authors.”
  11. “Policies & FAQS.”
  12. “For Authors.”
  13. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: Welcome to the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/2016/1/weiter.1.
  14. “Policies & FAQS.”
  15. “Editorial Board,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/editorial-board.
  16. “For Authors.”
  17. “Policies & FAQs.”
Continue Reading

International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleInternational Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

ISSN: 2474-3542

Websitehttp://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol

Purpose, objective, or mission: The International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL) “is a peer­-reviewed open access journal dedicated to publishing articles on as broad an array of topics as possible from all aspects of librarianship in all types of libraries.”1

Target audience: IJoL‘s primary audience is members of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA) that provides a forum for discussion and development among Chinese American librarians and information professionals.2 However, as an international and open-access journal, IJoL‘s scope and reach is worldwide.

Publisher: IJoL is published by CALA, an affiliate of the ALA.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Articles deemed suitable by the editors are double-blind peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: “IJoL publishes original research papers, practical developments, reviews, and commentaries of value to professional practice in librarianship in general. It encourages communication on librarianship within and among relevant professional and academic communities.”5 Regular columns include Featured Articles, Reports from the Field, LIS Education around the World, Commentaries, Reviews, and News.

Frequency of publication: Twice each year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: IJoL accepts Featured Articles, which are original research or comprehensive, in-depth analyses; Reports from the Field, which “describe the implementation and assessment of innovative practices in libraries of all types” and report on distinguished Chinese librarians; Reviews of books, articles, or conference papers; and Commentaries offering perspectives on current topics.7 The journal publishes on all topics related to libraries and librarianship, including “academic, research, public, school and special libraries” and other information institutions; it is focused on, but not limited to, “major development of Chinese librarianship throughout the world.”8

Submission and review process: IJoL uses the Open Journal Systems9 online portal for submissions and offers guidelines and a submission checklist, which authors should follow to ensure that processing and publishing is not delayed.10 Each section has its own policies, so authors should check that their submissions meet these requirements as well. The editor sends suitable articles to two referees for blind review, and articles may be accepted as is, with revisions, or declined.11

Editorial tone: The tone is overall scholarly but also appropriate to each column and topic.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

IJoL‘s first issue was in 2016, so it is a very new scholarly journal. It is the official journal of CALA, which was established in the 1970s.13 In the first editorial, Editor-in-Chief Guoying Liu introduces the journal as “a forum for librarians and other researchers from Canada, China, the UK, the US and other countries to share their research, best practices and perspectives in international librarianship, international collaboration and academic exchange, library spaces and services, library technology and innovation, and other aspects of information science and studies.”14 This journal is a great fit for scholars, professionals, and students whose work or research focuses on Chinese librarianship, but the journal publishes on all topics of library and information science, including all types of libraries and information institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: IJoL statistics show that there are 131 registered users and 113 registered readers in 2018.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: IJoL readership is most likely Chinese and Chinese American librarians and information professionals. However, this is an English-language international journal that publishes on all LIS topics, and its readership is similarly international. Authors should keep in mind this international readership and explain regionalisms and particular terms and practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and information professionals, scholars, and students interested in Chinese librarianship and information communities, as well as broader topics and current trends affecting LIS professionals throughout the world. The editors of IJoL are from universities and libraries in the United States, China, and Canada.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a strong understanding of LIS subject matter; however, writers should explain regional or particular terms, concepts, and practices for an international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that the readership for this journal is global but there is a particular interest in Chinese librarianship throughout the United States, Canada, and China. Readers of the journal are LIS scholars, professionals, and graduate students who are interested in developments particular to Chinese user populations and research and practices that can be extended to a similarly global population. As a new, open-access journal, LIS authors can peruse what types of articles are being published and editorials that explain the journal’s direction.17

Last updated: April 6, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Membership,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/membership.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Submissions,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/submissions.
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “About This Publishing System,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/aboutThisPublishingSystem.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Editorial Policies.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/about.
  14. Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Message from Editor-in-Chief,” International Journal of Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2016.vol1.1.17.
  15. “Statistics,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/statistics?statisticsYear=2018.
  16. “Editorial Team,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialTeam.
  17.  Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Celebrating One Year Anniversary and Introducing the Third Issue,” International Journal of Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 1-2, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2017.vol2.2.54.
Continue Reading

School of Information Student Research Journal (SRJ)

Image courtesy of Student Research Journal


 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: School of Information Student Research Journal (SRJ)

ISSN: 2575-2499

Website: http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The School of Information Student Research Journal (SRJ) “aims to showcase excellent graduate student scholarship in library and information science, archival studies, and records management. Adhering to a rigorous double-blind peer review process, SRJ upholds critical standards of scholarship in regards to the conceptualization, execution, references, and overall value of published manuscripts.”1 The journal’s former title was SLIS Student Research Journal (2010-2017).2

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) students and the larger LIS community.

Publisher: San José State University (SJSU).3

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access. SRJ is hosted by SJSU ScholarWorks.5

Content: SRJ publishes research-oriented manuscripts, critical essays, and academic book reviews. Published articles cover a wide range of LIS and related topics, such as “archives, or records management theory, policy, application, or practice which advance intellectual inquiry in the field.”6

Frequency of publication: SRJ is published biannually.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Policies.

Types of contributions accepted: SRJ accepts manuscripts from graduate students enrolled at the time of submission.8 “Research manuscripts should investigate an original idea or set of ideas or circumstance, and may be empirical, critical, or theoretical in nature. Critical essays should analyze and contribute an interpretation, or analytical perspective, or new theme or concept to a theory or body of work, and may address a collection of published scholarship.” For book reviews, writers should contact the editor-in-chief to ensure the book fits the journal’s scope and is available for reviewing. There is also a list of suggested titles.9

Submission and review process: Manuscripts are accepted on a rolling basis through electronic submission. The editor-in-chief reviews manuscripts, consulting with the editorial advisory board as warranted. If approved, the manuscript is submitted to at least two peer reviewers for double-blind review. The editor-in-chief contacts the author, advising if the manuscript is accepted, needs minor or major revisions, or is rejected. Most manuscripts require revision before final acceptance.10

Editorial tone: The tone of SRJ is scholarly, and the journal follows the “conventions of scholarly discourse.”11

Style guide used:  Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

SRJ is an ideal peer-reviewed journal for LIS graduate students to submit their work. The journal is produced by a team of SJSU graduate students and a faculty advisory board, which includes prominent SJSU faculty. Submitting to SRJ offers an opportunity for students to share their best work with LIS community leaders, to market themselves as emerging LIS professionals, and to begin forging professional relationships. SRJ offers a prime opportunity for LIS students writing about archives and records management or museum studies, as it publishes articles in these areas as well as in library and information science. Potential authors should watch this brief informational video created by the SRJ team.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Specific data are not available, but the journal’s website does indicate the number of full-text downloads for each article.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: SRJ is aimed at both LIS students and the larger LIS community, and since its inception in 2011, it has attracted student authors from a wide variety of other LIS graduate schools. SRJ has a worldwide reach because it is an open-access journal and because the SJSU School of Information attracts U.S. and international students.15

Reader characteristics: Readers of the publication are graduate students studying a wide variety of LIS and related subjects and professionals from all types of libraries and institutions. SRJ publishes original research and critical reviews and essays, so readers will expect intellectual rigor and fresh perspectives on issues in library and information sciences, archives, museums, records management, and technology.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Because this publication accepts submissions about virtually all areas of information science and targets LIS professionals in all stages and settings of the profession, it would be wise to briefly introduce concepts and explain any specialized terminology for the benefit of those outside of one’s area of expertise.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS students and professionals are a diverse group, with interdisciplinary workplaces and interests. SRJ publishes papers on virtually any topic related to LIS, making this publication a possibility for students writing on many subjects. Submissions to SRJ should be scholarly and critical, with a clear contribution to graduate research and its promotion of intellectual inquiry. Critical pieces and original studies of emerging and ongoing issues such as open-source LIS models, collection development, information literacy, information-seeking behavior, user experience, electronic records and digital asset management, or a host of other areas are welcome here.

Last updated: March 16, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Aims & Scope,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/aimsandscope.html.
  2. Journal Home, Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/.
  3. Journal Home.
  4.  “Policies,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/policies.html.
  5. Home, scholarworks.sjsu.edu, accessed March 16, 2018.
  6. “Aims & Scopes.”
  7. “About This Journal,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/about.html.
  8. “Policies.”
  9. “Aims & Scope.”
  10. “Policies.”
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Style Guide & Formatting Requirements,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/styleguide.html.
  13. “Journal Home.”
  14. “Most Popular Articles,” Student Research Journal, accessed March 16, 2018, http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/topdownloads.html.
  15. “MLIS Student Profiles,” SJSU School of Information, accessed March 16, 2018, http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/mlis/student-profiles.
  16. “Policies.”
Continue Reading

Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

ISSN: 2333-3316

Websitehttps://www.weaveux.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weave is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.”1

From it’s editorial philosophy, “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students, library User Experience professionals.

Publisher: Michigan Publishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a double-blind review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Weave UX consists of full length, scholarly articles and The Dialog Box, featuring book and media reviews.6

Frequency of publication: Issues are published twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Manuscript submission guidelines can be found in a Google Doc linked on the submissions page.

Types of contributions accepted: Weave is looking for two types of submissions:

  • Full length, scholarly articles of relevance to UX in libraries
  • The Dialog Box, a new kind of review section aiming to “extend beyond traditional book review sections and feature critical dialog not only with books but with other media that set the boundaries of UX”8

Submission and review process: Before writing an article, Weave asks that you send a short pitch about your topic, they can then help develop it into an article. If you already have something written, send them a few sentences about your article and they’ll take it from there.9

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: APA is used for in-text citations and works cited pages, and the Chicago Manual of Style is used for spelling, grammar, punctuation and all other style concerns.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Weave has a “come one, come all” approach regarding librarians and professionals who are passionate about UX. Whether you have ideas you want to explore or you have already composed a full-fledged article, Weave is an excellent place to start if you are writing about user experience in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: All editors are based in the United States and the journal is hosted by Michigan Publishing. However, this quote pulled from the Editorial Philosophy shows that the journal is not limited to only U.S.-based librarians: “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries (wherever they are, whatever their job title is) can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Weave’s audience and authors are not limited to just the United States, they have published articles from Canadian, Swedish and Australian writers.12

Reader characteristics: According to their Editorial Philosophy, “Weave’s intended primary audience consists of people in libraries who are using or are interesting in using UX.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Readers are already familiar with UX in libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Weave articles are obviously passionate about libraries and user experience in libraries. The latest issues of Weave have featured articles such as “A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility,” “How Much Research is Enough?” as well as a book review, demonstrating that Weave’s readers are interested in a broad array of topics related to User Experience.14

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Home,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/
  2. “Editorial Philosophy,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/about.html#philosophy
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Editorial Philosophy”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Weave Submissions,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  7. “Archive,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://quod.lib.umich.edu/w/weave/12535642.*
  8. “Weave Submissions”
  9. “Weave Submissions.”
  10. Submission Guidelines for Manuscript drafts,” Weave, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  11. “About.”
  12. “Archive.”
  13. “Editorial Philosophy.”
  14. “Archive.”
Continue Reading