Wiki Tags Archives: Book reviews

International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleInternational Journal of Librarianship (IJoL)

ISSN: 2474-3542

Websitehttp://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol

Purpose, objective, or mission: The International Journal of Librarianship (IJoL) “is a peer­-reviewed open access journal dedicated to publishing articles on as broad an array of topics as possible from all aspects of librarianship in all types of libraries.”1

Target audience: IJoL‘s primary audience is members of the Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA) that provides a forum for discussion and development among Chinese American librarians and information professionals.2 However, as an international and open-access journal, IJoL‘s scope and reach is worldwide.

Publisher: IJoL is published by CALA, an affiliate of the ALA.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Articles deemed suitable by the editors are double-blind peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: “IJoL publishes original research papers, practical developments, reviews, and commentaries of value to professional practice in librarianship in general. It encourages communication on librarianship within and among relevant professional and academic communities.”5 Regular columns include Featured Articles, Reports from the Field, LIS Education around the World, Commentaries, Reviews, and News.

Frequency of publication: Twice each year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: IJoL accepts Featured Articles, which are original research or comprehensive, in-depth analyses; Reports from the Field, which “describe the implementation and assessment of innovative practices in libraries of all types” and report on distinguished Chinese librarians; Reviews of books, articles, or conference papers; and Commentaries offering perspectives on current topics.7 The journal publishes on all topics related to libraries and librarianship, including “academic, research, public, school and special libraries” and other information institutions; it is focused on, but not limited to, “major development of Chinese librarianship throughout the world.”8

Submission and review process: IJoL uses the Open Journal Systems9 online portal for submissions and offers guidelines and a submission checklist, which authors should follow to ensure that processing and publishing is not delayed.10 Each section has its own policies, so authors should check that their submissions meet these requirements as well. The editor sends suitable articles to two referees for blind review, and articles may be accepted as is, with revisions, or declined.11

Editorial tone: The tone is overall scholarly but also appropriate to each column and topic.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, sixth edition.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

IJoL‘s first issue was in 2016, so it is a very new scholarly journal. It is the official journal of CALA, which was established in the 1970s.13 In the first editorial, Editor-in-Chief Guoying Liu introduces the journal as “a forum for librarians and other researchers from Canada, China, the UK, the US and other countries to share their research, best practices and perspectives in international librarianship, international collaboration and academic exchange, library spaces and services, library technology and innovation, and other aspects of information science and studies.”14 This journal is a great fit for scholars, professionals, and students whose work or research focuses on Chinese librarianship, but the journal publishes on all topics of library and information science, including all types of libraries and information institutions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: IJoL statistics show that there are 131 registered users and 113 registered readers in 2018.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: IJoL readership is most likely Chinese and Chinese American librarians and information professionals. However, this is an English-language international journal that publishes on all LIS topics, and its readership is similarly international. Authors should keep in mind this international readership and explain regionalisms and particular terms and practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and information professionals, scholars, and students interested in Chinese librarianship and information communities, as well as broader topics and current trends affecting LIS professionals throughout the world. The editors of IJoL are from universities and libraries in the United States, China, and Canada.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers most likely have a strong understanding of LIS subject matter; however, writers should explain regional or particular terms, concepts, and practices for an international readership.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

LIS authors should keep in mind that the readership for this journal is global but there is a particular interest in Chinese librarianship throughout the United States, Canada, and China. Readers of the journal are LIS scholars, professionals, and graduate students who are interested in developments particular to Chinese user populations and research and practices that can be extended to a similarly global population. As a new, open-access journal, LIS authors can peruse what types of articles are being published and editorials that explain the journal’s direction.17

Last updated: April 6, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialPolicies.
  2. “Membership,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/membership.
  3. “Editorial Policies.”
  4. “Editorial Policies.”
  5. “Editorial Policies.”
  6. “Editorial Policies.”
  7. “Submissions,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/submissions.
  8. “Editorial Policies.”
  9. “About This Publishing System,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/aboutThisPublishingSystem.
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Editorial Policies.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About,” cala-web.org, accessed April 3, 2018, http://www.cala-web.org/about.
  14. Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Message from Editor-in-Chief,” International Journal of Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2016.vol1.1.17.
  15. “Statistics,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/statistics?statisticsYear=2018.
  16. “Editorial Team,” International Journal of Librarianship, accessed April 3, 2018, http://ojs.calaijol.org/index.php/ijol/about/editorialTeam.
  17.  Guoying Liu, “Editorial: Celebrating One Year Anniversary and Introducing the Third Issue,” International Journal of Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 1-2, https://doi.org/10.23974/ijol.2017.vol2.2.54.
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Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Weave: Journal of Library User Experience (Weave UX)

ISSN: 2333-3316

Websitehttps://www.weaveux.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Weave is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.”1

From it’s editorial philosophy, “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students, library User Experience professionals.

Publisher: Michigan Publishing, a division of the University of Michigan Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles are subjected to a double-blind review process.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Weave UX consists of full length, scholarly articles and The Dialog Box, featuring book and media reviews.6

Frequency of publication: Issues are published twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Manuscript submission guidelines can be found in a Google Doc linked on the submissions page.

Types of contributions accepted: Weave is looking for two types of submissions:

  • Full length, scholarly articles of relevance to UX in libraries
  • The Dialog Box, a new kind of review section aiming to “extend beyond traditional book review sections and feature critical dialog not only with books but with other media that set the boundaries of UX”8

Submission and review process: Before writing an article, Weave asks that you send a short pitch about your topic, they can then help develop it into an article. If you already have something written, send them a few sentences about your article and they’ll take it from there.9

Editorial tone: Professional.

Style guide used: APA is used for in-text citations and works cited pages, and the Chicago Manual of Style is used for spelling, grammar, punctuation and all other style concerns.10

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Weave has a “come one, come all” approach regarding librarians and professionals who are passionate about UX. Whether you have ideas you want to explore or you have already composed a full-fledged article, Weave is an excellent place to start if you are writing about user experience in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: All editors are based in the United States and the journal is hosted by Michigan Publishing. However, this quote pulled from the Editorial Philosophy shows that the journal is not limited to only U.S.-based librarians: “Weave’s primary purpose is to provide a forum where practitioners of UX in libraries (wherever they are, whatever their job title is) can have discussions that increase and extend our understanding of UX principles and research.”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Weave’s audience and authors are not limited to just the United States, they have published articles from Canadian, Swedish and Australian writers.12

Reader characteristics: According to their Editorial Philosophy, “Weave’s intended primary audience consists of people in libraries who are using or are interesting in using UX.”13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Readers are already familiar with UX in libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Weave articles are obviously passionate about libraries and user experience in libraries. The latest issues of Weave have featured articles such as “A Practical Guide to Improving Web Accessibility,” “How Much Research is Enough?” as well as a book review, demonstrating that Weave’s readers are interested in a broad array of topics related to User Experience.14

Last updated: March 19, 2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. “Home,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/
  2. “Editorial Philosophy,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://www.weaveux.org/about.html#philosophy
  3. “Home.”
  4. “Editorial Philosophy”
  5. “About.”
  6. “Weave Submissions,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  7. “Archive,” WeaveUX.org, accessed March 15, 2018, https://quod.lib.umich.edu/w/weave/12535642.*
  8. “Weave Submissions”
  9. “Weave Submissions.”
  10. Submission Guidelines for Manuscript drafts,” Weave, accessed March 15, 2018, https://weaveux.submittable.com/submit/34335/weave-submissions
  11. “About.”
  12. “Archive.”
  13. “Editorial Philosophy.”
  14. “Archive.”
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Journal of Information Literacy (JIL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Information Literacy (JIL)

ISSN: 1750-59681

Website: https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Information Literacy (JIL) is the professional journal of the CILIP Information Literacy Group. The journal “publishes innovative and challenging research articles and project reports which push the boundaries of information literacy thinking in theory, practice and method, and which aim to develop deep and critical understandings of the role, contribution and impact of information literacies in everyday contexts, education and the workplace.”2

Target audience: The target audience includes members of the UK-based CILIP Information Literacy Group and LIS professionals, scholars, students, and teachers, and those working in any field related to information literacy instruction and scholarship.

Publisher: JIL is published by the CILIP Information Literacy Group and hosted by Loughborough University Library.3

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: JIL “aims to investigate information literacy in all its forms to address the interests of diverse IL communities of practice.”5 Regular sections include Peer-Reviewed Articles, Articles from LILAC (Librarians’ Information Literacy Annual Conference), Book Reviews, Conference Updates, Project Reports, and Students’ View of IL.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: JIL accepts research articles that are “informed and evidence based, designed around an arguable research question, contextualised with reference to previous and current advances in IL thinking, [and] methodologically robust with a demonstrable research design.8 For the Students’ View of IL section, submissions should be “papers drawn from research (theoretical or applied) undertaken by students as part of a postgraduate course in LIS or other cognate disciplines, such as education or media.”9 Authors may also submit reviews of books, media, websites, and software relevant to information literacy practices; conference updates; and project reports “related to information, digital and learning literacies.10

Submission and review process: JIL‘s Submission page includes a section titled The Route to Publication that provides a helpful overview of the submission, review, and acceptance process. Authors need to format manuscripts according to the journal’s article template and verify that manuscripts conform to each item on the Submission Preparation Checklist. After manuscripts are submitted online, they are peer reviewed with comments on suitability and suggestions for revision; authors receive feedback and may resubmit for review if substantial changes are made.11

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly, and writers should use UK spelling. The journal’s Submission page provides helpful guidelines and templates for expected style, structure, and argument.12

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).13 

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JIL “publishes articles from both established and new authors” in the field of information literacy. Furthermore, JIL “welcomes contributions that push the boundaries of IL beyond the educational setting and examine this phenomenon as a continuum between those involved in its development and delivery and those benefiting from its provision.”14 This journal is a good fit for LIS authors who conduct original research and novel scholarship in any area of information literacy. LIS graduate students and recent graduates have a great opportunity to publish in the journal’s Students’ View of IL section. JIL accepts 44% of articles submitted for publication.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: JIL is published by CILIP Information Literacy Group, which “works across the UK and represents a UK workforce of 87,000 information professionals working across the private, public and third sectors to unlock the value of information.”16 Authors should keep in mind that readers are information professionals throughout the UK, but as an open-access journal for a large organization, it can have an international reach.

Reader characteristics: Readers are information professionals throughout the UK. CILIP explains that information professional “is an umbrella term for librarians, information managers, knowledge managers and data professionals.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Based on membership in CILIP, readers are UK information professionals in a wide range of libraries and institutions. Members are interested in staying up-to-date on the most current developments in information literacy and in advancing scholarship of and practice in the field. Authors should keep in mind the journal’s focus on innovative research, scholarship, and practice in the field of information literacy.

Last updated: April 10, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1.  Journal of Information Literacy, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 15, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523821255563/626763
  2. Homepage, Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/.
  3. “About the Journal,” Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/about.
  4. “Submissions,” Journal of Information Literacy, accessed April 10, 2018, https://ojs.lboro.ac.uk/JIL/about/submissions.
  5. “About the journal.”
  6. “Submissions.”
  7. “About the Journal.”
  8. “Submissions.”
  9. “Submissions.”
  10. “Submissions.”
  11. “Submissions.”
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “Submissions.”
  14. “About the Journal.”
  15. “About the Journal.”
  16. “Who We Represent,” cilip.org.uk, accessed April 10, 2018, http://www.cilip.org.uk/page/who_we_represent.
  17. “Who We Represent.”
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No Shelf Required

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: No Shelf Required

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.noshelfrequired.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: NSR started as a blog run by Sue Polanka, an academic librarian at Wright State University. For librarians from all fields, it quickly became a go-to source for new information on ebooks in libraries–a burgeoning concept at the time. Sue and the current editor, Mirela Roncevic, joined forces on all sorts of writing endeavors and the blog eventually grew into its own site with regular columnists and contributors from all over the world.1

From NSR’s About page: “In 2016, NSR expanded its mission to inspire professionals inside the book industry to do more with ebooks and econtent and embarked on groundbreaking projects that challenge what we think is possible with ebooks.”2

Target audience: Publishers, writers, editors, LIS students and professionals.3

Publisher: Currently, NSR’s editor is Mirela Roncevic.4

Peer reviewed? Unknown.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: NSR features articles on all sorts of topics–academic libraries, apps, ebook readers, piracy and many more. They have recently expanded to include reviews and opinion pieces from writers in all areas of digital content.5

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/

Types of contributions accepted: Reviews and opinion pieces, news posts.6

Submission and review process: Send proposals to Editorial Director, Mirela Roncevic at mirelaronevic@gmail.com. Review process unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, but casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Given the breadth of information and the scope of topics that are covered, NSR could be a great fit for all sorts of LIS authors. Published pieces are written “by industry insiders of all walks of life: writers, editors, librarians, educators, publishers, vendors, independent authors, and tech entrepreneurs, to name a few. Some creatively draw our attention to the issues, while others offer perspectives on what various statistics tell us about the state of the larger book industry.”7

Authors covering topics regarding ebooks and the digital or technological aspects of the LIS fields may particularly be interested in looking more into NSR.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Readers and writers are primarily in the United States, though they feature contributors from all over the world.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though NSR began as a blog out of Wright State University in Ohio, its audience is found all over North America, with an additional global presence. Articles are published in English, but the website offers Google translation on all pages.8

Reader characteristics: NSR readers are students and professionals in many different areas–LIS, publishing, education and more.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers of NSR may have a library science background, but given the wide range of readers and topics covered, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

NSR strives to publish the latest news and information on the ever growing fields of ebooks and epublishing. Readers interested in these fields are advocates for improving technology and tech usage in the LIS fields and beyond. NSR has a fantastic, comprehensive list of articles and essays related to emerging trends and issues in the ebook/epublishing fields for researchers and inquiring minds. To see if their work would be a good fit, potential authors should check out Learn with NSR to read some the latest publishings.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Home,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Write for NSR,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/
  6. “Write for NSR.”
  7. “Write for NSR.”
  8. “About.”
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Journal of New Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of New Librarianship

ISSN: 2471-3880

Website: http://newlibs.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of New Librarianship editors acknowledge the “need to offer quality literature in our field in an open, independently produced journal. Beyond that, we believe that the library is meant to set an example for academia. Free and open access to information and innovation is crucial to the future of our institutions and profession. By providing an outlet that mixes both traditional and disruptive forms of scholarly and professional communication, we can change the way our profession shares and leads.”1

Target audience: The Journal of New Librarianship aims to reach all library and information science (LIS) professionals, practitioners, scholars, teachers, and graduate students, as well as those who are interested in the LIS field.

Publisher: The journal is “independently produced.” It uses the Scholastic academic journal management system.2

Peer reviewed? Yes, blind review. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles and other content that is not peer-reviewed.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content: The Journal of New Librarianship is a new journal, first published in 2016. The journal publishes peer-reviewed articles, essays, editorials, book reviews, and columns4 on all topics in the field of LIS and seeks both “traditional and disruptive” forms of communication.5  The Columns section publishes “short pieces on topics of timely interest to information professionals covering innovations and issues for the next generation of librarians.”6

Frequency of publication: Articles are published on a rolling basis on the website; these are collected into two issues each year.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For Authors.

Types of contributions accepted: “Submissions may include, but are not limited to: Solicited articles; Scholarly Articles; Essays; Experience and opinion pieces; Media (i.e., podcasts, video, etc) relevant to innovative practices in librarianship; Book reviews; Technology reviews; Letters to the Editor on topics relevant to the field; Data sets; Manifestos; Extended scholarship (Greater than 15,000 words); and Interviews.”8 “We want lengthy treatises on intersectionality and library practice just as much as we want data analysis and recorded interviews with people doing awesome teen programming or video projects on the transformation of a library’s physical space and the perceived impact. All aspects of librarianship – by any name – are within the intended scope of the journal.”9

Submission and review process: Authors are asked to submit their articles stripped of identifying information so they are ready for peer review. They ask for a cover letter that explains “the origin of the project, whether it has been presented and if so where, and affirmation of its originality, veracity, and the author’s right to include all submitted material, data, and media.” Further, the cover letter should explain if the article has time constraints, for example, if it should be published immediately or during a particular conference. Finally, during the online submission process, authors are asked to list potential peer reviewers who are appropriate or those who should be avoided, and these suggestions should be explained in the cover letter. The editors ask authors to contact them with “preliminary pitches,” and they “encourage ideas for content in any and all forms.”10

Editorial tone: The editors encourage “submissions that we have no idea how to categorize,” so the tone should be appropriate to the piece: scholarly, conversational, casual, experimental, and so on.11

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition).12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of New Librarianship is an interesting, high-quality, experimental journal that aims to set an example in academia for free and open access to information, scholarship, and ideas.13 This is a great publication for LIS authors who want to publish traditional academic scholarship or who have novel explorations in theory or practice, timely observations, or experimental pieces, including multimedia, to contribute. LIS graduate students are encouraged to submit work and to volunteer as a part of the journal’s editorial team.14 This is an exciting new journal that is breaking new ground in the discipline’s publishing practices.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an open-access journal that is produced in the United States. Editorial board members are from U.S. universities and libraries.15 The journal welcomes non-English-language content and will provide translation assistance.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians in all types of libraries and institutions and LIS professionals, scholars, and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ will have both an academic and practical knowledge and understanding of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are members of the LIS community who are looking for novel, interesting, relevant, timely, and experimental work in the LIS field. The editors, and presumably the readers, “share a steadfast commitment to recognizing and discussing intersectionality –how social categories like race, class, and gender create overlapping and situational systems of discrimination and privilege.”17 Readers of this journal look for innovative models and practices in libraries and in LIS scholarship.

Last updated: April 16, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/about.
  2. “About the Journal.”
  3. “For Authors,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/for-authors.
  4. “Issues,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/issues.
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue of the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 2, no. 2 (2017): 100, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/3/1.
  7. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: We Proudly Offer You the Third Issue,” 100.
  8. “For Authors.”
  9.  “Policies & FAQS,” Journal of New Librarianship Blog, December 29, 2016, http://www.newlibs.org/post/55.
  10. “For Authors.”
  11. “Policies & FAQS.”
  12. “For Authors.”
  13. Stephen P. Weiter, “Editor’s Note: Welcome to the Journal of New LibrarianshipJournal of New Librarianship 1, no. 1 (2016): 1, http://dx.doi.org/10.21173/newlibs/2016/1/weiter.1.
  14. “Policies & FAQS.”
  15. “Editorial Board,” Journal of New Librarianship, accessed April 16, 2018, http://www.newlibs.org/editorial-board.
  16. “For Authors.”
  17. “Policies & FAQs.”
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Catholic Library World

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Catholic Library World

ISSN: 0008-820X

Website: http://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Catholic Library Association, an international organization established in 1921, seeks to provide professional development, promote Catholic literature and offer spiritual support. They promote the exchange of ideas and provide an inspirational source of guidance on ethical issues related to librarianship.1

Target audience: LIS professionals, both within and outside of the Catholic faith.2

Publisher: Catholic Library Association.

Peer reviewed? Yes, all submissions are subjected to a double-blind review process.3

Type: LIS scholarly.

Medium: Print.

Content: Catholic Library World publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholicism and Catholic Studies. “CLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to, academic, public, theological, parish & church libraries, and school libraries.”4

Frequency of publication: Journals are published in September, December and March.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Links to PDF files containing author guidelines can be found on CLA’s Publications page.

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews (for both children and adult works) and articles on all aspects of librarianship, particularly those that relate to Catholicism and Catholic Studies.6

For a better idea of what CLW publishes, here are two recent articles:

The Bayou Lafourche Oral History Project: Understanding Environmental Change and Religious Identity in Louisiana

Catholic Academic Libraries and Print Promotional Materials

Articles should contribute new findings to the existing literature in the field. The word count should be between 3000 and 5000 words, but may be longer if an editor gives approval.7

Submission and review process: Send manuscripts via email as an attachment including author’s full name, affiliation and email address. Manuscripts should be neither previously published nor published simultaneously elsewhere. Because of the lengthy peer review process, authors will be notified within ninety days of submission whether or not their work was accepted. 8

If published, authors keep copyrights and publication rights for their work.

Editorial tone: Accessible and well documented.9

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Potential LIS authors should keep in mind that the Catholic Library Association does not limit their publications to works about Catholicism or Catholic librarianship. Their Publications page states that “CLW respects diverse Christian traditions as well as non-Christian. While it is a Catholic publication, CLW welcomes relevant articles from a variety of religious traditions.”10
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Catholic Library World features a wide readership within and outside of the Catholic Library Association. The journal is “indexed in Book Review, CPLI, Library Literature and Information Science, Library and Information Science Abstracts, Reference Book Review Index, Current Index to Journals in Education (ERIC), Information Science Abstract, and University des sciences humans de Strasbourg (CERDIC.)”11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The majority of Catholic Library World’s readers are likely to be American Catholics.

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to be LIS professionals. From their Publications page, “CLW is intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various libraries.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Members of the Catholic Library Association are networkers in the field of library science with a passion for the future of libraries and library trends in the U.S. and abroad.13 Considering that each issue of CLA’s award winning journal features over 100 book and media reviews, readers of Catholic Library World are interested in a wide variety of LIS topics.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Cathla.org, accessed March 6, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/About_Us/Main/About/About_Us.aspx?hkey=1d0656f5-9a4c-4436-a435-6074be93e751
  2. “Publications,” Cathla.org, accessed March 6, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  3. “Author Guidelines,” Cathla.org, accessed March 2, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications
  4. “Author Guidelines.”
  5. “Author Guidelines.”
  6. “Author Guidelines.”
  7. “Author Guidelines.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. “Publications.”
  11. “Publications.”
  12. “Publications.”
  13. “Become a Member,” Cathla.org, accessed March 13, 2018, https://cathla.org/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member/Main/Membership/Become_a_Member.aspx?hkey=b2bcc799-8b31-4f9e-8629-f408fde31e9d
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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

ISSN: 1931-54731

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.2 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”3

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.4

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.7

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.10

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.11

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members13; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1.  SCA Newsletter, Society of California Archivists (SCA), accessed March 18, 2018, http://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  3.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  4. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  5.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  13. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  14.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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Library & Information History

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library & Information History

ISSN: 1758-3489 (Print) and 1758-3497 (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: To publish articles on “all subjects and all periods relating to the history of libraries and librarianship and to the history of information, in its broadest sense.”2

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/ylbh20

Target audience:Library & Information History is a journal for anyone interested in the social, cultural and intellectual history of libraries and of information.”3

Publisher: Routledge.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS Scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Subject matter varies widely and includes topics such as the Nazi looting of European libraries, the history of archiving, how Rome’s history informs the French revolution, etc., as well as more current topics like preserving information in today’s digitized world.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ylbh20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: According to the journal’s website: “Issues include substantial articles as well as book reviews, occasional surveys of recent publications, and guides to relevant sources.”10

Submission and review process: All submissions should be formatted according to a template available on the “Instructions for Authors” page and should be no more than 8,000 words. Six keywords should be included with each manuscript for purposes of search engine optimization. Manuscripts can be submitted in Word, LaTeX, or any other standard format and emailed to melanie.kimball@simmons.edu or p.reid@rgu.ac.uk.11

As for the review process, all manuscripts are subject to a standard double-blind peer review, in keeping with the journal’s standards for academic integrity.12

Editorial tone: Although the journal’s title suggests a neutral tone, some articles, such as “See the Movie, Read the Book! Cleveland Public Library’s Bookmarks Programme, 1923–1972” take an enthusiastic tone towards their subject matter, with descriptions like “hugely influential” and “fascinating.”13 This enthusiastic tone, however, does not in any way, shape, or form detract from the meticulous research of each article. Instead, this tone makes for a more engaging reading experience than, say, an article from a history textbook.

Style guide used: The journal asks authors to use consistently use any standard spelling throughout a manuscript, as well as single quotation marks except for  where ‘a quotation is “within” a quotation’. Lastly, the journal notes that lengthy quotes are indented without quotations marks.14 For further guidance, please see these layout guidelines.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library & Information History is an excellent choice for authors with extensive knowledge of the history of libraries, as well as the ways our current information practices shape the “future of history.”15 When viewed through this unique “future of history” lens, the options available to authors are even broader than the journal’s title suggests. As for authors strictly interested in the history of libraries, this journal is simply incomparable.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although based in the U.K., Library & Information History is an international journal with a global reach.16 As such, regional cultural references and language should be kept to a minimum.

Reader characteristics: While readers’ jobs, workplaces, and level of education may vary, they share an interest in the history of libraries and information. Since Library & Information History is a high-level academic journal17, readers will most likely have post-secondary degrees in Library Science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The bulk of this journal’s readers are likely to be historians (amateur or professional) of library and information science. Also, due to the journal’s scholarly nature, knowledge of LIS subject matter amongst readers is likely quite high.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

In keeping with the tone of the journal, readers are likely to be enthusiastic LIS history buffs and will appreciate a thoroughly researched scholarly paper. Due to the international flavor of this publication, readers are likely to be open-minded and interested in a variety of other cultures. Authors with a passion for LIS history will find a diverse audience for their ideas here.19

Last updated: February 24, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?journalCode=ylbh20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
  4.  Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  5.  Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  6. Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  7. Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  8.  Library & Information History, Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/ylbh20/current
  9.  Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  10.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ylbh20&page=instructions
  12.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ylbh20&page=instructions
  13. Karen F. Gracy, “See the Movie, Read the Book! Cleveland Public Library’s
    Bookmarks Programme, 1923–1972,” Library & Information History 33, no. 4 (2017): 236.
  14. “Style Guidelines,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ylbh20&page=instructions#Style_guidelines
  15. Lena Roland and David Bawden, “The Future of History: Investigating the Preservation of Information in the Digital Age,” Library & Information History, 28, no. 3 (2012): 220.
  16. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 24, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
  17. Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  18.  Library & Information History, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 23, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1519443448289/38434
  19.  “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 23, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ylbh20
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Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

ISSN: 2157-0396 (Print) and 2161-3540 (Online)1

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”2

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,3 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.4

Publisher: Georgia Library Association5

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.6 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.7

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.8 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,9 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online10

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.11

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”12

Frequency of publication: Quarterly13

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.14

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”15

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”16

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.17

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.18

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,20 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.22 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,23 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,24 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia25 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.26 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,27 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1.  Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/465320178
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  4. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  7. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  8. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  10. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  11. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  12. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  13. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  14. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  15. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  16. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  17. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  18. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  19. (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  20. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  21. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  22. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  23. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  27. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
Continue Reading

Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn)

ISSN: 0038-3686

Website: http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Southeastern Librarian (SELn) “is the official publication of the Southeastern Library Association (SELA).” The journal publishes “articles, announcements, and news of professional interest to the library community in the southeast”1

Target audience: The library community of the southeastern United States as well as members of SELA.2

Publisher: Southeastern Library Association.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.

Content: For each volume, SELn publishes four issues that report SELA business, juried articles, book reviews, and state library/personnel news. The journal “represents a significant means for addressing the Association’s research objective.”5 Regular sections include Articles, Book Reviews, and News Articles.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions.

Types of contributions accepted: Manuscripts submitted to SELn “need not be of a scholarly nature but should address professional concerns of the library community. SELn particularly seeks articles that have a broad southeastern scope and/or address topics identified as timely or important by SELA sections, round tables, or committees.” SELn also accepts articles with a broad range of information sources, not limited to the purely scholarly: “News releases, newsletters, clippings, and journals from libraries, state associations, and groups throughout the region.”6 SELn also accepts book reviews for consideration.7

Submission and review process:

For articles, the “manuscript will be acknowledged by the editor. Incoming manuscripts are added to a manuscript bank from which articles are selected for each issue.” The editor assigns manuscripts to at least two reviewers for blind review. Following the review, the author will be notified of the publication decision; articles are usually published within twelve months.8

For book reviews, “submissions will be judged on writing style, content and perceived interest to the readership of the journal.” Those reviews solicited by the editor receive preferential consideration.9

Editorial tone: SELn publishes both juried articles and news and association items. Scholarly articles have an academic tone but a readable style, whereas news articles are more informal. Articles that are not scholarly should “address professional concerns of the library community.”10 A review of the most recent articles reveals well-researched, referenced, and academic writing.11

Style guide used: Latest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal provides a good opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and students based in the southeastern United States to publish original research and scholarship. Potential authors should consider joining SELA in order to identify topics of interest to members through the association’s sections, roundtables, and committees.13 LIS authors can also submit book reviews. Further, SELn has issued a call for volunteer reviewers; a reviewer must be a member of SELA and have two years professional experience and two published peer-reviewed articles (or equivalent).14

 

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SELA members are able to access current issues online.15 Back issues one year past are available to all through DigitalCommons.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are based in the southeastern United States. “State library associations of the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia are eligible to be constituent members of the Association.”17 As this publication focuses on a particular group of states, there will generally be a shared cultural understanding of relevant topics. However, as the SELn covers a fair number of states, specific regional terms should be explained.

Reader characteristics: SELA membership “may include any person, library or other organization . . . interested in the promotion and fostering of library and information services in the southeastern United States.”18 The audience will share a concern for the betterment of libraries in this region.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As members of SELA, readers will have knowledge of LIS subject matter and jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal will have a variety of interests in LIS issues, especially those whose relevance is demonstrated in the context of the southeastern United States. SELn readers are LIS professionals and students throughout the region, so there is an interest in a wide variety of research and scholarship that will benefit and advance practices in all LIS environments .

Last updated: March 14, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. Homepage, The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/issues.html.
  2. Homepage.
  3. Homepage.
  4. “Guidelines for Submissions and Author Instructions,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/guidelines.html.
  5. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  6. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  7. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers,”The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/bookreviewers.html.
  8. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  9. “Guidelines for Book Reviewers.”
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  11. SELn Archives, digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu, accessed March 14, 2018, https://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/seln/.
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  13. “Guidelines for Submissions.”
  14. “Call for Reviewers,” The Southeastern Librarian, accessed March 14, 2018, http://www.selaonline.org/sela/publications/SEln/reviewers.html.
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  16.  SELn Archives.
  17. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” 2014 edition, p. 9, accessed March 14, 2018, http://selaonline.org/sela//contacts/SELA_Handbook.pdf.
  18. “Southeastern Library Association Handbook,” p. 7.
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