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New Review of Academic Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: New Review of Academic Librarianship

ISSN1361-4533 (print), 1740-7834 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/racl20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission: The New Review of Academic Librarianship is an international journal that works to establish “the relevance and applicability of theory and/or research for the academic library practitioner.” The journal’s intent is “disseminate developments and encourage discussion on the future role of academic libraries and their services.”1

Target audience: The target audience is academic librarians and information professionals from around the world.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.5

Content: The New Review of Academic Librarianship publishes a comprehensive range of topics in the realm of academic libraries and their services, including scholarly communication and institutional repositories, learning and research support, information literacy, technological advances, physical space, monitoring and evaluation, collection management, conservation and preservation, collaboration, electronic content, and national and international higher education library policy.6 The journal regularly publishes special issues; past themes include Supporting Researchers: Sustainable Innovation in Strategy and Services7 and Librarian as Communicator.8

Frequency of publication: Four times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: Original research articles, literature review articles,10 and scholarly perspectives “based on theory and research that advance the understanding of the development of high quality academic library and information management practices.”[1o. “Aims and Scope.”]

Submission and review process: New Review of Academic Librarianship uses ScholarOne Manuscripts for submissions.11 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and anonymous peer review.12 Taylor & Francis provides a website for authors that gives an overview of the publishing process and help with submitting manuscripts.13

Editorial tone: The tone of the writing in the New Review of Academic Librarianship is academic yet less formal than one might expect in a scholarly journal. Since the journal is intended for an international readership, authors are instructed to adopt “a straightforward writing style…avoiding over-long or complex sentence structures.”14

Style guide used: APA (6th edition); Taylor & Francis provides a reference guide as well.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The New Review of Academic Librarianship is a prestigious LIS journal with an international scope and a focus on research and practice in academic libraries. Submissions reflect advanced and original research and high-level scholarship. LIS authors are encouraged to submit manuscripts that “significantly contribute to the knowledge base of academic librarians.” Futhermore, the journal welcomes perspectives “from academic library practitioners, educationalists involved with academic libraries and others with relevant knowledge and interest.”16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although published in the United Kingdom, the New Review of Academic Librarianship is intended for an international readership, including both English-speaking and non-English-speaking countries, especially in Europe. The journal is published in English; however, given its intended international audience, the publishers stress the importance of using a straightforward writing style.17

Reader characteristics: The readers targeted are most likely librarians and information specialists associated with colleges and universities. While the specific practices at institutions of higher education may differ in the various nations where the journal is read, the librarians are most likely highly educated individuals providing educational and research support for faculty and students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It is safe to assume that the readers of this journal are well versed in LIS issues. However, an author should remember that the readers are academic librarians and will not necessarily be familiar with the details or practices of other types of libraries. Furthermore, an author writing for the New Review of Academic Librarianship should consider that the experiences of academic librarians in other countries might differ significantly from those in their own countries, and so provide some context and explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors submitting to the New Review of Academic Librarianship should understand that the readership is international in scope and focused on theory and practice in academic libraries and information services targeted to faculty and students in colleges and universities. They should keep in mind regional and cultural considerations that may need to be explicated for readers from different regions. The readership expects high-level scholarship and research, as well as analyses that emphasize how LIS scholarship can be implemented in practices and services in academic libraries.

 

Last updated: February 10, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=racl20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Journal Information,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=racl20.
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Journal Information.”
  6. “Aims and Scope.”
  7. Wendy White, “Libraries and Research: Five Key Themes for Sustainable Innovation in Strategy and Services,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 23, nos. 2-3: 85-88, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2017.1355637.
  8. Helen Fallon, “Librarian as Communicator: Case Studies and International Perspectives,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 22, nos. 2-3: 107-111, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2016.1216216.
  9. “Journal Information.”
  10. Jo Alcock, “Literature Reviews and Academic Librarianship: The Review Editor’s Perspective,” New Review of Academic Librarianship 22, no. 4: 351-354, https://doi.org/10.1080/13614533.2016.1246291.
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” New Review of Academic Librarianship, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=racl20&page=instructions.
  12. “Aims and Scope.”
  13. “Author Services,” taylorandfrancis.com, accessed February 10, 2018, https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/.
  14. “Instructions for Authors.”
  15. “Taylor & Francis Standard Reference Style: APA,” Taylor & Francis Author Services, accessed February 10, 2018, http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/authors/style/reference/tf_APA.pdf.
  16. “Aims and Scope.”
  17. “Instructions for Authors.”
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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

ISSN: 2379-95281

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.2 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”3 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”4

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.5

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: LIS professional news.8

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.9

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Active Librarian, Michael J. Carlozzi, accessed March 18, 2018, http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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Electronic Green Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Electronic Green Journal

ISSN: 1076-79751

Website: http://escholarship.org/uc/uclalib_egj

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The main goal of the EGJ is to assist in international scholarly communication about environmental issues. In order to meet this goal, the journal strives to serve as an open and active forum of communication about environmental issues, as well as an educational environmental resource, including both practical and scholarly articles, bibliographies, reviews, editorial comments, and announcements.”2

Target audience: Electronic Green Journal is geared toward information consultants, environmentalists, ecologists, regional planners, publishers, booksellers, educators, librarians, students, and others interested in environmental issues.3

Publisher: University of California at Los Angeles Library4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Environmental Studies and LIS, scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: International environmental information8

Frequency of publication: Semiannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions may not be previously published or simultaneously submitted to another publication. Scholarly manuscripts from all fields and countries related to environmental issues are accepted. No specific information is given as to length of manuscripts.10 Book reviews of up to 600 words are also accepted.11

Submission and review process: Authors must register with the website first. Manuscripts are to be written in English and submitted online. Specific requirements for manuscript submission including abstract and formatting instructions can be found at http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines. Before submitting a manuscript, potential authors should ensure it complies with preparation checklist on the Submission Guidelines page. All feature articles are reviewed by experts in the particular field. If necessary, articles will be edited by journal staff.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly13

Style guide used: The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition. Authors are advised to consult the Purdue Online Writing Lab for additional assistance.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an interdisciplinary publication with a broad readership that includes librarians and students. LIS authors whose research encompasses environmental concerns and who wish to reach a global audience should consider submitting to this journal.15

Authors interested in writing book reviews are invited to choose from a selection of titles and produce a review of no more than 600 words.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated. As the Electronic Green Journal has been an open-access publication since 1994, it likely serves a fairly large international audience.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As an open-access online journal written in American English, Electronic Green Journal serves a diverse, well-educated, and professional  international community interested in environmental topics.18

Reader characteristics: This journal serves the global community and is written for information consultants, environmentalists, librarians, educators, students and all who are interested in “worldwide environmental topics.” According to the website, environmental issues cross disciplines and borders, so readers will likely be progressive and liberal, and come from a variety of backgrounds.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Since readers come from a variety of disciplines, authors are well-advised to include descriptions of any specific LIS terms and subject.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

By publishing in the Electronic Green Journal, authors may expect to reach a politically liberal, professionally diverse, and international audience interested in environmental issues.21

Last updated: April 22, 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523472187676/202120
  2. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  3. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  4. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  5. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  6. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  7. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  8. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  9. Electronic Green Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 22, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406171732058/202120
  10. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  11. “Guide for Reviewers,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=guidelinesforreviewers
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  13. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=submissionguidelines
  15. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  16. “Guide for Reviewers,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=guidelinesforreviewers
  17. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  18. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  19.  “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  20. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
  21. “Aims and Scope,” University of California eScholarship, accessed April 22, 2017, http://escholarship.org/uc/search?entity=uclalib_egj;view=aimsandscope
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Bayline

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Bayline

ISSN: N/A

Website: To read posts: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/. For information: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/bayline/ and for Archives: http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/issues/.

Purpose, objective, or mission: Bayline is the “official bulletin of the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter” of the Special Libraries Association (or the SLA), according to their website. It presents information of interest to librarians in special libraries throughout the Bay Area.1

Target audience: The target audience is comprised of members of Special Libraries Association, an association for libraries who are not in traditional settings. These libraries can be at museums, corporations, law firms, botanical gardens, etc. “SLA serves more than 12,000 members in 83 countries in the information profession, including corporate, academic and government information specialists.”2

Publisher: The San Francisco Bay Region Chapter of the SLA.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news magazine.5

Medium: Online. In 2013, Bayline shifted from a web magazine to a blog that’s incorporated into SF chapter’s website.6

Content: Profiles of member libraries (which can be very interesting and varied), and articles presenting information librarians in nontraditional settings would find useful. It also contains business news for the professional organization, such as the treasurer’s report and information on what members are doing.7

Frequency of publication: Monthly issues, with new posts added as often as necessary. From a recent post, Bayline is updated with at least 2-3 posts per month.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no submission guidelines at the Bayline website however each newsletter contains this statement, “All article submissions must receive approval from the editor and are subject to editing. Submitting authors must sign a copyright release. Authors retain all rights to their articles and know that the full contents of Bayline will be published online at the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter web site. Articles previously published will usually not be accepted for Bayline but exceptions can be negotiated.”9

Types of contributions accepted: There are no limitations given, however the articles should be of interest to the target audience. The invitation to submit does note that Bayline prefers not to publish articles that have seen prior publication, but this is negotiable.10

Submission and review process: Articles must be submitted to the editor before the publication date of the issue they were written for. The editor will read and make sure the article is appropriate for the audience, and is an appropriate length.

To contact the editor email: mcwjrlis@gmail.com .11

Editorial tone: There are no instructions given as to editorial tone, most articles are written in the first person, or third person familiar and informal manner.12

Style guide used: None listed.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication would be a good venue for anyone writing an informal article on subjects of interest to almost any LIS subject, since special librarianship covers such a wide range of topics. There is no indication authors must be members of SLA to submit work for publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Bayline is a free online newsletter/magazine. It is emailed to members of the Bay Area Special Library Association, but is not printed and distributed. As an online periodical, it’s available throughout the world, but is actively read mostly in the Bay Area.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Bayline is focused on the Bay Area, and deals with subjects of interest to librarians in the Bay Area. It is possible that articles with a national focus would be accepted for publication, but the readership is almost entirely local. This periodical is written in American English. Articles may deal with librarianship in other languages or cultures as special libraries may have collections in other languages, but the articles are written in English. There is a wide variety of cultures represented in the SLA, so authors should be sensitive to other cultures and avoid stereotypes and explain information that might not be evident to someone from a different cultural background.14

Reader characteristics: The range of librarians covered by the SLA is huge. The SLA local chapter website illustrates this by saying, “Members of the San Francisco Bay Region Chapter of SLA work in diverse information environments ranging from business and technical organizations to research, government and academic institutions. We are found in public and private corporations, law firms, colleges and universities, banks and financial institutions, newspapers, hospitals, research facilities, public libraries, and engineering and architectural firms. Although many members work in corporate and special libraries, others are managers, researchers, analysts, technical services specialists, and consultants.”15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are almost entirely professional librarians or library students. A broad background in LIS subject matter can be assumed, but due to the diverse nature of the libraries represented, extremely specialized terms used in specific kinds of libraries or specializations (such as cataloging, technical services, reference) would need to be defined.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of Bayline would be interested in any library topic, especially if it’s local, especially if it involves an unusual library or an unusual librarian. Profiles of libraries, tours of libraries, information on collections, profiles of members and information on resources are all of interest. Information on marketing to the general public would be slightly less well-received here than in other publication (because of the largely corporate nature of the libraries represented) but marketing within the organization would be of great interest.

Bayline is more of a community newsletter than other professional publications, with a section on member news and neighborhood professional dinners. The long community history of the newsletter may explain this, the archive shows that newsletter publication dates back to the 1920s.17

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  2. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  3. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  4. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Bayline Issues. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/issues/
  5. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  6. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  7. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  8. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  9. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2010, February/March). Bayline Staff/Editor’s Notes. Bayline, 80(1). Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/febmar10.pdf
  10. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2010, February/March). Bayline Staff/Editor’s Notes. Bayline, 80(1). Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/febmar10.pdf
  11. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/bayline/
  12. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
  13. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  14. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  15. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  16. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). About SLA and the San Francisco Bay Chapter. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/about/
  17. Special Libraries Association (SLA) San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. (2016). Archive Bayline. SLA San Francisco Bay Region Chapter. Retrieved from http://sanfrancisco.sla.org/category/bayline/
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GOOD

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

ISSN: 1935-1488 (Print)1

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “GOOD is a global media brand and social impact company. Our collective mission is to help people and organizations be forces for good. Through award-winning media and creative partnerships, we connect deeply and authentically with this generation’s desire for purpose.”2 The magazine and website cover stories on business, environment, politics, culture, technology, education, etc.

Target audience: Millennials who want to make a difference in the world.3

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and print magazine.6

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.good.is/about/faq

Types of contributions accepted: According to the site’s FAQ, “We work with artists, designers, photographers and writers on a freelance basis.”8

Submission and review process: Send your story pitch to submissions@goodinc.com to be considered for publication in the magazine or on the website. Due to the high volume of submissions, editors will only respond to pitches they are considering for publication. Allow two weeks for review.9

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD€™’s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and a recent piece on the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 50,000 for the print magazine, 10 million monthly unique visits to the website.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English.11

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.12

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy,13 they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’€™s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: September 28, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1.  Good, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521897393214/626468
  2. “About,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/about
  3. “Audience,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/community/audience
  4. About.”
  5. About.”
  6. About.”
  7. About.”
  8. “General Inquiries,” Good.is, accessed September 27, https://www.good.is/about/faq#general-questions
  9. “GOOD Magazine (print),” Good.is, accessed September 27, 2016, https://www.good.is/about/faq#print-questions
  10. “GOOD Media Kit 2016,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  11. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  12. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  13. GOOD Worldwide, Inc. (2014). About Us. GOOD. Retrieved from http://community.good.is/about
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Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America

ISSN: 0730-7187 (Print) and 2161-9417 (Online)1

Website: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/journals/journal/adx.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a peer-reviewed journal presenting issues of concern to librarians working within art history, art criticism, the history of architecture, archeology, and similar areas. The journal has established itself as a vital publication for art information professionals, acting as a forum for issues relating to both the documentation of art, and the practice and theory of art librarianship and visual resources curatorship.”2

Target audience: Art, architecture, and design librarians and visual resources curators.3

Publisher: University of Chicago Press4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: Art and LIS, scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: Articles and information relevant to art librarianship and visual resources curatorship in academic, special library, and museum settings.8

Frequency of publication: Semiannually9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttps://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146

Types of contributions accepted: According to the contributor guidelines, “Feature articles may take the form of theoretical or scholarly submissions, revisions of conference presentations, papers emphasizing library practice, descriptions of specific libraries or collections, interviews, or articles of a historical nature. Articles must relate to art librarianship, visual resources curatorship, or the documentation of art, and the writing style should be formal.” Published articles are typically 2,500 to 5,000 words, with a maximum of 8,000 words.10

Submission and review process: Authors should contact the content editor via email to discuss topic and abstract before submitting a manuscript. Submission deadlines are March 1 for the fall issue, and September 1 for the spring issue.11

Editorial tone: Scholarly12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Professionals, academics, and graduate students seeking to establish themselves in the field of art librarianship will find an opportunity in this peer-reviewed publication.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation statistics available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is an English-language journal published in the United States, with a North American focus.14

Reader characteristics: A subscription to Art Documentation is a benefit to membership in the Art Libraries Society of North America. It is assumed that readers have a shared interest in art, developing LIS skills, and supporting fellow art librarians. Workplaces would include art libraries with an interest in mentoring, networking, and developing best practices. Readers would have a professional interest in promoting access to art and art preservation.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers have an LIS degree. It is likely that many members of the ARLIS/NA also hold additional degrees in history or art.16

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Writers need to consider the education level and very specific interest the readers share when writing for this publication. Authors are encouraged, as with any publication, to read past issues of the publication before querying the editor with a proposal.

Last updated: November 1, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed April 10, 2018, https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  2. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  3. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  4.  Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  5. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  6. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  7. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  8. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  9. Art Documentation, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406645579973/65374
  10. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  11. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  12. “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  13. “Art Documentation Contributor Guidelines,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016, https://arlisna.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=257:art-documentation-contributor-guidelines&catid=18:publications&Itemid=146
  14.  “Art Documentation: Journal of the Art Libraries Society of North America: About,” University of Chicago Press, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/journals/adx/about
  15.  “Art Documentation,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016 https://arlisna.org/publications/art-documentation
  16. “What Our Members Are Saying,” Art Libraries Society of North America, accessed November 1, 2016, https://www.arlisna.org/membership/what-our-members-are-saying
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Voice of Youth Advocates

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://www.voyamagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Focuses on library services to/with young adults (aka “teenagers” “adolescents,” typically youth of middle and high school ages). VOYA‘s policy is based on the following principles: specialize in young adult library service; intellectual freedom and equal access; and youth advocacy and youth participation.1

Target audience: Public librarians, school librarians and educators serving youth ages 12 to 18, paraprofessionals serving youth, publishers, authors of young adult books, and other young adult advocates.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional journal.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The journal includes book reviews on fiction, nonfiction, and genre titles, as well as articles about YA services, programming, space design, and lists of award winners.7

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly publication.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Literary analysis, author interviews, or practical project ideas, new YA space redesigns or makeover profiles (a regular column) are accepted. Submissions are also accepted for the “VOYA Get With the Program” column.9

Submission and review process: Short articles should be between 800 to 1,700 words and up to 3,500 words for longer pieces. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Information for specific column requirements is available on the website. Authors should query the editor before submitting manuscripts, to ensure the piece is suitable for the journal.10

Editorial tone: VOYA solicits articles written in an approachable style for practitioners serving YA users. The goal is to publish articles by authors who express enthusiasm in working with YA and who can speak from experience about YA services.11

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VOYA is a well-respected journal in the field of library and information services for young adults. The journal is written in an approachable style which may not meet tenure requirements for academic faculty. Also, this journal is intended for public and school librarians who work with YA and not academic librarians. Those interested in tenure may not want to submit manuscripts for publication to this journal.

The journal welcomes articles about new, progressive, informative, and controversial issues as they relate to youth culture. Authors who have experience in working with YAs and who can demonstrate enthusiasm for working with them through their writing are encouraged to submit manuscripts. VOYA‘s wide range of readers provides authors with a large audience which will provide them wide recognition in the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: VOYA has 7,000 subscribers. According to the last reader’€™s survey, each subscriber circulates the journal to two colleagues which means that the journal experiences a readership of 21,000 people.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published within the United States,13 but there is a possibility that there are subscribers outside of the country. The journal is printed in English.14 Due to wide readership, it is important that language remain clear of local jargon. This also means that all acronyms should be spelled out. Cultural consideration should also be taken into account. Pop culture references should be explained so that all readers will understand. This is very important for this journal since it focuses on young adults, who are very interested in pop culture.15

Reader characteristics: There is no statistical breakdown on the readers of this journal. However, the journal does say that the readers of this journal are public and school librarians, educators, authors of young adult books, publishers, and other youth advocates. The common interest among this group is young adults. However, they may not all be interested in this age group in the same way. School librarians may be more interested in the book review section and have marginal interest in programming, which public librarians are keen on. Publishers and authors might also be interested in the book review sections and the interviews with authors. The journal does not profess itself to be liberal or conservative, however, it does value intellectual freedom, young adults, literature for this group, and advocacy for YA resources. All of which lean more towards a progressive attitude. The journal often features articles about controversial topics, books, or authors.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the breadth of professions represented in this readership community, it is suggested that authors avoid using LIS specific jargon which may not be understood or interesting to lay readers.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal are a very diverse group in terms of language, geographic location, profession, and educational attainment. Authors should consider writing articles about new and interesting topics in the field of library services. However, the topics should not be scholarly in tone or esoteric. Authors should remember that the readers have different backgrounds and interests in young people.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  2. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  7. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  9. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  10. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  11. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  12. VOYA. (2016). AdvertisersRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/advertisers/
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  14. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  15. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  16. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  17. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
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