Wiki Tags Archives: Advocacy

Public Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Public Libraries

ISSN: 0163-55061

Website: Public Libraries magazine: http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries; Public Libraries Onlinehttp://publiclibrariesonline.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Public Libraries is the official trade publication of the Public Library Association (PLA), a division of American Library Association (ALA), and thus reflects its standards. The magazine seeks to provide public librarians with the news and information they need to be as successful in their careers as possible.2

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.3

Publisher: Public Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS professional news. This publication focuses on the public library workplace rather than on scholarly research.6

Medium: Print.7 Public Libraries Online, a complement to the printed journal, is available online.8

Content: Quality articles and information germane to all aspects of public libraries.9

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl

Types of contributions accepted: The following types of contributions are considered for publication:

  • Feature articles. Manuscripts should be 3,000-6,000 words.
  • €œVerso€ pieces, of no more than 1,500 words.
  • Vendor announcements. (Contact Kathleen Hughes, khughes@ala.org.)
  • Reviews of professional literature. (Contact Kathleen Hughes, khughes@ala.org.)11

Submission and review process: Public Libraries has a specific style guide that authors should adhere to before submitting manuscripts to the editor. Manuscripts are evaluated by the Feature Editor and persons knowledgeable about the topic of the work.12 All submissions are reviewed in a double-blind process to ensure that published papers are of high quality.13

Articles are accepted on a rolling basis and the evaluation process generally takes eight to twelve weeks. Articles are typically scheduled for publication in the order in which they are received.14

All submissions must be submitted through the online Public Libraries Editorial Manager. First-time authors will need to register. You may then submit your manuscript and track its progress through the system.15

Editorial tone: From the website: “Write in a clear, simple style. Use the active voice whenever possible. Avoid overly long sentences.”16

Style guide used: Consult the Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. and the Random House Webster’€™s College Dictionary for questions about grammar, usage, or spelling.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is an excellent publication for public librarians, LIS professionals or student authors interested in sharing unique knowledge or experiences germane to public libraries. This is a credible resource since it is published by the Public Library Association, a division of the American Library Association. Potential topics this publication may address include: career development, serving diverse populations in public libraries, and improving public programming.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Subscription accompanies membership in the Public Library Association (PLA),18 meaning that each issue of Public Libraries circulates to nearly 10,000 PLA members and subscribers throughout the entire United States and Canada.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLA is a division of the American Library Association, indicating that readers of this publication are primarily located throughout the United States.20 The information in this publication is printed in the English language.21 It is culturally focused on the U.S. and on library and information science issues relevant to American librarians working in the public library realm.22

Reader characteristics: Expect readers to be familiar with current library technologies and policies. Readers are likely working in a public library, and are knowledgeable of procedures and technologies related to their field. By subscribing the magazine, the readers are displaying a personal interest in bettering themselves and their knowledge of their chosen field. The majority of this publication’€™s readers include reference, children, youth, special collections, and technical librarians working in public libraries. Although most of the audience has an MLIS education, there are professionals who have worked in libraries for an extensive amount of time and may have gotten involved when a graduate degree was not required. Furthermore, this publication is appealing to LIS graduate students interested in learning more about issues in the public library realm. This publication is progressive insofar as it is concerned with ensuring that the general public, including the disadvantaged, has access to information, services and programs.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that this is a professional publication, most readers are already familiar with issues relevant to the library and information science profession. They will also be familiar with LIS jargon, specifically that used in public libraries.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Public Library‘s readers are professionally affiliated with both the American Library Association and the Public Library Association. Collectively, readers are very likely to be public library employees. Most read this publication to learn about national public library news, to build camaraderie within the field, and to gain insight about how they might approach issues within their own libraries. Considering this publication’s national audience, it is important to link unique experiences to national issues. For instance, an article about lending e-readers in one library would make connections to copyright or cost issues relevant to other libraries.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest. 2019. “Public Libraries.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521399522510/23515
  2. American Library Association. 2019. Public Libraries Magazine. Public Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries
  3. American Library Association, Public Libraries Magazine.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. American Library Association. 2019. Write for Public Libraries Magazine. Public Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl
  6. American Library Association, Public Libraries Magazine.
  7. Proquest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Library Association, Public Libraries Magazine.
  9. American Library Association, Public Libraries Magazine.
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Library Association. 2019. Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines. Public Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/writeforpl/editorialguidelines
  12. American Library Association, Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.
  13. American Library Association, Public Libraries Magazine.
  14. American Library Association, Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.
  15. American Library Association, Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.
  16. American Library Association, Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.
  17. American Library Association, Public Libraries Editorial Guidelines.
  18. American Library Association. 2019. Subscribe to Public Libraries. Public Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/publiclibraries/subscribe
  19. American Library Association. 2019. Advertise with PLA. Public Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/pla/publications/advertise
  20. American Library Association, Subscribe to Public Libraries.
  21. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  22. American Library Association, Public Libraries Magazine.
  23. American Library Association, Public Libraries Magazine.
  24. American Library Association, Public Libraries Magazine.
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Information Outlook

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information Outlook

ISSN: 1091-0808 (Print) and 1938-3819 (Online)1

Website: https://www.sla.org/access-membership-3/io/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Information Outlook is the official publication of the Special Libraries Association (SLA). The SLA “promotes and strengthens its members through learning, networking, and community building initiatives.”2

Target audience: Information Outlook is targeted towards their membership of information professionals, specifically those working in special libraries.

Publisher: Special Libraries Association (SLA).3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Per their website, the publication contains “articles on timely topics such as data curation, digital asset management, bibliometrics, and value co-creation; columns about technology, copyright law, and other issues of perpetual interest; and interviews with SLA members, offering a close-up look at information professionals in different disciplines, work environments, and countries.”7

Frequency of publication: Bi-monthly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/

Types of contributions accepted: From the “Write for IO,” “Although written primarily by SLA members, articles in Information Outlook also are contributed by futurists, attorneys, academicians, technology professionals, human resources specialists, communications experts–anyone with knowledge or ideas about how information professionals can better serve their clients.”9

Submission and review process: Interested authors should send a query email to the current editor with an outline of your topic along with your qualifications. The editor will forward your query to the advisory council for review. The guidelines encourage illustrated article of approximately 2,000 words in length.10

Editorial tone: Written in an active voice following the SLA style guide provided in the submission guidelines.11

Style guide used: Current edition of Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information Outlook is an excellent forum for LIS authors writing on topics of interest to special libraries. Since there is such a wide variety of special library types, there are a number of topics that can be addressed. Despite differences among particular types of special libraries, many experiences and situations can be generalized and made applicable to all of Information Outlook readers.13

Although this is not a scholarly journal, Information Outlook is a highly respected journal, and LIS authors would benefit from having their work published by the SLA.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 4,000.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Special Libraries Association has 49 regional chapters. The majority are located in the United States, but there are also chapters in Canada, Africa, the Arabian Gulf, Australia, New Zealand, Asia, Europe, and the Caribbean. In addition to the regional chapters, SLA boasts members in 75 countries.15 Information Outlook is published in English, but circulates to members in other countries as well (as listed above). Issues pertaining to special librarians will be of general interest to all readers, but there may be some regional/cultural specifics that might not be applicable to readers in different countries.16

Reader characteristics: The readers of Information Outlook are individuals who typically hold a library degree. Many have master’s degrees in subject specialties as well. There is gender diversity in the audience, and they range in age, typically from late 20s upwards. They may be brand new to the profession or they may be upper management with many years of experience. All readers of Information Outlook are special librarians, and therefore they have a common mission and values, and much in common within the profession. However, they work in settings that are incredibly varied, both in size and type. Readers might work alone or in large organizations, and might specialize in institutions such as government, medical, legal, and academic libraries.17 The readers of Information Outlook care specifically about issues pertaining to special libraries. According to the publication’s website, its readers are interested in articles about “administration, organization, marketing, and operations.” They value information that will help their organizations stay successful and stay informed of the latest developments and technologies.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Information Outlook are extremely knowledgeable about issues relating to library and information science. They will be at different stages of their careers, of course, with some readers having more experience and expertise than others, but writers can assume a basic level of knowledge and can expect readers to understand LIS jargon.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information Outlook‘s readers are hungry for the latest information about issues that impact special libraries. They want to read articles that have practical application in their day-to-day lives and careers. As stated on SLA’s website, “readers want to read articles about new techniques, new ideas, new trends…They’re interested in growing their organizations and in planning their careers…They want to know how to confront problems and how to avoid them.” The profession is comprised of individuals who “strategically use information…to advance the mission of the organization…through the development, deployment, and management of information resources and services.”20

Potential authors can reach this audience effectively by providing case studies and real-world examples, and by focusing on what is new and innovative in the field. Most special librarians are technologically savvy and interested in cutting-edge applications that will help them accomplish their professional goals and serve their patrons. They will also likely have limited time to devote to professional reading, and will only devote that time to articles and reviews that are relevant and timely. Therefore, authors will be best served by submitting writing that is direct and to the point.

Last updated: June 9, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest. 2019. “Information Outlook.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412097741980/63314
  2. Special Libraries Association. 2019. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  3. ProQuest. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/
  8. Special Libraries Association. 2019. 2019 Editorial and Advertising Calendar. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/editorial-calendar/
  9. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Write for Information Outlook. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/shop/information-outlook/write-for-i/
  10. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  11. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  12. Special Libraries Association, Write for Information Outlook.
  13. Special Libraries Association. 2019. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  14. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Association Finances. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/association-finances/
  15. Special Libraries Association. 2019. Chapters. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/get-involved/chapters/
  16. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  17. Special Libraries Association, About SLA.
  18. Special Libraries Association, Editorial and Advertising Calendar.
  19. Special Libraries Association. 2016. About SLA. Special Libraries Association. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/about-sla/
  20. Special Libraries Association, About SLA.
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Voice of Youth Advocates

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA)

ISSN: 0160-4201

Website: http://www.voyamagazine.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Focuses on library services to/with young adults (aka “teenagers” “adolescents,” typically youth of middle and high school ages). VOYA‘s policy is based on the following principles: specialize in young adult library service; intellectual freedom and equal access; and youth advocacy and youth participation.1

Target audience: Public librarians, school librarians and educators serving youth ages 12 to 18, paraprofessionals serving youth, publishers, authors of young adult books, and other young adult advocates.2

Publisher: E L Kurdyla Publishing LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional journal.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: The journal includes book reviews on fiction, nonfiction, and genre titles, as well as articles about YA services, programming, space design, and lists of award winners.7

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly publication.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: Literary analysis, author interviews, research, practical project ideas, controversies, and new YA space redesigns or makeover profiles are accepted. Booklists and columns are usually planned by the editor, but new content suggestions are accepted as queries.9

Submission and review process: Short articles should be between 800 to 1,700 words and up to 3,500 words for longer pieces. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Information for specific column requirements is available on the website. Authors should query the editor before submitting manuscripts, to ensure the piece is suitable for the journal.10

Editorial tone: VOYA solicits articles written in an approachable style for practitioners serving YA users. The goal is to publish articles by authors who express enthusiasm in working with YA and who can speak from experience about YA services.11

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

VOYA is a well-respected journal in the field of library and information services for young adults. The journal is written in an approachable style which may not meet tenure requirements for academic faculty. Also, this journal is intended for public and school librarians who work with YA and not academic librarians. Those interested in tenure may not want to submit manuscripts for publication to this journal.

The journal welcomes articles about new, progressive, informative, and controversial issues as they relate to youth culture. Authors who have experience in working with YAs and who can demonstrate enthusiasm for working with them through their writing are encouraged to submit manuscripts. VOYA‘s wide range of readers provides authors with a large audience which will provide them wide recognition in the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: VOYA has 6,000 subscribers. According to the last reader’€™s survey, each subscriber circulates the journal to 3.5 colleagues which means that the journal experiences a readership of 21,000 people.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published within the United States,13 but there is a possibility that there are subscribers outside of the country. The journal is printed in English.14 Due to wide readership, it is important that language remain clear of local jargon. This also means that all acronyms should be spelled out. Cultural consideration should also be taken into account. Pop culture references should be explained so that all readers will understand. This is very important for this journal since it focuses on young adults, who are very interested in pop culture.15

Reader characteristics: There is no statistical breakdown on the readers of this journal. However, the journal does say that the readers of this journal are public and school librarians, educators, authors of young adult books, publishers, and other youth advocates. The common interest among this group is young adults. However, they may not all be interested in this age group in the same way. School librarians may be more interested in the book review section and have marginal interest in programming, which public librarians are keen on. Publishers and authors might also be interested in the book review sections and the interviews with authors. The journal does not profess itself to be liberal or conservative, however, it does value intellectual freedom, young adults, literature for this group, and advocacy for YA resources, all of which lean more towards a progressive attitude. The journal often features articles about controversial topics, books, or authors.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Given the breadth of professions represented in this readership community, it is suggested that authors avoid using LIS specific jargon which may not be understood or interesting to lay readers.17

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of this journal are a very diverse group in terms of language, geographic location, profession, and educational attainment. Authors should consider writing articles about new and interesting topics in the field of library services. However, the topics should not be scholarly in tone or esoteric. Authors should remember that the readers have different backgrounds and interests in young people.

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  2. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  7. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  9. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  10. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  11. VOYA. (2016). SubmissionsRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/submissions/
  12. VOYA. (2018). Media Kit. Retrieved from http://voyamagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/VOYA2018-mediakit_web.pdf
  13. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  14. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Voice of Youth Advocates: the library magazine serving those who serve young adults. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406654017922/84283
  15. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  16. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
  17. VOYA. (2016). AboutRetrieved from http://www.voyamagazine.com/about/
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American Indian Library Association Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Indian Library Association Newsletter

ISSN: 2152-35251

Website: https://www.ailanet.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Their website states, “An affiliate of the American Library Association, the American Indian Library Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.”2 “The American Indian Libraries Newsletter is an official publication of the American Indian Library Association. It includes information about decisions, goals, activities, and business meetings of AILA, as well as articles on programs, projects, grants, and resources relating to American Indian culture and library and information services. A column by the current president is a regular feature. In addition, you will find books reviews, interviews, and other information that furthers the goals of the association. “3

Target audience: Individuals and institutions interested in working to improve library services to American Indians and Alaska Natives in every type of library.4

Publisher: The American Indian Library Association (AILA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: This is the official publication of the American Indian Library Association. Per their website, it includes “committee and member updates and events; interviews with indigenous authors; scholarly articles; and conference program details.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines are not listed online, but you can contact the newsletter editor, George Gottschalk, for more information about submitting work to the newsletter.11

Types of contributions accepted: Their website states that the newsletter “contains information of professional interest to AILA’s members.” Contributions include updates, events, scholarly articles, author interviews, and conference program details. Book and media reviews are published on the AILA website. 12

Submission and review process: All inquiries should be directed to the current editor.13

Editorial tone: An overview of recent, archived issues suggests that articles should be informative and engaging for library professionals without relying on technical jargon.14

Style guide used: No style guidelines are listed for the newsletter.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are interested in submitting articles should consider contacting the editor, whose information appears on the AILA Publications website. Even though there are no submission guidelines listed, many of the articles are written by members. Interested authors can see the types of articles accepted by looking at previous submissions to the newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: While membership and circulation numbers are unavailable, the newsletter is mailed to all AILA members and digital copies are available to those without memberships.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Members are located throughout the United States and Canada.17 The newsletter is written in English18 and contains library terminology. Readers are aware of the different tribes and expect articles to identify specific tribes and/or bands. Some cultural considerations that authors need to consider may be using the correct term to identify American Indian people. Some readers may object to the term American Indian or Native American. This publication uses the term American Indian in their articles.19

Reader characteristics: “Members are individuals and institutions interested in the development of programs to improve Indian library, cultural, and informational services in school, public, and research libraries on reservations.” Readers are tribal librarians, are associated with tribal libraries or have an interest in issues that affect library and information services for American Indian people. Some readers may be educators in a Native community, or public librarians working with Native people. It is assumed that many readers have LIS degrees. Readers value respect of American Indian communities and their drive to be self sufficient. Factors that aid in independence, such as programs to assist under served American Indian tribal members located on the reservation are important issues and a conduit for receiving that information is the American Indian Library Association Newsletter.20€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with library terminology and the use of LIS jargon is present but does not dominate in the publication. Articles are written for a professional, educated audience.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The American Indian Library Association Newsletter is a respected publication read by librarians and other interested individuals who provide services to American Indian people. Authors writing for this publication will gain recognition within the American Indian LIS community. If published, authors will have a small but concentrated audience of American Indian library professionals. Authors have a good chance of being published if they involve tribal colleges and library-related issues in some way. When writing for this newsletter, it is suggested that authors include tribal affiliation of American Indian people.

Authors that are interested in submitting articles may consider topics such as the future for tribal libraries, improving services for traditionally underserved populations, or articles regarding reading and American Indian children.

Last updated: April 12, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  ProQuest. 2019.”American Indian Library Association Newsletter.” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521736632647/124732
  2. American Indian Library Association. 2019. About. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/about-aila/
  3. American Indian Library Association. 2019. Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/frequently-asked-questions/#q5
  4. American Indian Library Association, About.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Indian Library Association. 2019. Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  9. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  12. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  13. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  14. American Indian Library Association. 2019. Newsletters. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/newsletter/
  15. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  16. American Indian Library Association, Publications.
  17. American Indian Library Association, About.
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. American Indian Library Association, About.
  20. American Indian Library Association, About.
  21. American Indian Library Association, About.
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Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

ISSN: 2474-7459 1

Purpose, objective, or mission:  The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy is the official journal of the American Library Associations’s Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF).2 It seeks to be at the center of all library related discussions on intellectual freedom and privacy issues.3

Website: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/index

Target audience: The primary audience for this publication are librarians, scholars, and researchers. However, given the nature of the content, it is likely that a wider audience of professionals, for example, those who work in education, technology, or other cultural institutes, will find the topics posed in this journal to be of interest and use.

Publisher: American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 606114

Peer reviewed? This publication welcomes both peer reviewed (research/feature) articles and non-peer reviewed (commentary) articles.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content:  The Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy (JIFP) replaces and expands on ALA’s Newletter on Intellectual Freedom (NIF) which was published from 1952 to 2015. As a reincarnation of the newsletter, it continues to cover book banning, legal controversies, and success stories in addition to its newer content, such as refereed essays, peer reviewed articles, book reviews, and opinion pieces.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter)8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy welcomes submissions related to intellectual freedom and privacy, both in libraries and in the wider world.”9 According to their website, submissions can include:

Research articles/Features: These are original research articles submitted for peer review. Submissions should be 4,000-8,000 words and anonymized for double-blind peer review.

In addition to research articles there are also vast options for those who want to submit non-peer reviewed material which will be reviewed by the editorial staff. These include:

Commentaries: Shorter essays, think pieces, or general commentary on topical issues, controversies and emerging questions for the field. Non-peer reviewed articles and essays discussing or describing policies, practices, projects, law, and scholarship related to intellectual freedom and privacy. Personal accounts of censorship and intellectual freedom challenges. Opinion pieces and essays on current and topical issues. Commentaries are typically 500-1000 words.

Book Reviews: Reviews of recent books or publications relevant to the field. Reviews should be 800-1000 words.

Please note, per the journals guidelines, word count must include references.10

Submission and review process: Queries can be sent to Managing Editor Deborah Caldwell-Stone (dstone@ala.org) or Editor Shannon Oltmann (shannon.oltmann@uky.edu).11

Editorial tone: Peer-reviewed feature articles are expected to be scholarly, while commentaries, book reviews, and news items might take on a more conversational tone as long as their content is well researched and arguments are well supported.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style is required for all submission formats.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy provides much potential to LIS authors. Since this journal publishes both peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed articles, professionals with diverse backgrounds and various publishing goals will find  this a suitable journal to submit to. Intellectual freedom and privacy are some of the core principles libraries are built on, therefore, librarians of all areas are likely to have much to contribute to this publication. As a fairly recent publication, The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy is actively seeking submissions and enjoys working with new authors. This is an excellent opportunity for LIS professionals to gain publishing credentials and be published in a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available for this publication, however, as a journal of the American Library Association, it can be assumed that a large portion of its 58,000 members are potential readers.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is international in scope and published in English.14

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers of this publication are likely librarians, scholars, researchers, and other LIS professionals interested in intellectual freedom, privacy, and related topics. Additionally, since intellectual freedom and privacy are topics that interest a diverse audience, readers are also likely to be professionals in other sectors such as business, technology, and education.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a scholarly journal of the American Library Association, strong knowledge of LIS subject matter can be assumed by readers coming from an LIS background. However, since this publication is likely to engage a wider audience, and also publishes non-research based articles, it might be best to also assume some readers will not be as familiar with library jargon and to keep it to a minimum or provide additional clarification.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy’s readers will be eager and open to learning about the most recent research and concerns regarding intellectual freedom and privacy, both in libraries and around the world. Readers are educated professionals and advocates of libraries and their core principles.

Last updated: 11/14/2018


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1. Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, OCLC World Cat, accessed November 6, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/journal-of-intellectual-freedom-privacy/oclc/953205347
  2. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  3. “Editorial Policies,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  4. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  5. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  6. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  7. “Editorial Policies,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  8. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  10. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  12. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  13. “ALA Annual Membership Statistics,” AlA.org, accessed November 8, 2018, http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/annual_memb_stats
  14. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
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Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Public Library Quarterly (PLQ)

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitlePublic Library Quarterly (PLQ)

ISSN: 0161-6846 (print), 1541-1540 (online)

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wplq20/current

Purpose, objective, or mission:Public Library Quarterly (PLQ) is addressed to leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends who believe that change is imperative if public libraries are to fulfill their service missions in the twenty-first century.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) “leaders-directors, managers, staff, trustees, and friends,” especially those working in public libraries.2

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Peer reviewed? Yes, all articles undergo editorial screening and peer review.3

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Print and online.

Content: PLQ focuses on how public library directors and operating officers affect change. It examines best practices and service improvement models, management case studies, library mythologies that impede development, planning and outcomes, marketing and fundraising, budget and financial management, new technology in practices, and programs for children.4 “Every issue of  Public Library Quarterly contains informative articles written by the directors and staffs of leading public libraries, news of current public library events, and book reviews covering issues of interest to those in public library work.”5

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Instructions for authors.

Types of contributions accepted: PLQ publishes original research, scholarship, and analyses of current issues in public libraries, from theoretical and practical perspectives. The journal “addresses the major administrative challenges and opportunities that face public libraries, providing insight and assistance to all public library workers.” Furthermore, the journal publishes surveys “that can be developed and used as national benchmarks for such administrative concerns as salaries, usage standards, and budget breakdowns.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online via Editorial Manager, a portal that manages the submission, revision, review, and publication process for authors, editors, and reviewers.8 Manuscripts undergo editorial screening and peer review.9

Editorial tone: Scholarly.

Style guide used: PLQ uses the Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition).

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

PLQ is a long-standing, high-quality LIS journal that publishes scholarship on all aspects of public libraries from around the world. As such, it is a a good fit for LIS authors whose scholarship is focused on public libraries or who study these libraries’ connections with other information organizations or in the realm of public policy. The journal is both practical and scholarly; many articles are written by public library directors or staff members, but the journal also looks to publish research and surveys in this domain. There is a sense that authors are highly experienced in the realm of public libraries, but this does not necessarily exclude graduate student authors with solid scholarship and novel approaches to the field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available, but each article’s homepage lists number of views, citations, and Altmetric score.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: PLQ is published in English for a worldwide audience. Editorial board members are from universities, libraries, and information organizations in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Wales, Ireland, and Taiwan.10 Authors should consider readers from around the globe and explain jargon or regional usages.

Reader characteristics: Readers are public library directors and managers, staff members, trustees, and friends, as well as LIS researchers, scholars, professionals, and graduate students.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will have a solid and practical understanding of LIS subject matter, but since this journal has a worldwide reach, authors should be careful to explain particular terms and practices.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

PLQ reaches a worldwide audience of public library directors, librarians, staff members, scholars, researchers, and graduate students. Readers are interested in how current events, policy, trends, and changes in the public library landscape will affect their institutions and how other libraries’ experiences and practices may inform their own practices. Readers look for evidence of positive leadership in and responses to a climate of change in the public library realm. Readers expect both theory- and practice-based articles, as well as larger scale surveys and research results.

Last updated: April 30, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wplq20.
  2. “Aims and Scope.”
  3. “Aims and Scope.”
  4. “Aims and Scope.”
  5. “Instructions for Authors,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission show=instructions&journalCode=wplq20.
  6. “Journal Information,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wplq20.
  7. “Instructions for Authors.”
  8. “Instructions for Authors.”
  9. “Aims and Scope.”
  10. “Editorial Board,” Public Library Quarterly, accessed April 30, 2018, https://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wplq20.
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Political Librarian, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Political Librarian

ISSN: 2471-3155

Website: https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/ and http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Political Librarian “is dedicated to expanding the discussion of, promoting research on, and helping to re-envision locally focused advocacy, policy, and funding issues for libraries.”1

Target audience: Library and information science (LIS) professionals, scholars, practitioners, and graduate students, as well as those outside of the LIS discipline, who are interested libraries and tax and public policy.

Publisher: The Political Librarian is organized and published by EveryLibrary.2 It is hosted by the Washington University in St. Louis Open Scholarship site.3

Peer reviewed? Yes. Not all articles are peer reviewed, but there is a section in most issues for those that are.

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online, open access.

Content:The Political Librarian publishes peer-reviewed articles, white papers, and editorials that focus on how funding issues, tax implications, budgeting, and broader economic policy affect libraries on the local level.4 Articles range from focused examinations, such as library budgeting strategies, to broader issues, such as tax reform and trickle-down economics.5 The journal is “at the intersection of local libraries, public policy and tax policy.”6

Frequency of publication: Two volumes each year.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: PolicesFinal Manuscript Preparation Guidelines, and Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian.

Types of contributions accepted: The Political Librarian publishes opinions/first drafts, white papers, and peer-reviewed articles. The journal seeks a variety of perspectives, new voices, and lines of inquiry, and does not limit “contributors to just those working in the field of library and information science.” The journal invites “submissions from researchers, practitioners, community members, or others dedicated to furthering the discussion, promoting research, and helping to re-envision tax policy and public policy on the extremely local level.”7

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts though the journal’s online portal. Initial submissions do not have strict guidelines to follow.8 However, accepted manuscripts need to follow the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.9

Editorial tone: The tone is professional. Clear guidelines are provided by the editorial team.10

Style guide used: The journal’s reference and citation style is explained in the Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Political Librarian is a new journal (first published in 2015) that has a very particular focus: it is a “dedicated space where practitioners, researchers, and users [can] publish on frontline advocacy experiences, campaign strategy and research, and/or about tax and public policies impacting libraries on the local level.” The journal is a resource for examinations of the impact of tax and public policy locally and how policy affects library services and community outcomes and for new models of library funding and resources to educate stakeholders.12 LIS authors–professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students–who write about the intersection of libraries with tax and public policy will find a good fit with this journal.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available, but the number of downloads appears on each article’s title page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Political Librarian is written in English. The audience is mostly located in the United States, as US tax and public policy are primarily discussed.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals, practitioners, scholars, and graduate students, as well as those outside the LIS community, who are interested in how tax and public policy affects libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a strong academic and practical understand of LIS subject matter, but there may be readers outside of the discipline for whom jargon or idiosyncratic terms should be explained.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should understand that readers have a particular interest in libraries and in public and tax policy, and they look for articles that both explain how libraries can survive and thrive in the current environment and how to advocate now for positive changes in the future. Readers also look for local analyses and examinations that may have implications on a broader scale.

Last updated: April 24, 2018


 

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “Journal Home,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/.
  2.  The Political Librarian, everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/how-we-help-libraries/political-librarian/.
  3. “Browse Journals and Peer-Reviewed Series,” Washington University Open Scholarship, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/peer_review_list.html.
  4. “Journal Home.”
  5. “Most Popular Papers,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/topdownloads.html
  6. “Volume 1, Issue 1 (2015),” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/vol1/iss1/.
  7. “Aims & Scope,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/aimsandscope.html.
  8. “Policies,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/policies.html.
  9. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines,” The Political Librarian, accessed April 24, 2018, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/pollib/styleguide.html.
  10. “Editorial Team and Guidelines for The Political Librarian,” everylibrary.org, accessed April 30, 2018, http://everylibrary.org/editorial-team-guidelines-political-librarian/.
  11. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines.”
  12. Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, and Rachel Korman, “The Political Librarian: Foundations,” The Political Librarian 1, no. 1(2015): 7, https://openscholarship.wustl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=pollib.
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Journal of Radical Librarianship

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Radical Librarianship

ISSN: 2399-956X

Website: http://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Radical Librarianship “is an open access journal publishing high quality, rigorously reviewed and innovative scholarly work in the field of radical librarianship….The scope of the journal is any work that contributes to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”1

Target audience: Librarians and library and information science (LIS) practitioners, managers, scholars, and students who are interested in “radical librarianship,” loosely defined for the purposes of the journal as “the ethical roots of librarianship.”2

Publisher: The journal is self-published by the editors.3 Its platform and workflow are supported by OJS/PKP.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, the journal has a policy for manuscripts to undergo either open or double-blind review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online and open access.

Content: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes LIS articles on a broad range of topics but emphasizes that articles should contribute “to a discourse around critical library and information theory and practice.”6 Sections include Research Articles, Editorials and Commentary, and Reviews. The journal’s Announcements page issues calls for proposals and papers on specified topics; a 2018 call was for proposals offering a “structural critique of race and power in LIS.” 7

Frequency of publication: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is published on a continual basis: articles are published as soon as they are ready under the year’s volume number.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions.

Types of contributions accepted: The Journal of Radical Librarianship publishes research and scholarly articles that offer critical analyses of “the influence of neoliberal policy on the profession.”9 With this basis in critical LIS theory and practice, the journal covers many “traditional” topics, such as information literacy, digital rights, cataloging, and technology, but also brings nondominant discourses to the field, with topics including including politics and social justice; anti-racist theory, critical race analysis, anti-colonial studies; equity, diversity, and inclusion; gender variance, queer theory, and phenomenology; the political economy of information and knowledge; critical pedagogy; and sustainability and environmentalism.10 The editors will also consider nontextual formats.11

Submission and review process: Authors submit manuscripts online and must ensure compliance with the Submission Preparation Checklist. “Prospective authors are welcome to send outlines or drafts to the editor in advance of making a formal submission. Submissions can be sent throughout the year. Revisions may be required before a decision is made to accept or reject the paper.”12 The journal gives authors and reviewers the option of open or double-blind peer review. The authors and reviewers must all agree to an open review; if not, the manuscript undergoes double-blind review.13

Editorial tone: The tone is scholarly but appropriate for the topic and type of submission.

Style guide used: “Manuscripts should be prepared according to any consistent bibliographic style.”14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Radical Librarianship is a fairly new journal (first published in 2015) that is based in the UK but has an international scope and seeks contributions from “library and information workers, researchers, and academics from anywhere in the world.”15 LIS authors, including graduate students, who are writing critically about LIS theory, research, and practices, especially in ways that engage in nondominant discourses, consider a progressive point of view, and disrupt neoliberal library policy, will find encouraging and supportive editors and a high-quality, relevant journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Journal of Radical Librarianship is based in the UK and North America and is written in English, but the journal’s scope is international and the editors hope to find “editors and authors from beyond the English-speaking world” as the journal grows and evolves.16 Authors should consider an international audience for their articles and explain jargon or region-specific practices accordingly.

Reader characteristics: Readers are librarians and LIS professionals, scholars, researchers, and students from around the world in all types of libraries and information organizations. Further, readers may be members of the Radical Librarianship Collective, which is an organization “building solidarity for those critical of the marketization of libraries and commodification of information.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a solid academic and practical knowledge of LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors should keep in mind that readers expect authors to approach LIS scholarship with a consideration of critical, radical, and nonhegemonic analyses. Readers will expect traditional LIS topics to be analysed and critiqued from new, radical, or nondominant points of view, and they expect writing on newer topics crucial to the profession’s progressive advancement and a disruption of its neoliberal and market-based practices.

Last updated: April 20, 2018


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. “About the Journal,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about.
  2. Stuart Lawson, “Editorial,” Journal of Radical Librarianship 1 (2015): 1, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/article/view/1.
  3. “About the Journal” lists the editors and their subject areas.
  4. “About the Journal.”
  5. “About the Journal.”
  6. “About the Journal.”
  7. “Announcements,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/announcement.
  8. “About the Journal.”
  9. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  10. “About the Journal.”
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Radical Librarianship, accessed April 20, 2018, https://journal.radicallibrarianship.org/index.php/journal/about/submissions.
  12. “Submissions.”
  13. “About the Journal.”
  14. “Submissions.”
  15. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  16. Lawson, “Editorial,” 1.
  17. “Home,” Radical Librarians Collective, accessed April 20, 2018, https://rlc.radicallibrarianship.org/.
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Everyday Advocacy Matters

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Everyday Advocacy Matters

ISSN: N/A

Websitehttp://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/everyday-advocacy-matters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Everyday Advocacy, an initiative of ALSC (a division of ALA), was launched in May 2013 after the ALSC’s executive committee came together to discuss two major issues:

  • How can ALSC educate policy makers on the importance of children’s service?
  • How can ALSC assist youth service librarians to articulate their value within their profession and the community?

Along with the new Everyday Advocacy website, the ALSC Board of Directors approved of a newsletter promoting “20-minute” advocacy.1

Everyday Advocacy Matters is a quarterly, electronic newsletter featuring simple, effective ways to learn, share, and make a difference in local library communities.”2 Content for each issue is related to Everyday Advocacy’s five tenets: Be Informed, Engage With Your Community, Speak Out, Get Inspired and Share Your Advocacy Story.3

Target audience: The primary audience is members of ALSC and children’s librarians, the secondary audience is anyone who advocates for children and libraries.4

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Electronic.

Content: Each issue features five sections:5

  • From the Editor: A friendly welcome to each issue’s seasonal focus.
  • Everyday Advocacy Spotlight: Features to help you focus your advocacy efforts.
  • News You Can Use: The latest reports, data and stories that readers may find useful in their own libraries.
  • Get Inspired: A section that often features a “Savvy Success Story” highlighting an inspirational member of the community.
  • Calendar: Key dates and events for “learning, sharing and making a difference.”

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Send submissions to Amy Martin. Her email address can be found on EAM‘s home page.

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions that are appropriate for one of the five sections listed above. For a better example, here are the call to submissions for the October 2017 issue:

  • Everyday Advocacy Spotlight. We’re looking for short articles (250-500 words) to use as our Savvy Success Story feature.
  • News You Can Use. Help us highlight advocacy events, opportunities, and news items our colleagues can use to learn, share, and make a difference for youth and families in their library communities.
  • Get Inspired! Let us know what motivates you and helps keep you going as an Everyday Advocate so we can inspire others, too.”7

Submission and review process: Unknown, but be mindful of copy deadlines and mailing dates for upcoming issues.8

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

EAM could be a great potential outlet if you have something to say that’s more on the informal side. If you’ve been doing advocacy work at your local library, or you know someone who has, this newsletter may be a great place to showcase it.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC and ALA.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are likely members of ALA, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals and students with a passion for advocacy in libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

EAM readers are well-versed in the library world and have a passion for doing meaningful work in their communities. They are already members of ALA and ALSC, so networking and community are at the forefront of their work.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About Everyday Advocacy,” ALA.org, accessed March 20, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/about
  2. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page,” ALA.org, accessed March 12, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/everyday-advocacy-matters
  3. “Everyday Advocacy,” ALA.org, accessed March 19, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
  6. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
  7. “Everyday Advocacy Matters – July 2017,” ALA.org, accessed March 19, 2018,
  8. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
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