Wiki Tags Archives: Advocacy

REFORMA Newsletter

*Note:  REFORMA Newsletter last published in April 2014, and its current status is unknown. Please contact the wiki team if you have information about this publication so we can update this profile.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: REFORMA Newsletter

Website: http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2

Purpose, objective, or mission: To develop library services for the growing population of Spanish speakers and Latinos in the United States and abroad. REFORMA’s goals include:

  • Development of Spanish-language and Latino-oriented library collections
  • Recruitment of bilingual, multicultural library personnel
  • Promotion of public awareness of libraries and librarianship among Latinos
  • Advocacy on behalf of the information needs of the Latino community
  • Liaison to other professional organizations1

Target audience: Librarians and other professionals with an interest in library services to Latinos and Spanish speakers.2

Publisher: REFORMA.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news.5 The newsletter contains LIS professional news and information about developing and improving library services.6

Medium: As of 2012, REFORMA Newsletter is an electronic and virtual newsletter that is open to anyone.7

Content: The newsletter covers issues that concern information and library services for the Spanish speaking and Latinos. It contains book reviews, articles on issues concerning Latinos and the Spanish speaking, features about librarians in different Spanish speaking countries, interviews with authors, bilingual and Spanish language book lists.8

Frequency of publication: Updated as submissions are accepted.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: None available.

Types of contributions accepted: Artwork, opinion pieces, news briefs, features, reviews, and letters to the editor are accepted. REFORMA’s sections include News Articles, President’s Column, Chapter Updates, Adult Book Reviews, Children’s Book Reviews, Young Adult Book Reviews, Felicidades!, Letter from the Editor, and La Opinión.10

Submission and review process: Article submissions should be sent via email to the editor. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Please note that all submissions are subject to editing and revision due to space, grammar, and clarity.11

As of November 2012, editor Francisco Vargas put out a call for REFORMA editors, including coeditor, copy editor, and regular columnists. These volunteer positions are all virtual and require an average of 10 hours per week.12

Editorial tone: The newsletter does not indicate a type of editorial tone. The pieces in the newsletter are written in an approachable tone.13

Style guide used: No style guide indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The REFORMA Newsletter is well respected and widely read among librarians who provide services to the Spanish speaking and Latinos in the United States and other countries where Spanish is spoken. The level of diversity of topics offered through the newsletter allows librarians and others to explore a range of subjects for articles. However, it should be noted that the focus of the newsletter is on library services for Latinos and the Spanish speaking. Authors should keep this in mind when submitting a manuscript to this publication.

This publication is neither peer reviewed nor written in a scholarly tone. As such, it most likely will not meet any requirements for tenure. However, the articles are interesting and the authors of published work in the newsletter will have a far-reaching audience as this newsletter is distributed across the globe. Authors in the publication gain recognition within this community.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: REFORMA Newsletter is open-access, online.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: REFORMA offices are located in the United States (Anaheim, California) with membership located throughout North America.15 This publication accepts submissions in “Spanish, English or Spanglish”16 suggesting authors need an understanding of Spanish-language and Latino cultural.

Reader characteristics: Writers can safely assume that readers of this newsletter, per their website, are committed to, “development of library services and programs that meet the needs of the Latino community; the establishment of a national information and support network among individuals who share our goals; the education of the U.S. Latino population in regards to the availability and types of library services; and lobbying efforts to preserve existing library resource centers serving the interests of Latinos.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have some knowledge of LIS topics, as they are working to provide library services to Latinos, but the level of knowledge will vary.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors need to keep in mind the mission of the organization and, possess a clear understanding of the needs of the membership. The readers will be interested in how to recruit Latino and Spanish speaking individuals into the library field, how to establish and maintain Spanish-language collections, and how to effectively lobby to secure and retain funding for library services for the Latino communities they serve.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  2. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  6. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  7. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  8. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  9. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  10. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  11. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  12. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  13. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  14. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  15. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  16. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  17. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  18. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
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Progressive Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Progressive Librarian: A Journal for Critical Studies and Progressive Politics in Librarianship

Website: http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_contents.shtml

Purpose, objective, or mission: Progressive Librarian provides “€œa forum for critical perspectives in Library and Information Science (LIS).”1 It publishes critical perspectives in librarianship that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.2

Target audience: Librarians and LIS professionals interested in progressive issues within the profession.3

Publisher: Progressive Librarians Guild4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly. This journal aims to provide critically relevant information in an academic setting.6

Medium: Print and online.7 Full text of articles are available online, previous to and including the Winter/Spring 2009 issue.8

Content: From the website: “€œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice yearly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission Guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: From the website: “œArticles, book reviews, bibliographies, reports, and documents that explore progressive perspectives on librarianship and information issues.”11

Submission and review process: Submit electronic files only via e-mail in rich text format (.rtf) or Microsoft Word (.doc). Prints and digital images are welcome; if digital, provide 300 dpi grayscale TIFF (.tiff) files no larger than 5X7 inches. The editors reserve the right to edit all manuscript submissions before publication.12

Submit manuscripts to Kathleen de la Peña McCook at klmccook@gmail.com or Susan Maret at iecologie@yahoo.com.13

To submit a book review contact:

Michael Matthews
Watson Memorial Library, Room 311-D
Northwestern State University of Louisiana
Natchitoches, LA 71497
318-357-441914

Papers are published under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, No-Derivatives 2.0 license, which places work in the public domain.15

Editorial tone: The articles are both innovative and present alternative views to typical librarian publications. Social justice, racism and other topics that may be considered controversial are published.The style of writing is creative and individualistic while still being academic.16

Style guide used: Submissions in your favorite citation style such as Chicago, MLA, APA, Harvard, Turabian are accepted. The style of choice has to be used consistently throughout the paper.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

According to the Progressive Librarians Guild, every library issue embodies a political value choice–and its publication, Progressive Librarian, aims to unearth those propositions and discuss them openly.18 Progressive Librarian rejects the proposition that contemporary libraries are value-neutral information markets, embracing the older idea that librarianship is a profession firmly for the people,€ a democratic force that promotes intellectual inquiry and an informed citizenry.19 It aims to publish articles and promote discussion that defend and extend the library as a free public sphere that makes independent democratic civil society possible.€ Accordingly,the Progressive Librarians Guild is opposed to commercial and business interests that threaten the free flow of information.20 If you are interested in activism and the struggle for social justice and how politics informs professional practice, consider writing for this publication.

A survey of past articles included cultivating freedom of expression within the workplace, Mexican libraries, the internet, and titles such as, “€œCataloging the Path to a New Dark Age: a taxonomy of the Bush administration’s pervasive crusade against scientific communication.” Papers that tie LIS issues, concepts, practices or history to women’s, workers’€™ or civil rights; education; culture; environmental protection; social welfare or insurance; and supporting the public sector in general will be welcomed here. For LIS students, the Progressive Librarian’€™s Guild presents the Miriam Braverman Memorial Prize, which annually awards the best student paper about an aspect of the social responsibilities of librarians, libraries, or librarianship. The winning paper is published in an issue of Progressive Librarian.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are approximately 400 subscribers, 25% being libraries. Accordingly, it is difficult to gauge total readership–but certainly over 400.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is international in readership. Most subscribers are based in the United States, though there are a large number in Canada and others on every continent except for Antarctica.23 As with any scholarly article, avoid colloquialisms and explain any regional or subject-specific terms.24

Reader characteristics: According to Elaine Harger, the managing editor, they encompass both genders and range widely in age.25 The readership is made up almost entirely of librarians, librarian graduate students, or library school faculty working in public or academic libraries. Readers are likely interested in activism and the struggle for social justice, and how politics informs LIS practices.26 Readers are probably liberal. They are interested in activism, the struggle for social justice, and how politics can inform LIS practices.27

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: While readers are probably LIS students, professionals or scholars, they may work in widely different areas within the profession. Assume readers have a basic understanding of broad LIS concepts. Readers probably know about commonplace news and events in the LIS world, but explain any subject-specific jargon, issues or events others may not be familiar with.28

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication and its readers stand within the American Progressive tradition, hearkening back to FDR’€™s New Deal and representing a spectrum of views that moves left from New Deal-type reformism to much more radical positions and approaches.29 In late February of 2011 the Progressive Librarians Guild issued a statement in support of the Wisconsin employees who protested against proposed cuts to union benefits and health care.30 Progressive Librarian is one of the only journals in the LIS field to report on and document labor activism within the library profession.

This readership values the working class and the public sector, and is concerned with how the LIS profession can support and advance these causes. The journal is characterized by an interest in and/or commitment to socialism, anti-capitalism, feminism, environmentalism, anti-racism, labor advocacy, cultural democracy, ideology-criticism, radical social movements, anti-imperialism and holds skeptical/critical views of technological issues.

Papers that view library and information issues in this framework will be welcomed—whether they offer collection development practices for sex education materials, suggestions for communicating with right-wing colleagues or patrons, or advocate international library rights.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 30 footnotes

  1. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  2. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  3. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  8. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  9. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Progressive Librarian: a journal for critical studies and progressive politics in librarianship. Ulrich’s Global Serial Solutions. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403279663238/208054
  11. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  12. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  13. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  14. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  15. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  16. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  17. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  18. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  19. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  20. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Statement of Purpose. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/purpose.shtml
  21. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). 2014 Braverman Award Winner Announced. Retrieved from http://progressivelibrariansguild.org/content/award.shtml
  22. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  23. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  24. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  25. Harger, E. (2008). Personal communication.
  26. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  27. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). About Progressive Librarian. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_about.shtml
  28. Progressive Librarians Guild. (2014). Progressive Librarian Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/jnl_submit.shtml
  29. Progressivism in the United States. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressivism_in_the_United_States
  30. Davey, M. & Greenhouse, S. (2011, February 16). Angry demonstrations in Wisconsin as cuts loom. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/17/us/17wisconsin.html?_r=0
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Information for Social Change

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information for Social Change

Website: http://libr.org/isc/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An activist librarian organization that “examines the issues of censorship, freedom and ethics amongst library and information workers.”1

Target audience: LIS workers and practitioners.2

Publisher: Information for Social Change.3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional. The topics and informal style of the content may also appeal to civilian readers.5

Medium: Online6

Content: Documenting the control of information globally and also alternatives to the control of information.7

Frequency of publication: Semi-annually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libr.org/isc/call-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles between 500 and 2500 words. Longer articles may be excerpted with the full text made available from the author, according to the guidelines. Letters, review articles and poems are also accepted for publication.9

Submission and review process: Send an email to the editor at isc-journal@libr.org.10

Editorial tone: Simple and clear English. Views are radical and thought-provoking themes that promote debate.11

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS authors who are interested in radical librarianship that examines censorship, ethics and freedom, this journal would be a good choice. The journal suggests potential authors review past and current issues in order to gauge the interest.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not stated but British English style of writing is used.13 Website is in British English but it’s not stated as to whether that is the only acceptable version. This journal addresses global issues so it is safe to assume their readers are international. The organization holds events in association with progressive groups such as Third World Book Fair.14

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely progressive in their viewpoints. Readers are LIS professionals with progressive and radical views15 who are interested in finding channels in which to allow “unfettered and unmediated ideas” to circulate.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS terms and the profession is helpful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal most likely hold progressive viewpoints and feel strongly about the issues presented such as freedom of information and radical changes to the way information is controlled and disseminated. Authors who wish to submit to this publication should hold similar views or at least be extremely open to new ideas.17


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Information for Social Change. (2016). Welcome. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/
  2. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  5. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  7. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  9. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  10. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  11. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  12. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  13. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  14. Information for Social Change. (2016). Events. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/events/
  15. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  16. Information for Social Change. (2016). Policies. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/policies-submission-guide/#1
  17. Information for Social Change. (2013). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
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base line

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: base line

Website: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: base line is the official publication of the Map and Geospatial Information Round Table (MAGIRT). MAGIRT “leads and inspires information professionals at all levels of expertise in their work with map and geospatial information resources, collections and technologies in all formats, through community, education and advocacy.”1 “The purpose of base line is to provide current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”2

Target audience: As per MAGIRT’s site: “People interested or involved in any aspect of map or geospatial librarianship.”3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Each issue “provide(s) current information on cartographic materials, other publications of interest to map and geography librarians, meetings, related governmental activities, and map librarianship.”8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: On the first page of each issue: http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/

Types of contributions accepted: base line calls itself “a medium of communication for members of MAGIRT and information of interest is welcome.”10 Articles related to cartography, geography, “related governmental activities, and map librarianship ” would be welcome.11

Submission and review process: Depending on article content, contributions can be sent to one of four editors: Editor, John Olson, jaolson@syr.edu; Cataloging Editor, Tammy Wong, twon@loc.gov; Electronic Mapping Editor, Carol McAuliffe, carolmc@uflib.ufl.edu; or New Maps and Books Editor, David Bertuca, dbertuca@buffalo.edu12

Editorial tone: Articles tend towards an informal, but professional voice.13

Style guide used: Not specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although there is an informality in tone to this publication, there is still room for a more professional article related to geospatial information. This publication offers a good opportunity for a writer with experience in this field of librarianship to be published.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As a benefit of membership in MAGIRT, base line reaches 319 people.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is based in the U.S. and is written in American English.15 As members hail from across North America, authors should avoid using local terminologies or dialects, and should be tailored to a national audience.

Reader characteristics: Readers are members of MAGIRT. As such, one can assume that the majority of readers are “involved in the geospatial librarianship world.”16

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized LIS knowledge can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of base line are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to MAGIRT committee work and topics related to geospatial librarianship. Members of MAGIRT seem eager to “connect with like-minded people, to learn, or to impart…knowledge.”17 Although the pool of readers is relatively small, the LIS author who is interested in geospatial information will find a supportive and interested readership in base line.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2016). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  2. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  3. American Library Association. (2016). Map & Geospatial Information Round Table  (MAGIRT). American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/
  4. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  5. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  6. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  7. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  8. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  9. ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  10.  American Library Association. (2015). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  11. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  12. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  13. American Library Association. (2016). base line. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/publications/baseline/
  14. American Library Association. (2016). MAGIRT Map & Geospatial Resources: About MAGIRT. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://magirt.ala.libguides.com/resources
  15.  ProQuest. (2016). base line. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1428426335226/483555
  16. American Library Association. (2016). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Resources. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/magirt/resources
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”1

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”2

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”3

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”10

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”11 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.12

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”13

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”14

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”15

Editorial tone: Academic16

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,18, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”19

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26920

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.21

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”22 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”23, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.24 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  5.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  10. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  13. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  20. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  21. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  22. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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The Huffington Post

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Huffington Post

Website: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The online destination for breaking news and opinion.”1

The site is sort of a CliffsNotes of water cooler fodder: anything and everything current is most likely being discussed on The Huffington Post, through its regular bloggers, celebrity contributing bloggers, and news spotted and posted by regular readers. In 2012, it won a Pulitzer prize for reporting on wounded veterans.2

Target audience: A politically-engaged audience seeking the latest news in entertainment, politics, and world affairs.

Publisher: The Huffington Post Media Group.3

Peer reviewed? No. Most articles posted on the site are in the form of blog posts.

Type: Civilian publication; online news site.

Medium: Online.

Content: A roundup of political, entertainment, and news from around the globe.

Of special interest to LIS writers, there’€™s a Books section under Entertainment, featuring articles and reviews by various bloggers, and the Libraries section featuring library-related news and articles. In 2012 a a section titled Libraries in Crisis was created to examine the role of libraries in today’s society. The section’€™s first series was titled The Death Of The Public Library?, and it has been somewhat controversial among LIS professionals, with a Hack Library School post noting, “€œI understand that stories of library closures are much sexier than the latest controversies with Overdrive, but if we want to see the libraries as a national tradition continue, we need to step away from the extremism and start proving what we are capable of. Let’s see some library success stories on this page, too.”

Frequency of publication: Updated daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Use the Contact Page to determine the best place to send your post. You can send scoops to the editors, send a blog pitch to the Blog Team, or search current job openings.4

A helpful 2013 article on Digital Media Zone (from Ryerson University in Canada) goes into some detail on becoming a blogger for The Huffington Post, including tips on getting noticed and advice on sending the finished post to the site editors.

Types of contributions accepted: Mostly articles and commentary in the form of blog posts.

Submission and review process: Send an email to the appropriate section you’€™d like to blog for.5

Editorial tone: Very informal and informational at the same time. Writers don’€™t talk down to readers, and readers are encouraged to log in and contribute to content and discussion.6

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Huffington Post is an excellent resource for librarians to reach a wide ranging global and local audience with news from the LIS world. The Libraries section would be a great place to discuss library efforts and updates, technological and otherwise, and news from the LIS sector, with a readership who is truly interested. Also a good place to suggest and write about books for review.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Total digital population of 79 million monthly unique visitors.”7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based out of the US, the site has local editions such as Huff Post San Francisco and Chicago; as well as international versions covering Canada, France, Italy, Spain and the UK.8 The US versions are written in American English; culturally the site is considered a left-leaning publication, with special attention to U.S. political and entertainment news.

Reader characteristics: The Huffington Post was created in 2005 and became known as a liberal website for commentary/and alternative to more right wing sites such as the Drudge Report & Fox News. Although founder/creator Arianna Huffington is careful to note that the site does not consciously lean in either party direction, the site has a more left-leaning feel.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although readers are educated and The Huffington Post has a special library section, this site is more informal information and entertainment, not really the place for LIS jargon. If submitting a query or blog for the Books/Library section, the focus is more on specific voice or activity, not the formal academic jargon commonly found in LIS publications.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are interested in what’s going on with US libraries, and in discussing the most recent books and book news. While articles are not scholarly in tone, this site would most likely welcome posts written by LIS students as long as the topic is interesting and appealing to Huffington Post readers.

Last updated: November 25, 2016


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “Huffington Post,” Advertising.AOL.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://advertising.aol.com/properties#huffington-post
  2. Michael Calderone, “Huffington Post Awarded Pulitzer Prize.” The Huffington Post, January 14, 2013. Accessed November 25, 2016, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/16/huffington-post-pulitzer-prize-2012_n_1429169.html
  3. “The Huffington Post,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1414718214018/716779
  4. “Contact us,” HuffingtonPost.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/contact/
  5. Contact us.”
  6. “Frequenty Asked Questions,” HuffingtonPost.com, accessed November 25, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/p/frequently-asked-question.html#moderation
  7. Huffington Post.”
  8. “Huffington Post,” Wikipedia.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Huffington_Post
  9. Huffington Post.”
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First Monday

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: First Monday

Website: http://www.firstmonday.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-€“reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to research about the Internet.”1 First Monday believes the impact of digitization on society is universal and ubiquitous, and seeks articles about how digitization is changing our understanding of society.2

Target audience: First Monday’€™s target audience includes intelligent, independent-thinking people located in more than 180 countries. Because readers’€™ cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly, readership is diverse. The journal is not geared toward those in academia, and many readers do not speak English as a first language.3

Publisher: First Monday Editorial Group at the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library4 First Monday was originally designed in Copenhagen and published by Munksgard, a Danish publisher.5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: Computers and Internet, scholarly7 (First Monday is published in conjunction with the university library at the University of Illinois-Chicago, which indicates that the LIS community has a vested interest in the publication and represents a large proportion of its readership. Due to its diverse readership, we have categorized First Monday as both a “scholarly” and a “civilian” publication.)8

Medium: Online9

Content: First Monday publishes original interdisciplinary research papers about the Internet and related technologies. Articles emphasize subjects that are particularly interesting or groundbreaking. This publication’€™s strength lies in its diversity of content centered around the influence of the Internet and related technologies.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: First Monday publishes articles on interesting and novel ideas related to the history, present, and future of the Internet.12 Published topics of interest to LIS authors include: knowledge management, trends and standards, information-seeking behavior, emerging electronic classification frameworks, digital copyright, social networks, education, information society, the internet’s technological and commercial development, technical issues, and the political and social implications of the Internet. Research surveys, studies, exploratory and critical theory articles tied to the internet and related technologies would be welcome here.13 The publication also provides detailed Guidelines for Authors. These guidelines include writing tips; citation, reference, and abstract guidelines; submission format; formatting templates; and a final checklist for use in preparing manuscript submissions.14

Submission and review process: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions. Papers are subject to a double-blind peer review for originality and timeliness in the context of related research.15

Editorial tone: Articles published in First Monday are as diverse as its readership. All articles are written in an academic tone, though style varies in complexity. Many are written in an easy-to-read style, while others employ more sophisticated language. In either case, writers maintain the active voice and employ short sentences and paragraphs.16

Style guide used: First Monday provides its own style guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

First Monday publishes interdisciplinary research articles on all aspects of the internet, from highly-specialized technical issues to the internet’€™s social and political impact. Given the increasing digitization of information, this journal holds tremendous promise for LIS authors.

Because this audience is not academic, writing standards are not rigid, and an international distribution creates the potential to reach many readers. This publication’€™s diverse readership allows for writing from a variety of disciplines–LIS authors with backgrounds in engineering, literature, or history would be equally at home here. First Monday would be an excellent place to publish a thesis, or research on emerging Web technologies or trends. Additionally, the fact that the journal is peer reviewed makes it an attractive choice for those who wish to add a published article to their curriculum vitae.

Started in 1996, the journal has published 1,381 papers in 218 issues written by 1,888 authors. The journal is also abstracted in Communication Abstracts, Computer & Communication Security Abstracts, DoIS, eGranary Digital Library, INSPEC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, LISA, PAIS.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 314,559 per month.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are located in over 180 countries, concentrated in western Europe, North America, and the Pacific Rim. First Monday is published by the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, where its server is also located.20 Due to the publication’€™s international scope, many readers’€™ first language is not English. Additionally, many readers are not academics. Authors should avoid using specific cultural references or idioms unless these are explained. Simple explanations, active voice, and less complex sentences will help this diverse audience better understand your message.21

Reader characteristics: Because First Monday‘€™s focus is international and its scope is interdisciplinary, the cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly among First Monday readers. Cultural, educational, and professional interests vary greatly among readers, and this publication’€™s interdisciplinary scope is larger than library information science alone. That said, the publication’€™s focus is salient to the discipline. This, combined with the fact that it is published by a university library, makes it reasonable to presume that many readers are LIS professionals with shared professional interests and workplaces. The articles published in First Monday represent a wide variety of standpoints and approaches. The articles do not show overt bias or attitude toward any particular view, which seems indicative of the audience’s diversity.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many articles published in First Monday are not directly related to LIS, so it is reasonable to presume that many readers are involved in other aspects of Internet technology. In view of this, authors should cautiously employ LIS jargon and explain any specialized terms they use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

First Monday prides itself on its interdisciplinary scope, and publishes a wide variety of articles from multiple perspectives. Demographic information about readers’€™ professional affiliations could not be obtained, and nothing in this publication’™s submission guidelines indicates a preference toward LIS authors or topics. However, First Monday‘€™s publisher indicates that librarians have a vested interest in this publication and may represent a large proportion of its readers. First Monday’™s Audience Profile stresses that many readers are not academics, but one might conclude that many are librarians.24

Library science is an interdisciplinary field, and LIS students and professionals possess specialized knowledge of digital information collection, organization, and dissemination. This uniquely positions them as potential authors for First Monday. When writing for this publication, explain any professional terminology that would be unfamiliar to those outside the LIS field. For example, a study of library cataloging standards and information-seeking behavior on the web should explain terms like MARC21 or RDA. To be well-suited for First Monday, such an article might focus on digitization’€™s broad affects on LIS cataloging and how these are shaping practices.

While First Monday’€™s readership is not primarily academic, the content of articles is often sophisticated and complex. This may be why the editors stress simplicity and brevity in style; readers from different backgrounds will better understand a complex message through simple explanations and short sentences.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. First Monday, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 25, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  2. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  3. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  4. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  5. “Editorial Policies,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  7. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  8. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  9. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  10. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  11. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  12. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Archives,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/archive
  14. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. First Monday,  University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  19. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  20. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  21. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  22. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  23. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  24. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
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IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations) Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: IFLA Journal (International Federation of Library Associations)

Website: www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal (1992-2002 archived at http://www.ifla.org/V/iflaj/index.htm)

Purpose, objective, or mission: “IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.”1

Target audience: Library professionals around the world, especially those interested in library services in developing areas2

Publisher: Sage Publications3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online open access6

Content: The journal publishes articles on “library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#submission-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.”9 Though the journal publishes primarily original research, case studies on successful and unsuccessful projects and opinion pieces on library issues are also accepted.10 Articles should be between 3,000 to 8,000 words and accompanied by an abstract of no approximately 150 words. Authors whose primary language is not English should not be inhibited from submitting, as correction of minor errors and revision to standard English is considered standard editorial procedure.11

Submission and review process: IFLA requests submissions be sent as an email attachment, preferably as MS Word document. Expect approximately six weeks for the editorial committee to review submissions.12

Editorial tone: The tone of IFLA Journal is academic,13 but attempts to use unbiased language to make examples and practices applicable to library staff from around the world.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For authors wishing to convey current and upcoming library innovations to developing areas, this journal is well regarded. It presents issues that smaller libraries and countries are dealing with as compared to the United States and Europe. Well-researched articles about procedures that have been tested at large libraries are highly valuable to librarians in developing countries. Some services may be beyond the technology of small countries, but writers should strive to keep the theories simple and useful.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific numbers provided, but the journal is promoted to IFLA members16 and is available online.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in the United Kingdom,18 but the editorial board is international.19 Although most articles are published in English, some are published in other major languages such as Spanish, Russian, French, or German, when appropriate.20 Potential authors should take care to describe a specific system or local procedure, because the reader may be familiar with LIS terms in general but not with local practice.

Reader characteristics: While most librarians in the United States are women, the author should keep in mind that some restrictions are put on women in other countries so this demographic may be different among IFLA Journal readers. Librarians in most countries have college or graduate degrees, and are considered professionals. Though many readers of IFLA Journal work in libraries in developing countries, there is a genuine desire to learn about practices in major libraries throughout the world. In terms of education and professional skills, there may be emphasis placed on less technical aspects of librarianship.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It may be assumed that the readers of this journal understand LIS jargon and current issues. Despite the scholarly tone of the journal, library services are still developing in some countries, so discussion of current-generation digital technologies and digital information may have to be explained or simplified.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors for IFLA Journal should be prepared to do academic research into their topics, and to thoroughly study the region or country they are addressing. Readers might range from a librarian or teacher in a one-room school in Kenya with limited resources to a LIS professor in Germany with digital access.23 An author from the United States should be careful not to “preach” about advanced services which may not be relevant to developing countries. The members of IFLA are likely to be curious about policies and practices that are successful in other regions, especially when discussed in factual, not proscriptive way.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  2. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/
  3. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  4. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  5. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  6. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  7. “IFLA Journal/Description,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal
  8. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  9. “IFLA Journal/Aims and Scope,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#aims-and-scope
  10. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#ARTICLETYPES
  11. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  13. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  16. “Membership,” International Federation of Library Associations, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/membership
  17. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  18. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  19. “IFLA Journal/Editorial Committee,” International Federation of Library Associations, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal/editorial-committee
  20. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  22. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  23.  “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
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GOOD

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “GOOD is a global media brand and social impact company. Our collective mission is to help people and organizations be forces for good. Through award-winning media and creative partnerships, we connect deeply and authentically with this generation’s desire for purpose.”1 The magazine and website cover stories on business, environment, politics, culture, technology, education, etc.

Target audience: Millennials who want to make a difference in the world.2

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and print magazine.5

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.good.is/about/faq

Types of contributions accepted: According to the site’s FAQ, “We work with artists, designers, photographers and writers on a freelance basis.”7

Submission and review process: Send your story pitch to submissions@goodinc.com to be considered for publication in the magazine or on the website. Due to the high volume of submissions, editors will only respond to pitches they are considering for publication. Allow two weeks for review.8

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD€™’s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and a recent piece on the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 50,000 for the print magazine, 10 million monthly unique visits to the website.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English.10

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.11

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy,12 they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’€™s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: September 28, 2016


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/about
  2. “Audience,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/community/audience
  3. About.”
  4. About.”
  5. About.”
  6. About.”
  7. “General Inquiries,” Good.is, accessed September 27, https://www.good.is/about/faq#general-questions
  8. “GOOD Magazine (print),” Good.is, accessed September 27, 2016, https://www.good.is/about/faq#print-questions
  9. “GOOD Media Kit 2016,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  10. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  11. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  12. GOOD Worldwide, Inc. (2014). About Us. GOOD. Retrieved from http://community.good.is/about
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CLA Insider

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CLA Insider

Website: http://www.cla-net.org/?11

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the CLA home page: “CLA (California Library Association) provides leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library services, librarianship, and the library community. We help members excel in a fast-changing job market. We’re a resource for learning about new ideas and technology, and we actively work to influence legislation affecting libraries and librarians.”1

From the CLA Newsletter Archives page, the Insider features “€œnews, articles, library/people/program spotlights, information about upcoming events.”2

Target audience: The Insider targets librarians, staff, patrons and users of California libraries.3

CLA’€™s website says that the Insider is members-only.4

Publisher: California Library Association (CLA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: E-newsletter.8

Content: CLA conference updates, member news, news items by and about CLA members, and California-library specific initiatives.9

Frequency of publication: Monthly, since August 2012.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no guidelines provided, but the newsletter’€™s home page provides some direction. See the section on the right side of the page: Comments, Questions, Contribute?11

Types of contributions accepted: News for, by, and about CLA members, member profiles, exceptional CA library services or programs, reports on research projects. Other suggestions welcome.12

Submission and review process: Email CLA Membership Associate and Newsletter Editor Lauren Takeda at laurent@socallibraries.org.13

Editorial tone: Very informal, friendly, California-library positive and CLA focused.14

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you’€™re a student in CA or plan on working in CA libraries, this is a great place for sharing information and news about CA librarian goings-on. You might need to be a CLA member to submit; it’€™s not clear from the guidelines. But this is an excellent newsletter to submit CA news, librarian profiles, initiatives, specific CA library activities, etc. CLA promotes itself as “the community for California Libraries€.” Keep in mind that it’€™s a member-oriented newsletter though, not a peer-reviewed publication, and can only be accessed by members.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Currently the CLA has around 3000 members. The newsletter is circulated to members; including LIS students, trustees, business memberships (to those who sell products to support library operations), and librarian memberships at all kinds of libraries.16

Geographic location: The publication is based in California.17 Written in American English, the focus is on California libraries and LIS professionals.18

Reader characteristics: The newsletter is targeted to those with an interest in California libraries: students, professionals, service providers, users and library supporters. If there is a bias, it’€™s that CA libraries are exceptional community centers, and the newsletter aims to be the source of information for the libraries.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The knowledge level should be fairly strong, since the newsletter is for California Library Association members. But keep in mind that this is written for and about all sorts of civilians involved in the CA library world, and keep LIS jargon to a minimum.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are interested in hearing positive news about CA libraries: functions, initiatives, programs, advocacy, librarians, and CLA-specific updates. This is a CA specific newsletter, open to suggestions for news, profiles, reports, research -€“ anything having to do with CA libraries. Student submissions – particularly regarding news from CA’€™s LIS programs – would most likely be well received, providing a good balance to the newsletter’€™s current member-centric articles, and giving librarians (and library donors) insider insight into what’€™s going on in the state’™s LIS student centers. CLA Insider has a very limited audience, as it is a members-only publication, yet is still a viable publishing option.21

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. California Library Association. (2016). About the California Library Association. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=A3
  2. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  3. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  4. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  5. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  6. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  7. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  8. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  9. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  10. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  11. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  12. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  13. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  14. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  15. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  16. California Library Association. (2016). History. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=29
  17. California Library Association. (2014). About the California Library Association. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?page=A3
  18. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  19. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  20. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
  21. California Library Association. (2016). Newsletter Archives. California Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.cla-net.org/?11
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