Wiki Tags Archives: Accessibility

College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”1

Target audience: Academic library staff2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.5 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”10 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.11

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .12

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”13

Editorial tone: Academic14, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.15

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”17 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,19 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”20

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”21 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”22 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”24

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”25

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  7.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  9. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  11. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  13. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  14. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  18. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  19. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  21. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  22. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  24. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  25. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Against the Grain

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

This website provides more than 3,500 pages with continuously updated content, including full-text access to articles from the print Against the Grain publication (access is limited to subscribers), along with a additional free, available, web-only content like breaking industry news, blog posts, job openings, conference announcements, and an online version of the popular “If Rumors Were Horses” column by editor Katina Strauch.1

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. It is a unique collection of reports on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals.”2

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.3

Publisher: Against the Grain.4

Peer reviewed? All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.5

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.6

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.7 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.8

Content: Articles. The ATG website also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.9

Frequency of publication: Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews and people profiles, Reviews, Legal Issues, International Dateline, Publishing, Bookselling and Vending, and Technology and Standards.11 Some issues have specific focuses, such as the December 2013/January 2014 issue, “eBook Platforms for Academic Librarians.”12 Articles should be approximately 2000 words, although the editors allow authors to make a piece as long or short as needed by their subject. They like a minimum of 200 dpi for charts and graphs and 300 dpi for photos.13

Submission and review process: Contact Leah Hinds at leah@katina.info or Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.14

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,15 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.16

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.18 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.19 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (ATG’s current editors are affiliated with College of Charleston or the Charleston Conference).21 Written in American English.22

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.23 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”24 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics0 and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

Last updated: April 20 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  2. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  3. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  4. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  5. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  6. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  7. Against the Grain. (2014). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  8. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  9. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  10. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  11. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  12. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  13. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  14. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  15. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  16. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  17. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  18. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  19. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  20. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  21. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  22. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  23. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  24. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  25. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  26. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”1

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”2

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”3

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”10

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”11 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.12

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”13

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”14

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”15

Editorial tone: Academic16

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,18, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”19

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26920

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.21

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”22 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”23, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.24 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  5.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  10. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  13. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  20. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  21. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  22. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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Library Hi Tech

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht

Purpose, objective, or mission: This international-scope journal focuses on computing and technology issues specifically for the library community, defining technology “€œto include the full range of tools employed by librarians and their customers”€.1

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals, as well as LIS researchers and lecturers; library senior management; LIS students and academics.2

Readers of the journal will be able to learn more about the potential of LIS technologies while finding out how to use the new technologies; explore the implications of tech changes; and stay informed of the latest LIS technology trends and developments.3

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing, LTD.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online,7 with access available as part of a paid subscription to Emerald Library Studies eJournals.8

Content: From their website, topics covered in the journal include articles about integrated library systems, networking, strategic planning, policy implementation, security, automation systems, the role of consortia, resource access initiatives, architecture and technology, electronic publishing, library tech in specific countries, user perspectives on technology, how technology can help disabled library users, and library-related websites.9

Frequency of publication: Four issues per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht

The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist.11

Types of contributions accepted: Original manuscripts/articles, 4000-8000 words, submitted in MS Word. See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Hi Tech topics.12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

The editor reviews each submission and decides whether it’s a good fit for Library Hi Tech. The submission is then sent to two independent referees for double-blind peer review. Based on the three recommendations and consultation with the Editorial Board members, the decision is made whether to accept, revise or reject the submission.14

A 2013 editorial reveals how long it takes a Library Hi Tech manuscript to go through peer review, and how authors can speed up the review time for their article by following the strict author guidelines.15

Editorial tone: Very professional and often technical, written in grammatically correct English with an emphasis on writing towards an intelligent, knowledgeable LIS audience.16

Style guide used: Harvard style guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech is a wonderful resource for staying abreast of the latest tech developments in the LIS world, and for learning about how the technology is used in a variety of LIS settings, worldwide. It is professional and very interesting to read, working with LIS professionals and students to provide an in-depth perspective on the applications of these new and emerging technologies. Recent articles detail the “€œAccessibility of academic library websites in North America”, covering 56 library websites, design methods and accessibility; virtual reference and the link to librarian job satisfaction; and increasing content findability with SEO.18 The journal has a reputation for discovering hot topic items before they become mainstream: for LIS students, that means potential to write from personal knowledge and experience, while providing updates into current tech trends and issues. The journal is part of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE),  “€œa forum for editors and publishers of peer reviewed journals to discuss all aspects of publication ethics.”19 The journal takes a positive attitude towards LIS technologies, but thoroughly researches the pros and cons of systems and their applications in libraries and helpfulness in fulfilling library goals.20

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: More than 100,000 downloads per year on the Emerald site. Per the Library Hi Tech co-editor, the publication has “a worldwide audience with a strong focus in North America”.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although written in English,22 the journal is international in scope, with the editor hailing from Humboldt Universitat zu Berlin, Germany, and the co-editor from the Royal School of LIS, Denmark. The editorial advisory board is comprised of LIS professionals from universities across the globe, including the U.S., Spain, South Africa, Australia and Canada.23 Submissions need to adhere to the Worldwide English language rights, and Emerald provides resources for making sure papers are written in grammatically correct standard English, for authors for whom English is not their first language.24

Reader characteristics: Subscribers, writers and editorial staff are primarily LIS professional academics at universities across the world, and interested in how technology can work in LIS settings, trends and case study examples.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as the publication is aimed at LIS professionals and students with an interest in LIS technologies. Articles are thoroughly researched and highly technical, written by professionals in the LIS field.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are passionate about technology in the LIS workplace, and would be interested to hear of emerging technologies from an LIS student point of view, case studies/examples on how technologies are being used in classrooms (virtual or not), and in library communities. If you have an example or a technology you’d like to research, this would be the perfect place to share your knowledge and experience.

Last updated: November 3, 2014


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  2. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  3. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  8. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  9. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  15. Greifeneder, E. (2013). 30 days to first decision: Time span in Library Hi Tech from submission to first decision. Library Hi Tech. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=17082842
  16. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Table of Contents: Volume 31 Issue 1. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0737-8831&volume=31&issue=1
  19. Committee on Publication Ethics. (2014). Home. Retrieved from http://publicationethics.org/
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  21. E. Greifeneder, personal communication, 2013
  22. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Library Hi Tech. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404358837394/137737
  23. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Editorial Team. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lht&
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Library Hi Tech Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht&PHPSESSID=gclvq051q437bie0sjkmpu9g06
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Library Hi Tech News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech News

Website: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn

Purpose, objective, or mission: Helps readers stay abreast of events, developments and news in the LIS industries. From their Editorial Objectives: “Readers consider LHTN as the source from which to hear what’€™s coming next in terms of technology development for academic and public libraries.”1

Target audience: Library and info science professionals, and anyone with a reason to use LIS services/technologies in their own professional workplace. The primary goal of the publication is to keep readers ahead of LIS technology developments so they’€™re in the know about what they can use to help improve library services (“€œexploit their potential”), with a nod towards improving services for library users with disabilities through the new tech updates and activities. This is all on an international scale.2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publications.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: Articles of varying lengths, reporting on LIS conferences, and case studies on how tech is used in the library.7

Regular content includes technology profiles from libraries around the world; feature articles; in depth conference reviews & reports; new & noteworthy updates for librarians; and a calendar of relevant upcoming events.8

Frequency of publication: 9-10 issues per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn

The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist.10

Types of contributions accepted: From the website, particularly welcome topics include: New web browsers/search engines; virtual reference experiments; library uses of Skype/VOIP; integrated library systems and management; blogging; library mobile applications; social networks; virtual worlds; Twitter applications for libraries; gaming and simulations; digital textbooks; new library learning spaces; tech for library users with disabilities; crowdsourcing and open source software. The list is extensive.11

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article. Upload files as a Word document o f 1000-3000 words. All submissions are reviewed by the Library Hi Tech News editors, who make the final decision on publication.12

Editorial tone: Informal, but informative. Speaks to readers in a knowledgeable, conversational tone that provides great information on new technologies without making the articles dull or so technical that readers are overwhelmed or tune out.13

Style guide used: Harvard style formatting.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech News‘s editorial objectives note that “publishing your article in LHTN can be a ‘€˜place to start,’€™ analogous to a ‘poster session in print’€™, and does not preclude publishing a more fulsome piece in a peer-reviewed journal at a later date.”15€ (A peer-reviewed journal to spring to might be Library Hi Tech.)

The list of content submissions (see Types of Contributions Accepted, above) is vast and touches on subjects that every LIS student will be familiar with, dealing with, and will most likely have an opinion about. This is an excellent place to start your LIS publishing.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International in scope, with the primary editors of the publication based out of U.S. colleges and universities.17 Submissions need to adhere to the Worldwide English language rights, and Emerald provides resources for making sure papers are written in grammatically correct standard English, for authors for whom English is not their first language.18

Reader characteristics: Readers and writers for this publication are LIS professionals and students interested in new and emerging technologies, and new uses for established technologies. The journal is part of the Committee on Publication Ethics  (COPE), “€œa forum for editors and publishers of peer reviewed journals to discuss publication ethics.”€19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, as the publication is aimed at LIS professionals and students with an interest in LIS technologies.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors 

This is a wonderful publication for LIS new professionals and students, as readers and authors. The authors are seeking submissions covering such a variety of interesting topics, and seem to be open to submissions on anything that is even remotely related to technologies that can be used in libraries and the LIS field. For example, a 2013 issue provided an overview of Pinterest and how it can be used in libraries, as well as iPads, Kindles and tablets, and social media ethical issues for librarians. All issues that most students, not just LIS, can speak to, and particularly relevant for those in LIS programs currently using and evaluating these technologies, personally, professionally, and through LIS studies. There are also more technical issues covered, like open source library management systems, global development for libraries, profiles of LIS professionals, and relevant conference updates. A great place to jump in and write for.21

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  4. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  9. ProQuest. (2016). Library Hi Tech News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412892197249/339661
  10. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  11. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  12. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  13. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  14. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  15. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  17. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Editorial Team. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lhtn
  18. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Author Guidelines. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lhtn
  19. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  20. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2016). Library High Tech News Information. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lhtn
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Faculty of Information Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Faculty of Information Quarterly (*Publication currently on hiatus.*)

Website: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/index

Purpose, objective, or mission: Faculty of Information Quarterly (FIQ) is a student-led, peer reviewed journal and provides immediate open access to its content by publishing online, on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Edited by graduate students at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information, the journal seeks to provide an environment for the voices of emerging and established scholars and practitioners in diverse Information fields, including but not limited to the following: archival science, accessibility studies, book history and print culture, communication theory, critical theory, cultural informatics, health informatics, information studies, information systems and technology, knowledge theory, library science, management science, media theory, museum studies, semiotics, and technology studies.”1

Target audience: University of Toronto LIS students, faculty and global LIS community2

Publisher: University of Toronto, Faculty of Information3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online6

Content: Research articles covering any topic relevant to LIS community. Recent article titles include Research as a Social Process: Considerations for Academic Libraries, Applying Concepts of Bug-Tracking Software to e-Resource Management in Academic Libraries, and The Rare e-Vent: Concepts of Rarity and Scarcity in e-Books.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8 *The last edition published was Volume 3, Number 4, in 2011.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Research articles from the LIS and related academic communities. Per the publication website, “While there is an emphasis on encouraging student work in FIQ we certainly support submissions from all members of the Information community. Masters and PhD students and faculty of all disciplines, practitioners and Information professionals with an interest in scholarly work, and interested members of the Information community in its broadest sense are all welcome to submit works to this publication.”10 “We encourage students to submit articles they think are of an academic calibre, which can include conference papers, reworked course papers, personal research projects, reflections on the scholarly and practical elements of Information, or other communications of excellent quality.”11

Submission and review process: All work is submitted online through the publication  website. Detailed instructions provided for authors including a checklist to ensure all requirements are met. FIQ is peer-reviewed and publication is subject to approval and review by the Editorial Staff.12

Editorial tone: Formal13

Style guide used: For Canadian English spelling, authors should consult the latest edition of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary; for citations and references authors should use the latest edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Although FIQ was founded in part to promote publication of student research and writing, all members of the information community are invited to submit manuscripts.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available. As an open access, online publication of a leading information school, FIQ is freely accessible to academic and professional members of the information community the world over.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Toronto, Canada.17 While its target audience is the global information community, the publication requires its authors to use Canadian spellings and to ensure the relevance of articles to Canadian culture.18

Reader characteristics: Though FIQ is an open-access publication with an international reach, it is likely, given its editorial bias,19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of readers would have an LIS background or education; however, since FIQ strives for a global reach and LIS education varies around the global, writers should consider this when writing.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As a publication run by graduate students and primarily for graduate students and academics in the the LIS community, fellow graduate student authors would seem to have a better chance of publication in FIQ.

Last updated: April 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  2. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  4. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  5. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  6. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  7. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  8. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  9. “Archives,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/issue/archive
  10. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  12. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  13. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  14. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  15. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  16. “Editorial Policies,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. Faculty of Information Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406056076086/717394
  18. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  19.  “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines that the majority of its readers are Canadian or North American. Readers of this student-run journal will have a keen interest in the latest developments in the LIS field. The journal does state a preference for publishing the student work, so this is an ideal venue for a first publication.[20. “Focus and Scope,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. “Submissions,” University of Toronto Faculty of Information, accessed April 24, 2017, http://fiq.ischool.utoronto.ca/index.php/fiq/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
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IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations) Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: IFLA Journal (International Federation of Library Associations)

Website: www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal (1992-2002 archived at http://www.ifla.org/V/iflaj/index.htm)

Purpose, objective, or mission: “IFLA Journal is an international journal publishing peer reviewed articles on library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries. The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.”1

Target audience: Library professionals around the world, especially those interested in library services in developing areas2

Publisher: Sage Publications3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Online open access6

Content: The journal publishes articles on “library and information services and the social, political and economic issues that impact access to information through libraries.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#submission-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal publishes research, case studies and essays that reflect the broad spectrum of the profession internationally.”9 Though the journal publishes primarily original research, case studies on successful and unsuccessful projects and opinion pieces on library issues are also accepted.10 Articles should be between 3,000 to 8,000 words and accompanied by an abstract of no approximately 150 words. Authors whose primary language is not English should not be inhibited from submitting, as correction of minor errors and revision to standard English is considered standard editorial procedure.11

Submission and review process: IFLA requests submissions be sent as an email attachment, preferably as MS Word document. Expect approximately six weeks for the editorial committee to review submissions.12

Editorial tone: The tone of IFLA Journal is academic,13 but attempts to use unbiased language to make examples and practices applicable to library staff from around the world.14

Style guide used: References should be written in Harvard style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For authors wishing to convey current and upcoming library innovations to developing areas, this journal is well regarded. It presents issues that smaller libraries and countries are dealing with as compared to the United States and Europe. Well-researched articles about procedures that have been tested at large libraries are highly valuable to librarians in developing countries. Some services may be beyond the technology of small countries, but writers should strive to keep the theories simple and useful.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No specific numbers provided, but the journal is promoted to IFLA members16 and is available online.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in the United Kingdom,18 but the editorial board is international.19 Although most articles are published in English, some are published in other major languages such as Spanish, Russian, French, or German, when appropriate.20 Potential authors should take care to describe a specific system or local procedure, because the reader may be familiar with LIS terms in general but not with local practice.

Reader characteristics: While most librarians in the United States are women, the author should keep in mind that some restrictions are put on women in other countries so this demographic may be different among IFLA Journal readers. Librarians in most countries have college or graduate degrees, and are considered professionals. Though many readers of IFLA Journal work in libraries in developing countries, there is a genuine desire to learn about practices in major libraries throughout the world. In terms of education and professional skills, there may be emphasis placed on less technical aspects of librarianship.21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: It may be assumed that the readers of this journal understand LIS jargon and current issues. Despite the scholarly tone of the journal, library services are still developing in some countries, so discussion of current-generation digital technologies and digital information may have to be explained or simplified.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors for IFLA Journal should be prepared to do academic research into their topics, and to thoroughly study the region or country they are addressing. Readers might range from a librarian or teacher in a one-room school in Kenya with limited resources to a LIS professor in Germany with digital access.23 An author from the United States should be careful not to “preach” about advanced services which may not be relevant to developing countries. The members of IFLA are likely to be curious about policies and practices that are successful in other regions, especially when discussed in factual, not proscriptive way.

Last updated: May 13, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  2. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/
  3. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  4. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  5. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  6. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  7. “IFLA Journal/Description,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal
  8. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  9. “IFLA Journal/Aims and Scope,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#aims-and-scope
  10. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#ARTICLETYPES
  11. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  12. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  13. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  14. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  15. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  16. “Membership,” International Federation of Library Associations, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/membership
  17. “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
  18. IFLA Journal, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 13, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1405614660545/30868
  19. “IFLA Journal/Editorial Committee,” International Federation of Library Associations, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal/editorial-committee
  20. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  21. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  22. “Submission Guidelines,” Sage Publications, accessed May 17, 2017, https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/journal/ifla-journal#EditorialPolicies
  23.  “IFLA Journal,” Sage Publications, accessed May 13, 2017, http://www.ifla.org/publications/ifla-journal
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San Diego Reader

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: San Diego Reader

Website: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: To cover all aspects of life in San Diego.1

Target audience: People living in, or visiting, the San Diego region.

Publisher: James E. Holman.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian weekly alternative newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.3

Content: The Association of Alternative Newsweeklies (AAN) describes the content as follows: “Specializing in feature stories, the Reader covers San Diego life in general, with emphasis on politics and the arts and entertainment. The Reader publishes comprehensive listings of movies, events, theater, and music; restaurant and film reviews; and free classifieds.”4

Frequency of publication: Weekly.5

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.sandiegoreader.com/contact/

Types of contributions accepted: Their website allows for online submission (requires free registration) of articles in four specific categories: CD or concert review, neighborhood news story, travel story, waterfront story, or cover story.6 They also accept letters to the editor.7 Per their website: “Woo us with actual reporting, not a cover letter written to impress your creative-writing teacher.”8

Submission and review process: There are online submission forms for each type of story.9

Editorial tone: Informal but informative.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The San Diego Reader celebrates San Diego and its diverse people. It focuses on a variety of ordinary people and places within the county. The potential for publication of San Diego LIS authors by the San Diego Reader exists for a variety of reasons. A call for the commencement of construction on the new central library, designed a decade ago, could be shaped as a letter to the editor. Other issues which librarians and the Reader feel strongly about are equal access to information and censorship. A concise reporting of banned books week events may be framed as a neighborhood story.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 90,000 as of March 2015.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The focus of the Reader articles is on local San Diego life, politics, and entertainment. Its reach extends beyond San Diego County, (the sixth largest county in the United States) into under-represented Imperial County and Baja California.

Although the Reader is written in English, there is awareness that San Diego is a culturally diverse region. The tone is informal and direct, the vocabulary concrete and the sentence structure is not complex. The investigative articles usually feature five to ten San Diegans to show how the issue impacts different people from a variety of backgrounds. Frequently, the names of cities and communities, as well as local businesses, are used as examples, without bothering to explain a reference to readers outside the region.

Reader characteristics: Audience demographic are not available, but readers will be residents of the San Diego area. The publication is progressive; its coverage of local politics confronts issues critically. Its bias is inherent in its values. The attitude calls attention to those who exploit the average person. Some topics are intended to evoke outrage. The common man is valued most highly.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The level of knowledge of LIS issues will vary and it can be safely assumed that readers have the same level of LIS knowledge as the general public.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Reader has a reputation for high-quality writing that the readers have come to expect, suggesting, even in the limited fashion that contributions are accepted, that quality of writing would play a role in acceptance. Living in San Diego would be important in order to convey the essence of the city and county to readers.

Last updated: November 1, 2016


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “San Diego Reader,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/
  2. “San Diego Reader,” Ulrichsweb, accessed November 1, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1415817959160/559101
  3. San Diego Reader.”
  4. “San Diego Reader,” Altweeklies.com, accessed November 1, 2016, from http://www.altweeklies.com/aan/san-diego-reader/Company?oid=80
  5. “Archives,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/archives/
  6. “Contact Us,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/contact/
  7. “Letters to the Editor,” SanDiegoReader.com, accessed November 1, 2016, http://www.sandiegoreader.com/letter-editor/
  8. Contact Us.”
  9. Contact Us.”
  10. San Diego Reader.”
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Collection Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Management

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/aboutThisJournal?journalCode=wcol20

Purpose, objective, or mission: The website of Collection Management states that the publication “offers library professionals of all types crucial guidance in the fast-changing field of collection management, including the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”1

Target audience: Librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries.2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: Collection management covers topics on collection management, planning, allocation of resources, selection, and acquisitions, development of virtual collections, consortia, resource sharing, preservation, and other relevant topics7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t792303985~tab=submit~mode=paper_submission_instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per the publication website, “The journal welcomes articles that provide library professionals with crucial guidance about the latest developments in sharing and providing access to resources, creating digital collections, preserving both traditional and digital library resources, applying technological developments to managing collections, training and developing staff, and managing and analyzing the administrative data associated with building collections, such as usage, licensing or rights, access, and financial issues.”9

Submission and review process: Collection Management does not require initial queries or proposals; it accepts completed manuscripts. Using the ScholarOne Manuscript software, Taylor and Francis offers an extensive website, Authors Services, that provides guidance beyond the submission guidelines for this specific journal and is full of helpful information.10

Editorial tone: Scholarly, suitable for practitioners and academics in the LIS field.11

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Management is an authoritative and credible LIS scholarly publication. This peer-reviewed journal publishes articles on collection development and related topics. With this in mind, potential authors may contribute articles on a broad variety of topics, from electronic resource acquisitions to recreational reading collections to book preservation. Authors need to be certain they submit work that contributes to the body of knowledge on collection management.

The journal is indexed in Cabells Education Technology and Library Science, CSA, CSA Technology Research Database, EBSCOhost Online Research Databases, H.W. Wilson Indexes, Informed Librarian, JournalSeek, Periodicals Index Online, SwetsWise All Titles.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation information not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is published in English in the United States, but has an international audience.14 The issues covered are of interest to librarians whether they are in United States, Taiwan, or Germany, with topics including how to manage collection development in a digital environment, selection versus censorship, and the use of circulation statistics and interlibrary loan data in collection management.15

Reader characteristics: Readers range from associate university librarians to assistant professors to electronic resources librarians. Often the audience will have earned several degrees: BA, MLS or MLIS, MA, and perhaps PhD. Readers often have supervisory functions with purchasing responsibility, either selecting or authorizing resources for purchase. Readers of Collection Management will most likely have several publications of their own in their portfolio and therefore expect to see well-thought-out and well-researched articles.16

The readers of Collection Management have the same professional interests in common, building their library collections in support of the research and teaching agendas of their parent institutions. They meet the challenge of changing technology, providing the latest publications, and staying within limited library budgets. Collection Management has well-researched theoretical and practical articles that help librarians of any rank succeed in their work. It explores “the future and emerging trends in the field and provides reviews of relevant books, technological resources, and software. This useful resource examines technological advances that help librarians manage and assess collections, such as electronic resource management modules, utilities that provide journal coverage data, and developments in the preservation of library materials.”17

Collection Management is geared towards librarians and information professionals who are interested in articles that help them understand how collection assessment tools and methods can help improve their overall resource management and planning for the future, including how to effectively use staff, facilities, and computing resources.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Collection Management is a peer-reviewed publication that focuses on collection development in college, university, and research libraries of all types. The main readers are librarians and information specialists working in access services, interlibrary loan, and special collections; library administrators and educators; archivists, curators, bibliographers, academics, students, and publishers who work with libraries. These readers have a strong background on LIS topics and issues. Not only will they understand library jargon, but they will expect to find it in articles written for this journal.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors for Collection Management would do best to consider the education level of the audience and the journal’s reputation for addressing the challenges of their profession. Successful submissions will target current issues in collection management.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  3. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  4. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  5. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  6. “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcol20
  7. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  8. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  9. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  10. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  11. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcol20&page=instructions#.U9GEZ7FiND4
  13. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GIGLFiND4
  14. Collection Management, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406239781093/67186
  15. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wcol20#.U9GEeLFiND4
  16. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed March 24, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcol20#.U9GEgrFiND4
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Children and Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Children and Libraries

Website: http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/index.cfm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Children and Libraries (CAL) is the official, refereed journal of the Association for Library Service to Children. It primarily serves as a vehicle for continuing education of librarians working with children, and showcases current scholarly research and practice in library service to children and significant activities and initiatives of the Association.”1

Target audience: Children’s librarians, school librarians, reading teachers, library directors, book reviewers, and university professors.2

Publisher: Association for Library Services to Children/American Library Association.3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: Children and youth; LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: Current scholarly research and practice in library service to children with highlights of significant activities and programs of the association7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors

Types of contributions accepted: CAL publishes full-length scholarly research articles; “best practice” pieces on children’s programming (usually 1,500 words or less); and ends each issue with a brief feature by a children’s librarian, a light essay, humorous story, interview, or interview with a children’s author (up to 300 words). 9

Submission and review process: Submissions via email as Microsoft Word attachments are preferred. Manuscripts will be acknowledged upon receipt and evaluated by at least two referees.10 Authors may expect to be notified of the editor’s decision approximately eight weeks after submission. All articles are subject to the double-blind peer review process, with the following exceptions: transcripts of speeches or articles derived from ALSC-sponsored events, news items, and interviews and articles written by or solicited by the editor.11

Editorial tone: Academic or informal, depending on the submission type.12

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are involved and interested in providing library services to children would benefit from submitting an article to this journal. Having an article published in Children and Libraries increases prestige for the author as the publication is distributed nationwide and in some foreign countries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although exact circulation numbers are not available, Children and Libraries is delivered to members of the ALSC at a discounted rate and is a benefit of membership. In addition there are individual subscribers and copies distributed for marketing purposes.14 ALSC has a membership network of approximately 4,000.15 Children and Libraries is also available online, with the four most recent issues available only to members but older issues open to all.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the official journal of the ALSC the audience of members extends to every state in the nation and to some foreign countries.17 ALSC is conscious of different cultures and is the national home of El día de los niños – El día de los libros (Children’s Day – Book Day) program. They have also developed the ALSC Every Child Ready to Read project, which aims to promote early literacy skills in children from birth to age five.18 These programs reflect the organization’s support for diversity and dedication to service to all children.

Reader characteristics: Readers of Children and Libraries are made up of children’s librarians, including school librarians, reading teachers, library directors, book reviewers, university professors, library support staff, and retired library professionals. Readers will be familiar with the fundamentals and values of school libraries, public libraries, and community programs that serve children. Readers can be expected to be LIS professionals and to have advanced degrees. Many may work in schools or in public libraries and deal directly with children. Readers have interests in children’€™s education, literacy programs, continuing education for library professionals, and collection development of children’€™s materials in schools and libraries.19

ALSC boasts a network of “more than 4,000 children’s and youth librarians, children’s literature experts, publishers, education and library school faculty members, and other adults committed to creating a better future for children through libraries.”20€ These readers are dedicated to children around the country and promote practices that improve children’€™s library services. The ALSC supports equity of access and the continued development of multicultural, multilingual library staff.21 Cultural diversity is a value of the organization, evident in the various articles in CAL that cover service and programs to patrons of different ethnic backgrounds.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers can be expected to be familiar with LIS jargon and issues facing children and libraries. The readers of CAL have experience with current technologies and the latest trends in library services for children.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are professionals who are concerned with issues pertaining to children and libraries. Readers work in school libraries, public libraries, or have contact with children. These professionals seek out literature that is specific to library service for children and this journal meets those needs. Readers wish to be informed of the latest trends, research involving children, literacy, and collection development in order to meet the needs of their young patrons. Writers interested in writing for this publication would be most successful addressing these needs.

Last updated: January 27, 2017


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. “About Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib
  2. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  3. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  4. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  5. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  6. Children and Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  7. “About Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib
  8. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 27, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406601484375/483395
  9. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  10. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  11. “Children and Libraries Manuscript Referee Process,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/calrefereeprocess
  12. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  13. “CAL Author Guidelines,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/guidelinesforauthors/guidelinesauthors
  14. “Children and Libraries Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/calsubinfo
  15. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  16. “Children and Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Services to Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib
  17. “Children and Libraries Subscription Information,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/calsubinfo
  18. “ALSC Initiatives,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/initiatives
  19. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, Accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  20. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
  21.  “The Importance of Diversity in Library Programs and Material Collections for Children,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/sites/ala.org.alsc/files/content/ALSCwhitepaper_importance%20of%20diversity_with%20graphics_FINAL.pdf
  22. “Back Issues of Children and Libraries,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/compubs/childrenlib/indices
  23. “About ALSC,” Association for Library Services to Children, accessed January 27, 2017, http://www.ala.org/alsc/aboutalsc
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