Wiki Tags Archives: Accessibility

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

ISSN: 1944-9682

Website: https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ULJ “addresses all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.” The journal was formerly titled Urban Academic Librarian.1

Target audience: ULJ’s audience includes librarians, LIS students, and other professionals working in urban libraries, those serving diverse and urban populations, and those interested in these and related fields.

Publisher: ULJ is published by the Library Association of the City University of New York (LACUNY)2 and is sponsored by the Office of Library Services at CUNY Central.3 The journal is hosted by CUNY Academic Works.4

Peer reviewed? Yes, double-blind peer review.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content: ULJ publishes research, theory, and practice articles addressing “all aspects of urban libraries and librarianship.”7 The journal has a regular book review section. Furthermore, the journal publishes Selected Proceedings from the 2017 LACUNY Institute, which regularly appear in one issue of each volume.8

Frequency of publication: ULJ “is published online on a rolling basis, and will be collected into issues twice per year.” 9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: ULJ “welcomes articles dealing with academic, research, public, school, and special libraries in an urban setting”10 The journal’s scope is broad, as it invites manuscripts on “areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources.” Further, the editors invite recommendations for columns or special issues.11 The website lists the most popular articles, according to full-text download statistics.12

Submission and review process: ULJ accepts submissions via the journal’s website.13 Authors can submit manuscripts at any time. Manuscripts that the editors determine to be in the journal’s scope are sent to at least two reviewers for double-blind peer review, and authors receive reviewers’ comments. The editors strive to make decisions on manuscripts, including peer review, within sixty days of receipt.

Editorial tone: Articles exhibit a formal, academic style.

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ULJ is a long-established leading journal, and its peer-review process, emphasis on research, and scholarly tone make it a viable option for LIS professionals and scholars with experience in urban libraries or whose research focuses on theories and practices in urban and diverse settings. It may not be suitable for beginning or student authors, but those with workable ideas should not be discouraged from submitting.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data are not available for ULJ. LACUNY, the journal’s publisher, has about 150 members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LACUNY members are City University of New York faculty and staff, as well as library employees from affiliated institutions.16 ULJ editorial board members are mostly from CUNY campuses. However, the journal’s reach and relevance are broad because it is an open-access journal and its articles are of interest to LIS professionals throughout the United States and in other countries. It is written in English.

Reader characteristics: Overall, readers have master’s degrees in educational technology, computer science, and library science, and are associated with urban academic libraries. The journal is also relevant to librarians, library staff members, and other LIS professionals in a variety of libraries in urban settings or with diverse populations. Academic librarians and practitioners in other types of libraries, including school, public, and special, contribute to the journal, showing that the interest in urban libraries is emphasized more than the library type.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will possess considerable knowledge about LIS topics and subjects, with many readers knowledgeable about the inner workings of academic libraries. However, specialized jargon should be avoided or explained, in order to appeal to a wide range of librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

ULJ is a scholarly journal that publishes theoretical, practical, and heavily researched articles. Readers are from academic, public, school, and special libraries serving urban and diverse populations. Topics including services to immigrants, services to students, affordability and open educational resources, libraries as community spaces, advocacy, and the urban library setting are all suitable.

Last updated: March 23, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About This Journal,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/about.html.
  2. “Publications,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Publications.
  3. “About This Journal.”
  4. CUNY Academic Works, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/.
  5. “About This Journal.”
  6. “About This Journal.”
  7. “About This Journal.”
  8. For example, Urban Library Journal 23, no. 2 (2017), https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/vol23/iss2/.
  9. “About This Journal.”
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html.
  11. “About This Journal.”
  12. “Most Popular Papers,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/topdownloads.html.
  13. “Submit Article,” Urban Library Journal, accessed March 23, 2018, https://academicworks.cuny.edu/cgi/login.cgi?return_to=https%3A%2F%2Facademicworks.cuny.edu%2Fcgi%2Fsubmit.cgi%3Fcontext%3Dulj&context=ulj.
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. “Paid Members,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Paid-Members.
  16. “Join Us,” lacuny.org, accessed March 23, 2018, https://lacuny.org/Membership.
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Library Philosophy and Practice (LPP)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Philosophy and Practice (LPP)

ISSN: 1522-02221

Website: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, this journal “publishes articles exploring the connection between library practice and the philosophy and theory behind it. These include explorations of current, past, and emerging theories of librarianship and library practice, as well as reports of successful, innovative, or experimental library procedures, methods, or projects in all areas of librarianship, set in the context of applied research.”2

Target audience: Library professionals (primarily employees working in academic libraries) interested in exploring the philosophy of librarianship.3

Publisher: University of Nebraska, Lincoln Libraries; University of Idaho Library4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: LPP includes research-based articles covering all aspects of philosophy and theory of librarianship. Some of the many topics the journal has covered over the years include extended library-hour service, the information-seeking behaviors of journalists, information ethics, the information needs of women in prison, the creativity of public librarians, gaming theory, the role of academic libraries in developing countries as access points to print and electronic resources, and many more.8

Frequency of publication: Annually.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/instructions.html

Types of contributions accepted: Research papers on all aspects of philosophy and theory of librarianship.10

Submission and review process: Authors should email their articles (in .doc, .rtf, or html format) to the editors. The editors encourage authors to query them prior to submitting an article.  The journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Lastly, authors should be aware that “all manuscripts are checked using Safe Assignment software before they are sent for peer review.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly.12

Style guide used: “Use MLA, APA, or any other style that embeds citations in the article, e.g., (Bolin, 2005), with a list of works cited at the end of the article. Do not use footnote or endnote citations. Please include links to any web resources that are mentioned.”13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Each issue of LPP covers an extensive variety of topics pertaining to applied research and the theory behind it. The sheer breadth of topics beneath the umbrella of applied LIS research, combined with the journal’s international scope (please see the “Audience analysis” section below) make this publication an excellent choice for new and seasoned LIS authors alike. Additionally, the journal’s flexibility regarding the style used (MLA, APA, etc.) make it an appealing choice for authors in both the humanities and scientific professions.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although circulation figures are unavailable, LPP’s papers have been downloaded almost three million times. Nearly 700,000 of these downloads occurred within the past year.14

Audience location: Although LPP is published in the U.S.15, it covers topics pertaining to specific libraries and information organizations all over the world. The map on the journal’s homepage shows that readers live in New Zealand, the U.S., Jamaica, and numerous countries in between.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are educated, have an MLIS, a PhD, or are currently studying in an information and library science program. They may be students yet to work in an information organization, librarians, directors of information organizations, researchers, etc.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: In general, it’s safe to assume that most readers will have extensive knowledge of LIS subject matter. However, as mentioned above, the articles vary widely, both in terms of content and complexity. Some articles are written in a less formal style while others are very scholarly, containing advanced language and foreign concepts that even a professional librarian might have trouble deciphering.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Due to the broad scope of this journal, authors should write to a specific group of people, rather than trying to please every reader. Articles tend to address very specific topics (e.g., “Information Seeking Behaviors of Journalists in North India”),19 so readers will expect authors to be experts on their chosen topic. Additionally, authors shouldn’t shy away from technical terms or library jargon, since they can safely assume that at least some of their readers will be familiar with it.

 

Last updated: March 5, 2018


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  2.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  3.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  4. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018, http://www.webpages.uidaho.edu/~mbolin/lpp.htm
  5. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  6.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  7.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  8. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  9. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  10. Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  11. Library Philosophy and Practice: Instructions for Authors,” University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  12.  Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  13.  “Library Philosophy and Practice: Instructions for Authors,” University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  14.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  15. Library Philosophy and Practice, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 5, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520296753644/266299
  16.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
  17. Mary Bolin, email message to author, September 16, 2008.
  18. Mary Bolin, email message to author, September 16, 2008.
  19.  Library Philosophy and Practice, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries, accessed March 5, 2018,  https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/libphilprac/
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Library Hi Tech (LHT)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Hi Tech

ISSN: 0737-88311

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Hi Tech (LHT) is concerned with technology-assisted information systems that support libraries & cultural memory, education & the academy, health & medicine, and government & citizenship. LHT covers the IT-enabled creation, curation, representation, communication, storage, retrieval, analysis, and use of records, documents, files, data, and learning objects.” 2

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/lht

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals, LIS researchers and lecturers, library senior management, as well as LIS students and academics.3

Publisher: Emerald Publishing Limited.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online,7 with access available as part of a paid subscription to Emerald Library Studies eJournals.8

Content: From their website, topics covered in the journal include articles about system quality and reliability, integrated library systems, networking, strategic planning, policy implementation, security, automation systems, the role of consortia, resource access initiatives, architecture and technology, electronic publishing, library tech in specific countries, user perspectives on technology, how technology can help disabled library users, and library-related websites.9

Frequency of publication: 14 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht

Types of contributions accepted: Original manuscripts/articles (research papers, viewpoints, technical papers, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews), 4000-8000 words, submitted in MS Word.11 See the Content details (above) for more info on Library Hi Tech topics.

Submission and review process: The Author Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions, including an Article Submission Checklist. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles which aren’t currently under review elsewhere. Authors are asked to create an account through ScholarOne Manuscripts and submit their manuscripts there. As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

According to a 2013 editorial, a Library Hi Tech manuscript takes up to 30 days to go through peer review, though authors can speed up the process by following the guidelines detailed within the editorial.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly/technical.14

Style guide used: Harvard style guide.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Hi Tech is a wonderful resource for staying abreast of the latest tech developments in the LIS world (sometimes even before these technologies become mainstream). LHT also has the distinction of being a journal affiliated with the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE),16 a respected organization which promotes “the integrity of the scholarly record through policies and practices that reflect the current best principles of transparency and integrity.”17 Additionally, the journal supports all of its findings with systematic research. For instance, a 2017 article on Apple and non-Apple smartwatches administered an online survey and found that “perceived product attributes” are an important factor in selecting one watch over the other.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Unavailable. Per the Library Hi Tech co-editor, the publication has “a worldwide audience with a strong focus in North America.”19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although written in English,20 the journal is international in scope, with members of the Editorial Board hailing from Germany, Australia, Canada, Ireland, the UK, South Korea, Spain, South Africa, and the USA.21 Submissions need to adhere to Worldwide English language rights.22

Reader characteristics: Subscribers, writers, and editorial staff are primarily LIS professional academics working in universities and are interested in LIS-based technology trends.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will likely be very knowledgeable about LIS subject matter in general, as well as LIS technologies specifically.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal are passionate about technology in the LIS workplace. They expect articles to present all findings objectively and methodically, in keeping with the journal’s strong research focus. Readers are likely to welcome articles about emerging technologies from an LIS student point of view, as well as case studies/examples of how technologies are used in classrooms (virtual or not), and in library communities.

Last updated: March 3, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  2. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  3. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  4.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  5. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  6. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  7. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  8. “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  9.  “Aims & Scope,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lht
  10. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  13. Elke Greifeneder, “30 Days to First Decision: Time Span in Library Hi Tech from Submission to First Decision,” Library Hi Tech 31, no. 1 (2013): 5-7, accessed March 2, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1108/07378831311310338
  14.  Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  15.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  16.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  17. “Core Practices,” Committee on Publication Ethics, accessed March 2, 2018, https://publicationethics.org/core-practices
  18.  Kuo-Lun Hsiao, “What Drives Smartwatch Adoption Intention? Comparing Apple and Non-Apple Watches,” Library Hi Tech 35, no. 1(2017): 186-206, accessed March 2, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1108/LHT-09-2016-0105
  19. Elke Greifeneder, email message to author, 2013.
  20. Library Hi Tech, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 2, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1520039985618/137737
  21. “Editorial team,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lht&
  22. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  23.  “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
  24. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 2, 2018, http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lht
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Journal of Web Librarianship (JWL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Web Librarianship (JWL)

ISSN: 1932-2909 (Print) and 1932-2917 (Online).1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, “The Journal of Web Librarianship is an international, peer-reviewed journal focused on all aspects of librarianship as practiced on the World Wide Web, including both existing and emerging roles and activities of information professionals.”2

Target audience: Information professionals (worldwide) interested in Web-based librarianship.3

Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: Hybrid: LIS scholarly journal and LIS professional news source. JWL is a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal which also publishes a significant number of professional articles. Taylor and Francis mentions that JWL “strives to find a balance between original, scholarly research, and practical communications.”6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The journal covers a wide variety of topics, including library website design and usability, strategies for cataloging web information, Web 2.0 technologies (i.e., wikis, RSS, etc.), search engines, and the future of web librarianship.8 Issues contain editorials, articles, professional communications, global connections, and reviews.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their site, “The Journal of Web Librarianship welcomes articles covering topics including but not limited to library web page design and redesigns, web project management, usability testing of library or library-related sites, cataloging or classification of Web information, international issues in web librarianship, library integration with other web sites, and future aspects of web librarianship. The journal is also interested in articles related to user behavior on the web, including search behaviors, social networking site trends, and the connection between the web-at-large and library web resources.”11

“The journal accepts empirical studies providing objective evidence related to current web-related challenges for libraries, including usability test reports, user survey results, and analyses of web statistics. The journal will also consider case studies of cutting-edge web projects in all types of libraries and best practices based on library experiences, literature, tutorials, and literature reviews.”12

Submission and review process: Work is submitted via the ScholarOne Manuscripts program and must be accompanied by a statement that the manuscript has not been published or submitted elsewhere. Articles should contain a 100 to 200-word abstract.13

Authors can expect JWL‘s double-blind peer review process to take anywhere from six to eight weeks. Additionally, two editors typically review each manuscript, adding an additional layer of objectivity.14

Editorial tone: Most manuscripts should have a scholarly, unbiased tone (e.g., scholarly research articles). Considering that the journal also publishes practical communications, it seems reasonable to assume that these non-scholarly communications should have a slightly more down-to-earth tone.15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JWL is a relatively new journal (its first issue was released in 2007),17, its credible and highly relevant information on “hot” topics in LIS make it an exciting and unique publishing opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and student authors. LIS practitioners could submit a case study on the practical application of a Web 2.0 technology in their workplace, while educators might conduct original research in the field of virtual librarianship. LIS students could submit an interview, an article describing an internship experience practiced in the Web environment, or an in-depth literature review (to name but a few options).

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although there is no detailed information available regarding the geographic location of JWL readers, a significant portion of the publication’s content is devoted to international issues. For example, many issues feature a “Global Connections” section, which has featured articles on Jamaica, Scotland, South Africa, and Egypt.18 Additionally, editors from all over the world serve on the Editorial Board.19 Thus, although the journal is published solely in American English, authors should limit their use of colloquialisms and specific cultural references.20

Reader characteristics: No demographic information is available for JWL readers. Since the journal is published in American English and is geared towards Web-based technologies, it seems safe to assume that most readers live in the U.S., work in information-based organizations, and are technologically inclined.21 In addition to information professionals of all types, LIS students are likely to be part of the journal’s core audience. Regardless of their profession, readers of JWL almost certainly share common professional interests, such as virtual library services or web design.22

JWL readers are likely to have established attitudes about the future direction of librarianship and might be considered progressive (especially in light of how articles in previous issues have enthusiastically advocated for new technologies and services).23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: JWL readers are likely to be knowledgeable about certain LIS jargon and subjects, such as those that specifically relate to technology and Internet use in librarianship.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because JWL is both a professional and scholarly journal, authors have multiple opportunities to reach readers. Whether an author decides to submit a theoretical research paper or a practical case study, it is important to focus the work on the highly specialized interests of JWL readers. As mentioned in the Publication Analysis, appropriate topics might include such issues as Web 2.0/Library 2.0, web design and usability testing, international or comparative issues in web librarianship, or the future of the profession. In order to connect with this audience, articles should demonstrate superior technological expertise and cutting-edge research.

Last updated: February 17, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wjwl20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  4.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  5. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  6.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Taylor and Francis, accessed February 16, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/jwl-cfp16
  7.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  9. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  10. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  15.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  17. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  18. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  19. “Editorial Board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7tDhbGdROg
  20. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  21. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  23. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  24. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 17, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
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LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research e-journal

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research e-journal

ISSN: 1058-6768

Website: https://www.libres-ejournal.info/

Purpose, objective, or mission: LIBRES, an international refereed e-journal, publishes research and scholarly articles in library and information science and services (LIS). “It has a particular focus on research in emerging areas of LIS, synthesis of LIS research areas, and on novel perspectives and conceptions that advance theory and practice.”1

Target audience: LIBRES is for information science professionals and librarians interested in all aspects of LIS research and scholarship, but especially in emerging areas, novel perspectives, and new understandings of LIS theory and practice.2

Publisher: LIBRES is jointly published by the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication & Information and the NTU Libraries at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. It was previously published by the Department of Information Studies at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia.3

Peer reviewed? At least two referees blind review each paper.4

Type:  LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: LIBRES is an online, open-access journal.

Content: This journal has three main sections, Research Papers, Synthesis & Perspectives, and Special Sections. The journal publishes research papers on studies that advance LIS, synthesis papers that survey areas of LIS for new or better understandings, and scholarly opinion or perspective papers that explore new conceptions of LIS.5 Each Special Section is devoted to papers from conferences from around the globe, promoting the journal’s commitment to regional LIS scholarship.6

Frequency of publication: Twice a year, in June and December.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Author Guidelines.

Types of contributions accepted: LIBRES accepts scholarly research, synthesis, and perspective papers on any aspect of LIS, especially in emerging areas or with novel conceptions that advance theory and practice. 8

Submission and review process: Submissions should be sent in Microsoft Word documents to the editor at LIBRESeditor@ntu.edu.sg. Submissions are usually reviewed within 60 days of receipt. Papers should not be under review or published elsewhere. “The reviews will pay particular attention to whether the papers are interesting, useful, thoughtful, and a significant contribution to knowledge in the LIS field.”9

Editorial tone: The journal uses a formal academic style. The journal’s official language is English, but the editor encourages submissions from developing countries and countries where English is not the native language; revision and editing for readability are part of the publication process.10

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIBRES is focused on new research and novel perspectives from the LIS international academic community. Authors can submit to either the Research Papers section or to the Synthesis & Perspectives section. The journal’s authorship is international, and it publishes articles from developed and developing countries; LIBRES takes “a nurturing attitude towards papers and authors,” and the editorial board provides “substantive guidance to the authors,” especially those who are not native English speakers.12 “In subject coverage, it has a particular strength in library/information service,” and it promotes worldwide regional LIS community scholarship by publishing conference papers.13 It publishes high-quality research, often on technology and service, from a many different countries, pushing LIS regional and international innovation forward.


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Data not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:  LIBRES is published in English and is international in scope,14 and the editorial board is especially interested in linking up with “regional LIS research communities worldwide.”15

Reader characteristics: The audience of LIBRES is LIS academics and professionals from around the world,16 and papers are published by authors from the United States, Mexico, Cuba, Qatar, India, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, and Malaysia, to name a few. The conference papers in the Special Sections expand its international scope in terms of research and readership.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a professional and scholarly understanding of LIS practice and research.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This scholarly journal’s readers will expect formal research and high-level syntheses. Topics for submission include current and emerging LIS research areas, emerging technology, and library service. For LIS professional and student researchers, LIBRES is a good place to research that investigates practices within library and information science environments and advances in new and emerging technology. For LIS scholars, LIBRES encourages synthesis papers that consider theory and practice in a new light and opinion and perspective pieces that explore new ideas in LIS.

Last updated: January 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “About LIBRES,” LIBRES, accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/about-libres/.
  2. “About LIBRES.”
  3. “About LIBRES.”
  4. “About LIBRES.”
  5. “Author Guidelines,” LIBRES, accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/author-guidelines/.
  6. For example, Special Section: Digital Curation Projects and Research in Asia, LIBRIS 26, no. 1 (2018), accessed January 26, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/all-issues/volume-26-issue-1/.
  7. “About LIBRES.”
  8. “Author Guidelines.”
  9. “Author Guidelines.”
  10. Chris Khoo, “Editorial,” LIBRIS 25, no. 1 (2015), accessed January 31, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/1621/.
  11. “Author Guidelines.”
  12. Chris Khoo, “Editorial,” LIBRIS 24, no. 1 (2014), accessed January 31, 2018, https://www.libres-ejournal.info/1369/.
  13. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
  14. “Author Guidelines.”
  15. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
  16. Khoo, “Editorial” (2014).
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Library Juice Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Library Juice Press

Website: http://libraryjuicepress.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Juice Press is an imprint of Litwin Books, “specializing in theoretical and practical issues in librarianship from a critical perspective, for an audience of professional librarians and students of library science.” They publish topics such as “library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and in general anything that can be placed under the rubric of ‘critical studies in librarianship.'”1

Target audience: Professional librarians and students of library science.”2

Owner: Litwin Books, LLC. 3

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. “Manuscripts submitted to us undergo a peer-review process to ensure their quality according to academic or professional standards, depending on the title.”4

Types of books published: LIS-specific books with a critical edge. Sample titles include:5

  • Feminists Among Us: Resistance and Advocacy in Library Leadership
  • Queer Library Alliance: Global Reflections and Imaginings
  • Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom
  • Where are the Librarians of Color? The Experiences of People of Color in Academica

Medium: Print.

Topics covered: Library philosophy, information policy, library activism, and any topics under the rubric of “critical studies in librarianship.” 6

Number of titles published per year: Approximately five.7

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://libraryjuicepress.com/authors.php 8

Types of submissions accepted: The publisher accepts book proposals and full manuscripts on topics that are within its editorial scope.9 

Submission and review process: The Authors page provides specific submission and manuscript formatting requirements, but the publisher’s formal review process is not outlined. More information can be found in the recorded webinar.10

Editorial tone: Academic.11

Style guide usedChicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Library Juice Press titles focus on theoretical investigations into library activism, social justice, feminist pedagogy, as well as practically oriented books like So You Want to Be a Librarian. The publisher produces serious, in-depth works with alternative perspectives.

A related and worthwhile opportunity to submit writing that is not book-length is Library Juice’s annual paper contest (2,000 to 10,000 words), which is designed “to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition.”13 The contest is open to librarians, library students, academics, and others. “Acceptable paper topics cover the full range of topics in the field of library and information studies, loosely defined. Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not essentially be the report of a study.”14

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published): Publishing since 2006, Library Juice Press has approximately 30 frontlist and backlist titles.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: While the publisher is based in California and books are published in English, recent Library Juice Press titles focus on international perspectives—i.e., academic librarian labor activism in Canada, and librarianship in the context of the Cuban revolution.16

Reader characteristics: Readers are interested in content that addresses: social responsibility; information as a public good; intellectual freedom and civil liberties; print culture, web culture, visual culture, and the meaning of literacy; information policy and ethics; and the state of the library profession (issues of identity, work life, and deprofessionalization).17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are “professional librarians and students of library science” who likely have a very strong knowledge of or strong interest in specific LIS subject areas.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Library Juice Press originated as a webzine and blog, covering “topics of interest to passionate librarians from a political left perspective that is linked to the fundamental values of the profession.”18 LIS authors seeking to publish works that are politically oriented or rooted outside the cultural mainstream may potentially find an audience through Library Juice Press.

Last updated: January 29, 2018


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” Litwin Books, LLC, http://litwinbooks.com/about.php.
  2. Litwin Books, LLC, accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com.
  3. “Litwin Books, LLC.”
  4. “About Us.”
  5. “Our Books,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 21, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/books.php.
  6. “About Us.”
  7. “Catalog,” Library Juice Press,  accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com/catalog.php.
  8. “Authors,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 21, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/authors.php.
  9. “Authors.”
  10. “Authors.”
  11. “About Us.”
  12. “Litwin Books Submission Guidelines,” Litwin Books, LLC, accessed September 21, 2015, http://litwinbooks.com/litwin-books-submission-guidelines.pdf.
  13. “Library Juice Annual Paper Contest,” Library Juice Press, accessed September 15, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/contest.php.
  14. “Library Juice Annual Paper Contest.”
  15. “Our Books.”
  16. “Our Books.”
  17. “Library Juice Blog,” last modified August 30, 2015, http://libraryjuicepress.com/blog/.
  18. “Library Juice Blog.”
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Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve

ISSN: 1072-303X (Print) and 1540-3572 (Online)1

Website: http://www.informaworld.com/wild

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve is dedicated to providing the latest and most current information about interlibrary loan and electronic reserves librarianship. It combines articles about practice and research.2

The journal also provides a forum for all cooperative library endeavors, including consortial purchasing and multilibrary digitization projects as well as more traditional resource sharing and supply services like interlibrary loan and reserves.3

In 2005, the name was changed from Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Information Supply to the current title to reflect the changing nature of the information world.4

Target audience: The journal is tailored towards librarians and staff who work in interlibrary loan and electronic reserve as well as administrators.5

Publisher: Routledge.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: This publication falls into a gray area. The content is peer reviewed, and although many articles are oriented toward practitioners, others are more research oriented. Overall, the publication could be categorized as an LIS scholarly publication. Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory categorizes it as scholarly and academic.8

Medium: Print and online.9

Content: The journal runs the gamut from practical to research articles. Sample subject matter includes the role of emerging technologies in interlibrary loan delivery, the use of inter-library loan statistics for acquisitions and collection development purposes, copyright issues, and interlibrary loan as a career specialization.10

Frequency of publication: 5 issues per year.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on innovations in interlibrary loan, document delivery, and research sharing. Scholarly articles usually adhere to the same format and generally contain an abstract, keywords, and a literature review.12

Submission and review process: This publication receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts website. Previously published and simultaneous publications are not accepted.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA).15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This journal is an excellent choice for LIS authors, especially those with a strong knowledge of interlibrary loan, electronic reserves, or access services in general. As Ulrich’s Global Serials Directory notes, “Interlibrary loan and document delivery is arguably the area of library service experiencing the most growth in the last several years. As libraries increasingly are unable to collect everything needed by their own users, the provision of materials through interlending or commercial document delivery has seen a phenomenal increase.”16 Consequently, LIS authors will find a wide audience when publishing with this journal, especially since it’s indexed in a number of prominent databases, including FRANCIS, LISA, ProQuest 5000, and many others.17

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not available.

Audience location: The primary audience for this publication is the United States, and–to a slightly lesser degree–other English-speaking countries such as Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. Most of the articles are geared towards library applications in North America. English language speakers comprise the majority of the audience.18 Many of the articles are predicated on the principles espoused by the ALA Interlibrary Code for the United States, which would mean the laws and standard practices of North American libraries are often given space in the journal.19 However, there is evidence that the audience is becoming more international, as evidenced by the inclusion of case studies from countries outside of North America.20

Reader characteristics: Most readers have a vested interest in the success of an interlibrary loan office. Often, readers are veteran staff members, but just as often, readers may be learning the tricks of the trade, as interlibrary loan can be very specialized. Additionally, many readers are librarians or administrators who are responsible for making the overarching decisions in an interlibrary loan office. The vast majority of readers are from the interlibrary loan or access services worlds. Paraprofessional staff comprise a large portion of the readership, as well as interlibrary loan department supervisors (mostly librarians). Finally, administrators have a vested interest in the scholarship of this subject, as they are most often the decision makers.21

Two issues frequently permeate this journal: the worth of interlibrary loan services and the issue of position in the interlibrary loan office. Interlibrary loan is often unknown or forgotten in many libraries, despite its enormous value to communities.  As for position, interlibrary loan offices must decide whether paraprofessionals or librarians should be in charge. There is a strong feeling that the position of ILL librarian is valuable and useful.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this publication are usually very knowledgeable about libraries, especially the specialized field of interlibrary loans. Civilians with little exposure to libraries, as well as staff outside of access service departments are, for the most part, outside this journal’s intended audience. Some of the articles meticulously detail the day-to-day work in interlibrary loan offices, even when the subject mater is more theoretical.23For example, in a past article, the issue of free document delivery is discussed. On the one hand, the article discussed the philosophical issues behind charging or not charging patrons, but on the other hand, the article goes into significant detail about the reality of providing articles for a large patron base.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because interlibrary loan and electronic reserves are very specialized fields within the library world, thorough knowledge of the subject is key. Additionally, the interlibrary loan community is very close-knit and collaborative by design. Potential authors need to be very aware of this community, and if they are not already part of it, become part of it.

Last updated: January 26, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wild20.
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  4.  Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  5. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  6. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  7. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  8. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  9. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  10. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg.
  11. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg.
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg.
  14. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg.
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wild20&page=instructions#.U78Fm7GdROg.
  16.  Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  17.  Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  18. Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Supply & Electronic Reserve, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed January 26, 2018,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/176666.
  19. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  20. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg.
  21. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  22. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg.
  23. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wild20#.U78FqLGdROg.
  24. “Publication History,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed January 26, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wild20#.U78INrGdROg.
Continue Reading

College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

ISSN: 1069-1316 (Print) and 1545-2530 (Online)1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”2

Target audience: Academic library staff3

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.6 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”7

Medium: Print and online8

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”11 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.12

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .13

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”14

Editorial tone: Academic15, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.16

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”18 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.19

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,20 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”21

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”22 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”23 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”25

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”26

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1.  College & Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/search/773306169
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  7. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  8.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  9. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  10. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  12. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  14. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  15. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  18. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  19. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  21. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  22. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  23. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  24. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  25. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  26. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Against the Grain

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

ISSN: 1043-20941

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

This website provides more than 3,500 pages with continuously updated content, including full-text access to articles from the print Against the Grain publication (access is limited to subscribers), along with a additional free, available, web-only content like breaking industry news, blog posts, job openings, conference announcements, and an online version of the popular “If Rumors Were Horses” column by editor Katina Strauch.2

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. It is a unique collection of reports on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals.”3

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.4

Publisher: Against the Grain.5

Peer reviewed? All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.6

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.7

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.8 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.9

Content: Articles. The ATG website also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.10

Frequency of publication: Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews and people profiles, Reviews, Legal Issues, International Dateline, Publishing, Bookselling and Vending, and Technology and Standards.12 Some issues have specific focuses, such as the December 2013/January 2014 issue, “eBook Platforms for Academic Librarians.”13 Articles should be approximately 2000 words, although the editors allow authors to make a piece as long or short as needed by their subject. They like a minimum of 200 dpi for charts and graphs and 300 dpi for photos.14

Submission and review process: Contact Leah Hinds at leah@katina.info or Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.15

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,16 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.17

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.19 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.20 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (ATG’s current editors are affiliated with College of Charleston or the Charleston Conference).22 Written in American English.23

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.24 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”25 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.26

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics0 and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

Last updated: April 20 2016


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1.  “About,” Against the Grain, LLC, accessed March 18, 2018, http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  2. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  3. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  4. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  5. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  6. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  7. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  8. Against the Grain. (2014). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  9. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  10. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  11. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  12. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  13. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  14. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  15. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  16. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  17. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  18. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  19. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  20. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  21. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  22. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  23. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  24. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  25. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  26. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  27. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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Journal of Community Informatics, The

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Journal of Community Informatics

ISSN: 1712-44411

Website: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Community Informatics (CI) is the study and the practice of enabling communities with Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs). CI seeks to work with communities towards the effective use of ICTs to improve their processes, achieve their objectives, overcome the “digital divides” that exist both within and between communities, and empower communities and citizens in the range of areas of ICT application including for health, cultural production, civic management, and e-governance, among others.”2

“CI is concerned with how ICT can be useful to the range of traditionally excluded populations and communities, and how it can support local economic development, social justice and political empowerment using the Internet.”3

Target audience: Readership spans a wide variety of disciplines: “community activists, nonprofit groups, policymakers, users/citizens, and the range of academics working across (and integrating) disciplines as diverse as Information Studies, Management, Computer Science, Social Work, Planning, and Development Studies.”4

Publisher: The Journal of Community Informatics5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: LIS scholarly7

Medium: Online8

Content: The journal includes a variety of “emerging issues within the CI field, includ(ing) community access to the internet, community information, online civic participation and community service delivery, community and local economic development, training networks, telework, social cohesion, learning, e-health and e-governance.”9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: As per the journal website: “The Journal of Community Informatics accepts the submission of articles on any topic within the field of CI and from any geographic location and including Internet-enabled multimedia. Submitted articles are evaluated on the basis of their contribution to the knowledge and practice CI and on methodology, theoretical and empirical contribution, and style.”11

As this is an open access journal that is available globally, “editors will seek to ensure that the content of the journal is also global in scope, encouraging the submission of articles from the developing world. Articles incorporating the use of the diverse range of Internet accessible media are also encouraged.”12 This journal publishes articles in multiple languages.13

Submission and review process: “The submission should be in a Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Rich Text Format (RTF), WordPerfect, or equivalent open source document file format. All identifying author information should be removed from the submission file. This includes any author names, affiliations, and/or other identifying information.”14

“For each article, the author must provide a 100-word abstract in English. As well, since the Journal is of interest to a multilingual community of scholars, we ask that the English abstract be followed where possible and depending on its subject matter, by additional abstracts in French, Spanish and/or Russian.”15

“Submitted articles will in general be reviewed by two external reviewers chosen for their knowledge in specific sub-areas of CI. . . . Our intention is to publish research as quickly as possible. Our electronic submission process is designed to facilitate rapid publication. Articles may at this time be submitted and will be peer reviewed in English, French, Spanish, and Russian. Abstracts in English must be provided for all articles.”16

Editorial tone: Academic17

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 5th edition18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Community Informatics provides an excellent forum for LIS authors interested in publishing scholarly articles related to the field of community informatics. Because of the global reach of this journal, and the specific policy of encouraging global and first-time authors,19, LIS graduate students and established professionals alike could potentially find a voice in this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As this is an open-access journal, circulation statistics are not available. However, The Journal of Community Informatics does keep statistics of abstract and article views. Readers are encouraged to register for the journal’s publishing notification service, which “allows the journal to claim a certain level of support or readership.”20

Journal total views since August 27, 2006:

  • Abstract views: 1,696,513
  • Article views: 3,308,26921

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As this journal serves a global audience, authors should avoid regional or culture-specific references. Articles are published in English, French, Spanish and Russian. Authors should be aware that readers may not be fluent in the language of submission, so should avoid LIS jargon. Since The Journal of Community Informatics is a scholarly journal, it is expected that the reader has knowledge and interest in the topic, and is most likely a professional.22

Reader characteristics: As per their site: “The Journal of Community Informatics speaks to a network of academics, CI practitioners and national and multi-lateral policy makers.”23 This is also a global readership that spans a multitude of cultures and languages.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have a general knowledge and interest in the issues surrounding the field of community informatics, but because this is journal reaches such a diverse cross-section of cultures, languages, and professions, their knowledge of LIS subject matter may be specialized or limited.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of the Journal of Community Informatics span a wide variety of cultures, languages and professions. What they have in common is an interest in the field of community informatics. From “academics, CI practioners and . . . policy makers”24, this is a passionate audience that is interested in serving local communities.25 The impact of an author on such a diverse audience is potentially great. As The Journal of Community Informatics is a free online publication, authors also benefit from a large global readership.

Last updated: May 14, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 11, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1523478909052/597635
  2. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  3. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  4. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  6.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  7.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  8.  The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  9. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  11. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  14. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  18. “Submissions,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  19. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. “Information for Readers,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/information/readers
  21. “Journal Statistics,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/reports/
  22. The Journal of Community Informatics, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1427060606843/597635
  23. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  24. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  25. “Editorial Policies,” The Journal of Community Informatics, accessed May 14, 2017, http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
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