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Library Connect Newsletter

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Connect Newsletter

ISSN: 1549-37331

Website: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Library Connect Newsletter covers library and information science best practices, issues, technology and trends. Library Connect is a global program from Elsevier for academic, medical, corporate and government librarians. .”2

Target audience: Academic, medical, corporate and government librarians. 3

Publisher: Elsevier, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Topics of interest to librarians, including LIS news, current issues in LIS, best practices, Elsevier news, and thoughts from leaders in the LIS field.8

Frequency of publication: 10 times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract

Types of contributions accepted: Interested in your experiences as an academic, corporate, medical or government librarian such as tactical or how-to articles, librarian roles, big ideas or strategies, community news, and how Elsevier products provide solutions.10

Submission and review process: Read the editorial guidelines and if your article fits, then email the editor at libraryconnect@elsevier.com with a short description for review and response.11

Editorial tone: Conversational and professional12

Style guide used: The Library Connect Newsletter evaluates submission based on their content, not form or language, and provides editing support to authors.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Library Connect Newsletter is a respected professional publication with a global audience. LIS practitioners, educators, and students are encouraged to submit work or story ideas here particularly for their targeted librarian groups. Editing support is available which makes it an ideal site for new writers.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: There are more than 50,000 subscribers in 175 countries to Library Connect webinars and the newsletter.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Publisher based in United States, publication has international audience and a review of the past issues finds articles written by information professionals from around the world.16

Reader characteristics: Library Connect Newsletter is read around the globe by academic, special and medical librarians “interested in library and information science best practices, issues, trends and events.” Readers are likely to be professionals in the field of library issues as well as Elsevier advocates.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to be familiar with general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors should avoid highly specialized topics and language.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors are advised to submit work of a practical nature, rather than overly scholarly content, as Library Connect Newsletter serves as forum for professional news and discussion.19

Last updated: March 16, 2020


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1.  Library Connect Newsletter, Elsevier, Inc., accessed March 16, 2020, https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/
  2. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  3. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  4. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  5. Elsevier Inc. (2020). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/submit-article-abstract
  6. Elsevier Inc. (2020). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  7. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  8. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  9. ProQuest. (2020). Library Connect. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412889236236/538496
  10. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  11. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  12. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Library Connect Newsletter – Print Archive. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/newsletters
  13. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  14. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
  15. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  16. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Library Connect Newsletter – Print Archive. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/newsletters
  17. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  18. Elsevier Inc. (2018). About Library Connect. Library Connect. Retrieved from http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/about-library-connect
  19. Elsevier Inc. (2018). Editorial Guide. Library Connect. Retrieved from https://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/editorial-guidelines
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ALCTS News

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALCTS News

ISSN: “ALCTS News is an official publication of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS), a division of the American Library Association. It replaced the ALCTS Newsletter Online (ISSN 1523-018X) in September 2013; that publication replaced the ALCTS Newsletter (ISSN 1047-949X) in December 1998.”1

 Website: http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/

Purpose, objective, or mission: ALCTS Newsletter Online is the official newsletter of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. The Newsletter is, from the ACLTS’ Publications & Resources: will “deliver critical information to ALCTS members and the broader library community in areas of expertise related to selecting, obtaining, preserving, and providing access to resources required by library users, and they establish ALCTS as the leading voice in these functional areas.” There are several different publications to contribute to through ALCTS. 2

The ALCTS, according to their bylaws, “…will provide its members, other ALA divisions and members, and the library information and community” with “leadership and a program for action on the access to, and identification, acquisition, description, organization, preservation, dissemination of information resources in a dynamic, collaborative environment.”3

Target audience: ALA members and members of ALCTS.4

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

TypeALCTS Newsletter is a LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Online, with an archive of past issues.8

Content: Information and news on topics for those involved in library collections and technical services as well as events, updates, practices and developments in the field. Newsletters typically include letters from the editor, ALCTS news, ALA news, and calls for papers from related journals. There are frequent announcements for web courses and workshops at various sites and online.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about

Types of contributions accepted: Per the submission guidelines, “The primary focus…is to report the news and activities of ALCTS and its members.11 The secondary focus is “reporting activities of interest to the membership relating to practice and developments in the fields of library collections and technical services.”12

Submission and review process: From the Author Guidelines: submit manuscripts in Word format, single spaced (double spaced between paragraphs), with no highlighting, special fonts, or text effect other than bold or italic. Do not use page numbers, headers, or footers. Submissions may be sent as email attachments to alctsnews@ala.org. Most articles and reports are about 300-500 words; longer articles will be considered on an individual basis.13

Editorial tone: Tone appropriate for a professional publication.14

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.)15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, there is a reasonable assumption that non-members are permitted to submit written materials for publication on the newsletter although members are probably preferred. There certainly is potential for LIS writers to expand the knowledge in the areas of library collections and technical services.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ALCTS, as of 2018, has a membership of 3209, according to ALA Membership Statistics.16 However, the newsletter is open to anyone with access to the internet.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALCTS is a division of ALA, with a majority of its members located in the United States and smaller numbers in as many as 42 countries.18 ALCTS Newsletter is published in English19 and is written primarily for American librarians. It is an informal newsletter written for a more general audience of librarians with less jargon or scholarly terminology.20

Reader characteristics: No specific information could be located; however, since a majority of Library Resources & Technical Services readers are members of ALCTS, their characteristics would be similar: the majority work in academic and public libraries.21 Most members of ALCTS are particularly interested in collections and technical services, such as acquisitions, cataloging, metadata, collection management, preservation, electronic and continuing resources.22 Readers of this newsletter will have established opinions on library issues but are generally more interested in seeking scheduling information on workshops, seminars, etc. There is not much opportunity in this newsletter for sharing opinions or biases; short essays relevant to ALCTS might provide an opportunity for sharing values and attitudes on technical services functions.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is a highly informed and educated audience of technical services and collections librarians. They will have a full knowledge of library issues relating to cataloging, collections, preservation, and all the encompassing technical jargon.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The readers of ALCTS Newsletter are interested in professional news. Authors would want to write short articles and reports relevant to ALCTS committee work, and other topics related to ALCTS, and have the skills necessary for writing book reviews on highly technical topics.

Last updated: March 15, 2020


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “About ALCTS News,” American Library Association, accessed March 15, 2020, http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  2. American Library Association. (2017). Publications & resources. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/resources
  3. American Library Association. (2017). Bylaws. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about/governance/bylaws#3
  4. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  5. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  6. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  7. American Library Association. (2014). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  9. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  10. American Library Association. (2017). ALCTS Newsletter Online: Index of Issues. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/ano/
  11. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  12. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  13. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  14. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  15. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  16. American Library Association. (2020). ALA’s Membership Statistics by Division, 2000-Present. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/divisionstats#alcts
  17. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  18. American Library Association. (2017). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
  19. SerialsSolutions. (2017). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  20. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  21. SerialsSolutions. (2014). ALCTS News. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401821270907/75249
  22. American Library Association. (2017). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
  23. American Library Association. (2017). About ALCTS News. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/about
  24. American Library Association. (2017). About Us. Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/alcts/about
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American Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Libraries

ISSN: 0002-9769 (Print) and 2163-5129 (Online)1

Website: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: American Libraries is “the flagship publication of the American Library Association,” dedicated to publishing news “about all matters of import to libraries and librarians.”2 Per the Editorial Policy, part of the ALA Policy Manual section 10.2: the editor is charged with “a particular responsibility to convey to the membership and other readers full and accurate information about the activities, purposes, and goals of the Association.”3

Target audience: ALA members, the majority of whom are professional librarians in the United States.4

Publisher: American Library Association (ALA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news magazine.7

Medium: American Libraries is a print publication, with occasional digital supplements. American Libraries Online is the online edition.8

Content: American Libraries “features articles on professional concerns and developments, along with news of the Association, library-related legislation, and libraries around the country and the world. Expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.” 9

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published 6 times per year, with a digital-only July/August issue and occasional digital supplements.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/

Types of contributions accepted: American Libraries solicits contributions of 600-1,500-word articles, including book reviews, features and opinion pieces on topics of general interest to members of the American Library Association. Letters to the editor are also accepted.11

Submission and review process: Manuscripts should be submitted via email to americanlibraries@ala.org. Hard copies may be mailed to American Libraries, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611. After submission, there may be “editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that in their opinion support the article’s focus. Editors will make every possible effort to review copy with the author prior to publication, especially regarding any proposed substantive changes.” Authors should hear back about their manuscripts within 4-8 weeks.12

Editorial tone: “Informal, but informative. Factual articles must be inviting and readable, with all statements backed by responsible research and interviews with several expert sources.” The editor encourages the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues.”13

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style (15th ed.).14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This 100+-year-old magazine is a well-respected publication with a wide audience. It would not be scholarly enough in tone to carry much weight for someone building up publications for tenure, but it is a credible, professional publication that provides a forum for practical information sharing among members of the LIS community. American Libraries publishes feature stories and opinion pieces as well as letters to the editor, and occasionally opportunities for columnists arise. Strong writers with appropriate story ideas should be encouraged to submit work here, whether they are LIS practitioners, educators, or students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Over 62,000 member organizations, individual members, and paid subscribers.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A geographic breakdown could not be found, though American Libraries does offer rates for the US, Canada, and International subscriptions.16 It is probably safe to assume that the majority of ALA members reside and work in the United States. American Libraries is published in English, and readers are likely to be completely comfortable communicating in English. However, overuse of regionalisms should be avoided to appeal to the diverse and widespread American audience.17

Reader characteristics: Because readers are usually members of the ALA, the vast majority work in a variety of libraries and have a high level of education.18 As librarians, these readers are likely to be interested in library topics and sympathetic to library issues. However, it is not safe to assume that readers are homogeneous in terms of how they believe problems should be solved. Letters to the editor and point-of-view pieces indicate that readers can be highly opinionated. The editorial policy states that the “expression of diverse viewpoints and critical interpretation of professional issues make the magazine the premier forum for the exchange of ideas.”19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are likely to know a lot about general library topics and issues. Still, the audience includes all types of librarians, so authors would want to avoid highly specialized topics and language. For example, public librarians may not be familiar with (or interested in) the particular jargon and issues of military librarians, and technology specialists may not be familiar with the jargon of catalogers.[19. American Libraries, “About.”

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because this is a professional rather than a scholarly publication, appropriate submissions would be practical rather than theoretical. Possibilities might include current topics in librarianship, or unique twists on topics of general interest to the broad LIS community such as management, advocacy, and general-interest technologies. American Libraries readers have in common a professional or personal interest in libraries, but the audience is large, and readers’ specialized interests will be quite diverse. For this magazine, general library topics would be appropriate — articles on things like library technology, marketing, or management, the kinds of topics that would be relevant to all librarians, no matter what kinds of libraries they worked in.

Authors could assume that American Libraries readers would understand general library language and that basic terms would not need to be explained (the editors of American Libraries, for example, assume that readers will understand ALA’s common acronyms, such as ACRL). However, authors should try to avoid the kinds of topics or jargon that might be related to a specific library environment or aspect of librarianship, such as academic libraries or cataloging. Articles on highly specific topics or for particular ALA subgroups would be better directed toward the publications of the related ALA divisions, such as College and Research Libraries News or Children and Libraries.

Last updated: June 30, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “American Libraries,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 30, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561931025099/41722
  2. American Library Association, “About,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/about/
  3. American Libraries, “About.”
  4. American Libraries, “Advertising,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/advertising-2/
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. American Libraries, “About.”
  9. American Libraries, “Submissions,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/submissions/ 
  10. American Libraries, “About.”
  11. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  12. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  13. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  14. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
  15. American Libraries, “Advertising.”
  16. American Libraries, “Subscriptions,” accessed June 30, 2019, https://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/subscriptions/
  17. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  18. American Libraries, “About.”
  19. American Libraries, “Submissions.”
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Marketing Library Services

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Marketing Library Services

ISSN: 0896-39081

Website: www.MarketingLibraryServices.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Marketing Library Services (MLS) emerged in 1987 and is the longest-running publication that regularly delivers how-to articles and case studies for marketers in all types of libraries. They’re written by practitioners from around the world and curated by a respected expert who has 25+ years in the field. These detailed, vetted articles deliver more value than the brief ideas and advice offered via social media.2

Target audience: Information professionals in any type of library who need to learn to do better marketing, promotion, and advocacy.3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: MLS covers strategies and tactics for all marketing-related topics: advocacy, outreach, branding, segmentation, social media, funding initiatives, long-term campaigns, assessment, ROI, partnerships, promotional materials, program publicity, communications, PR, advertising, etc. Subscribers will also benefit from interviews with marketing masters, conference coverage, book reviews, and news.8

Frequency of publication: Six times a year (January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December).9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: The editor of Marketing Library Services, Kathy Dempsey, does not accept blind submissions; instead, it is preferable to email her first (see Editor below) with an article idea, so that she can see if it fits in with upcoming issues, or whether or not something similar has already been published. In a personal correspondence she asserts that if the topic is something useful to Marketing Library Services readership, she will send the author a desired length and deadline. Writers will be sent guidelines, and all graphics (photos, charts, etc.) must be in color and high resolution.10

The site itself says very little about submissions. Editorial communications should be directed to the editor, Kathy Dempsey, at kdempsey@infotoday.com.11

Types of contributions accepted: From a correspondence with the editor: “Marketing Library Services covers a wide range of marketing-related topics, including these: advocacy, outreach, programming, fundraising, event planning, dealing with the media, getting votes for library issues, proving your value, making good promotional materials, community promotion, online promotion, winning related awards, studying demographics for target marketing, innovations, surveys and focus groups, strategic communication, etc. And, of course, true marketing (plans for full campaigns).” Also, “in addition to the case studies, Marketing Library Services carries news, reviews of books and videos, conference coverage, and links to library articles and culture.” 12

Submission and review process: Authors first should send correspondence to Kathy Dempsey stating their idea. Because Marketing Library Services is published often, timely articles are strongly recommended. Also, authors must have been directly involved in the projects they are writing about, and must write in the first person. Ms. Dempsey states that authors’ specific titles do not matter.13

Editorial tone: Marketing Library Services should not be written in third-person or academic tones. The newsletter’s tone is conversational, professional, and should inspire readers. According to the editor, “Articles should be written as if you’€™re sitting down with a colleague and explaining your project over lunch.”14

The editor will correspond with the author about this after the author’s idea has been accepted.15

Style guide used: Associated Press.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Marketing Library Services is a very good resource for LIS authors interested in writing on community outreach and marketing of library services. Many topics can fall under this umbrella, so it is important for potential authors to be creative and open in how they frame their content.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Marketing Library Services has 700 subscribers. Most of these are in North America, but some are in Europe and in other English-speaking countries.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Because the content of the newsletter is in English and about a broad topic (marketing), the geographic location of the newsletter’s readership is assumed to reside across the United States. There are some readers from outside the United States, but because marketing can be culturally specific, those readers are likely already doing the work of cultural translation. English is used entirely throughout Marketing Library Services and, for the most part, readers are American or from Europe.18 Because of this spread, colloquialisms should be avoided (as in most professional writing).

Reader characteristics: According to Kathy Dempsey, the editor, most of the readership is comprised of librarians who market for their organization, while others are managers and directors. She also states that some are professors specializing in marketing. Because Marketing Library Services readership is comprised of professionals directly involved in marketing, it may be safely assumed that jargon specific to marketing is fine. As well, because this is a trade journal, readers will be interested in practical information. Kathy Dempsey states from a personal correspondence that, “MLS is written for a wide horizontal market that covers all types of libraries: public, academic, special (medical, gov’€™t, etc.), corporate, and to a lesser extent, K-12 school. It welcomes article queries from all of these librarians. What they all have in common is the need to promote their services. Many case studies about how one lib accomplished a goal can be used as models to doing similar things in other types of libraries. Articles on projects that have this ability to be widely replicated are especially valuable.”19

Readers of Marketing Library Services work in many types of libraries, so it may be safely assumed that they all value libraries’ continuing prosperity. That said, this does not mean that their values are identical. However, the newsletter’s tone is conversational, not argumentative. Articles written arguing strongly for one thing or another probably will not fit in Marketing Library Services.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Marketing Library Services is a newsletter informing LIS professionals the best practices and valuable ideas regarding LIS marketing. Professionals reading this newsletter are looking for good ideas and solidly practical plans and instances of good marketing. Marketing Library Services is not a dry tome of theoretical research written in an hermetic tone. Nonetheless, most of the readers are deeply engaged with marketing their organization, and are working professionals whose time and attention is valuable. Writers should consider their readers as interested colleagues who are deeply interested in successful programs and campaigns, and how they may learn from writers’ experiences and implement similar strategies in their own organizations.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Proquest, “MLS: Marketing Library Services,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521418800307/153039
  2. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Marketing Library Services,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/
  3. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  8. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  9. Information Today, Inc., “Marketing Library Services.”
  10. Dempsey, K., 27 June 2019, personal communication.
  11. Information Today, Inc., 2019, “Subscription & Editorial Info,” http://www.infotoday.com/mls/mls-subs.shtml
  12. Dempsey, personal communication.
  13. Dempsey, personal communication.
  14. Dempsey, personal communication.
  15. Dempsey, personal communication.
  16. Dempsey, personal communication.
  17. Dempsey, personal communication.
  18. Dempsey, personal communication.
  19. Dempsey, personal communication.
  20. Dempsey, personal communication.

    Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this newsletter have a high degree of LIS subject matter. Marketing Library Services caters to the LIS profession, so references to library specific trends, ideas, and concepts will be well received and will not require a high degree of explanation. However, because the readership is broadly based across the LIS professional spectrum some terms and knowledge specific to one group may not be appropriate for all readers.[21. Dempsey, personal communication.

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Library Journal

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Journal (LJ)

ISSN: 0363-02771

Website: http://www.libraryjournal.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This journal is produced as a trade publication with the intent to provide library news and related information. Although the emphasis of the journal is on public libraries, the journal contains information pertinent to a wide variety of professionals in the library world. Library Journal also provides reviews of books, ebooks, audiobooks, DVDs/videos, and other media annual to assist library professionals in purchasing for their institution. The mission of the journal is to provide feature articles and news stories which inform library professionals about current issues in a readable style.2

Target audience: The target audience is composed of librarians in public, academic, and special libraries, as well as library administrators, staff, and directors.3

Publisher:  Media Source, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news. Library Journal is a non-research-oriented LIS professional news journal that includes advertising, bibliographies, illustrations, and book reviews.6

Medium: Library Journal is a print publication with free online content. Online archives are free, though they do not necessarily contain everything that is in the print edition.7 You can also subscribe to LJ’s RSS feeds and follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.8 The online version of Library Journal also includes blogs, podcasts and message boards, links to affiliated newsletters, and tools to assist in collection development and other areas of library administration.9

Content: Library Journal content includes news, reviews, LJ bestsellers, commentary, departments, info-tech, special reports, letters to the editor, upcoming events, classified ads, and photos.10 Library Journal evaluates over 8,000 books annually and also provides reviews of library-related equipment and materials.11

Frequency of publication: The print publication is issued 12 times a year.12 Online content is updated continuously.13 Reviews are also welcomed, though review contributors are expected to regularly write, rather than simply submitting one review.14

Submission and review process: Submissions to the Features and Columns sections should be 2 to 4 pages in a magazine, or 1800 to 2700 words. Finalized drafts can be sent as an attachment along with a query describing the coverage and approach of the article as well as the writer’€™s connection to the subject and his or her expertise. The query can be a paragraph or several paragraphs in length. Response to queries may take between 4 to 6 weeks. LJ also accepts opinion pieces and rants about topics and concerns in the library profession for its “BackTalk” . Pieces should be in the range of 900 words. Be sure to email the appropriate editor for the type of content being submitted.15

Book reviewer guidelines for contracted and unpaid review writers can be found here.16

Editorial tone: As this publication is aimed at the general librarian population, the tone of articles should be objective as well as thought-provoking while providing topical and useful information. Articles should be written in an “accessible and readable style.”17

Style guide used: No particular style guide is indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

A trusted and respected publication for the library community, Library Journal certainly has the potential for an LIS author to reach a wide audience. Since the journal reaches out to public, academic, and special libraries, there are a multitude of articles that could possibly be written for this publication.

Library Journal is open to ideas for articles and columns, and also encourages “opinion pieces and rants.”18 Library Journal prefers an approach that is widely accessible by its readers.19 There is therefore great potential for newer writers who are not necessarily comfortable with a more scholarly voice. There is also a market here for librarians to offer insight and advice on practical issues facing contemporary libraries. This is a wonderful opportunity for librarians (including those who may not consider themselves to be professional authors) to share their real-world experience with others.

Library Journal Reviews+ is a popular selection tool used in public and academic libraries, and an ongoing opportunity exists here to publish reviews in a wide range of disciplines. Reviewers are not required to have previously published reviews.20 This would be an excellent opportunity for library students with graduate degrees in other areas to review books in their specialty and begin to publish in the LIS field.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Library Journal is distributed to 43,000 print subscribers, and its online equivalent registers over 91,000 monthly visits. The publication is also popular on social media, with over half a million followers across various social media platforms, on which journal content is shared.21

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: LJ is printed in English, and most articles focus on topics affecting libraries in the United States. A scan of recent article titles reveals an editorial comfort with acronyms specific to the American context, such as CIA, ALA, and NYPL.22 However, authors should remain sensitive to the possibility of diverse readership, since cultural diversity and international issues are embraced by the publication, as demonstrated by recent articles on Indigenous Academic Libraries, Spanish-language collection development, and inclusion in scholarly publishing.23

Reader characteristics: Because the audience largely consists of librarians and library staff, readers are likely to be both interested in and sympathetic to library issues. They are also likely to share common values and beliefs about the role and importance of librarianship.24 The readership is large,25 however, and likely diverse in their particular perspectives on library issues.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter:  Library Journal is read by people all across the library profession, so a working knowledge of library terms can be assumed, but authors should be aware that members of their audience may not have MLIS degrees.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Library Journal include library directors, administrators, and staff in all types of libraries. An article written for this publication has the potential to reach and influence people across the library field, nationally and even internationally. Authors should remain aware that their readers are familiar with both the current highest standards of librarianship, yet also the practical difficulties that come with working in the field. It is recommended to aim for a broad reach, even when writing about an issue specific to one kind of library, so that readers from all types of libraries can gather ideas or inspiration from each article.

Last updated: June 29, 2019


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Library Journal,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521665093762/48829
  2. Library Journal, “About Us,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=About-Us.
  3. Library Journals, “About Us.”
  4. Media Source, Inc., “Media Source Inc.,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://mediasourceinc.com/
  5. Library Journal, “Submissions,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news.
  6. Library Journal, “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com
  7. Library Journal, “Reviews+,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=Reviews%2B
  8. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  9. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  10. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”
  11. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal,” accessed June 29, 2019, http://media.libraryjournal.com/library-journal/.
  12. Library Journal, “Subscribe to Library Journal, accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=subscribe.
  13. Library Journal, “Library Journal.”

    About the publication’s submission guidelines

    Location of submission guidelines: For articles: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=submit-features-news. For reviews: https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ

    Types of contributions accepted: Feature articles that are broad in scope and/or offer useful information and ideas. The journal also accepts news pieces, announcements, photos of library-related news and events, letters to the editor, and opinion pieces.[14. Library Journal, “Submissions.”

  14. Library Journal, “Review for LJ,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?page=Review-for-LJ.
  15. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  16. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  17. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  18. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  19. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
  20. Library Journal, “Review for LJ.”
  21. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  22. Library Journal, “News,” accessed June 29, 2019, https://www.libraryjournal.com/?subpage=News
  23. Library Journal, “News.”
  24. Library Journal, “About Us.”
  25. Media Source, Inc., “Library Journal.”
  26. Library Journal, “Submissions.”
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College & Research Libraries News

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Research Libraries News

ISSN: 0099-0086 (Print) and 2150-6698 (Online)1

Website: http://crln.acrl.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: C&RL News “provides articles on the latest trends and practices affecting academic and research libraries and serves as the official newsmagazine and publication of record of the Association of College and Research Libraries.”2

Target audience: Members of the ACRL.3

Publisher: Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news magazine.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Per their website, “College & Research Libraries News (C&RL News) publishes articles, reports, and essays written by practitioners addressing philosophy and techniques of day-to-day management of academic library services and collections. C&RL News provides current information relating to issues, activities, and personalities of the higher education and academic and research library field. Information literacy, scholarly communication, technology, professional education, preservation, government actions that affect libraries, acquisitions, grants to libraries, product updates, and the business of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) are covered in C&RL News.”8

Frequency of publication: 11 monthly issues.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Articles, essays, and reports.10

Submission and review process: Manuscripts must be submitted to the editor via email. Only original manuscripts that have not been published will be accepted, however, exception may be given to previous items published in other institutional newsletters. Submission length depends on type: “News notes may be 150-350 words; essays for “The Way I See It” should be 750-1,000 words; feature articles (Scholarly Communication, ACRL Techconnect, and Internet Resources) should be no more than 2,000 words.” Footnotes, charts and tables should be minimal; graphics should be included with submission. The author is responsible for obtaining permission for the use of any graphics. Please provide a brief caption and credit (if needed) for all images.11 Authors should consult past issues and the author guidelines for instructions on writing for specific columns.

Editorial tone: Practical, accurate, informative, and informal. Even humorous essays are welcomed.12

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed.13

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing with C&RL News provides a strong foundation for both an author’s portfolio, in addition to allowing the author to be involved in a LIS association. Authors are not required to become ACRL members to publish with C&RL News; however, ACRL offers a variety of publication tools and resources, including wikis and other forums for information sharing that is important to the professional development of librarians, and LIS authors. C&RL News provides new LIS authors the potential to build their writing portfolio within a supportive, field-specific environment.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The largest division of the ALA, the ACRL claims a membership of over 10,000.15 Since these members receive automatic subscriptions to the C&RL News, this would be a certain count towards the circulation. However, nonmembers can also subscribe to the publication, and the latest circulation total notes the total circulation count at 14,000. Aside from members and nonmember single subscriptions, there may also be subscriptions by other libraries or related groups (educators) that may have an interest in receiving this publication.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: As the ACRL is a division of the American Library Association, the publication is geared towards academic and research libraries in America. However, the subscription information provides rates specific to subscriptions to Canada, Postal Union of the Americas and Spain (PUAS) countries, and all other countries.17 The publication is printed in English and serves as the official news outlet for a US-based organization, so cultural considerations do not seem to expand beyond the U.S. However, some columns may include international websites and stories on librarianship in other countries18 which demonstrate an awareness of how library trends and practices in other countries can affect U.S. librarianship.

Reader characteristics: The audience of C&RL News is comprised of members of the ACRL, who are professional librarians, staff, administrators, directors, educators in LIS, and students. Nearly all members report affiliation with universities or colleges, with almost half belonging to large research or doctoral-granting universities. The smallest reported group of subscribers is those affiliated with two-year or technical colleges, who comprise 11% of the current membership.19 Readers are used to the publication’s inclusion of more personal insights into individual experiences and humorous anecdotes, and are therefore likely to be open to new perspectives.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As the ACRL is a professional association of academic librarians and individuals with interest in academic librarianship, an advanced and specific knowledge of LIS subject matter can be assumed. Readers will not want definitions and descriptions of issues that they are familiar with; this audience expects to be informed on the current news, trends, and practices in academic and research libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This publication’s readers are involved in their libraries, their institutions, the academic library community, and the academic community itself. Though not a scholarly publication, informal research exploring best practices and methods for improving services is a sure way to maintain readers’ attention. From archives to community college public services, any essay on a specific topic within the academic library field could offer readers the opportunity to apply the author’s findings to their own institutions. However, authors should keep in mind that readers have diverse experiences. Staff members at technical colleges may be more interested in new resources on serving local communities, whereas administrators at research universities may have a greater interest in international trends. Whatever the chosen topic, authors should be sure to write from experience and with the confidence of expertise.

Last updated: June 29, 2019.


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “College & Research Libraries News,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 29, 2019. http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1561866753201/119300
  2. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/pages/view/about
  3. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  4. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  5.  Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  6. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  7. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0.
  8. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  9. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies.”
  10. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions.”
  11. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  12. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  13. Association of College and Research Libraries, Submissions.
  14. Association of College and Research Libraries, “About C&RL News.”
  15. American Library Association, “About ACRL,” Association of College & Research Libraries, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl.
  16. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2018-2019 Media Planning Guide, accessed June 29, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/ACRL_MediaKit19.pdf.
  17. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Editorial Policies.”
  18. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Past Issues,” College & Research Libraries News, accessed June 29, 2019, https://crln.acrl.org/index.php/crlnews/issue/archive.
  19. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2018-2019 Media Planning Guide.
  20. Association of College and Research Libraries, “Submissions.”
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Library Leadership and Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Leadership and Management (formerly Library Administration and Management)

ISSN: 1945-8851 (Print) and 1945-886X (Online)1

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, “Library Leadership & Management (LL&M) is the official journal of the Library Leadership and Management Association. LL&M focuses on assisting library administrators and managers at all levels as they deal with day-to-day challenges. In-depth articles address a wide variety of management issues and highlight examples of successful management methods used in libraries. Features include interviews with prominent practitioners in libraries and related fields, and columns with practical advice on managing libraries.”2

Website: http://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm

Target audience: The publication is directed toward library administrators and managers in all sectors, including public, special and academic libraries.3

Publisher: American Library Association.4

Peer reviewed? Hybrid journal: “LL&M offers both formal peer review and editorial review options depending on the author’s preference.”5

Type: LIS professional news.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Research-based articles, interviews, new developments and success stories related to managing libraries. Specific topics relate to management, leadership, and administration.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Per guidelines, “Recognizing the LLAMA is a diverse organization, Library Leadership & Management (LL&M) welcomes articles that correspond to the interests of the membership. This includes manuscripts that relate to leadership, management, and administration, as well as manuscripts that mirror the topical interests of the sections and discussion groups.”10

“The journal accepts both longer, in-depth manuscripts of 4,000 to 6,000 words and briefer practice-based articles of 1,000 to 2,500 words. Manuscripts longer than 6,000 words should be discussed with the Editor(s) prior to submission as there may be interest in converting it into a series of articles.”11

Submission and review process: Article submission is through their online portal. Review process depends on author’s preference: editorial or peer review.12

Editorial tone: Informative.13

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style and Random House Webster’s College Dictionary are listed as resources for writers.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Authors able to write on the topics associated with library administration and management would be a good fit for this publication. Recent articles focused on job satisfaction and employee turnover, diversity, innovative space planning, award winners, and customer satisfaction.15 The editors will consider articles presented at conferences, making this publication a possibility for LIS graduate students.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is an online publication with Open Access Policy providing unrestricted access to published content indicating a larger audience beyond the LLAMA membership.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although headquartered in Chicago as part of the American Library Association,17 LLAMA and its membership is national in scope. The articles are domestic in nature, and the LLAMA Board of Directors all are from U.S. institutions.18 The publication is printed in English.19 Despite the fact that many LLAMA members manage libraries in ethnically diverse communities, the articles in the journal focus on general management issues that all administrators face, such as strategic planning, fundraising, library boards, and internet ethics, not community-specific issues.20

Reader characteristics: The commonality of LLAMA members is that they are at a managerial level within a library organization. It can be assumed that the majority of LLAMA members have been in the library business for a number of years, however no demographics are available. Unless they are a one-person operation (which could be the case for a school librarian), they hold supervisory roles within their organizations. Their interests are based on financial, human resource, building, and legal and ethical issues as they affect the success of their particular organizations. They are concerned with strategic planning, disaster planning, and facility planning.21 In looking over the editorials from recent issues, the overall value that can be attached to this journal would be one of empowerment. The content seeks to provide library managers with the tools needed to develop successful organizations out of preparedness rather than reactionary responses to a crisis.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Despite the fact that these are library managers, they may or may not have MLIS degrees, as some library managers followed business, not library, career tracks.23 Recent articles did not contain overly technical topics or LIS jargon, veering more toward business concepts.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The audience is more specific than €™American Libraries€™, which is directed toward all library personnel. In contrast, LL&M is designed for library managers and administrators. This could be an opportunity or a challenge for a writer. Things such as negotiating with a vendor, ergonomic work stations, and staff development are matters of concern to nearly any organization manager. Topics such as working with a library board, dealing with book challenges, and internet filters are problems that are specific to library management. But both categories have a place in this publication and therefore open up a host of possibilities for articles. However, these readers, as organization managers, most likely have very limited time to pursue professional reading. Authors for the journal need to be on top of the issues at the forefront of the managers’€™ daily lives in order to offer something new to say that is of value.

Last updated: June 12, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “Library Leadership and Management,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 12, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560362802779/67509
  2. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm
  3. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management.”
  4. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Library Leadership & Management.”
  5. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Information for Authors,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/information/authors
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Information for Authors.”
  9. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  10. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions,” accessed June 12, 2019 https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  11. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  12. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  13. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  14. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Submissions.”
  15. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives,” accessed June 12, 2019, https://journals.tdl.org/llm/index.php/llm/issue/archive
  16. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
  17. Library Leadership and Management Association, Library Leadership & Management.
  18. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA,” accessed June 12, 2019, http://www.ala.org/llama/about
  19. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  20. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
  21. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA.”
  22. American Library Association, “Archives.”
  23. Library Leadership and Management Association, “About LLAMA.”
  24. Library Leadership and Management Association, “Archives.”
Continue Reading

CLS Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CLS Newsletter

ISSN: 0887-35501

Website: www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/sections/cls/clswebsite/collpubs/clsnewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: This is a newsletter produced by the College Libraries Section (CLS) of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL), which in turn is a division of the American Library Association (ALA). Its purpose is to provide information concerning the affairs of the CLS and ACRL to its members as well as to promote a sense of community among its members by publishing light, short articles dealing with experiences of working in academic libraries.2

Target audience: The newsletter is aimed at the general college librarian and provides information on the everyday activities of the CLS and ACRL. As such, it probably would not be of interest to a lay audience.3

Publisher: Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), College Libraries Section (CLS).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional. The newsletter is similar to other types of short, organizational communications meant for a general membership. It is unpretentious and full of very short pieces.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: The issues feature CLS and ACRL housekeeping pieces dealing with meetings, conferences, announcements, conventions, political issues, and promotions as well as human-interest pieces on librarians that work in academic libraries.8

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Articles and suggestions may be submitted to the editor directly via email.10

Types of contributions accepted: All types of submissions are considered with an emphasis on CLS related professional announcements and events.11

Submission and review process: All decisions are made by the editor who, from the content of past issues, is very flexible in what is accepted for publication as long as it is not too long and deals with CLS members or events.12

Editorial tone: Very informal with a simple prose style.13

Style guide used: There is no style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For a new author, these types of professional newsletters are gateway publications. These small publications are usually hungry for material and, though they do not usually pay, if the piece is not too long and is firmly down to earth it will probably be published.

The meat and potatoes of these types of newsletters are announcements of one sort or another along with scheduling and convention information pertaining to the organization itself. The short human-interest type pieces on librarians and the academic libraries where they work are usually used for filler and so the shorter and more concise they are the better.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of August 2015, CLS had 2,533 members which is a fine indicator of circulation because the newsletter is sent to all members.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: CLS Newsletter does not focus on any particular region though it does concern itself with college-level librarianship within the United States. The majority of the newsletter deals with giving kudos to various hard-working librarians within the CLS community and so there is no regionalism present. All college libraries and college librarians from coast to coast are treated equally. Articles are to be written in clear English. As this is not a scholarly work and is really meant to be a house organ for the leadership of the CLS and, by extension, ACRL, the purpose is to communicate the internal housekeeping information of the College Libraries Section and recognize the accomplishments of its members. Because of this, the use of jargon is not detrimental though obscure, local usage might need to be clarified.16

Reader characteristics: Based on a reading of several sample copies, the general readership can be assumed to consist of professionally active, middle-aged, Caucasian, and female academic librarians who work in baccalaureate-level, four-year schools. Of course, males are represented, but females still dominate the profession. The newsletter tries very hard to steer a middle course promoting the efforts of college librarians at all times.17

The four-year college library experience is what binds the members of the CLS together. The experiences of end-of-term reserves, interlibrary loan problems and meeting the needs of demanding faculty are what flavors their relationships with each other and illustrate their successes. Most of the readers will be reference librarians or lower-level administrative librarians who are settled into their career paths; though the occasional library director of the smaller libraries might find something of interest in the newsletter.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all professionals who have a strong grasp of their profession. The readers are interested enough in their career to have joined these organizations and so are relatively well informed on the new trends emerging in the profession such as blogging, and patron-centered services that would directly affect their work.19

Conclusion: Reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The one thing that must be kept in mind concerning the readers of this newsletter is that they are all dedicated to the profession of academic librarianship and that they are reading the newsletter to keep up on the current events of the College Library Section and the Association of College and Research Libraries. A popular feature is the kudos of various librarians throughout the country who have been awarded some honor or achieved some success. Also the occasional tidbit of gossip or library anecdote is found in the newsletter.20

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. ProQuest, “CLS Newsletter,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed June 11, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1557276839438/480566
  2. American Library Association, “About CLS,” Association of College & Research Libraries, College Libraries Section, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/sections/cls/aboutcls
  3. American Library Association, “About CLS.”
  4. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter,” Association of College & Research Libraries, College Libraries Section, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/sections/cls/clswebsite/collpubs/clsnewsletter
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  7. American Library Association, “About CLS.”
  8. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  9. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  10. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  11. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  12. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  13. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  14. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  15. American Library Association, “Manual of the College Libraries Section of the ACRL,” Association of College & Research Libraries, College Libraries Section, accessed June 11, 2019, http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/acrlsections/cls/CLS%20Manual%202017.pdf
  16. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  17. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
  18. American Library Association, “About CLS.”
  19. American Library Association, “About CLS.”
  20. American Library Association, “CLS Newsletter.”
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CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://cclibrarians.org/outlook/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œThe purpose of the Council of Chief Librarians is to represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education; to provide a vehicle for communication, discussion and collaboration among libraries; to provide opportunities for professional development, training and leadership development for library leaders and other librarians; and to support data collection, analysis and dissemination for the purpose of good public policy development.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines

Types of contributions accepted: News items about events and open positions should be less than 300 words. Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (500-1,500 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.10

Submission and review process: Articles may be submitted through the CCL website. The editorial team will revise for grammar, spelling, formatting, and style.11

Editorial tone: Per the website, “Succinct, inviting and informative style of writing is preferred.” The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.12

Style guide used: There is no style guide listed, but the editorial guidelines state that endnote citations should be in accordance with the current edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of librarians, library managers, and library deans, to whom it is sent electronically.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.15

Reader characteristics: While no information is available concerning their ages, members are all supervising librarians and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.16

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be library leadership, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.19

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: June 11, 2019


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/organization
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. “Home,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/editorial-guidelines
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/newsletter/outlook-archive
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Editorial Guidelines.”
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Home.”
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Mailing List Information,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/about-us/mailing-list-information
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory,” accessed June 11, 2019, https://cclibrarians.org/directory
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Directory.”
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Organization.”
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges, “Outlook Archive.”
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CARL Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CARL Newsletter

ISSN: 1090-99821

Website: http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/index.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: CARL is the official publication of California Academic & Research Libraries.2 The goal of California Academic & Research Libraries is to support professional growth opportunities for its members.3

Target audience: The newsletter is a benefit of membership and per their website, membership is open to “any person interested in academic or research librarianship or in academic or research libraries in California.”4

Publisher: California Academic and Research Libraries.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.8

Content: News related to professional workshops and CARL business.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/

Types of contributions accepted: Per their website, “Announcements of awards, publications, presentations, retirements and relevant professional accomplishments are limited to CARL members. News of professional appointments are welcome from any member library.”11

Submission and review process: E-mail the editor or send column information to the campus liaison coordinator.12

Editorial tone: Informational.13

Style guide used: No particular style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Publishing opportunities for first time LIS contributors are excellent if you are willing to network and attend workshops of interest to California academic librarians. The editor requests that “interest group” coordinators designate a notetaker during its programs. The newsletter will then publish the workshop or program notes. An “interest group” is one of many associations which are members of CARL and who promote through the newsletter when they sponsor a professional growth opportunity workshop.14

The SJSU SLIS Administration listserv often posts calls for volunteers for such events. The contact person designated in these postings can then be contacted. An arrangement can then be made regarding what volunteer contributions are needed. Workshop attendance also can be arranged. A volunteer may offer to create program announcements for the CARL Newsletter as well a volunteering to be the notetaker for the workshop; the story built from those notes is likely to be published in the newsletter.15

Some of the associations listed in the interest groups include: Academic Librarians’ Interest Group North (ALIGN); Collection Development Interest Group (CDIG); Diversity in Academic Libraries (DIAL);  Southern California Instruction Librarians (SCIL); Science and Engineering Academic Librarians (SEAL); and Scholarly Communication and Open Resources for Education (SCORE).16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: About 700 members receive the newsletter with membership.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication is based in California and written in English.18 California is a diverse state with strong multicultural values.

Reader characteristics: Readers are academic librarians or those interested in academic libraries, usually based in college or university libraries, especially those based in California. There is a strong focus on multicultural values.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Academic.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with their professional community, interested in improving their professional skills and maintaining strong ties with their peers in the field.

Last updated: May 6, 2019


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1.  ProQuest, “CARL Newsletter (Online),” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed May 6, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1560283718353/665033
  2. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Newsletter,” accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/index.html
  3. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission,” accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.carl-acrl.org/about/mission.html
  4. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission.”
  5. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  6. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  7. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  8. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  9. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Newsletter.”
  10. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  11. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Newsletter.”
  12. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Newsletter.”
  13. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, Newsletter 37 no. 2 (July 2014), http://www.carl-acrl.org/newsletter/2014jul.html
  14. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “About CARL Interest Groups,” accessed May 6, 2019, http://www.carl-acrl.org/leadership/ig/about.html
  15.  California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “About CARL Interest Groups.”
  16. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “About CARL Interest Groups.”
  17. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission.”
  18. ProQuest, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory.
  19. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission.”
  20. California Academic & Research Libraries Association, “Mission.”
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