Wiki Tags Archives: Academic libraries

Rowman & Littlefield

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Rowman & Littlefield

Website: http://rowman.com/RLPublishers

Purpose, objective, or mission: Rowman & Littlefield “publishes high-quality college texts, entertaining and informative books for general readers, and professional and scholarly books in the humanities and social sciences.”1 Its range of subject areas include library and information services, linguistics, communication, education, psychology, sociology, among others.2

Target audience: Rowman & Littlefield offers “serious works of scholarship; core textbooks for introductory courses; supplemental, affordable paperbacks for alternative approaches to teaching; and general interest and trade books for the curious reader.”3 LIS books are targeted toward practitioners, undergraduate and graduate students, and scholars.

Owner: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group is an independent publishing group4 which also owns one of the largest book distributors in the United States, National Book Network (NBN).5 The publishing group encompasses several imprints, including Lexington Books (specialized and scholarly research), and trade imprints such as Rowman & Littlefield Trade, Globe Pequot, Falcon Guides, TwoDot, Taylor Trade, and Down East Books.

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Authors are asked to provide a list of four to seven potential peer reviewers when submitting a book proposal.6

Types of books published: LIS-specific books run the gamut from primers and practical guides to both introductory and advanced textbooks.7

Medium: Titles are published simultaneously in print and e-book editions.8 Many books are supplemented with multimedia content.9

Topics covered: A range of disciplines across humanities and social sciences, government data, and education.10 LIS-specific topics cover management, archival studies, cataloging and classification, collection development, information technology, literacy instruction, and school librarianship. LIS series include The Practical Guides for Librarians, Library Technology Essentials, and Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections.11

Number of titles published per year: Approximately 1,500 academic, reference, professional, and trade books annually (all subjects).12 The number of LIS titles published per year is unknown.

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes13

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals for publication should be submitted to the appropriate acquisitions editor,14 and include a prospectus, outline (annotated table of contents), author’s CV or resume, one to two brief writing samples, and a list of potential peer reviewers.15 Full book manuscripts are not accepted unless requested by the acquisitions editor. See the publisher’s website for detailed submission guidelines.

Submission and review process: The publisher will acknowledge receipt of a proposal within two weeks, and aims to render a decision on acceptance within three months.16

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors include leading academics and respected practitioners. Formal book proposals require a detailed description, author qualifications, previously published works, writing samples, competitive analysis, and potential markets for a book.17 The publisher is well established in its subject areas, and maintains a presence at academic conferences and conventions.18 Rowman & Littlefield is a highly reputable publisher for LIS authors with a proposal for an academic or professional development topic.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)A 2015 catalog listed approximately 150 LIS books geared toward students, professionals, and academics.19 Print runs for titles are not publicly available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Rowman & Littlefield is based in the United States, and titles are published in English. Authors are experts and scholars based mostly in the U.S., UK, and Canada, and this may be reflected in the content of material.20 However, as Rowman & Littlefield is an international publisher, books are available to a worldwide audience.21

Reader characteristics: Readers have varying backgrounds within LIS, from management to technology, to instruction and research. Rowman & Littlefield texts are typically used in graduate and professional development courses, though many titles may be of interest to non-LIS readers.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are students, academics, and professionals with a strong knowledge of or strong interest in LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With diverse backgrounds, skills, professional duties, and interests, readers are likely seeking specialized LIS knowledge or best practices. Material is theoretical and practical, and provides professional learning for the LIS community.

Last updated: September 3, 2015


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  2. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Subjects. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/SubjectsMain
  3. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Retrieved from http://rowman.com/RLPublishers
  4. Publishers Global. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from http://www.publishersglobal.com/directory/publisher-profile/6304/
  5. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  6. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  7. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  8. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  9. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  10. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  11. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Library and information services. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/Library-Services
  12. Net Galley. (2015). Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved from https://www.netgalley.com/catalog/publisher/pub_id/29645
  13. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  14. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Editors. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/RLPGAE
  15. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  16. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  17. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Submission guidelines. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/RLAuthRes
  18. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Conventions schedule. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/ConventionsSchedule
  19. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  20. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
  21. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). About. Retrieved from https://rowman.com/Page/About
  22. Rowman & Littlefield. (2015). Digital catalogs. Retrieved from http://rowman.com/Page/eCatalogs
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Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”1

Target audience: Academic library staff2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.5 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”10 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.11

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .12

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”13

Editorial tone: Academic14, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.15

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”17 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,19 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”20

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”21 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”22 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”24

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”25

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  7.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  9. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  11. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  13. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  14. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  18. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  19. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  21. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  22. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  24. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  25. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Collection Building

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Collection Building

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/cb

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per the publication website, “Collection Building provides well-researched and authoritative information on the rapidly-changing conceptions of what collection development is in libraries, archives, museums and galleries.”1

Target audience: LIS academics and professionals2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Print and online6

Content: Topics of study include but are not limited to the collection and management of files, data, and artifacts in academic, special, and public libraries; the assessment of those collections; development of and public engagement with collections; and the appropriate use of space in libraries.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb

Types of contributions accepted: The journal publishes research papers, opinion pieces, technical product reviews, conceptual papers, case studies, literature reviews, and general reviews of a more instructional nature. Most articles are between 1,000 and 3,000 words in length.9

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system.10 To help authors ensure their submissions are complete, Emerald Publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist.11 Once a submission is deemed suitable for publication by the editor, it is “sent to at least one independent referee for double blind peer review. Conference reports and columns are not subject to a formal review procedure.”12

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. The journal publishes articles that are “well-researched and authoritative.”13

Style guide used: A comprehensive house style guide is provided on the journal website. References should be written in Harvard style.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Collection Building is a peer-reviewed, authoritative research journal.15 As the journal covers practical and academic issues, it is a suitable venue for both LIS professionals’ views on current trends in the field and library school students’ research in collection development. The Book Review section of each issue offers an alternative to the research article for publication.

Collection Building is indexed in Academic Search Alumni Edition, Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Premier, Current Abstracts, Current Awareness Abstracts, Education Full Text, Emerald Management Reviews, Information Management & Technology Abstracts, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, INSPEC, Library & Information Science Abstracts, Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts, Library Literature and Information Science, Library Literature and Information Science Full Text, OmniFile Full Text Mega, OmniFile Full Text Select, The Informed Librarian, Scopus, zetoc.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No circulation information is available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Language of text is English.17 This is a primarily North American publication, with the majority of the Editorial Team based in the United States.18

Reader characteristics: Readers of this journal are information professionals and academics who share an interest in collection development and management. Many of the readers are collection managers with purchasing responsibilities.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are library and information science academics, students, and professionals who study or work in access services, interlibrary loan, special collections, and collection services. They all have a knowledge of LIS subjects and jargon. This audience is looking for specialized information about collection development, and will expect technical language.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will have a high level of knowledge of LIS issues and a practical need of collection assessment tools and advice. The prospective author should remember the specialized needs of the audience and the expectation of well-researched, high-quality writing.

Last updated: March 24, 2017


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  2. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  3. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  4. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  5. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  6. “Features of an Emerald Subscription” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/subs/index.htm
  7. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  8. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  9. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  11.  “Article Submission Checklist,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017 http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  13. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  14. “Author Guidelines,” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017,  http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=cb
  15. Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  16. “Collection Building/Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  17.  Collection Building, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1435175863881/84311
  18. “Editorial Team,” http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=cb
  19. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
  20. “Journal Information” Emerald Publishing, accessed March 24, 2017, http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=cb
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Library Management

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Library Management

Website: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journal/lm

Purpose, objective, or mission: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”1

Target audience: “Library Management (LM) publishes articles of interest to senior library managers and academics.”2

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Print and online.6 LM “is available as part of an online subscription to the Emerald Library Studies eJournals Collection.”7

Content: Library Management “reflects the latest research undertaken in academic, government and corporate institutions by reporting contemporary thought, whilst also exploring practical implications for those involved in teaching and practice.”8

Included in every subscription is an annual Chinese supplement.9

Frequency of publication: 9 times per year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8

Types of contributions accepted: Articles should be in Microsoft Word format and between 3000 and 6000 words in length.11

The journal welcomes submissions on:

  • Strategic management
  • HRM/HRO
  • Cultural diversity
  • Information use
  • Quality and change management
  • Management issues
  • Marketing
  • Outsourcing
  • Automation
  • Library finance
  • Charging
  • Performance measurement
  • Data protection and copyright12

Submission and review process: Submissions are made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, an online submission and peer review system. You need to register, create your account, and then will be able to go through the submission process to upload your article.13

Emerald publishing offers an Article Submission Checklist  to ensure that your submission is complete.14

As per the Author Guidelines: “Each paper is reviewed by the Editor and, if it (is) judged suitable for publication, is evaluated using a double-blind peer review process.”15

Editorial tone: Articles are written in a highly professional and academic style. There is a strong international component to the selection of articles in each issue. While the content clearly embraces innovative thought and “big ideas”, there is a practical tone in the sharing of issues concerning individual libraries.16

Style guide used: A comprehensive list of guidelines is provided in the Author Guidelines section.17

References should be written in Harvard style.18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This is a highly informative publication in the field of library management. The articles in this journal explore a wide range of issues in various types of libraries worldwide. In the current issue alone (Volume 36 Issue 4/5), articles topics include: e-reserves in a Manila library; social welfare information management in Nigerian libraries; academic library leadership; and promotion and tenure for academic librarians.19

LIS authors, whether professional librarians, or library managers, have the opportunity to delve into  current issues in library management, and publish their research in a highly regarded academic journal.

International authors also have an excellent opportunity to publish research on issues important to their particular geographical area.20 Of particular interest to Chinese authors is the annual Chinese supplement — an excellent avenue for publication.21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available. According to the Emerald site, Library Management articles are downloaded over 11,000 times per month.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Library Management is written in English23, yet is international in scope. While the editor and book review editor are located in Australia, the editorial advisory board comprise professionals worldwide; including, the U.K., Canada, India, Finland, Hong Kong, New Zealand and South Africa.24

Emerald offers an editing service, The Charlesworth Group, that offers “expert Language Editing services for non-native English-speaking authors, and…discounts to authors planning to submit to Emerald’s journal(s).”25

The annual Chinese supplement is a Chinese language publication, “created specifically for Chinese researchers”26, with an “Editorial Board of eminent Chinese Librarians and Educators.”27

Reader characteristics: Readers are senior managers and academics from across the globe. As this journal has an international scope, the audience will have diverse cultural experiences. Despite this, readers will share an interest in current research and contemporary thought related to managerial issues in academic and government institutions worldwide.28

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects as this publication is aimed at senior managers and academics.29

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This is a knowledgeable, diverse, academic audience. Readers expect high-level, thorough and thoughtful research on leadership and management issues in libraries. Potential authors who want to share innovative approaches to these issues, especially with implications in real library settings, will find a highly invested audience.

Last updated: June 24, 2015


References

Show 29 footnotes

  1. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  2. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  3. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  4. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  5. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  6. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  7. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  8. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  9. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  10. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  11. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  12. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm#8
  13. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  14. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  15. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  16. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  17. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  18. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  19. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  20. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Table of Contents Volume 36 Issue 4/5. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/toc/lm/36/4%2F5
  21. Emerald Group Publishing Ltd. (2014). Chinese Supplement. Library Management. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldinsight.com.cn/
  22. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  23. ProQuest. (2015). Library Management. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1434481437406/338729
  24. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Editorial Team. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/editorial_team.htm?id=lm
  25. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Author Guidelines. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=lm
  26. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  27. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Emerald News. Emerald Group Publishing. Retrieved from http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/about/news/story.htm?id=1279
  28. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
  29. Emerald Group Publishing. (2014). Aims & Scope. Library Management. Retrieved from http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lm
Continue Reading

Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

Websitehttp://acrl.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the About page: ACRL is a professional association…dedicated to enhancing the ability of academic library and information professionals to serve the information needs of the higher education community and to improve learning, teaching and research.”1 From the ACRL Guidelines & Standards, “ACRL is the source that the higher education community looks to for standards and guidelines on academic libraries.”2

Target audience: Academic Libraries and the LIS field practitioners.3

Owner: Association of College & Research Libraries, a division of the ALA.4

Are published books peer reviewed? ACRL Publications in Librarianship is a peer reviewed series of monographic volumes.5

Types of books published: LIS Professional Development. Monographs of interest to the LIS field and academic libraries: books are research studies, theoretical monographs, or practical tools-based volumes for the practitioner. These are primarily to assist academic librarians in career development, managing their institutions, and keeping abreast of developments in librarianship.6

Medium: Print. “ACRL Publications in Librarianship is currently, and for some time, likely to remain principally a series of print on paper books. Nevertheless, we are eager to use electronic publishing to promote and supplement our printed volumes.”7

There are currently a handful of digital publications available in pdf format, but that is not ACRL’s primary publishing method.8

Topics covered: Information literacy, copyright and scholarly communication, research in academic librarianship, trends in academic libraries, leadership and organizational development, management, collection development, information access, and information literacy.9

Number of titles published per year: 8–1610

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals, completed manuscripts, or dissertations, accompanied by a Publication Proposal Form. See the Call for Book Proposals for specifics on suggested topics.11

Submission and review process: From the guidelines: “Ideally authors/editors will send one or more chapters with a proposal. Each proposal is then read by three members of the editorial board and the editor.”12 The review process takes around two months, and reviewers will send comments back to the author if they would like to move forward with the project. Completed manuscripts are then reviewed by a final editorial group, in a process that takes an additional three to four months, and then the editor will work with the author to set a publication timetable.13

Editorial tone: Professional and, where warranted, more immediate and casual.14

Style guide usedWebster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 10th edition, for spelling, and The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, for style.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Authors with a proposal for an academic library topic, or a proposal for furthering the professional development of any librarian or information professional would do well to consider ACRL for publication. The group is an outstanding ALA group with a large member base16, and reaches hundreds of libraries. In addition, the editorial staff is able to provide dedicated support and editing assistance to authors to ensure the most professional product possible.17 ACRL publications are promoted through its catalog18, and at the ALA store19, meetings and conferences, with articles and promotional notices appearing in C&RL at the time of publication. ACRL is a trusted organization, excellent to consider for publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Smallish, with 12 new books published in 2010-11, per the Annual Report.20

ACRL has a large automatic audience: “hundreds of libraries have blanket ACRL acquisition orders and many librarians order their own copies, or buy them at conferences.”21

In addition, ACRL is the largest division of the ALA, with more than 12,000 members.22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: National and, on occasion, global. ACRL is based, like ALA, in Chicago, IL.23 American English, leaning towards issues in American academic libraries.

Reader characteristics: The association, as an ALA organization and publisher, is interested in continuing the education and providing professional development for academic librarians and information professionals.24 Academic libraries and scholarly research. Strongly dedicated to providing high quality LIS information.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong. Not only is ACRL devoted to academic libraries, but it is part of the ALA.26 Expect editors and eventual readers to be very knowledgeable about LIS topics.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Any publishing group that calls the ALA home is a good place to query your LIS proposal, and ACRL is no exception. The largest division of the ALA,  ACRL currently has a membership of more than 12,000 members, accounting for nearly 20% of the total ALA membership.27 Readers will be keen to hear of new titles from this small, discriminating imprint.

Last updated: November 27, 2014


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  2. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards
  3. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  4. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  5. American Library Association. (2014). Publications in Librarianship: Guide for Authors. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  6. American Library Association. (2014). ACRL Publications Catalog. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/catalog/publications
  7. American Library Association. (2014). Publications in Librarianship: Guide for Authors. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  8. American Library Association. (2014). Digital Publications. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/digital
  9. American Library Association. (2014). ACRL Publications Catalog. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/catalog/publications
  10. American Library Association. (2014). ACRL Publications Catalog. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/catalog/publications
  11. American Library Association. (2014). Call for Book Proposals. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/PILproposals
  12. American Library Association. (2014). Publications in Librarianship: Guide for Authors. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  13. American Library Association. (2014). Publications in Librarianship: Guide for Authors. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  14. American Library Association. (2014). Publications in Librarianship: Guide for Authors. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  15. American Library Association. (2014). Publications in Librarianship: Guide for Authors. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  16. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  17. American Library Association. (2014). Publications in Librarianship: Guide for Authors. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/guidelinespil
  18. American Library Association. (2014). ACRL Publications Catalog. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/catalog/publications
  19. American Library Association. (2014). ALA Store. American Library Association. Retrieved from http://www.alastore.ala.org/
  20. American Library Association. (2014). ACRL Annual Report. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://crln.acrl.org/content/72/11/659.full.pdf+html
  21. American Library Association. (2014). Call for Book Proposals. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/booksanddigitalresources/booksmonographs/pil/PILproposals
  22. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  23. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  24. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  25. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  26. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
  27. American Library Association. (2014). About ACRL. Association of College & Research Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl
Continue Reading

Routledge

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Routledge. Haworth Press was acquired by Taylor & Francis Group, and books are now published by Routledge, a Taylor & Francis Group imprint.

Website: http://www.routledge.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Global publisher of quality academic books, journals, and online reference materials. Routledge is an older imprint, founded in 1836, and prides itself on publishing “many of the greatest thinkers and scholars,”1 including Einstein, Jung, and Sartre.2

Target audience: Teachers, librarians, educators, those seeking reference materials.3 Routledge has a specific Resources for Librarians page detailing catalogs, e-products and online references specifically for libraries, research series, and out of print titles.4

Owner: Taylor & Francis Group.5

Are published books peer reviewed? Yes. Each proposal is examined by a subject editor, and then given to independent, academic field specialists to determine if the final book, based on the proposal, has market potential. The process takes 6-8 weeks or longer.6

Types of books published : LIS reference. From the Guidelines for Authors: “Routledge is keen to consider proposals for new books at all levels from introductory and modular textbooks to supplemental texts and scholarly research monographs.”7

Medium: Print and online.8

Topics covered: Annuals, Yearbooks, Periodicals & AlmanacsBiographical ReferenceDictionariesDirectoriesEncyclopediasGeneral ReferenceHandbooksLibrary & Information ScienceMajor Works, and Regional Surveys.9

Number of titles published per year: Thousands of new books published each year.10

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/

Types of submissions accepted: Proposals, between 3-6 pages, supplemented by sample chapters if applicable. Do not send an unsolicited manuscript as the initial contact!11

Submission and review process: Send the proposal and supplemental materials by email to the appropriate subject editor.12 After reviewing the proposal, an editor will decide if they would like a full manuscript.13

Editorial tone: Professional and scholarly, but readable.14 The books potentially cover a wide audience including a variety of readers. Routledge also publishes under a wide variety of LIS subjects, with titles ranging from The Social Media Handbook, a slim volume at 194 pages, to International Encyclopedia of Information and Library Science, at 724 pages, significantly updating the last edition from 1996.15

Style guide used: U.S. authors: For US spelling use Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary or Webster’s Third New International Dictionary. There are different style preferences for different subject areas, such as Chicago or APA. Your Editorial Assistant will advise which style (Chicago, APA) you should follow – just be consistent throughout the submission and confirm the style you have used when submitting your final manuscript.16

For UK authors: Refer to Butcher’s Copy-editing: The Cambridge Handbook for Editors, Copy-editors and Proofreader and the New Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors: The Essential A-Z Guide to the Written Word. For British spelling use Concise Oxford English Dictionary; alternatives are accepted as long as they are consistent. For referencing, use the Harvard referencing system.17

For more details, please see Instructions for Authors and Proposal Guidelines.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Routledge is now owned by Taylor & Francis, which has a huge LIS audience and is where you can find a lot of print and online reference materials and publications targeted to students, LIS professionals, and academics.18 This is a prestigious publishing house that puts writers through a rigorous process just to get to publication; and once you’re there, there is the support of editors and the brand behind your finished book.19 This is an excellent group to consider proposing for an LIS specific book idea, as ideas can range from the very scholarly studies to more everyday topics that librarians or information professionals should be aware of.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size: Large, and international.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Offices for the US are based in New York21; office for the UK and the rest of the world are based in Oxford, England.22 The publisher notes that a majority of sales come from outside the UK, in the US and elsewhere around the world.23

Reader characteristics: Readers seeking high quality reference works specifically for an educational or library setting, or simply for their own personal and professional development. These are sophisticated readers expecting the same in their reading material. Routledge’s customer database covers over “1,000,000 academics worldwide”24, and these subjects are the publishing house’s primary bread and butter. Routledge considers itself (and is) very prestigious, one of the world’s leading academic publishers with a reputation for cutting-edge and ground breaking books.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varying. Most people seeking out Routledge books will most likely be academics, but whether in the LIS field specifically is not a given. However, Routledge readers are knowledgeable and educated, so assume a degree of understanding, and a quick learning curve, when referencing LIS subject matter.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The primary readership of Routledge materials includes academics, librarians, and educators interested in new titles pertaining to LIS. This is a group that eagerly awaits new publications, and is notified through a variety of resources when new topics are published.  Routledge’s marketing team “is dedicated to making sure that clear, compelling information about your book reaches all parts of its intended audience wherever they are.”26The team also utilizes accounts on TwitterFacebook, LinkedIn, YouTube and Wikipedia to market new books, and will work with authors to support personal social media undertakings on behalf of their books.27 This is an excellent group to publish with for support, marketing, and built-in, interested readership.

Last updated: November 27, 2014


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  2. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  3. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Homepage. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/
  4. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Homepage. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/resources/librarians/
  5. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  6. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Submitting a Proposal. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/subprop.pdf
  7. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Submitting a Proposal. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/subprop.pdf
  8. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  9. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Homepage. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/
  10. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Homepage. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/
  11. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  12. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Contacts. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/contacts/
  13. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  14. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  15. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Books. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/books/
  16. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/tf_authorguidelines_2013.pdf
  17. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/tf_authorguidelines_2013.pdf
  18. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). About Us. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/about_us/
  19. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Instructions for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://tandfbis.s3.amazonaws.com/rt-media/pdf/tf_authorguidelines_2013.pdf
  20. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  21. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  22. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  23. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Information for Authors. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/authors/
  24. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Online Marketing. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/marketing/online/
  25. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). The History of Routledge. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/marketing/history/
  26. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Global Reach. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/marketing/reach/
  27. Taylor & Francis Group. (2014). Social Media Marketing. Routledge. Retrieved from http://www.routledge.com/info/marketing/social/
Continue Reading

Computers in Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, the publication’s mission “is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs.”1

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.2

Publisher: Information Today Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”7

Frequency of publication: 10 times a year: monthly with combined Jul/Aug and Jan/Feb issues.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”9

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.10

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.11

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via online Query Form.12  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’€™ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’€™ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”13

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”14

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author: Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professional’€™s only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’€™s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”16 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 5,000 plus subscribers with another 3-4 readers acquired when each issue is passed along. Over 2,000 copies are distributed throughout the year at major library shows, including SLA and ALA, as well as Information Today, Inc.’€™s library shows: ”Computers in Libraries, Internet Librarian, and Internet Librarian International. The parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to WorldCat there are 2,153 libraries around the world that have Computers in Libraries on their shelves. These readers are spread all over the world: USA, Canada, Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, South Africa, and United Kingdom. Computers in Libraries focus on worldwide community of librarians who are interested in emerging technologies and their implementation.18 Computers in Libraries is published in English. Since its content is devoted to discussion of impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems, there is no cultural labels attached and author’€™s language wouldn’€™t be affected.19

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only “€œtechies”€ but also library managers, system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.20

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”21

Computers in Libraries does not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. From the mission statement of CIL: “CIL‘s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs. CIL does this through articles that are written by library professionals for library professionals, with a friendly, personal voice. These general technical articles are practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment: corporate, special, academic, public, and K-12. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries does not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead it devotes its pages to entirely to technology topics.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “€œdo not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”24 There is month by month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.25 This is a publication where readers will understand use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, the technical writing should be geared toward general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.26

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  2. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  4. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  5. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  7. Information Today Inc. (2016). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  9. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  10. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2016). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  13. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  14. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. OCLC WorldCat. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/title/computers-in-libraries/oclc/18848244&referer=brief_results
  19. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  20. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  21. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  22. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  23. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  24. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
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Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table 

Website: http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Endnotes Committee is part of the ALA’€™s New Members Round Table (NMRT), a which consists of ALA members with fewer than ten years’ membership. The committee’s mission is to provide support for librarians who want or need to publish scholarly articles, and to publish peer-reviewed research by NMRT members and directed at new librarians.1

The committee oversees publication of Endnotes: The Journal of the New Members Round Table.2

Target audience: American Library Association new members, specifically those who are part of the New Members Round Table (ALA NMRT)3

Publisher: American Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Online7

Content: According to the Endnotes Committee Charge, “Each edition of the journal will contain 2-4 scholarly articles written by members of NMRT, as well as web site reviews and scholarly book reviews of titles relevant to new librarians.”8

Frequency of publication: One issue per year, with the possibility of more issues if there is interest. The editor welcomes suggestions for special themed issues from NMRT members.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-endnotes-committee

Types of contributions accepted: Original research, practitioner-based research, case studies, book and media reviews. Articles range between 2000-4000 words; book and media reviews 300-500.10

Submission and review process: Endnotes accepts article submissions on a rolling basis, but NMRT members are encouraged to contact the editor about proposals to determine if it fits the journal’€™s scope.11

Send typed, double-spaced MS word docs to nmrtendnotesjournal@gmail.com.12

The committee reviews manuscripts via an double-blind peer-review process. Accepted manuscripts will be returned with committee suggestions for edits, and authors will have about a month to revise the manuscript for publication.13

Editorial tone: Scholarly, but not too formal. The articles and reviews are almost conversational.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

To submit a manuscript for publication, register with the ALA and then join the NMRT, whose mission is to provide support for librarians with that specific goal. The publication is for NMRT members and directed at new librarians.€“ Endnotes is the perfect place for LIS students and new authors to submit a query to supportive editorial staff and among a group of peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Endnotes is an open-access journal available online for anyone to read, but is primarily for members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: ALA is based in Chicago, IL, but the website and newsletter are online open access, available to anyone with internet access, or through a library. œA network of affiliates, chapters, and other organizations enables the ALA to reach a broad audience. Although it is written in American English and published by the American Library Association, the ALA does not limit itself to U.S. library concerns.17

Reader characteristics: Most readers of Endnotes, and all authors, are members of the ALA’€™s NMRT.18 ALA members include “librarians, library trustees, and other interested people from every state and many nations. The association serves public, state, school, and academic libraries, as well as special libraries for people working in government, commerce and industry, the arts, and the armed services or in hospitals, prisons, and other institutions.”19 The ALA’€™s mission is “€œto provide leadership for the development, promotion, and improvement of library and information services and the profession of librarianship in order to enhance learning and ensure access to information for all.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of this scholarly journal are part of the ALA’€™s New Members Roundtable, so they may be expected to be aware of current LIS trends and terminology.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are primarily new members to the ALA, and are interested in reading the most recent LIS scholarly research, news, reviews and updates in order to further their education or careers, and to inspire their own research and writing. This is an ideal publication for new authors to consider, and as it’€™s part of the ALA, has built-in credibility and respect, as well as readership.

Last updated: April 22. 2017


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. “About NMRT,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/nmrt/about-nmrt
  2. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  3. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  4. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  5. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  6. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  7. American Library Association. (2014). Endnotes Committee. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  8. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  9. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  10. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  11. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  12. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  13. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  14. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  15. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  16. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  17. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  18. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
  19. “Membership,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  20. “Mission,” American Library Association Annual Report, 2015, American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017,  http://www.ala.org/aboutala/sites/ala.org.aboutala/files/content/2015-ALA-Annual%20Report-Accessible-Final-7-8-2016.pdf
  21. “Endnotes Committee,” American Library Association, accessed April 22, 2017, http://www.ala.org/nmrt/oversightgroups/comm/schres
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Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice

Website: http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap

Purpose, objective, or mission: To provide opportunities to Pennsylvania librarians to share their knowledge on all areas of librarianship to other librarians in the state and beyond.1

Target audience: LIS professionals in Pennsylvania and internationally especially in the academic library field.2

Publisher: PALA College & Research Division/University of Pittsburgh University Library System.3

Peer reviewed? Research and Practice articles are subject to double-blind peer review. News and Commentary items are not peer reviewed.4

Type: LIS Scholarly.5

Medium: Online and open access.6

Content: News, commentary and peer-reviewed journal articles on best practice of interest to academic libraries in Pennsylvania.7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually. (Note: this is a new journal and the 2013 issue is the first one.)8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submissions. Registration and login is required.

Types of contributions accepted: Items that have already been published or are under consideration for publication, either in print or online, will not be accepted. The journal focus and scope page states it will “consider all submissions that report original research (research articles), highlight innovative initiatives (practice articles), or discuss current trends/challenges (editorial/commentary). Each issue will also feature news items (collections, services, awards, events, etc.) from Pennsylvania’€™s libraries.”9

Submission and review process: Articles should be submitted in 12-point font and use italics rather than underlining. The journal can accept articles in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF format.10 Specific formatting and submission requirements for each type of article can be found here: Submissions. Research and Practice articles are subjected to blind peer review and should have no identifying names or terms and include a 100 to 150 word abstract and a completed Submission Preparation Checklist. News articles do not have to follow peer review guidelines.11

Editorial tone: The publisher’s intent is to provide articles on a wide range of subject with a focus on academic libraries.12 A review of Research and Practice articles issue indicates there is a definite scholarly tone.13

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition.14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication is a place for Pennsylvania librarians to publish, in particular, in the academic field. As this is a new journal, it is an especially excellent place for new writers to submit articles and news items. As it’s open-access and online, the audience will not be limited to Pennsylvania readers. For example, one article published in the first issue addressed the topic of “Using Social Media to Promote International Collaboration.”

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This is a new online open-access journal directed specifically to librarians in Pennsylvania librarians. No numbers have yet been determined.15

Audience location and location or cultural considerations: Pennsylvania, USA with an expected international audience.16 American English and American practices will probably be the focus; although, the editors do intend it to be read internationally.17

Reader characteristics: Readers will most likely be academic librarians in Pennsylvania. Biased towards research and articles written about academic libraries in Pennsylvania.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have LIS subject matter knowledge.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Although this publication is intended for academic and other librarians in the state of Pennsylvania only, the editors anticipate a wider audience including global interest. Therefore, authors should keep in mind that there is a potentially much wider audience than just a local one.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 19 footnotes

  1. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  2. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: About the Journal. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  4. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  7. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  10. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  11. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  12. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  13. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap
  14. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/submissions
  15. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  16. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research and Practice. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403193551579/768851
  17. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  18. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
  19. Pennsylvania Library Association. (2014). Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice: Editorial Policies. Retrieved from http://www.palrap.org/ojs/index.php/palrap/about/editorialPolicies
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