Teacher Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Teacher Librarian: The Journal for School Library Professionals

Website: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “Teacher Librarian is designed specifically for you, the library professional working with children and young adults. Within our pages you’€™ll find lively and relevant articles exploring current issues such as collaboration, leadership, technology, advocacy, information literacy, and management.”1

Target audience: Teachers and other information professionals working in K-12 schools.2

Publisher: Scarecrow Press, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? Yes;4 Teacher Librarian is considered a “refereed” or “juried” publication. Submitted articles are reviewed by at least two members of an advisory board, “all of whom are either scholars or recognized professionals. This is a blind review; reviewers do not know the name of the author of the article. The editor is responsible for final decisions regarding manuscripts and reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and consistency of style.”5

Type: LIS scholarly.6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Teacher Librarian focuses on articles on the latest in information technology as well as Internet resources. It provides reviews of education and other library related professional materials. It lists new books, videos, and software that are geared toward children and young adults. The articles in the journal give strategies for managing library resources, collaboration, leadership, advocacy and information literacy.8

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly, except for the month of August.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: Per their website, “Teacher Librarian is committed to collaborative partnerships for improved student learning through thought-provoking and challenging feature articles, strategies for effective advocacy, regular review columns and critical analysis of management and programming issues.”10

Submission and review process: Per their guidelines, “A manuscript, including references, bibliographies, charts, figures and tables, should not exceed 15 double-spaced pages, in 12-point type with one-inch margins. Please include a 100 to 200-word abstract for the manuscript and a word count.”11 Articles are submitted as an email attachment and they request you include a short biographical note along with contact information. “Proposed articles are reviewed by at least two members of our advisory board, all of whom are either scholars or recognized professionals. This is a blind review; reviewers do not know the name of the author of the article. The editor is responsible for final decisions regarding manuscripts and reserves the right to edit for brevity, clarity and consistency of style…We acknowledge receipt by e-mail and endeavor to respond to authors within eight weeks. If your article is accepted for publication, we will require a small color photo. Authors are paid an honorarium for their work upon publication.”12

Editorial tone: At this point the journal does not lean in any particular direction. The journal was originally published in Canada but has recently moved to the US, so there may be a subtle change in tone.13 Notably, one of the new editors is SJSU’s own Dr. David Loertscher.14

Style guide used: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It would be especially beneficial for an LIS student to submit an article to this journal if he or she were interested in going into the K-12 field of librarianship. The articles in the journal cover a wide range of topics that are of interest to those working in the schools, so there is no lack of subject matter. The length, style, and additional information required is clearly spelled out, and the authors are informed within eight weeks regarding acceptance. If your article is chosen for publication, you will have to submit a small photo for them to include next to your article. And the best news of all…authors are paid an honorarium!

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Teacher Librarian has more than 26,000 subscribers.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The readers of Teacher Librarian are mostly located in the United States and Canada.17 The journal does not make a large effort to reach out to those in other countries, so the focus remains on those in North America. Since the journal is focused on American and Canadian readers,18 authors should not have any problems using cultural references or jargon that is common within school libraries, school districts, or within the public libraries.

Reader characteristics: According to a 2012 ALA survey, the vast majority of librarians are women. Only 9.7% of all credentialed school librarians were minorities.19 The ALA projected that these numbers would remain relatively stable, so one could project that the current readership of Teacher Librarian mainly consists of Caucasian women. Since this shows a lack of diversity in the readership of the journal, this fact has relevance to the author submitting articles to this publication. This journal is designed specifically for library professionals working with children and young adults in either the K-12 schools or within the public library. In order to be considered a teacher librarian, one must have a teaching credential as well as an MLIS or MLS. This creates specific type of readers who have equal levels of education and similar types of workplaces. Teacher Librarian is biased only in the fact that it caters to a very specific group of librarians, so it will only print articles that are of interest to this group. It is also mindful of the connection between schools and government, so it will not overtly criticize in this area, but it does provide many articles on ways to increase funding or tips on grant writing. Overall, the publication has a very positive attitude towards librarianship and teaching, and the view that information literacy must become and remain an integral component of the curriculum.20

Readers’ knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers of this journal will most likely be graduates of an MLS or MLIS program, so there should not be any problem with using LIS jargon, acronyms or terminology specific to schools.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Teacher Librarian are library professionals who are working with K-12 students in the school setting or in the public library. These professionals are looking for articles that present strategies that would help them to better manage library resources for students, or articles that review educational and library related professional materials. The readers need to be kept up to date on the latest happenings in information technology, so articles regarding advances in this field would be welcomed, as well as resources that can be found on the Internet, organized in an easy to use format. Collection development is a large part of the duties of the teacher librarian, so presenting reviews of new books and other media is of great interest to them. Many of the teachers are required to take continuing education courses, so articles on collaboration, leadership, advocacy, management, or any other aspect of information technology would also appeal to this group.

Last updated: October 28, 2014


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. Teacher Librarian. (2014). About. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/
  2. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Teacher Librarian: The School Journal for Library Professionals. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403636959698/60920
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Teacher Librarian: The School Journal for Library Professionals. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403636959698/60920
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Teacher Librarian: The School Journal for Library Professionals. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403636959698/60920
  5. Teacher Librarian. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Teacher Librarian: The School Journal for Library Professionals. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403636959698/60920
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Teacher Librarian: The School Journal for Library Professionals. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403636959698/60920
  8. The YGS Group. (2014). Teacher Librarian 2013 Media Kit: Overview. Retrieved from http://mediakits.theygsgroup.com/tl/teacher-librarian/overview
  9. SerialsSolutions. (2014). Teacher Librarian: The School Journal for Library Professionals. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403636959698/60920
  10. Teacher Librarian. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/
  11. Teacher Librarian. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/
  12. Teacher Librarian. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/
  13. The YGS Group. (2014). Teacher Librarian 2013 Media Kit: Overview. Retrieved from http://mediakits.theygsgroup.com/tl/teacher-librarian/overview
  14. Teacher Librarian. (2014). Submissions. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/
  15. Teacher Librarian. (2014). Author Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/submissions/author-guidelines/
  16. Teacher Librarian. (2014). About. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/
  17. Teacher Librarian. (2014). About. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/
  18. Teacher Librarian. (2014). About. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/
  19. American Library Association. (2012). Diversity Counts Tables 2012. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/offices/sites/ala.org.offices/files/content/diversity/diversitycounts/diversitycountstables2012.pdf
  20. Teacher Librarian. (2014). About. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/
  21. Teacher Librarian. (2014). About. Retrieved from http://www.teacherlibrarian.com/about-2/
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