Oral History Review

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Oral History Review

Website: http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their site, the publication’s “mission is to explore the nature and the significance of oral history and advance the understanding of the field among scholars, educators, practitioners, and the general public.”1

Target audience: The publication is directed at local historians, librarians, archivists, students, journalists, teachers, and academic scholars from many fields.2

Publisher: Oxford University Press.3

Peer reviewed? Yes.4

Type: LIS scholarly5

Medium: Available in print with online access to subscribers.6

Content: Oral History Review “publishes narrative and analytical articles and reviews…that present and use oral history in unique and significant ways and that contribute to the understanding of the nature of oral history and memory.”7

Frequency of publication: Semiannually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/

Types of contributions accepted: The publication includes book, website and film reviews, feature articles and bibliographies.9

Submission and review process: Specific, detailed information regarding submission of work contained in guidelines. In general, manuscripts should not be submitted simultaneously to other journals and no previously published works accepted. All work reviewed and edited by appropriate editorial staff.10

Editorial tone: Scholarly but not overly academic. Photographs welcomed.11

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

There are many opportunities for LIS professionals to contribute to this publication. Original work can be done collecting oral histories from prominent community members with interesting stories to tell. Guidance can be provided about cataloging and preservation methodologies. LIS professionals can also weigh in on the ethics of information, including collection, copyright, distribution, and access.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation limited to Oral History Association membership, but membership numbers could not be located.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Oral History Association is located in the United States but has an international membership.14 The editorial staff represents academicians from across the United States.15 Although the journal is printed in English (and the majority of the readers are American), the association website says that the group serves a broad and diverse audience. The organization is committed to disseminating information on a variety of societies and cultures. Articles with obvious cultural, historical and/or geographic overtones are strongly encouraged.16 This commitment is evidenced by the association’€™s Committee on Diversity and International Committee, which seek to increase a minority and global presence in the organization.17

Reader characteristics: The society has six regional U.S. organizations as well as an organization for its international members.18 Readers have a high knowledge of and interest in oral history, from both a local and an international perspective. Readers will expect articles that are well-written and original. Oral History Review presents a well-balanced view of all aspects of oral history. Readers expect articles on any topic that supports good practice in gathering oral histories.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is not strictly an LIS publication, although librarians do read and contribute to its content. Articles should avoid LIS jargon and be directed toward a more broad readership base.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Oral History Review is written for an academic and international audience, so writers who contribute should be sure that their articles exhibit the knowledge and novelty that the experienced readership has come to expect. This could make it a difficult journal for oral history novices to write for. LIS students who have expert knowledge of oral history or archival techniques and exhibits would be most likely to be accepted by the journal for publication.

Last updated: October 30, 2014


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  2. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Oral History Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403036779660/104264
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Oral History Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403036779660/104264
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Oral History Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403036779660/104264
  6. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  7. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  8. SerialsSolutions. (2014). The Oral History Review. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1403036779660/104264
  9. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review: Submission. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/
  10. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review: Submission. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/
  11. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review: Submission. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/
  12. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review: Submission. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/the-oral-history-review-submission/
  13. Oral History Association. (2012). Join Us. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/join-us/
  14. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  15. Oral History Association. (2012). Editors and Editorial Board. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/ohr-editors-and-editorial-board/
  16. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  17. Oral History Association. (2012). Committees. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/about/committees/
  18. Oral History Association. (2012). Regional and International Organizations. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/about/regional-organizations/
  19. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
  20. Oral History Association. (2012). The Oral History Review. Retrieved from http://www.oralhistory.org/publications/oral-history-review/
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