Hack Library School

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Hack Library School

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://hacklibschool.wordpress.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Hack Library School (HLS) was inspired by a 2010 post by Micah Vandegrift on In the Library with the Lead Pipe, a train of thought brought about by Hacking the Academy, where “a group of academics, librarians and higher ed techies crowdsourced submissions for a born-digital book.”1

Per Vandegrift’€™s challenge: “It is time for the emerging library professionals (we students) to take an active role in what we learn, need to learn, didn’t learn, and wish we had learned in library school by curating our own hack.”2

Hack Library School was formed from the idea of allowing LIS students and practitioners to decide upon and create “standards and foundations of the profession,” outside the institutional framework. “€œThis is not meant to subvert the education that library school provides, but to supplement it. I propose that the body of library school students should become the change they wish to see enacted.”3

Target audience: “By, for, and about library school students.”4

Publisher: Hack Library School (a WordPress site)

Peer reviewed? No. The site is written by and for LIS students, to share information.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online. The primary content is via the blog; information is also shared via Twitter, and Facebook.7

Content: The original intention, per Vandergift, was that “Content should have a focus on library school, providing tips, insights, challenges, definitions or any other type of “€œhack” that a current or future student might benefit from.”8 The site contains just that.

Frequency of publication: All online media updated as frequently as contributors post. The goal is to post new content three times per week.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: For guest posts, see the guidelines.10 To be a regular contributor, see 2012’s Call for New Writers.11

Types of contributions accepted: Anything related to LIS, from a you-should-know, student perspective. Posts are meant to be conversation starters.12

From the Call for New Writers, HLS is “looking for a diverse group of writers: diversity of experience, professional interest, and opinions. We strive to critically engage with topics and we’€™re not afraid of ‘€˜stirring the pot.'”13

Submission and review process: Send an email to hacklibschool@gmail.com. If accepted, HLS will get back to you with comments and start working on scheduling your post to the site.14

Editorial tone: Informal. From the guest post guidelines, this is not a site for essays or student papers: HLS wants to hear your voice. “€œPosts that raise questions are at the heart of HLS. We need the discussion and sometimes discomfort and disagreement in order to dig into the heart of (L)IS.”15

Style guide used: None. Links to other sites, citations and references to other points of view are encouraged but not strictly regulated.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

HLS is gaining recognition around the LIS blogosphere, and already has a great Twitter and Facebook following. This is the place to post your experiences in the LIS world, thoughts on improvements, gripes, and ideas for a group who really gets it, and will use the information you provide in the quest of their own LIS degree and pursuits. If you haven’€™t written articles or blogs yet, this would be a great place to get started, writing to like-minded peers.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of April 2013, HLS‘s blog has 420 followers, Facebook has 1371 and Twitter has 6023.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Hackers are almost exclusively based at US colleges & universities, but the site is read internationally.18 Written in American English, to be easily read and interpreted by anyone interested in LIS.19

Reader characteristics: Writers are purposefully as diverse as the many facets of the LIS world. They are interesting, informative, encouraging, supportive and happy to share information. The writers are all LIS students or recent graduates, with interests in just about every aspect of the LIS world, from academic library data collection to reference services, children’€™s lit and library advocacy programs.20 The prevailing bias is that information should be shared, and discussed, and that learning need not only take place within educational institutions. And that we respect each other’€™s opinions, comments, and posts. From the Guest Post guidelines: “Take responsibility for your own opinion and respect other opinions.”21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but in various stages. HLS is written for, by and about LIS students, but that also means people in their first year in the program, or those just considering getting their degree. Don’t assume readers will understand LIS jargon; explain what you’€™re referencing so lay readers can easily comprehend.22

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of HLS want to know what you think, what your experiences, thoughts and cautions are on the LIS degree and anything related to it. The idea is for LIS students to imagine, discuss and develop the profession the way we want to see it, alongside what’€™s being taught in school. If you know something that’s outside of the books -€“ please share it. If you have ideas, concerns, professional advice, career tips, or just a cool LIS subject you’€™d like to broach, the editors and readers of HLS will be happy to hear from you.23

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  2. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  3. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  4. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  5. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  6. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  7. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Home. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/
  8. Vandegrift, M. (2016). #HackLibSchool. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2010/hacklibschool/
  9. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  10. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  11. Pho, A. (2016). Call for new writers! (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/2012/09/18/call-for-new-writers/
  12. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  13. Pho, A. (2016). Call for new writers! (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/2012/09/18/call-for-new-writers/
  14. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  15. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  16. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  17. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  18. Lai, P. (2013). Mapping Hack Library School. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/2013/06/14/mapping-hack-library-school/
  19. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  20. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). About. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/
  21. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  22. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
  23. Vandegrift, M. (n.d.). Guest posts. (Web log post). Retrieved from http://hacklibraryschool.com/about/guest-posts/
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