Computers in Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Computers in Libraries

ISSN: 1041-79151

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, the publication’s mission “is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs.”2

Target audience: Librarians and information professionals in academic, public, school, corporate and special libraries.3

Publisher: Information Today Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS trade publication. From How to write for Computer in Libraries: “We do not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: Computers in Libraries, per their site, “provides complete coverage of the news and issues in the rapidly evolving field of library information technology. Focusing on the practical application of technology in community, school, academic, and special libraries, CIL includes discussions of the impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems and services, and on the library community itself.”8

Frequency of publication: 10 times a year: monthly with combined Jul/Aug and Jan/Feb issues.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: Per How to Write for Computers in Libraries, “Interesting articles, written as case studies or how-we-did-it pieces. These general technical articles should be practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment — academic, public, K-12, or corporate libraries. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”10

How to Write for Computers in Libraries lists an editorial calendar with author deadlines and the detailed focus of each issue.11

CIL does not publish reviews of books or software, or general computing news.12

Submission and review process: Queries must be submitted via online Query Form.13  Computers in Libraries stresses that manuscripts are not accepted. Allow up to a month after the query deadline for a response. “After considering all ideas received, CIL will respond to each person who queried. If the article idea is accepted, then we will send you writers’€™ guidelines and discuss the article with you to ensure that your feature will fit Computers in Libraries’€™ needs and style. CIL does pay small honorariums for feature articles.”14

Editorial tone: Informal, “friendly and personal.”15

Style guide used: Computers in Libraries has specific writers’ guidelines, which are sent out to authors after the proposal is accepted. Other than that, there is no style guide specified.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

It doesn’t matter whether you are experienced or a new author: Computers in Libraries is looking for interesting articles and how-to pieces. A well written query on a relevant subject matter (written from experience) can open doors for LIS authors at this publication. The Media Kit notes that “Computers in Libraries is the library professional’€™s only venue for sharing and learning practical information about today’s library technologies,” and “CIL’€™s columnists are well-known, well-respected opinion leaders in their fields.”17 As the publication accepts submissions from working librarians regarding their technology projects, this would be an ideal place for LIS students to submit queries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 5,000 plus subscribers with another 3-4 readers acquired when each issue is passed along. Over 2,000 copies are distributed throughout the year at major library shows, including SLA and ALA, as well as Information Today, Inc.’€™s library shows: ”Computers in Libraries, Internet Librarian, and Internet Librarian International. The parent website, Information Today Inc., averages more than 50,000 visitors per month.18

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: According to WorldCat there are 2,153 libraries around the world that have Computers in Libraries on their shelves. These readers are spread all over the world: USA, Canada, Australia, Germany, Hong Kong, South Africa, and United Kingdom. Computers in Libraries focus on worldwide community of librarians who are interested in emerging technologies and their implementation.19 Computers in Libraries is published in English. Since its content is devoted to discussion of impact of emerging computer technologies on library systems, there is no cultural labels attached and author’€™s language wouldn’€™t be affected.20

Reader characteristics: General readers are average librarians in any sort of setting—academic, public, school, or special. They are not only “€œtechies”€ but also library managers, system, reference, collection, and acquisitions librarians who are making purchasing decisions about recent library tools.21

95% of Computers in Libraries readers are involved in some way in the purchasing process, including three in five who either authorize purchases or select the products. The readers “buy, lease and use products and services such as large scale integrated library systems, tools for RFID and ERM, online services, networking hardware and software, peripheral products, security tools, books, and reference tools.”22

Computers in Libraries does not publish academic pieces nor does it accept articles by vendors and publishers. From the mission statement of CIL: “CIL‘s mission is to provide librarians and other information professionals with useful and insightful information about all computer-related subjects that affect their jobs. CIL does this through articles that are written by library professionals for library professionals, with a friendly, personal voice. These general technical articles are practical and helpful for the average librarian in any sort of environment: corporate, special, academic, public, and K-12. CIL aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the field.”23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of Computers in Libraries are well informed about LIS topics and issues. They are library directors, knowledge managers, webmasters, and acquisitions librarians. Computers in Libraries does not publish articles about salaries or association trends and news; instead it devotes its pages to entirely to technology topics.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Prospective authors may wish to keep in mind that Computers in Libraries aims to publish articles that are interesting to read and appealing to people in many aspects of the computer-related library field. CIL does not include reviews of books or software and does not cover general computing news. The publication stresses several times throughout the mission statement and FAQ, that they “€œdo not publish academic research papers or vendor-written articles.”25 There is month by month table showing publication themes for the year, which include topics like managing electronic resources, open source software, technology for check-in and checkout, etc.26 This is a publication where readers will understand use of LIS jargon, as it is “by librarians, for librarians.” However, the technical writing should be geared toward general audience and be practical and helpful for the average librarian.27

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1.  Computers in Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 22, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521728654342/91053
  2. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  3. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  5. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  6. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  8. Information Today Inc. (2016). Home. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/default.shtml
  9. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  10. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  11. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  12. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  13. Information Today Inc. (2016). Computers in Libraries Online Query Form. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/query.asp
  14. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  15. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  16. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  17. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  18. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  19. OCLC WorldCat. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.worldcat.org/title/computers-in-libraries/oclc/18848244&referer=brief_results
  20. ProQuest. (2016). Computers in Libraries. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1411932182567/91054
  21. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  22. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  23. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  24. Information Today Inc. (2016). Media Kit. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/advert/default.shtml#print
  25. Information Today Inc. (2016). FAQ: Writing for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/faq.shtml
  26. Information Today Inc. (2016). How to Write for Computers in Libraries. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/contrib.shtml
  27. Information Today Inc. (2016). CIL’s Mission Statement. Computers in Libraries. Retrieved from http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/cilinfo.shtml
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