CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

Publication Profiles > LIS Professional and Trade Publications > CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: CCL Outlook: Newsletter of the Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.cclccc.org/outlook.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: The constitution of the Council of Chief Librarians (CCL) states that the organization’s purpose is “€œto represent, promote and advance libraries in public California community college education and to provide a vehicle for communication among chief librarians, other community college personnel, and state agencies.”1 The CCL Outlook supports that goal by serving as the primary means of communication between the organization and its members.

Target audience: CCL membership, which is limited to the chief librarians of each community college in California.2

Publisher: Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges.3

Peer reviewed? No. Content decisions are made by the editor.4

Type: LIS professional newsletter.5

Medium: Online.6

Content: The major portion of the material included in Outlook is news announcements from the organization itself. Each issue begins with “News from the President.” The items that follow frequently include discussions of the actions of the organization and its committees, announcements of relevant conferences and seminars, job postings, and administrative issues such as new officer elections. These items are almost always submitted by the officers or staff of the CCL.7

Additionally, some issues contain brief articles written by members or other librarians that discuss topics relevant to the membership; these have included a description of new information literacy training implemented at one college, a discussion of new teleconferencing techniques and a comparison of new OPAC software.8

Frequency of publication: Six times a year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no submission guidelines. Each issue includes the statement: “We encourage and appreciate contributions from our colleagues and friends,” along with the date of the next deadline, and the name and contact information of the editor.10

Types of contributions accepted: Most issues of Outlook include one or more brief articles (400-750 words) contributed by outside authors. These are brief summaries of topics that would be of interest to the administrators of community college libraries.11

Submission and review process: There is no stated review process. The editor is personally responsible for content decisions.12

Editorial tone: The tone of the newsletter is, not surprisingly, very informal. Much of the communication content in Outlook is frequently conversational; the articles do tend towards a more professional tone, but are still very relaxed.13

Style guide used: There is no stated style guide.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

CCL Outlook has a very small audience, and its content is limited to very brief articles; therefore publishing in this newsletter would not generate widespread name recognition, nor would it aid significantly in a tenure or promotion cause. Nevertheless, an author who is working, or hopes to work, in the field of community college libraries could gain valuable exposure in a publication that is read by their potential mangers.14

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Although it is available on the Internet for anyone to read, the CCL Outlook is intended for a group of approximately 112 library deans and directors, to whom it is sent electronically.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The chief librarians for whom the newsletter is written are specifically located in California. The community colleges at which they work are located throughout the state. The newsletter is written in English, and it would be safe to assume that all of the library directors are fluent. However, authors should be aware of the cultural diversity of the colleges at which these librarians work. California is home to many diverse communities, and so the community colleges will reflect that diversity. Many of the colleges are in highly populated areas and may have large minority populations, while other colleges are in smaller urban centers located in sparsely populated rural communities.16

Reader characteristics: The roster of members indicates that approximately 60% are female and 40% male. While no information is available concerning their ages, these are all supervising librarians, and it is probably safe to assume that they have a high degree of professional experience. The readers all work at community colleges as head librarians, and as such share many common interests. However, their professional environments should not be seen as completely homogeneous. The interests of the chief librarians at Los Angeles City College or Grossmont College in San Diego, who each supervise large staffs and serve over 16,000 students in high-density urban settings, are very different from the interests of the sole librarian at Barstow College, who serves less than 3000 students in a low-density farming community.17

Although some of the community colleges in California are small, most are large enough that the chief librarian is primarily an administrator, rather than a practicing reference librarian. As such, they will tend to consider issues from an organizational, rather than an individual, point of view. They will be less interested in a new approach to the reference interview than in a new resource that will help their librarians to provide more efficient reference services. Also, the readers are all likely to have years of professional experience, and will possibly be wary of highly theoretical approaches that they feel lack practical grounding.18

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The readers are all experienced LIS professionals who will be familiar with the operations of libraries, and the practices of librarianship. Their interests will be specific to community colleges, and so authors should be familiar with the specific needs of those institutions. While readers might not be fully current with cutting-edge research in information science, they will generally be familiar with emerging trends in librarianship.19

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

When writing for the CCL Outlook, there are three important factors that an author must consider: this is a professional rather than scholarly publication, the readers will be administrators, rather than practicing librarians, and the audience will be concerned with community colleges. Regarding the first two issues, the author must remember that the readers will be looking for practical approaches, and hopefully, solutions; authors must address big-picture issues, and focus on the implementation of projects, rather than the theory behind them. The recent contents of Outlook also indicate that readers are very interested in legislative issues that will have an impact on community colleges.20

The third consideration -€“ the orientation towards community colleges -€“ is essential. Authors should recognize that this publication is very specific to that environment. While the chief librarians are almost certainly interested in developments outside of their area, they also know that there are many other publications to which they can turn for those developments, but that Outlook is where they go for community college news.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Home. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/
  2. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Home. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/
  3. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Home. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/
  4. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
  5. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Home. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/
  6. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Home. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/
  7. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
  8. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
  9. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
  10. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
  11. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
  12. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
  13. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
  14. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Home. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/
  15. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Resources. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/resources.html
  16. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Directory. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/directory.php
  17. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Directory. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/directory.php
  18. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Directory. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/directory.php
  19. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). Directory. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/directory.php
  20. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. (2016). 2013-14 Outlook Newsletters. Council of Chief Librarians, California Community Colleges. Retrieved from http://cclccc.org/outlook.html
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