Wiki Categories Archives: LIS Professional and Trade Publications

Online Searcher

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are 27% academic librarians, 24% special librarians, 21% public librarians.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as a this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
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Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
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Everyday Advocacy Matters

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Everyday Advocacy Matters

ISSN: N/A

Websitehttp://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/everyday-advocacy-matters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Everyday Advocacy, an initiative of ALSC (a division of ALA), was launched in May 2013 after the ALSC’s executive committee came together to discuss two major issues:

  • How can ALSC educate policy makers on the importance of children’s service?
  • How can ALSC assist youth service librarians to articulate their value within their profession and the community?

Along with the new Everyday Advocacy website, the ALSC Board of Directors approved of a newsletter promoting “20-minute” advocacy.1

Everyday Advocacy Matters is a quarterly, electronic newsletter featuring simple, effective ways to learn, share, and make a difference in local library communities.”2 Content for each issue is related to Everyday Advocacy’s five tenets: Be Informed, Engage With Your Community, Speak Out, Get Inspired and Share Your Advocacy Story.3

Target audience: The primary audience is members of ALSC and children’s librarians, the secondary audience is anyone who advocates for children and libraries.4

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Electronic.

Content: Each issue features five sections:5

  • From the Editor: A friendly welcome to each issue’s seasonal focus.
  • Everyday Advocacy Spotlight: Features to help you focus your advocacy efforts.
  • News You Can Use: The latest reports, data and stories that readers may find useful in their own libraries.
  • Get Inspired: A section that often features a “Savvy Success Story” highlighting an inspirational member of the community.
  • Calendar: Key dates and events for “learning, sharing and making a difference.”

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Send submissions to Amy Martin. Her email address can be found on EAM‘s home page.

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions that are appropriate for one of the five sections listed above. For a better example, here are the call to submissions for the October 2017 issue:

  • Everyday Advocacy Spotlight. We’re looking for short articles (250-500 words) to use as our Savvy Success Story feature.
  • News You Can Use. Help us highlight advocacy events, opportunities, and news items our colleagues can use to learn, share, and make a difference for youth and families in their library communities.
  • Get Inspired! Let us know what motivates you and helps keep you going as an Everyday Advocate so we can inspire others, too.”7

Submission and review process: Unknown, but be mindful of copy deadlines and mailing dates for upcoming issues.8

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

EAM could be a great potential outlet if you have something to say that’s more on the informal side. If you’ve been doing advocacy work at your local library, or you know someone who has, this newsletter may be a great place to showcase it.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC and ALA.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are likely members of ALA, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals and students with a passion for advocacy in libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

EAM readers are well-versed in the library world and have a passion for doing meaningful work in their communities. They are already members of ALA and ALSC, so networking and community are at the forefront of their work.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About Everyday Advocacy,” ALA.org, accessed March 20, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/about
  2. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page,” ALA.org, accessed March 12, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/everyday-advocacy-matters
  3. “Everyday Advocacy,” ALA.org, accessed March 19, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
  6. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
  7. “Everyday Advocacy Matters – July 2017,” ALA.org, accessed March 19, 2018,
  8. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
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BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
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ALSC Matters!

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALSC Matters! (formerly ALSConnect)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly ALSConnect, ALSC Matters is a newsletter for ALSC members highlighting activities and information of interest for librarians working with children.1

Target audience: LIS professionals who work with children.

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Online.

Content: Apart from general ALSC news, ALSC Matters! also features:

  • Bright Ideas: highlights ideas in planning services and programming in libraries around the country.
    • Example: Group summer reading programs in Utah daycares and summer schools.
  • Hear Ye! Hear Ye!: discusses resources, events and honors of interest to ALSC members
    • Example: ALSC members who received the I Love My Librarian Award in 2017.
  • ALSC Voices: highlights members, showcases ALSC profiles and includes interviews with ALSC members
    • Example: Q & A profile on a senior children’s librarian in New York.

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Found on the About ALSC Matters! page. Submissions should be sent to Laura Schulte-Cooper.

Types of contributions accepted: News information to be featured in Bright Ideas, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! or ALSC Voices.

Submission and review process: Unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, children’s librarians may be interested in submitting short pieces showcasing new and interesting activities and programs they have been implementing at their local libraries. If LIS authors have been nominated or have won an award pertaining to work as a children’s librarian he or she may want to submit it to Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC receive issues of ALSC Matters!, though non-members can also subscribe using an online form.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers of ALSC Matters! are likely ALA members, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals or perhaps students working in the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of ALSC Matters! are professionals and students already involved in the field of children’s librarianship. ALSC Matters! may be a good venue for you to showcase projects that could be a source of inspiration, as well as relevant events and LIS happenings.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “About ALSC Matters!,” ALA.org, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/alsconnectonline/aboutalsconnect/aboutalsconnect
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
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Journal of Web Librarianship (JWL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Web Librarianship (JWL)

ISSN: 1932-2909 (Print) and 1932-2917 (Online).1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, “The Journal of Web Librarianship is an international, peer-reviewed journal focused on all aspects of librarianship as practiced on the World Wide Web, including both existing and emerging roles and activities of information professionals.”2

Target audience: Information professionals (worldwide) interested in Web-based librarianship.3

Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: Hybrid: LIS scholarly journal and LIS professional news source. JWL is a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal which also publishes a significant number of professional articles. Taylor and Francis mentions that JWL “strives to find a balance between original, scholarly research, and practical communications.”6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The journal covers a wide variety of topics, including library website design and usability, strategies for cataloging web information, Web 2.0 technologies (i.e., wikis, RSS, etc.), search engines, and the future of web librarianship.8 Issues contain editorials, articles, professional communications, global connections, and reviews.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their site, “The Journal of Web Librarianship welcomes articles covering topics including but not limited to library web page design and redesigns, web project management, usability testing of library or library-related sites, cataloging or classification of Web information, international issues in web librarianship, library integration with other web sites, and future aspects of web librarianship. The journal is also interested in articles related to user behavior on the web, including search behaviors, social networking site trends, and the connection between the web-at-large and library web resources.”11

“The journal accepts empirical studies providing objective evidence related to current web-related challenges for libraries, including usability test reports, user survey results, and analyses of web statistics. The journal will also consider case studies of cutting-edge web projects in all types of libraries and best practices based on library experiences, literature, tutorials, and literature reviews.”12

Submission and review process: Work is submitted via the ScholarOne Manuscripts program and must be accompanied by a statement that the manuscript has not been published or submitted elsewhere. Articles should contain a 100 to 200-word abstract.13

Authors can expect JWL‘s double-blind peer review process to take anywhere from six to eight weeks. Additionally, two editors typically review each manuscript, adding an additional layer of objectivity.14

Editorial tone: Most manuscripts should have a scholarly, unbiased tone (e.g., scholarly research articles). Considering that the journal also publishes practical communications, it seems reasonable to assume that these non-scholarly communications should have a slightly more down-to-earth tone.15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JWL is a relatively new journal (its first issue was released in 2007),17, its credible and highly relevant information on “hot” topics in LIS make it an exciting and unique publishing opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and student authors. LIS practitioners could submit a case study on the practical application of a Web 2.0 technology in their workplace, while educators might conduct original research in the field of virtual librarianship. LIS students could submit an interview, an article describing an internship experience practiced in the Web environment, or an in-depth literature review (to name but a few options).

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although there is no detailed information available regarding the geographic location of JWL readers, a significant portion of the publication’s content is devoted to international issues. For example, many issues feature a “Global Connections” section, which has featured articles on Jamaica, Scotland, South Africa, and Egypt.18 Additionally, editors from all over the world serve on the Editorial Board.19 Thus, although the journal is published solely in American English, authors should limit their use of colloquialisms and specific cultural references.20

Reader characteristics: No demographic information is available for JWL readers. Since the journal is published in American English and is geared towards Web-based technologies, it seems safe to assume that most readers live in the U.S., work in information-based organizations, and are technologically inclined.21 In addition to information professionals of all types, LIS students are likely to be part of the journal’s core audience. Regardless of their profession, readers of JWL almost certainly share common professional interests, such as virtual library services or web design.22

JWL readers are likely to have established attitudes about the future direction of librarianship and might be considered progressive (especially in light of how articles in previous issues have enthusiastically advocated for new technologies and services).23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: JWL readers are likely to be knowledgeable about certain LIS jargon and subjects, such as those that specifically relate to technology and Internet use in librarianship.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because JWL is both a professional and scholarly journal, authors have multiple opportunities to reach readers. Whether an author decides to submit a theoretical research paper or a practical case study, it is important to focus the work on the highly specialized interests of JWL readers. As mentioned in the Publication Analysis, appropriate topics might include such issues as Web 2.0/Library 2.0, web design and usability testing, international or comparative issues in web librarianship, or the future of the profession. In order to connect with this audience, articles should demonstrate superior technological expertise and cutting-edge research.

Last updated: February 17, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wjwl20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  4.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  5. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  6.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Taylor and Francis, accessed February 16, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/jwl-cfp16
  7.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  9. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  10. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  15.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  17. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  18. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  19. “Editorial Board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7tDhbGdROg
  20. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  21. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  23. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  24. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 17, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
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The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

ISSN: 2379-95281

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.2 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”3 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”4

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.5

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.6

Peer reviewed? Yes.7

Type: LIS professional news.8

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.9

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  The Active Librarian, Michael J. Carlozzi, accessed March 18, 2018, http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

ISSN: 1931-54731

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.2 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”3

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.4

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.7

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.10

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.11

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members13; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.14

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 14 footnotes

  1.  SCA Newsletter, Society of California Archivists (SCA), accessed March 18, 2018, http://calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  3.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  4. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  5.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  13. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  14.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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