Wiki Categories Archives: LIS Professional and Trade Publications

American Indian Library Association Newsletter

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: American Indian Library Association Newsletter

ISSN: 2152-35251

Website: https://www.ailanet.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Their website states, “An affiliate of the American Library Association, the American Indian Library Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.”2 “The American Indian Libraries Newsletter is an official publication of the American Indian Library Association. It includes information about decisions, goals, activities, and business meetings of AILA, as well as articles on programs, projects, grants, and resources relating to American Indian culture and library and information services. A column by the current president is a regular feature. In addition, you will find books reviews, interviews, and other information that furthers the goals of the association. “3

Target audience: Individuals and institutions interested in working to improve library services to American Indians and Alaska Natives in every type of library.4

Publisher: The American Indian Library Association (AILA)5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: LIS professional newsletter.7

Medium: Print and online.8

Content: This is the official publication of the American Indian Library Association. Per their website, it includes “committee and member updates and events; interviews with indigenous authors; scholarly articles; and conference program details.”9

Frequency of publication: Twice a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Submission guidelines are not listed online, but you can contact the newsletter editor, George Gottschalk, for more information about submitting work to the newsletter.11

Types of contributions accepted: Their website states that the newsletter “contains information of professional interest to AILA’s members.” Contributions include updates, events, scholarly articles, author interviews, and conference program details. Book and media reviews are published on the AILA website. 12

Submission and review process: All inquiries should be directed to the editor, George Gottschalk.13

Editorial tone: An overview of recent, archived issues suggests that articles should be informative and engaging for library professionals without relying on technical jargon.14

Style guide used: No style guidelines are listed for the newsletter.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

LIS professionals who are interested in submitting articles should consider contacting the editor, whose information appears on the AILA Publications website. Even though there are no submission guidelines listed, many of the articles are written by members. Interested authors can see the types of articles accepted by looking at previous submissions to the newsletter.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: While membership and circulation numbers are unavailable, the newsletter is mailed to all AILA members and digital copies are available to those without memberships.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Members are located throughout the United States and Canada.17 The newsletter is written in English18 and contains library terminology. Readers are aware of the different tribes and expect articles to identify specific tribes and/or bands. Some cultural considerations that authors need to consider may be using the correct term to identify American Indian people. Some readers may object to the term American Indian or Native American. This publication uses the term American Indian in their articles.19

Reader characteristics: “Members are individuals and institutions interested in the development of programs to improve Indian library, cultural, and informational services in school, public, and research libraries on reservations.” Readers are tribal librarians, are associated with tribal libraries or have an interest in issues that affect library and information services for American Indian people. Some readers may be educators in a Native community, or public librarians working with Native people. It is assumed that many readers have LIS degrees. Readers value respect of American Indian communities and their drive to be self sufficient. Factors that aid in independence, such as programs to assist under served American Indian tribal members located on the reservation are important issues and a conduit for receiving that information is the American Indian Library Association Newsletter.20€

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are familiar with library terminology and the use of LIS jargon is present but does not dominate in the publication. Articles are written for a professional, educated audience.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The American Indian Library Association Newsletter is a respected publication read by librarians and other interested individuals who provide services to American Indian people. Authors writing for this publication will gain recognition within the American Indian LIS community. If published, authors will have a small but concentrated audience of American Indian library professionals. Authors have a good chance of being published if they involve tribal colleges and library-related issues in some way. When writing for this newsletter, it is suggested that authors include tribal affiliation of American Indian people.

Authors that are interested in submitting articles may consider topics such as the future for tribal libraries, improving services for traditionally underserved populations, or articles regarding reading and American Indian children.

Last updated: April 12, 2019


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  American Indian Library Association Newsletter, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 06, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521736632647/124732
  2. American Indian Library Association. (2016). About. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/about-aila/
  3. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/frequently-asked-questions/#q5
  4. American Indian Library Association. (2016). About. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). American Indian Library Association Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401987299832/124732
  6. SerialsSolutions. (2016). American Indian Library Association Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401987299832/124732
  7. SerialsSolutions. (2016). American Indian Library Association Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401987299832/124732
  8. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  9. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  10. SerialsSolutions. (2016). American Indian Library Association Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401987299832/124732
  11. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  12. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  13. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  14. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Newsletters. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/newsletter/
  15. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  16. American Indian Library Association. (2016). Publications. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/publications/
  17. American Indian Library Association. (2016). About. Retrieved from http://ailanet.org/about/
  18. SerialsSolutions. (2016). American Indian Library Association Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1401987299832/124732
  19. American Indian Library Association. (2016). About. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/
  20. American Indian Library Association. (2016). About. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/
  21. American Indian Library Association. (2016). About. Retrieved from https://ailanet.org/about/
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AALL Spectrum

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: AALL Spectrum

ISSN: 1089-86891

Website: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Spectrum is the professional magazine for the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) and is included in association membership. This publication “provides informative and engaging articles of interest to AALL members. The magazine informs readers about the ever-changing, multifaceted world of legal information professionals on areas including the transformation of law, career and leadership development, accessibility, education, information technology, and best practices. The magazine also keeps members apprised of Association events and activities.”2

Target audience: Members of AALL are the target audience: members are law librarians in a variety of settings, including academic law school libraries, private firms libraries, judicial and government libraries, and public law libraries for counties and states, as well as other legal information professionals.3

Publisher: American Association of Law Libraries4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional and trade publication. This is an informal publication of AALL, primarily for association news and short practical pieces that would be of interest to practicing law librarians.6 Though it is not a scholarly journal, it is very well respected and has a high profile in its field.

Medium: Spectrum is a print publication sent free to all AALL members.7 The archives are available online back to mid-1998 at the Spectrum website.8

Content: Spectrum includes articles on subjects of interest to law librarians, especially practical pieces on marketing the library and management tips. The scholarly journal for AALL is titled Law Library Journal;  Spectrum publishes informational pieces more informally written but still of practical use to law librarians.9

Frequency of publication: Spectrum is published six times a year.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/editorial-policy/

Types of contributions accepted: Spectrum includes a mix of trend or feature stories, news briefs, regular columns, and opinion pieces about issues that affect legal information and law librarianship as well as Association events and activities.11

Submission and review process: The publishing guidelines indicate that “Spectrum prefers a thorough, detailed proposal letter that fully outlines the article topic.”12

Regarding article length, they note that “Feature articles should be between 2,000 and 2,500 words. News and department articles are typically between 800 and 1,200 words. Shorter or longer articles will be considered. “13

After submitting a query letter, the author should submit the requested article electronically, with any graphics in a separate file. “All submissions will be edited for clarity, grammar, and length.” “Whenever possible, the author will be contacted by either the AALL Spectrum editorial director or AALL publications manager to discuss questions of intention and interpretation.”14

Editorial tone: Reviewing the articles themselves, it appears that Spectrum attempts to include articles that will be of interest to firm, academic, and government librarians rather than focusing on just one type of library. The submission guidelines request “authoritative, well-researched articles about legal information and the profession.  Articles that inform, inspire, provoke, influence, or help improve practices are welcome additions to AALL Spectrum. Each submission should be an original, educational piece.”15

Style guide used: Spectrum follows The Chicago Manual of Style Seventeenth Edition and Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, Eleventh Edition for style and usage, as well as an AALL Style Guide.16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

AALL Spectrum is the best place to engage in the informal professional conversation surrounding law librarianship. Though it is not as high profile or scholarly as Law Library Journal, it may be more widely read, and will help any law librarian make a name for him or herself. The quality of writing is very high, as are the editorial standards. However, it is not appropriate for professors seeking tenure to boost publications, as it is not a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Spectrum is sent free to all AALL members. The archives for this publication are available online at the AALL website,17 and Ulrich’s Periodical Directory indicates that they are also searchable on various LIS databases (including EBSCOhost, H.W. Wilson products, and Thomson Gale databases).18 It is possible the articles will reach non-law librarian readers through these sources.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The main circulation of this magazine is within the United States, but AALL does have some international members. Unfortunately, international demographics were not available on the Spectrum site, advertising materials, AALL Salary Survey, or AALL member information.19 Spectrum is written in American English, and is primarily interested in legal librarianship relevant to the United States.20 If international subjects are covered, the legal systems will require more explanation. An example of international coverage is “Beyond the Spectrum,” by Shaikh Mohamed Noordin, available for download.21

Reader characteristics: AALL reports over 4,000 members, roughly half of whom work in an academic or law school setting. The most populated Special Interest Sections of AALL members are Academic Law Libraries and Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals.22  All librarians in AALL are either law librarians or are interested in the organization of legal information.  This publication is run by, written by, and edited by law librarians, and as such tends to reflect the dominant views of the profession. It’s analytical; fairly negative towards vendors, but strives to be fair; focuses primarily on academic and firm librarian concerns (such as training law students or new attorneys) and to a lesser extent of government librarianship.23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians, so a high degree of specialized language and knowledge of LIS principles and information can be assumed. However, specialized information from non-law library disciplines or terms specific to certain jobs (such as cataloging or database administration) require explanation.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors interested in publishing in Spectrum are advised to list their qualifications in their cover letters, as this audience respects degrees and library experience. Though the publication is focused entirely on law librarianship, general subjects of interest to LIS professionals will overlap in this field — for instance, information on Web 2.0 is of great interest to law librarians, and recent articles have dealt with how Second Life can be used in libraries. It is best, even with general topics, to make it evident how the subject could be useful to a law librarian.24

Last updated: March 24, 2019


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 21, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521387398626/111034
  2. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, http://www.aallnet.org/main-menu/Publications/spectrum/policy-spectrum.html
  3. “AALL Spectrum,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/resources-publications/publications/aall-spectrum/
  4. “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 21, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399332352226/111034
  5. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  6. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  7. “AALL Spectrum.”
  8. “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/spectrum_issue/
  9. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  10. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  11. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  12. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  13. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  14. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  15. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  16. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  17. “AALL Spectrum Issues Archive.”
  18. “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 21, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399332352226/111034
  19. “Meet Our Members,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/meet-our-members/
  20. “AALL Spectrum,” Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 21, 2019, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1399332352226/111034
  21. Noordin, Shaikh Mohamed. “Perspective: Beyond the Spectrum.” Spectrum, 10, no. 6 (2006): 12-13, 17, https://www.aallnet.org/wp-content/uploads/_mediavault/2017/11/pub_sp0604_Persp.pdf (accessed March 24, 2019).
  22. “By the Numbers,” American Association of Law Libraries, accessed March 24, 2019, https://www.aallnet.org/community/membership/by-the-numbers/
  23. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
  24. “AALL Spectrum Editorial Policy.”
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Interactions (ACM)

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Interactions

ISSN: 1072-5520 (Print) and 1558-3449 (Online)1

Website: http://interactions.acm.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Interactions is a trade magazine that is interested in the specific locus of culture, communication, and technology. While the magazine is not librarian specific, most of its content is relevant. From the website: “It is a multiplicity of conversations, collaborations, relationships, and new discoveries focusing on how and why we interact with the designed world of technologies.”2

Target audience: Professionals interested in best practices and methodologies regarding communicative interactions. “Each issue reaches thousands of designers, managers, researchers, and product specialists who wield great influence within their own companies and institutions and throughout the computing industries.”3

Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). Read more about the publisher here: http://www.acm.org/publications/.

Peer reviewed? No. Submissions to Interactions are reviewed by an internal review board, and then may be returned for edits and changes before final acceptance.4

Type: Information professional and interface design trade magazine.5

Medium: Electronic and print.6

Content: Practical essays on design, computing, research methods, best practices, etc. as they relate to technology, and more importantly, the interaction between people and technology. “Interactions has a special voice that lies between practice and research with an emphasis on making engaging human-computer interaction research accessible to practitioners and on making practitioners voices heard by researchers.”7

Frequency of publication: Six times a year.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:

Interactions guidelines: http://interactions.acm.org/submissions

ACM guidelines: http://www.acm.org/publications/authors/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: From the site:

“Word document (minimally formatted text and graphics) that includes a short, crisp working title or headline, and a standard byline: author name, affiliation, email address.”9

“All articles should contain no more than six endnotes/references.”10

“Brief author biography (50-word maximum) for each author listed in the byline. A bio generally includes the author’s current affiliation and his/her research interests.”11

The submission page also states specific formatting guidelines for images, and asks that writers have permission to use any third-party material in their submission.12

Submission and review process: From the website: “Articles go through several rounds of editing: first with the magazines editors-in-chief and forum editors for relevance, clarity, and groundedness and then with ACM’s managing editor and copy editor for grammar, punctuation, and length. ACM staff will send authors the copyedited version for their review. Once they have approved the copyedited version, authors will not review the copy again. Authors may be asked to review any redrawn figures.”13

Editorial tone: The publication’s tone is direct, inclusive, and conversational. Authors should avoid jargon, academic language, and references.14

Style guide used: The ACM uses a citation style that is detailed here: https://www.acm.org/publications/authors/reference-formatting

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Interactions has great potential for LIS professionals. Looking through the archives, one can see such essay topics as “Bridging the gap between accessibility and usability,” “Digital government information services: the Bureau of Labor statistics case,” “Web 2.0 and beyond,” and “Designing useful and usable questionnaires: you can’t just ‘throw a questionnaire together’.” While the magazine is not specific to librarians and does seem to focus on user interface design, its primary stated theme is the interaction of humans and technology. LIS professionals, whether they are reference librarians, information architects, or database administrators, all have direct experience and knowledge in this subject that can inspire meaningful written work.15

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: No numbers given. According to the section “For Advertisers”: “Each issue reaches thousands of designers, managers, researchers, and product specialists who wield great influence within their own companies and institutions and throughout the computing industries.”16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: International. The members of the Interactions advisory and editorial boards are located throughout the United States and as far as Korea.17 English is the dominant language of Interactions, but because it is both print and electronic the readership is dispersed geographically. As such, area-specific language should be avoided — especially since the specific focus of Interactions is the practices that increase better communication.18

Reader characteristics: Judging from the articles in Interactions archives, the average reader is most likely a professional working in field that utilizes technology as an interface with other patrons, clients, and customers. A quote from the history page and attributed to John Rheinfrank and Bill Hefley states that, “Today a widely distributed diverse community of working professionals is inventing a reality where the use of computing resources will have a profound impact on the quality of everyday life. And so we are practicing in a field where the gradient of change is staggering, the boundaries fuzzy, and the component parts only loosely aggregated.”19 This description very much includes LIS professionals, and as such the language used can be technical, but should not be library-specific.

Judging from the portions of the articles available without a subscription, and correlating this to the magazine’s readership, potential authors can be assured of at least one thing regarding their readership: an interest in innovative ideas relating to the intersections of culture, technology, and interaction. The magazine is certainly not just for LIS professionals, but if a librarian had a piece that was fresh, innovative, and surprising, the piece could easily find a home in Interactions.20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The average reader will probably not have both a clear and broad knowledge of LIS subject matter; however, the average reader will probably have a very good understanding of human/technology interactions (user interfaces, information architecture, web 2.0, content management systems). Thus, those LIS professionals interested in writing about this aspect of the profession should have a easy time understanding for whom they are writing.21

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

After perusing the site, I can easily imagine both upper level managers in software companies looking for potential market edges and 30-something punk-rock designers interested in community development and technology reading this magazine. The two most important elements for potential writers to keep in mind are to display some degree of “lateral thinking” and/or to write on unique and, above all, useful perspectives regarding interaction and technology; these could be reports, analyses, experiments, or original research)

Interactions is a multidisciplinary magazine that overlaps with many topics in which many librarians are interested. Some technical jargon is to be expected, and readers will be well acquainted with terms relating to user-interfaces, web design and aesthetics. Because this publication is published by the Association for Computing Machinery, terminology relating to computers and software is likely to be well understood by the journal’s readership.

Authors should not, however, assume that any piece they have written relating to computers or interfaces will be appropriate for the journal. Interactions is very specifically interested in communication and technology.22 Thus a piece written on the research and production of a clever piece of code would not be appropriate to the journal. A piece talking about how some clever coding affected users’ interactivity with the interface or each other would be, however, perfect.

Last updated: February 16, 2019


References

Show 22 footnotes

  1.  Interactions, Association for Computing Memory, accessed February 16, 2019, https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3190768&dl=ACM&coll=DL
  2. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). About ACM Interactions. Interactions. Retrieved from  http://interactions.acm.org/about
  3. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). For Advertisers. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/for-advertisers
  4. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Submissions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  5. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). About ACM Interactions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/about
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Interactions (New York). Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412282554209/237122
  7. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). About ACM Interactions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/about
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Interactions (New York). Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412282554209/237122
  9. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Submissions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  10. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Submissions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  11. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Submissions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  12. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Submissions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  13. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Submissions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  14. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Submissions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/submissions
  15. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Archives. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/archive
  16. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). For Advertisers. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/for-advertisers
  17. Association for Computing Machinery. (2014). About ACM Interactions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/about
  18. ProQuest. (2016). Interactions (New York). Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412282554209/237122
  19. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Archives. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/archive
  20. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). Archives. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/archive
  21. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). About ACM Interactions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/about
  22. Association for Computing Machinery. (2016). About ACM Interactions. Interactions. Retrieved from http://interactions.acm.org/about
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Online Searcher

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are 27% academic librarians, 24% special librarians, 21% public librarians.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as a this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
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Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
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Everyday Advocacy Matters

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Everyday Advocacy Matters

ISSN: N/A

Websitehttp://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/everyday-advocacy-matters

Purpose, objective, or mission: Everyday Advocacy, an initiative of ALSC (a division of ALA), was launched in May 2013 after the ALSC’s executive committee came together to discuss two major issues:

  • How can ALSC educate policy makers on the importance of children’s service?
  • How can ALSC assist youth service librarians to articulate their value within their profession and the community?

Along with the new Everyday Advocacy website, the ALSC Board of Directors approved of a newsletter promoting “20-minute” advocacy.1

Everyday Advocacy Matters is a quarterly, electronic newsletter featuring simple, effective ways to learn, share, and make a difference in local library communities.”2 Content for each issue is related to Everyday Advocacy’s five tenets: Be Informed, Engage With Your Community, Speak Out, Get Inspired and Share Your Advocacy Story.3

Target audience: The primary audience is members of ALSC and children’s librarians, the secondary audience is anyone who advocates for children and libraries.4

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Electronic.

Content: Each issue features five sections:5

  • From the Editor: A friendly welcome to each issue’s seasonal focus.
  • Everyday Advocacy Spotlight: Features to help you focus your advocacy efforts.
  • News You Can Use: The latest reports, data and stories that readers may find useful in their own libraries.
  • Get Inspired: A section that often features a “Savvy Success Story” highlighting an inspirational member of the community.
  • Calendar: Key dates and events for “learning, sharing and making a difference.”

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Send submissions to Amy Martin. Her email address can be found on EAM‘s home page.

Types of contributions accepted: Submissions that are appropriate for one of the five sections listed above. For a better example, here are the call to submissions for the October 2017 issue:

  • Everyday Advocacy Spotlight. We’re looking for short articles (250-500 words) to use as our Savvy Success Story feature.
  • News You Can Use. Help us highlight advocacy events, opportunities, and news items our colleagues can use to learn, share, and make a difference for youth and families in their library communities.
  • Get Inspired! Let us know what motivates you and helps keep you going as an Everyday Advocate so we can inspire others, too.”7

Submission and review process: Unknown, but be mindful of copy deadlines and mailing dates for upcoming issues.8

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

EAM could be a great potential outlet if you have something to say that’s more on the informal side. If you’ve been doing advocacy work at your local library, or you know someone who has, this newsletter may be a great place to showcase it.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC and ALA.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are likely members of ALA, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals and students with a passion for advocacy in libraries.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

EAM readers are well-versed in the library world and have a passion for doing meaningful work in their communities. They are already members of ALA and ALSC, so networking and community are at the forefront of their work.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About Everyday Advocacy,” ALA.org, accessed March 20, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/about
  2. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page,” ALA.org, accessed March 12, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/everyday-advocacy-matters
  3. “Everyday Advocacy,” ALA.org, accessed March 19, 2018, http://www.ala.org/everyday-advocacy/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
  6. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
  7. “Everyday Advocacy Matters – July 2017,” ALA.org, accessed March 19, 2018,
  8. “Everyday Advocacy Matters Home Page.”
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BayNet

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: BayNet Newsletter

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://baynetlibs.org/news/current-newsletter/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The BayNet Newsletter gives members of the San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network (BayNet) a place to share their news with other members of the organization. BayNet is a multidisciplinary library association dedicated to bringing together librarians, archivists, and information professionals from all over the Bay Area so they can share and learn from each other.

Target audience: LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California.

Publisher: San Francisco Bay Area Library and Information Network.

Peer reviewed? No, but “the editor reserves the right to make editorial revisions, deletions, or additions that, in their opinion, supports the author’s intent. When changes are substantial, every effort is made to work with the author.” This applies to both article blog posts and newsletter submissions.1

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.

Medium: Online newsletter + blog.

Content: BayNet’s site contains job notices, relevant news, events and more. See ‘Types of contributions accepted’ below for more information from the editor on what the newsletter contains.

Frequency of publication: New posts added multiple times a week; BayNet’s newsletter is published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/

Types of contributions accepted: According to a January 4, 2016 email from editor Collin Thormoto to the BayNet membership, “The BayNet Newsletter is looking for articles on a wide variety of topics: professional news, events, workshops, seminars, and issues or events of interest. If there’s something going on in the world of archives that you’re excited about, let everyone know! If you just got a new library program and want to tell people about it, then this is the place. And if you have an event that you want to make sure is packed, we’ve got your audience right here… Pictures are encouraged and will be published in full color.”

Submission and review process: “Electronic submissions are preferred. Submissions should be sent to collin.thormoto@gmail.com with the phrase “BayNet Newsletter Submission” in the subject line.”3

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

BayNet may be a good outlet for LIS authors in the area who have recent news or information pertinent to the Bay Area and beyond–events are especially welcome. The Winter 2017 issue features an article on the 2.016 virtual conference as well as information on increasing libraries’ social media presence. These articles are relevant to the area but not necessarily limited to Bay Area residents.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can join BayNet’s mailing list. In addition to the website and newsletter, there is also a Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Listserv that readers can access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is geared towards LIS professionals in the San Francisco Bay area of California. Articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: BayNet is a place for networking, sharing information and fostering connections, so it can be assumed that readers are professionals in the field interested in the latest LIS news for the Bay Area.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Feel free to include your LIS jargon–readers are professionals working in the field across all aspects of librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

As seen in the current newsletter and the above mentioned email from the editor, the BayNet newsletter is read by professionals across all LIS fields. Readers are eager to hear about Bay Area events and the latest information that is relevant to their jobs.

Last updated: April 3, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “Submission Guidelines,” BayNetLibs.org, accessed March 22, 2018, https://baynetlibs.org/news/submission-guidelines/
  2. “Submission Guidelines.”
  3. “Submission Guidelines.”
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ALSC Matters!

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: ALSC Matters! (formerly ALSConnect)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Formerly ALSConnect, ALSC Matters is a newsletter for ALSC members highlighting activities and information of interest for librarians working with children.1

Target audience: LIS professionals who work with children.

Publisher: ALA Association for Library Service to Children

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional newsletter.

Medium: Online.

Content: Apart from general ALSC news, ALSC Matters! also features:

  • Bright Ideas: highlights ideas in planning services and programming in libraries around the country.
    • Example: Group summer reading programs in Utah daycares and summer schools.
  • Hear Ye! Hear Ye!: discusses resources, events and honors of interest to ALSC members
    • Example: ALSC members who received the I Love My Librarian Award in 2017.
  • ALSC Voices: highlights members, showcases ALSC profiles and includes interviews with ALSC members
    • Example: Q & A profile on a senior children’s librarian in New York.

Frequency of publication: Published quarterly.2

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Found on the About ALSC Matters! page. Submissions should be sent to Laura Schulte-Cooper.

Types of contributions accepted: News information to be featured in Bright Ideas, Hear Ye! Hear Ye! or ALSC Voices.

Submission and review process: Unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

By reading previous newsletters, children’s librarians may be interested in submitting short pieces showcasing new and interesting activities and programs they have been implementing at their local libraries. If LIS authors have been nominated or have won an award pertaining to work as a children’s librarian he or she may want to submit it to Hear Ye! Hear Ye!

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Members of ALSC receive issues of ALSC Matters!, though non-members can also subscribe using an online form.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers of ALSC Matters! are likely ALA members, therefore they will be North American librarians.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS professionals or perhaps students working in the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Considering that ALSC is for professionals, LIS knowledge will be strong.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of ALSC Matters! are professionals and students already involved in the field of children’s librarianship. ALSC Matters! may be a good venue for you to showcase projects that could be a source of inspiration, as well as relevant events and LIS happenings.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 3 footnotes

  1. “About ALSC Matters!,” ALA.org, accessed March 7, 2018, http://www.ala.org/alsc/alscconnectonline/alsconnectonline/aboutalsconnect/aboutalsconnect
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
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Journal of Web Librarianship (JWL)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Web Librarianship (JWL)

ISSN: 1932-2909 (Print) and 1932-2917 (Online).1

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20

Purpose, objective, or mission: According to their site, “The Journal of Web Librarianship is an international, peer-reviewed journal focused on all aspects of librarianship as practiced on the World Wide Web, including both existing and emerging roles and activities of information professionals.”2

Target audience: Information professionals (worldwide) interested in Web-based librarianship.3

Publisher: Taylor & Francis, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? Yes.5

Type: Hybrid: LIS scholarly journal and LIS professional news source. JWL is a peer-reviewed, scholarly journal which also publishes a significant number of professional articles. Taylor and Francis mentions that JWL “strives to find a balance between original, scholarly research, and practical communications.”6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: The journal covers a wide variety of topics, including library website design and usability, strategies for cataloging web information, Web 2.0 technologies (i.e., wikis, RSS, etc.), search engines, and the future of web librarianship.8 Issues contain editorials, articles, professional communications, global connections, and reviews.9

Frequency of publication: Quarterly.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: Per their site, “The Journal of Web Librarianship welcomes articles covering topics including but not limited to library web page design and redesigns, web project management, usability testing of library or library-related sites, cataloging or classification of Web information, international issues in web librarianship, library integration with other web sites, and future aspects of web librarianship. The journal is also interested in articles related to user behavior on the web, including search behaviors, social networking site trends, and the connection between the web-at-large and library web resources.”11

“The journal accepts empirical studies providing objective evidence related to current web-related challenges for libraries, including usability test reports, user survey results, and analyses of web statistics. The journal will also consider case studies of cutting-edge web projects in all types of libraries and best practices based on library experiences, literature, tutorials, and literature reviews.”12

Submission and review process: Work is submitted via the ScholarOne Manuscripts program and must be accompanied by a statement that the manuscript has not been published or submitted elsewhere. Articles should contain a 100 to 200-word abstract.13

Authors can expect JWL‘s double-blind peer review process to take anywhere from six to eight weeks. Additionally, two editors typically review each manuscript, adding an additional layer of objectivity.14

Editorial tone: Most manuscripts should have a scholarly, unbiased tone (e.g., scholarly research articles). Considering that the journal also publishes practical communications, it seems reasonable to assume that these non-scholarly communications should have a slightly more down-to-earth tone.15

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

JWL is a relatively new journal (its first issue was released in 2007),17, its credible and highly relevant information on “hot” topics in LIS make it an exciting and unique publishing opportunity for LIS practitioners, educators, and student authors. LIS practitioners could submit a case study on the practical application of a Web 2.0 technology in their workplace, while educators might conduct original research in the field of virtual librarianship. LIS students could submit an interview, an article describing an internship experience practiced in the Web environment, or an in-depth literature review (to name but a few options).

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Although there is no detailed information available regarding the geographic location of JWL readers, a significant portion of the publication’s content is devoted to international issues. For example, many issues feature a “Global Connections” section, which has featured articles on Jamaica, Scotland, South Africa, and Egypt.18 Additionally, editors from all over the world serve on the Editorial Board.19 Thus, although the journal is published solely in American English, authors should limit their use of colloquialisms and specific cultural references.20

Reader characteristics: No demographic information is available for JWL readers. Since the journal is published in American English and is geared towards Web-based technologies, it seems safe to assume that most readers live in the U.S., work in information-based organizations, and are technologically inclined.21 In addition to information professionals of all types, LIS students are likely to be part of the journal’s core audience. Regardless of their profession, readers of JWL almost certainly share common professional interests, such as virtual library services or web design.22

JWL readers are likely to have established attitudes about the future direction of librarianship and might be considered progressive (especially in light of how articles in previous issues have enthusiastically advocated for new technologies and services).23

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: JWL readers are likely to be knowledgeable about certain LIS jargon and subjects, such as those that specifically relate to technology and Internet use in librarianship.24

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Because JWL is both a professional and scholarly journal, authors have multiple opportunities to reach readers. Whether an author decides to submit a theoretical research paper or a practical case study, it is important to focus the work on the highly specialized interests of JWL readers. As mentioned in the Publication Analysis, appropriate topics might include such issues as Web 2.0/Library 2.0, web design and usability testing, international or comparative issues in web librarianship, or the future of the profession. In order to connect with this audience, articles should demonstrate superior technological expertise and cutting-edge research.

Last updated: February 17, 2018


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1.  “Journal Information,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?journalCode=wjwl20
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  3. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  4.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  5. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  6.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Taylor and Francis, accessed February 16, 2018, http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/bes/jwl-cfp16
  7.  Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  9. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  10. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  11. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  12. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  13. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  14.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  15.  “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  17. Journal of Web Librarianship, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed February 16, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1404780301975/599351
  18. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  19. “Editorial Board,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=editorialBoard&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7tDhbGdROg
  20. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  21. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wjwl20&page=instructions#.U7s-GLGdROg
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
  23. “List of Issues,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 16, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wjwl20#.U7s96rGdROg
  24. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed February 17, 2018, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wjwl20#.U7s-D7GdROg
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