Wiki Categories Archives: LIS Professional and Trade Publications

The Active Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleThe Active Librarian

Website: http://www.activelibrarians.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Active Librarian (TAL) is devoted to publishing repeatable and data-driven initiatives in order to improve the services of public librarianship.1 TAL aims to become a centralized “repository of best practices among public librarians for developing new services and enhancing existing ones.”2 Its goal is to enhance the profession by publishing needed program analysis and assessment.”3

Target audience: LIS professionals working in public libraries.4

Publisher: Michael J. Carlozzi.5

Peer reviewed? Yes.6

Type: LIS professional news.7

Medium: Online.

Content: The publication reports on specific initiatives, services, programs, and protocols. Articles should provide concrete details about projects and programs so that other public libraries can use the information to develop, implement, or enhance their own services.8

Frequency of publication: TAL plans to publish one volume per year with nine issues; although the publishing schedule may be adjusted to meet supply and demand.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines:
http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope9

Types of contributions accepted: The journal seeks reports on public library initiatives, programs, or services—for example, a recently adopted adult literacy program. Acceptable topics may include any library-related idea that can be generalized to and applied by other librarians—for example, “fostering an educational partnership, configuring credit card payments, developing a community ‘make space,’ writing a troubleshooting guide for Envisionware’s Time Management service, becoming a passport processor.”10 The journal’s submission requirements emphasize articles of “practical application rather than theory-building or historicizing.”11

Submission and review process: Submissions may not be previously published, or under consideration before other journals. All articles undergo a peer-review process (unless an article is solicited by an editor). The editors determine whether an article is appropriate for publication in TAL, after which the article is submitted to at least two referees in a blind process wherein the referees are anonymous to the authors. Submissions may be accepted, accepted with minor revisions, accepted with major revisions, or declined.12

Editorial tone: According to the journal’s submission requirements: “TAL is a practical rather than academic journal.” The tone should be professional but not overly academic, “easy to read but not juvenile.”13

The journal adheres to important practices of publishing original peer-reviewed work, but forgoes overly-rigid academic norms in order to emphasize application. A TAL article does not require a literature review, exhaustive references, or deep statistical analysis. However, an article must include a clear, direct explanation of a project or program so that may be replicated.14

Style guide used: APA.15

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The journal presents a new opportunity for LIS professionals to share projects that have been implemented in a public library setting. (As of this writing, no issues have been published.) Authors need not be a public librarians to publish in TAL, but their work must be applicable to or done in partnership with public libraries. For example, academic librarians are encouraged to submit if their work can be generalized or applied to public librarianship, or if working in concert with public libraries. TAL intends to be a forum for professional exchange for projects that are best publicized widely and freely.16

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The journal is entirely open access. According to an ALA Library Fact Sheet, there are approximately 137,000 paid library staff in the United States.17

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The editors are based in the United States, so it may be inferred that the audience will be primarily U.S.-based. However, international (non-American) submissions are also welcome.18

Reader characteristics: Expect that readers are well-acquainted with public library issues and trends. Readers will want to know how their libraries might benefit from the work other public libraries have done, and the features and steps to implement such efforts.19

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a professional publication, most readers will be familiar with issues relevant to public libraries such as outreach and marketing, technology demands, computer networking, digital literacy instruction, collection development, among other areas.20

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The TAL website notes that “public librarians typically do not readily enjoy professional development opportunities that other LIS professionals do. Unlike colleagues in academic positions, [public librarians] often cannot attend distant conferences or take sabbaticals, purchase expensive database subscriptions, limiting exposure to cutting-edge research; and many do not have time apportioned for pursuing large-scale research projects. But our work benefits from the same professional exchange as academic librarians; the patrons we serve are no less important, and our community outreach is arguably greater and more critical.”21 If your library does something well and you want to share it, TAL provides an excellent forum for doing so.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  2. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  3. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  4. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  5. The Active Librarian. (2016). Journal contact. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/contact
  6. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  7. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  8. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
  9. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  10. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  11. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  12. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  13. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  14. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  15. The Active Librarian. (2016). Author guidelines. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/submissions#authorGuidelines
  16. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  17. American Library Association. (2016). Number Employed in Libraries: ALA Library Fact Sheet 2. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/tools/libfactsheets/alalibraryfactsheet02
  18. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  19. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  20. The Active Librarian. (2016). Focus and scope. Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  21. The Active Librarian. (2016). Retrieved from http://activelibrarians.com/index.php/tal/index
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Programming Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleProgramming Librarian

Website: http://www.programminglibrarian.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Programming Librarian is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office. Its mission is to “provide the resources, connections, and opportunities libraries need to fill their role as centers of cultural and civic life.”1 “ProgrammingLibrarian.org is a place for library professionals to share, learn, and be inspired to present excellent programming for their communities. Through resources, ideas, and professional development opportunities, [it] seeks to help libraries fill their role as cultural and civic hubs in their communities.”2

Target audience: Librarians in public, academic, special, and school libraries who perform programming duties officially and unofficially as part of their job responsibilities.3

Publisher: American Library Association Public Programs Office.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional news.5

Medium: Online.

Content: Programming ideas, resources, and professional development opportunities.6

Frequency of publication: New content is continually posted.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us

Types of contributions accepted: Programming Librarian seeks success stories about library programs, with detailed descriptions, related materials and graphics, and advice for peers.7

Submission and review process: Contributors should complete a webform that describes their library program details (advance planning, budget, activities, evaluation, advice), and include any related materials (reading lists, images). Submissions chosen for publication will be publicly available on ProgrammingLibrarian.org.8

Editorial tone: Informational.

Style guide used: No particular style guide is specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Programming Librarian presents an opportunity for LIS authors to contribute their expertise so that other professionals may build upon their work. The site aims to be a database of program ideas for libraries; and program models are presented in a standardized format. If your library has a successful or innovative program to share, Programming Librarian is a venue for doing so.9

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Programming Librarian serves as an online resource center for the Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG), a Member Initiative Group of the ALA.10 PLIG membership is open to all ALA members. The PLIG Facebook group has approximately 5500 members (2016).11

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The site features programs held at libraries around the United States and also Canada.12 Program models “represent public, academic, school, and state libraries; from small towns and large urban centers; and programs for a variety of ages and interests.”13

Reader characteristics: While job titles can vary, a programming librarian is “charged with any element of planning and presenting cultural and community programs on behalf of the library,” and programming is often one of many hats that a librarian wears.14 Programming occurs in diverse settings, public and private, and librarians are invested in fulfilling cultural and civic roles through programming.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers are generally professional librarians interested in practical ideas and strategies for developing programs, so a fairly strong knowledge of LIS knowledge can be expected.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Programming Librarian readership seeks ways to learn from fellow libraries, browse ideas, and explore learning opportunities.15 This is a good place for LIS authors to write about programs implemented in their professional settings.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “About,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about.
  2. “About.”
  3. “About.”
  4. “About.”
  5. “About.”
  6. “About.”
  7. “About.”
  8. “Submit Program Ideas,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/submit/submit-program-ideas.
  9. “Write/Present for Us,” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/write-us.
  10. “Programming Librarian Interest Group (PLIG),” Programming Librarian, accessed May 14, 2016, http://www.programminglibrarian.org/about/programming-librarian-interest-group.
  11. “Programming Librarian Interest Group, Facebook, accessed May 16, 2016, https://www.facebook.com/groups/ProgrammingLibrarianInterestGroup.
  12. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian,” ALA Public Programs Office, last modified May 14, 2016 http://www.programminglibrarian.org/articles/welcome-new-programming-librarian.
  13. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
  14. “About.”
  15. “Welcome to the New Programming Librarian.”
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Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Society of California Archivists Newsletter (SCA Newsletter)

Website: http://calarchivists.org/publications/scanewsletter

Purpose, objective, or mission: SCA Newsletter serves as the official voice of the Society of California Archivists (SCA), sharing news and events related to the archives community throughout California.1 The mission of SCA is “to support and develop the education of those who collect, care for, and provide access to the documentary heritage of California and adjoining areas and to encourage public interest in and public support for archival facilities in public and private institutions.”2

Target audience: SCA members, and those in the archives community (professional archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers) in California.3

Publisher: Society of California Archivists (SCA).4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional news.

Medium: Online.6

Content: Information and news for professionals and archival institutions in California. The newsletter typically features collection and exhibition spotlights, digital projects, reports of SCA Board actions and meetings, and announcements of seminars, workshops, and other regional events of interest.7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly: January, April, July, October.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter

Types of contributions accepted: Per an email from the newsletter editors, submissions on any topic of interest to the California archives community are welcome, including articles on newly processed collections, new acquisitions, digitization projects, upcoming events, exhibit openings, short book reviews, and other announcements from repositories throughout California.9

Submission and review process: Articles for consideration should be submitted via email attachment to newsletter@calarchivists.org. Include your repository name, location, and contact information. Images intended for publication should be submitted in a high-resolution format.10

Editorial tone: The tone is informational, professional, and accessible to a diverse range of readers in the library, archives, and museums (LAM) community.

Style guide used: No style guide specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The newsletter seeks profiles of archival activities and accomplishments. A call for submissions suggested articles related to newly processed collections, new acquisitions, how an institution responded to budget challenges, grants received, ongoing projects, and short reviews of books of potential interest to archivists. A survey of past issues shows that contributors range from LAM managers and directors, to library assistants and students. There are no guidelines stating that contributors should be members of SCA.11

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The Society of California Archivists has approximately 450 members12; however, the newsletter is open access, with back issues available online.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The publication focuses archival activities throughout the state of California and is written in English.

Reader characteristics: SCA members include archivists, manuscript curators, records managers, conservators, historians, librarians, genealogists, museum curators, students, and volunteers. Members are affiliated with colleges and universities; federal, state and local government archives and records centers; historical societies; museums; libraries; corporations; educational, religious, and medical institutions; and private collections in California.13

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers have a strong awareness of archival collections, issues, and practices. However, articles may appeal to readers in the LIS community who may not have specific knowledge of archives.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are likely involved with repositories and cultural institutions in California, and have an interest in issues and developments relating to the archives community. Articles are informative, reporting on events and local professional organizations, and sharing practical guidance for professionals and students. Most readers will be well-informed of archival practices; however, the tone of the newsletter is accessible and nonacademic.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  2.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA/Mission
  3. Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
  4.  ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  5. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  6. ProQuest. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1440550599400/733360
  7. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  8. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  9.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  10. Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  11.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). SCA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/Publications/SCANewsletter
  12. Society of American Archivists. (2016). Society of California Archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/assoc-orgs/society-of-california-archivists
  13.  Society of California Archivists. (2016). About SCA. Retrieved from http://www.calarchivists.org/About_SCA
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College & Undergraduate Libraries

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: College & Undergraduate Libraries

Website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wcul20/current#.VZ_L_elRGxs

Purpose, objective, or mission: “College & Undergraduate Libraries supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”1

Target audience: Academic library staff2

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group3

Peer reviewed? Yes4

Type: This is a hybrid scholarly journal and professional and trade publication. It is a scholarly publication because of its commitment to peer-reviewed research articles.5 It can also be considered a professional publication as it provides “practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: College & Undergraduate Libraries features “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns or special issues devoted to current topics.”8

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAiHelRGxs

Types of contributions accepted: Per the website, the journal accepts “research-based articles, case studies, reports of best practices, occasional literature or product reviews, and columns.”10 The journal specializes in “articles by faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students (that) provide practical information and creative solutions to common problems.” Recent areas of interest include collection management, preservation and conservation of library materials, trends in library support for undergraduate courses, standards and assessment, preparing for accreditation, archive management without an archivist, staff development on a limited budget, and marketing the college library.11

Submission and review process: College & Undergraduate Libraries receives all manuscript submissions electronically via its ScholarOne Manuscripts site .12

Per the publication website, “Full length articles in College & Undergraduate Libraries are subject to anonymous double-blind review. Column-type submissions are reviewed by the editor, and in some cases, are subject to anonymous double blind review.”13

Editorial tone: Academic14, yet per the submissions guidelines, a “highly readable” writing style is sought.15

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition16

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

College & Undergraduate Libraries “supports the continuous learning of academic library staff to become more effective professionals as they discover how to provide and assess outstanding, creative, and innovative services, resources, and facilities.”17 Newer, as well as more seasoned LIS authors will find opportunities for publication with this journal. It may be assumed that the work of authors working in in university and undergraduate library environments would be of especial interest to the editors of College and Undergraduate Libraries.

College & Undergraduate Libraries is abstracted/indexed in: De Gruyter Saur; IBZ; EBSCOhost; Academic Search Complete; H.W. Wilson; Education Research Complete; INSPEC; Library & Information Science Source; MasterFILE Complete; MLA International Bibliography; TOC Premier; Elsevier BV; Scopus; Gale; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; OCLC; ArticleFirst Ovid; ProQuest; Aerospace Database; Civil Engineering Abstracts; Engineering Research Database; Materials Business File; LISA: Library & Information Science Abstracts; METADEX; MLA International Bibliography; PAIS International; and VINITI RAN.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This journal is written in English,19 primarily by American authors for an audience of “librarians at two- and four-year colleges and university undergraduate libraries.”20

Reader characteristics: As this publication targets LIS practitioners at two- to four-year colleges and undergraduate libraries, the backgrounds and cultural experiences of the audience will be as diverse as the institutions they represent. According to the American Association of Community Colleges, “Community colleges are the gateway to postsecondary education for many minority, low income, and first-generation postsecondary education students. Since 1985, more than half of all community college students have been women. In addition, the majority of Black and Hispanic undergraduate students in this country study at these colleges.”21 Because of this diversity in their workplace, the readers of this publication will likely be committed to accessibility of information and services.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers of College & Undergraduate Libraries will represent all areas of Library and Information Science, including “faculty, librarians, paraprofessionals, library staff, and students”22 Therefore, there will be different levels of knowledge of LIS topics depending on level of education and workplace roles. Potential authors should avoid overly technical language, and strive for a “highly readable (writing) style”23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

According to ResearchGate, “this unique journal provides busy college librarians, already saddled with an array of responsibilities, with practical, step-by-step articles on subjects such as understanding statistics and purchasing and maintaining microcomputers, as well as columns on stretching library dollars.”24

The readers of this journal serve a variety of patrons, including “the students who attend to upgrade their skills for a particular job, students who are pursuing an associate degree to transfer to a 4-year institution, and students who attend to pursue a hobby (such as learning a language). The educational outcomes of community college students reflect this diversity.”25

Authors writing for this publication must take this diversity into consideration.

Last updated: April 1, 2017


References

Show 25 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  3. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  4. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  5. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  6. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  7.  “Subscribe,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/wcul20
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  9. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017 http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  10. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  11. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  12. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  13. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  14. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  15. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  16. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  17. “Aims and Scope,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=wcul20#.VaAGKelRGxs
  18. “Abstracting and Indexing,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=abstractingIndexing&journalCode=wcul20#.VaBICelRGxs
  19. College and Undergraduate Libraries, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 1, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436550662842/484751
  20. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  21. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
  22. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017 http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  23. “Instructions for Authors,” Taylor and Francis Group, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=wcul20&page=instructions#.VaAku-lRGxs
  24. College and Undergraduate Libraries, ResearchGate, accessed April 1, 2017, http://www.researchgate.net/journal/1069-1316_College_Undergraduate_Libraries
  25. “Students at Community Colleges,” American Association of Community Colleges, accessed April 1, 2017,  http://www.aacc.nche.edu/AboutCC/Trends/Pages/studentsatcommunitycolleges.aspx
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Georgia Library Quarterly

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Georgia Library Quarterly

Website: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/

Purpose, objective, or mission: The Georgia Library Quarterly “features news and information primarily of interest to Georgia librarians but will consider articles of state-wide or general interest in the field of librarianship.”1

Target audience: Primarily Georgia librarians,2 although articles have been downloaded from across the globe.3

Publisher: Georgia Library Association4

Peer reviewed? Research articles are peer reviewed.5 Other submissions will reviewed by the editorial team.6

Type: This journal is classified as scholarly for its peer-reviewed research articles.7 However, because the majority of the content features articles on activities, projects, news,8 and reviews for the LIS practitioner, this could be considered a hybrid scholarly-professional publication.

Medium: Print and online9

Content: This journal includes columns that feature insights and ideas, one peer-reviewed article per issue, news items from Georgia libraries, and book reviews.10

“Georgia Library Quarterly reviews books on aspects of life in Georgia and the South, including history, literature, politics, education, and genealogy. Materials written by Southern authors or published by regional publishers may also be considered, as well as those on libraries and librarianship.”11

Frequency of publication: Quarterly12

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html

Types of contributions accepted: Georgia Library Quarterly accepts research articles, opinion pieces, Georgia library news, and book reviews.13

Submission and review process: Papers should be submitted in Microsoft Word (2003 or later) format. Upload submissions to digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq. “Deadlines for articles and papers are the first day of March, June, Sept and Dec. Note that peer review articles may require more than one quarter to publish.”14

No specific article length is given. According to the final submission guidelines, “because this journal publishes electronically, page limits are not as relevant as they are in the world of print publications. We are happy, therefore, to let authors take advantage of this greater “bandwidth” to include material that they might otherwise have to cut to get into a print journal. This said, authors should exercise some discretion with respect to length. Peer reviewed articles are expected to meet a more stringent standard length.”15

Guidelines for book reviewers:

  • Notify the editor if a conflict of interest is discovered.
  • Read the book carefully and thoroughly.
  • Include a brief summary, a description and evaluation of highlights, especially those to Georgia or Southern references.
  • Include a recommendation of the appropriate readership.
  • Write a review of between 300 to 500 words.
  • Create the review in MS Word.
  • Use 11 pt. Calibri font.
  • Begin the review with the title, author or editor, publisher, date, ISBN, and price.
  • End the review with your name and your library or affiliation.
  • Please submit reviews to the GLQ site at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq, or, email them directly to the editor at lautzenheiserj@bibblib.org.
  • If for any reason you are unable to fulfill your obligation to write a review, notify the editor immediately–absolutely before the given deadline. You are expected to return the book/material at once.
  • Reviews may be edited for brevity or clarity.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the complimentary review copy may be retained by the reviewer.16

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for tone of submitted articles. Upon examination of several issues, there is a wide range of writing style that is represented. The peer-reviewed research article will have a scholarly and academic tone, whereas the opinion pieces are more informal. News items are also written in an informal style.17

Style guide used: The Chicago Manual of Style18

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

With its variety of offerings, Georgia Library Quarterly supplies opportunities not only for the LIS researcher, but also for those writers who would like to share ideas and opinions about the field of library and information science. This journal is especially relevant for LIS practitioners working and residing in the state of Georgia. One can assume that, as there is only one peer-reviewed research article published per issue,19 this avenue of publication original research published might prove more difficult than a purely academic journal. However, as this is a journal that focuses on Georgia-related topics, research particularly related to Georgia libraries would most likely be welcomed.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Georgia Library Quarterly is an “open access publication, freely available at http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/ with approximately 20,000 hits per year, including complete issues and individual articles.”20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Text is in English.21 Because this journal’s readership is primarily located in the state of Georgia,22 there will necessarily be a cultural bias in writing about issues of interest to Georgia librarians. However, as can be seen on the readership map on the publication website,23 Georgia Library Quarterly is downloaded from all over the world. Authors should bear this global readership in mind by avoiding regional colloquialisms.

Reader characteristics: Most readers of this publication will live in the state of Georgia24 and share an interest of topics importance to LIS professionals in this state.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Most readers will be LIS professionals and/or hold MLIS degrees. They will be knowledgeable about LIS issues, particularly those facing libraries in Georgia.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on author

The articles, news items, and book reviews in the GLQ are written primarily by Georgia librarians, for Georgia librarians.25 For a someone new to the profession, this publication presents an excellent opportunity to write for and connect with peers in libraries throughout the state. As this is an open-access journal, freely available worldwide,26 GLQ is also a good venue for original research.

Last updated: April 25, 2017


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  2. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  3. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  4. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  5. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  6. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  7. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  8. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  9. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  10. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  11. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  12. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  13. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  14. “Policies,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/policies.html
  15. “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  16. “GLQ’s Off the Shelf,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_bookreviews.htm
  17. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  18.  (2015). “Final Manuscript Preparation Guidelines for Georgia Library Quarterly,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/styleguide.html
  19. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  20. “Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
  21. Georgia Library Quarterly, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 25, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1436115352332/340453
  22. “Aims and Scope,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/aimsandscope.html
  23. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017,  http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  24. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  25. “Home,” Georgia Library Association, accessed April 25, 2017, http://digitalcommons.kennesaw.edu/glq/
  26. Georgia Library Association. (2015). Advertising Specifications and Rate Sheet. Georgia Library Association. Retrieved from http://gla.georgialibraries.org/glq_adrates.pdf
Continue Reading

Archeota

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Archeota

Website: http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Purpose, objective, or missionArcheota is the publication of SJSU SAASC (San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter). The newsletter profiles its current officers, promotes SAA (Society of American Archivists) and SJSU SAASC activities and events, discusses developments in the archival field, introduces students to professional responsibilities, and serves as a platform for students to publish original content.1

SJSU SAASC fulfills the purpose of connecting students with classmates and professional archivists. The group promotes archival interests in the academic community, organizes repository tours and related events, provides networking opportunities, and invites professional archivists to share knowledge about the field.2 3

Target audience: SJSU SAASC members, and students in the MLIS program (particularly those pursuing the Archival Studies and Records Management career pathway) and the MARA (Master of Archives and Records Administration) program.4

Publisher: SJSU SAASC.5 

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS student publication.6

Medium: Online.

Content: The newsletter features editorial pieces by students in graduate archival studies and library science, interviews with practicing archivists, and insights from internship experiences. Students may also share relevant coursework or projects, as well as promote their blogs or other work.7

Frequency of publication: Biannually (twice per academic year, once during Spring semester and once during Fall semester).8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html

Types of contributions accepted: Summary or opinion pieces on related items in the news; interviews with practicing archivists; archives-themed comics, illustrations, and puzzles; insights from internship experiences; and links to student work online.9

Submission and review process: Contributors must be SJSU SAASC members.10 Submissions should be a maximum of 750 words in length unless otherwise approved by the Communications Committee; and all work must be original (content is subject to an originality checker). Text files should be submitted in a .doc or .pages format, single-spaced, 12 pt font. Image files should be submitted in JPEG format at a minimum of 300 dpi.11

Editorial tone: The publication is geared toward students in graduate archival studies and library science; examples of articles include first-person narratives of recent work, internship, volunteer, and academic experiences. The tone is friendly, supportive, and aimed to foster community and professional learning among SAASC members.

Style guide used: APA.12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Archeota presents an excellent opportunity for graduate students to share thoughts on joining the profession or publish original content relevant to archives. As the voice of the SJSU SAASC, the newsletter is a forum for connecting with fellow members and LIS students. The inaugural issue was published in Spring 2015.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: SJSU SAASC has approximately 80 members, as of 2015;14 however, the newsletter is open access.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The audience of Archeota will be primarily SJSU SAASC members, and also SJSU iSchool students. The university is located in San Jose, California, but the student body (and readership) is international. As an English-language graduate program, it can be assumed that readers have a strong grasp of the English language.

Reader characteristics: The readership comprises students enrolled in SJSU’s MLIS and MARA programs. Readers are those who plan to work (or are already working) with archives and records within a range of settings: libraries, government, corporate, or nonprofit institutions. Potential career paths for students in these programs include archivists, digital archivists, digital asset managers, electronic records managers, digital projects specialists, knowledge managers, and technical information specialists.15 16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a publication targeted toward graduate students, knowledge of LIS subject matter may range from an emerging familiarity with archival theories and practices, to more significant experience and specific knowledge of the field.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Archeota is produced by and published for students pursuing careers in archives and records. Contributors have a good opportunity to share their practical experiences (what it’s like to work in a particular setting), professional projects and internships, or useful tools and applications.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  2. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  3. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). SJSU SAASC Constitution. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/constitution.html
  4. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  5. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  6. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Welcome to SJSU SAASC. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  7. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  8. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  9. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  10. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC membership. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/membership.html
  11. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  12. San Jose State University, Society of American Archivists Student Chapter. (2016). Archeota. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com/archeota.html
  13. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC blog. Retrieved from http://sjsusaasc.weebly.com
  14. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). SJSU SAASC Annual Report 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/sites/all/files/SJSUSAASC2013-2014AnnualReport.pdf
  15. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Management, Digitization and Preservation of Cultural Heritage and Records (Archival Studies and Records Management). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/career-pathways/management-digitization-preservation-cultural-heritage
  16. San Jose State University School of Information. (2016). Master of Archives and Record Administration (MARA). Retrieved from http://ischool.sjsu.edu/programs/master-archives-records-administration-mara
Continue Reading

Strategic Library

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Strategic Library

Website: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission:Strategic Library assists administrators and managers in all types of libraries as they deal with day-to-day and strategic challenges”1 by focusing on “innovation, best practices, and emerging trends in the complex and rapidly evolving library landscape.”2

Target audience: LIS managers and administrators.3

Publisher: LibraryWorks, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: As per their website, Strategic Library offers “in-depth articles, written by highly regarded professionals in the field, (that) focus on leadership, management, evaluation, assessment, marketing, (and) funding.8

An “Editorial Forecast” is accessible through their website that includes topics to “spark ideas”9 for possible submission. Broad topic areas include: Collections/Circulation, Community Leadership, Emerging Technologies, Fundraising/Budgeting, Legal Issues, and Strategic Planning.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly, from January to October.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/Write-for-Strategic-Library

Types of contributions accepted: Strategic Library encourages and welcomes submissions from librarians in management positions who have stories to tell and expertise to share.12

Editors offer these basic guidelines:

  • Draw story ideas from personal experience and expertise. Use the Editorial Forecast as a guide.
  • Organize thoughts by preparing an outline.
  • Write around 2500 words.
  • Focus on strategic planning through trends and solutions.
  • Include charts, graphs, photos, and links.
  • Put footnotes, references, and a brief bio at the end.13

A sample outline is also available to guide the author.14

Submission and review process: Articles should be sent in a Word file to the publisher, madavidson@charter.net15

According to the writer’s guidleines: “Once received, the article will be edited and formatted for Strategic Library style and clarity. It will be returned to the author for review and for answers to any questions posed in the text during editing. Once in a final version, the article will be assigned to an issue.”16

Editorial tone: Informal, yet professional. Editors are looking for professional stories that “cover concepts, strategies, and technologies”17 that are important to the writers and their colleagues.18

Style guide used: While no specific style guide is mentioned, editors prefer submissions to be in Microsoft Word document format. “Footnotes, references, and further readings should be formatted as endnotes in any standard style.”19

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This publication offers a forum for a variety of writers with an interest and experience in current best practices in the library landscape. A recent issue (Issue 17, May 15, 2015) features articles written by public librarians, academic librarians, a private consultant, and representatives of a technology integration company.20

Examples of possible topics for the potential author are:

  • Has your library completed a five-year strategic plan in a new format?
  • Does that plan include renovations, new construction, or consolidations?
  • Have you embarked on an outreach program to the communities you serve?
  • How are you positioning next year’s library fundraising campaign based on what you learned last time?21

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the website, subscribers number approximately 8,000, “although that number is an estimate since many of (their) subscriptions are institutional.”22

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This is a North American publication written in English.23 Because the majority of the readership spans North America, regional colloquialisms should be avoided.

Reader characteristics: Readers are “executive decision makers at all types of libraries: academic, public, and specialty.”24 As such, readers are “experienced managers who are looking for the latest strategies and best practices on a range of topics to help them plan for the future.”25

Strategic Library strives to offer a forum for the sharing of information and experience among the decision makers in LIS settings.26 Authoritative, instructive and innovative ideas and practice will appeal to this particular audience.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: These are experienced LIS professionals who will understand LIS jargon and expect authoritative writing on the subject of library management.27

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

This audience is looking for ways to improve service in innovative, cost-effective ways. Authors who would like to share successes can effectively communicate by using a first-person narrative of their own experiences. Case studies or others’ experiences with best practices are another option for the potential author to explore. Above all, the author must remember that these are motivated, experienced LIS professionals eager for current knowledge in the field of library management.

Last updated: May 13, 2016


References

Show 27 footnotes

  1. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  2. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  3. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  4. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). About Us. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775992
  5. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  6. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  7. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  8. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  9. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  10. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Editorial Forecast. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Editorial-Forecast.pdf
  11. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Home. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/
  12. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  13. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  14. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Outline. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Outline.pdf
  15. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  16. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  17. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  18. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  19. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  20. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2015). Issue 17. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://user-94545020520.cld.bz/SL-May15-1#9/z
  21. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  22. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  23. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Contact. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://strategiclibrary.wildapricot.org/page-1775945
  24. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  25. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  26. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
  27. LibraryWorks, Inc. (2016). Write for Strategic Library – Guidelines. Strategic Library. Retrieved from http://www.libraryspot.net/SL/SL_Guidelines.pdf
Continue Reading

Against the Grain

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Against the Grain

Website: http://www.against-the-grain.com/

This website provides more than 3,500 pages with continuously updated content, including full-text access to articles from the print Against the Grain publication (access is limited to subscribers), along with a additional free, available, web-only content like breaking industry news, blog posts, job openings, conference announcements, and an online version of the popular “If Rumors Were Horses” column by editor Katina Strauch.1

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: Against the Grain “is your key to the latest news about libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription agents. It is a unique collection of reports on the issues, literature, and people that impact the world of books and journals.”2

Target audience: Publishers; vendors of book, journal, and other scholarly materials; and library and information science professionals, particularly those interested in issues surrounding acquisitions, access, online platforms, publishers, and serials subscriptions.3

Publisher: Against the Grain.4

Peer reviewed? All feature presentations and special reports are refereed by at least two editors. Columns are refereed by the column editors only. A list of editors who review manuscript drafts and a proofreader for ATG is available here.5

Type: A hybrid scholarly journal and professional news magazine. While informative and based on professional practice and expertise, most submissions have an informal tone and lack extensive bibliographies, though some do provide endnotes.6

Medium: Print. ATG print subscribers can also be approved for a free online membership to access subscriber-only content on the ATG website.7 Free online access to archival content more than three years old is available at the Against the Grain Archives.8

Content: Articles. The ATG website also accepts additional content like job postings and announcements.9

Frequency of publication: Against the Grain is published six times a year, in February, April, June, September, November, and December/January.10

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/

Types of contributions accepted: Regular article contribution areas include features, interviews and people profiles, Reviews, Legal Issues, International Dateline, Publishing, Bookselling and Vending, and Technology and Standards.11 Some issues have specific focuses, such as the December 2013/January 2014 issue, “eBook Platforms for Academic Librarians.”12 Articles should be approximately 2000 words, although the editors allow authors to make a piece as long or short as needed by their subject. They like a minimum of 200 dpi for charts and graphs and 300 dpi for photos.13

Submission and review process: Contact Leah Hinds at leah@katina.info or Tom Gilson at gilsont@cofc.edu to submit an article for either online or print publication. Alternately, Katina Strauch (Editor), Tom Gilson (Editor, ATG Website), and Leah Hinds (Editor, ATG Website) can be contacted at editors@against-the-grain.com. Sample submission deadlines are listed on the content submission page.14

Editorial tone: There are no stated guidelines for the submitted articles’ tone,15 though most content is written in a clear, well-informed, but fairly informal style.16

Style guide used: ATG uses Turabian/Chicago Manual of Style format. Bibliographic citations, when included, are provided in endnotes and are not supplemented by a bibliography. Endnotes are indicated in-text by superscript Arabic numbers after the punctuation of the phrase or clause to which the note refers; endnote references are numbered in the same order that they are cited in the text.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

ATG will be a good fit for authors interested in writing shorter pieces exploring access, collection development, publishers, serials subscriptions, and online platforms.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: ATG currently has over 2,000 print subscribers.  A readership survey indicated the average subscriber circulates each issue of Against the Grain to 4.6 colleagues, giving ATG a readership of well over 9,200.18 The Against the Grain Archives provides free online access to archival content more than three years old (1989 on) at the Against the Grain Archives.19 Access to more recent content is limited to subscribers.20

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: United States (ATG’s current editors are affiliated with College of Charleston or the Charleston Conference).21 Written in American English.22

Reader characteristics: A typical reader would be interested in the interactions between libraries, publishers, book jobbers, and subscription services. They could work in a variety of library types, or in the larger publishing community.23 Typical readers will work in libraries or with publishers or jobbers, focusing on those who “impact the world of books and journals.”24 Readers will be looking for cutting-edge information about all things library.25

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will be familiar with trends and patterns in acquisitions, access, and online platforms, along with distinctions between various publishers and third-party subscription content providers.26

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics0 and their potential impact on authors

Against the Grain’s content is geared toward library and information science professionals who are interested in keeping up-to-date and informed about trends in libraries, publishing, and subscription services. Brief articles and case studies of a few pages, often with subheadings or bullet points, are recommended to focus the reader’s attention and to make content easy to digest.

Last updated: April 20 2016


References

Show 26 footnotes

  1. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  2. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  3. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  4. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  5. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  6. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  7. Against the Grain. (2014). Subscribe. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/subscribe/
  8. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  9. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  10. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  11. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  12. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  13. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  14. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  15. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  16. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/
  17. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  18. L. Hinds, personal communication, July 2014
  19. Purdue University. (2014). Against the Grain Archives. Retrieved from http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/atg/
  20. Against the Grain. (2014). Submit content. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/submit-content/
  21. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  22. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  23. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  24. Against the Grain. (2014). About. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com/about/
  25. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
  26. Against the Grain. (2014). Home. Against the Grain. Retrieved from http://www.against-the-grain.com
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REFORMA Newsletter

*Note:  REFORMA Newsletter last published in April 2014, and its current status is unknown. Please contact the wiki team if you have information about this publication so we can update this profile.*

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: REFORMA Newsletter

Website: http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2

Purpose, objective, or mission: To develop library services for the growing population of Spanish speakers and Latinos in the United States and abroad. REFORMA’s goals include:

  • Development of Spanish-language and Latino-oriented library collections
  • Recruitment of bilingual, multicultural library personnel
  • Promotion of public awareness of libraries and librarianship among Latinos
  • Advocacy on behalf of the information needs of the Latino community
  • Liaison to other professional organizations1

Target audience: Librarians and other professionals with an interest in library services to Latinos and Spanish speakers.2

Publisher: REFORMA.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: LIS professional news.5 The newsletter contains LIS professional news and information about developing and improving library services.6

Medium: As of 2012, REFORMA Newsletter is an electronic and virtual newsletter that is open to anyone.7

Content: The newsletter covers issues that concern information and library services for the Spanish speaking and Latinos. It contains book reviews, articles on issues concerning Latinos and the Spanish speaking, features about librarians in different Spanish speaking countries, interviews with authors, bilingual and Spanish language book lists.8

Frequency of publication: Updated as submissions are accepted.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: None available.

Types of contributions accepted: Artwork, opinion pieces, news briefs, features, reviews, and letters to the editor are accepted. REFORMA’s sections include News Articles, President’s Column, Chapter Updates, Adult Book Reviews, Children’s Book Reviews, Young Adult Book Reviews, Felicidades!, Letter from the Editor, and La Opinión.10

Submission and review process: Article submissions should be sent via email to the editor. All manuscripts are reviewed by the editor. Please note that all submissions are subject to editing and revision due to space, grammar, and clarity.11

As of November 2012, editor Francisco Vargas put out a call for REFORMA editors, including coeditor, copy editor, and regular columnists. These volunteer positions are all virtual and require an average of 10 hours per week.12

Editorial tone: The newsletter does not indicate a type of editorial tone. The pieces in the newsletter are written in an approachable tone.13

Style guide used: No style guide indicated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The REFORMA Newsletter is well respected and widely read among librarians who provide services to the Spanish speaking and Latinos in the United States and other countries where Spanish is spoken. The level of diversity of topics offered through the newsletter allows librarians and others to explore a range of subjects for articles. However, it should be noted that the focus of the newsletter is on library services for Latinos and the Spanish speaking. Authors should keep this in mind when submitting a manuscript to this publication.

This publication is neither peer reviewed nor written in a scholarly tone. As such, it most likely will not meet any requirements for tenure. However, the articles are interesting and the authors of published work in the newsletter will have a far-reaching audience as this newsletter is distributed across the globe. Authors in the publication gain recognition within this community.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: REFORMA Newsletter is open-access, online.14

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: REFORMA offices are located in the United States (Anaheim, California) with membership located throughout North America.15 This publication accepts submissions in “Spanish, English or Spanglish”16 suggesting authors need an understanding of Spanish-language and Latino cultural.

Reader characteristics: Writers can safely assume that readers of this newsletter, per their website, are committed to, “development of library services and programs that meet the needs of the Latino community; the establishment of a national information and support network among individuals who share our goals; the education of the U.S. Latino population in regards to the availability and types of library services; and lobbying efforts to preserve existing library resource centers serving the interests of Latinos.”17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will have some knowledge of LIS topics, as they are working to provide library services to Latinos, but the level of knowledge will vary.18

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors need to keep in mind the mission of the organization and, possess a clear understanding of the needs of the membership. The readers will be interested in how to recruit Latino and Spanish speaking individuals into the library field, how to establish and maintain Spanish-language collections, and how to effectively lobby to secure and retain funding for library services for the Latino communities they serve.

Last updated: May 14, 2016


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  2. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  3. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  4. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  5. SerialsSolutions. (2016). Reforma Newsletter: national association to promote library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406900061314/201093
  6. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  7. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  8. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  9. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  10. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  11. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  12. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  13. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  14. REFORMA. (2016). REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_home.asp?edition=2
  15. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  16. REFORMA. (2012). e-Newsletter task force: Looking for volunteers. REFORMA Newsletter. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/article_content.asp?edition=2%C2%A7ion=9&article=244
  17. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
  18. REFORMA. (2016). About REFORMA. Retrieved from http://www.reforma.org/content.asp?pl=2&contentid=2
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Letters to a Young Librarian

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Letters to a Young Librarian

Website: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: This blog offers “advice to those who are new (or even not so new) to librarianship from someone who has been doing this work for a while now.”1 The objective is to “break down the barriers between library schools & students and professional librarians.”2

Target audience: Library science graduate students and new professional librarians.3

Publisher: Jessica Olin.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS Professional and Trade Publication.6

Medium: Online.7

Content: Articles (ideas! advice! pep talks!) on all areas of librarianship. Examples from the last two months (March and April, 2015) include: a discussion of management vs. leadership, a reminder about patron privacy, and a description of and tips for whiteboard polling.8 Interspersed with the professional advice are “just for fun” posts.9 Guest posts are also included and welcomed.10

Frequency of publication: Very frequent, averaging 7-9 posts per month.11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html

Types of contributions accepted: Olin poses this question to potential contributors: “Is there something you wish you’d known when you were a graduate student and/or a brand new to libraries?”12 “In some posts, you see the author’s philosophy of an aspect of librarianship. In others, the piece is about developing job skills. So long as it answers that basic question, pretty much everything is germane to this blog.”13

Writing on exactly the same topics that have already been covered, or approaching topics in the same way, will not be published.14

Submission and review process: Casual tone is required (no footnotes allowed). Posts should be between 500-750 words. Submissions will be edited by Jessica Olin. Send topic ideas to librarianjessica@gmail.com15

Editorial tone: Tone is casual and welcoming.16 “This isn’t an academic, refereed publication. It’s a conversation. That means personal pronouns are encouraged and footnotes/endnotes/etc. are not allowed.”17

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If this is your first foray into writing for your peers, this blog is an excellent place to start. As this is a blog specifically written for new librarians and library school students, you will be writing for peers and like-minded individuals.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: As of May 2016, this blog has 254 followers.18 In addition, Olin has 2,222 followers on Twitter.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This blog is written in American English for a mostly North American audience.20

Reader characteristics: Readers seem to be mostly students or recent graduates with many and varied interests in the LIS world. As per the guest post guidelines, “this is a conversation.”21 Readers will expect informative and thoughtful posts written in an informal manner. As “posts need to be geared toward a general audience”22, readers represent all areas of librarianship.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS issues could range from the first year LIS graduate student, to a professional librarian starting a career in the field. Don’t assume that the reader will understand LIS-speak; keep jargon to a minimum.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of Letters to a Young Librarian want to learn about the profession in a way that is not taught at their graduate schools. They want first-hand accounts of first-time librarians. They are interested in everything from your philosophy of librarianship, to tips on networking. The possible topics are as varied as the profession.

Last updated: May 16, 2016


References

Show 23 footnotes

  1.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  2. Olin, J. (2016). Why I Decided to Start a Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2011/06/why-i-decided-to-start-blog.html
  3.  Olin, J. (2016). About This Blog. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-this-blog.html
  4.  Olin, J. (2016). About Me. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-me-with-contact-information.html
  5.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  6.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  7.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  8. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  9.  Olin, J. (2016). Just for Fun: Big Hero 6. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/2015/04/just-for-fun-big-hero-6.html
  10. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  11. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  12.  Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  13. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  14. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  15. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  16. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  17. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  18.  Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  19. Twitter. (2016). Jessica Olin. Retrieved from https://twitter.com/olinj
  20. Olin, J. (2016). Home. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/
  21. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  22. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
  23. Olin, J. (2016). About Guest Posts. Letters to a Young Librarian. Retrieved from http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.ca/p/about-guest-posts-includes-editorial.html
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