Wiki Categories Archives: Civilian Publications

Information for Social Change

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information for Social Change

Website: http://libr.org/isc/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An activist librarian organization that “examines the issues of censorship, freedom and ethics amongst library and information workers.”1

Target audience: LIS workers and practitioners.2

Publisher: Information for Social Change.3

Peer reviewed? No4

Type: LIS professional. The topics and informal style of the content may also appeal to civilian readers.5

Medium: Online6

Content: Documenting the control of information globally and also alternatives to the control of information.7

Frequency of publication: Semi-annually.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libr.org/isc/call-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles between 500 and 2500 words. Longer articles may be excerpted with the full text made available from the author, according to the guidelines. Letters, review articles and poems are also accepted for publication.9

Submission and review process: Send an email to the editor at isc-journal@libr.org.10

Editorial tone: Simple and clear English. Views are radical and thought-provoking themes that promote debate.11

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS authors who are interested in radical librarianship that examines censorship, ethics and freedom, this journal would be a good choice. The journal suggests potential authors review past and current issues in order to gauge the interest.12

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not stated but British English style of writing is used.13 Website is in British English but it’s not stated as to whether that is the only acceptable version. This journal addresses global issues so it is safe to assume their readers are international. The organization holds events in association with progressive groups such as Third World Book Fair.14

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely progressive in their viewpoints. Readers are LIS professionals with progressive and radical views15 who are interested in finding channels in which to allow “unfettered and unmediated ideas” to circulate.16

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS terms and the profession is helpful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal most likely hold progressive viewpoints and feel strongly about the issues presented such as freedom of information and radical changes to the way information is controlled and disseminated. Authors who wish to submit to this publication should hold similar views or at least be extremely open to new ideas.17


References

Show 17 footnotes

  1. Information for Social Change. (2016). Welcome. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/
  2. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  3. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  5. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  6. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  7. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  8. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  9. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  10. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  11. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  12. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  13. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  14. Information for Social Change. (2016). Events. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/events/
  15. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  16. Information for Social Change. (2016). Policies. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/policies-submission-guide/#1
  17. Information for Social Change. (2013). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
Continue Reading

Shelf Unbound

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Shelf Unbound

Website: http://www.shelfmediagroup.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Shelf Unbound book review magazine […] features the best of small press and independent books.”1

Target audience: “Avid readers.”2

Publisher: Shelf Media Group.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online Magazine.5

Content: Book reviews and author interviews.6

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://useast.mymarkettoolkit.com/shelf_media_group_mymarkettoolkit_com/pdf/shelf_submission_guidelines_2010.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: From the submission guidelines: “At this time, we are only accepting courtesy essays and reviews for publication.”8

Submission and review process: “If you would like to submit an indie book review or essay for consideration (up to 1,500 words), e-mail the text to edit [at] shelfmediagroup.com. Please indicate in your e-mail that you are making a courtesy submission and identify the blog or website address you would like the published piece to be linked to, if appropriate.”9

Editorial tone: Informal and engaging.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Shelf Unbound publishes book reviews and author interviews in the fiction/non-fiction field. As such, this publication does not apply directly to LIS authors but it may be a fun way to gain some publication experience. This publication may appeal to those wishing to write book reviews on books that interest them, or who want to flex their readers’ advisory skills.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the website, this online magazine is distributed to more than 125,000 readers in 70 countries.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based in the United States but distributed globally via online subscriptions and website. American English and content appears to be geared towards a US audience.

Reader characteristics: As this site is directed towards small and indie publishers, books and authors selected will come from these publishers.

According to the 2012 media kit, readers of Shelf Unbound are:

  • 75% are between the ages of 31 and 65
  • 96% describe themselves as regular or fanatic readers
  • 60% have annual household income over $50,000
  • 17% have annual household income over $100,000
  • 48 % have purchased and/or read a book they discovered in Shelf Unbound
  • 30% are in book clubs
  • 85% have recommended Shelf Unbound to a friend or say they are likely to do so.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: None can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Avid readers are always searching for the next good book and tend to read on a variety of subjects. This site appears to be a fun place in which to explore indie books on just about any topic.

Last updated: November 14, 2016


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “2016 Media Kit,” ShelfMediaGroup.com, accessed November 14, 2016, http://useast.mymarkettoolkit.com/108/pdf/2016-media-kit_2016-02-03_14-08-14.pdf
  2. 2016 Media Kit.”
  3. 2016 Media Kit.”
  4. “About,” ShelfMediaGroup.com, accessed November 14, 2016, http://www.shelfmediagroup.com/pages/about.html
  5. “Subscribe,” ShelfMediaGroup.com, accessed November 14, 2016, http://www.shelfmediagroup.com/pages/subscribe.html
  6. About.”
  7. 2016 Media Kit.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines,” ShelfMediaGroup.com, accessed November 14, 2016, http://useast.mymarkettoolkit.com/shelf_media_group_mymarkettoolkit_com/pdf/shelf_submission_guidelines_2010.pdf
  9. Submission Guidelines.”
  10. About.”
Continue Reading

Los Angeles Times

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Los Angeles Times (LA Times)

Website: http://www.latimes.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Los Angeles Times is the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country, with a daily readership of 1.4 million and 2.4 million on Sunday, more than 39 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.3 millionThe Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 134 years.”1

Target audience: Residents of Southern California.2

Publisher: Los Angeles Times Media Group.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: This is a lay publication. It is a newspaper geared toward the general public rather than toward LIS-oriented audiences.

Medium: Print and online. Archives are available online from the founding of the paper in 1881.4

Content: News reports, investigative journalism, editorials, reviews, and various columns. The website’s sections include Local, Nation, World, Business, Sports, Entertainment, Health, Lifestyle, Travel, and Opinion.5

Of interest to LIS writers, there is a special Books sub-section under Entertainment, including fiction and nonfiction book reviews and features. There’s also Jacket Copy, a section on “Books, authors and all things bookish,” hosted by Books staff writer Carolyn Kellogg.6

Frequency of publication: Daily.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/oe-howtosubmitoped,0,5238591.story

Types of contributions accepted: Op-ed articles are welcome on any subject. Per the website, “Most articles are about 750 words in length, though some are shorter, and on Sundays we can sometimes run pieces as long as 1,200 words […] We make every effort to read manuscripts promptly. If the article is accepted for publication, you will hear from a Times editor within five days. We regret that the volume of submissions we receive means that we cannot respond individually to each article, nor can we provide feedback to proposals or queries.”8

Letters to the Editor are another option9, as is Blowback, “The Times’ forum for full-length responses to our articles, editorials and Op-Eds.”10 Send 700 word submissions to blowback@latimes.com.11

Submission and review process: Email op-ed submissions to oped@latimes.com.12 For more information on op-ed pieces, see former editor Nicholas Goldberg’s explanation of op-ed processes and goals.13

Los Angeles Times has a staff of editors and writers for each section of the newspaper, as well as freelance writers, who are the primary contributors to the newspaper. You can contact the Editorial Staff by checking the directory for the relevant editor and emailing them at Firstname.Lastname@latimes.com.14

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Los Angeles Times is read by a general audience (not necessarily confined to Southern California) who wants to be ahead of the local and world news. Op-ed pieces about new digital collections, expanded library services, or opening of a new library branch would benefit LIS authors. You might also consider submitting a press release or event listing regarding a library event.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Daily readership is 1.4 million; Sunday readership is 2.4 million.15

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Los Angeles Times reaches one out of three adults in the Los Angeles area and is seen by tens of millions nationally.16

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers are affluent, college-educated adults, 90% of whom voted in the last presidential election.17 The newspaper’s market is also heavily Hispanic.18

The LA Times addresses bias via an Ethics Guidelines blog, noting that “a robust, ongoing discussion of ethics at all levels of the newsroom is essential to producing a first-rate newspaper.”19 A key goal of of “news and feature reporting -€“ apart from editorials, columns, criticism and other content that is expressly opinionated -€“ is to be non-ideological.”20

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Being a lay publication, Los Angeles Times will require LIS jargon-free contributions. While readers may be familiar with library issues, like Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA) and Dewey call numbers, generally authors should avoid writing on heavily specialized library topics such as OpenURL link resolver software technology or collection management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The newspaper’s readers are spread all over the world. They are everyday patrons and potential donors, suggesting they may wish to keep their submissions LIS jargon free and stay away from highly specialized topics.

Last updated: October 3, 2016


References

Show 20 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-about-us-storygallery.html
  2. “Audience,” Mediakit.LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://mediakit.latimes.com/audience
  3. “Executive Team,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/executives/
  4. “Archives,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/latimes/search.html
  5. “Site Map,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-sitemap-htmlstory.html
  6. “Books,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/books/
  7. About Us.”
  8. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html
  9. “Submit a Letter to the Editor,” LATimes,com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-letter-to-the-editor-htmlstory.html
  10. “About Blowback: The Opinion section’s online response forum,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/opinion/letters/la-op-blowback-about-story.html
  11. About Blowback: The Opinion section’s online response forum.”
  12. Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  13. “Op-Ed, Explained,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/news/la-oe-pages23oct23-story.html
  14. “Editorial Staff Directory,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-editorial-staff-directory-htmlstory.html
  15. About Us.”
  16. “National,” Mediakit.LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://mediakit.latimes.com/national
  17. “Why Los Angeles Times,” Mediakit.LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://mediakit.latimes.com/Media/LosAngelesTimesMediaKit/Toolkit/Why%20Los%20Angeles%20Times.pdf
  18. Audience.”
  19. “L.A. Times Ethics Guidelines,” Readers’ Representative Journal, July 20, 2007, http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/readers/2007/07/los-angeles-tim.html
  20. L.A. Times Ethics Guidelines.”
Continue Reading

The Huffington Post

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Huffington Post

Website: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The online destination for breaking news and opinion.”1

The site is sort of a CliffsNotes of water cooler fodder: anything and everything current is most likely being discussed on The Huffington Post, through its regular bloggers, celebrity contributing bloggers, and news spotted and posted by regular readers. In 2012, it won a Pulitzer prize for reporting on wounded veterans.2

Target audience: A politically-engaged audience seeking the latest news in entertainment, politics, and world affairs.

Publisher: The Huffington Post Media Group.3

Peer reviewed? No. Most articles posted on the site are in the form of blog posts.

Type: Civilian publication; online news site.

Medium: Online.

Content: A roundup of political, entertainment, and news from around the globe.

Of special interest to LIS writers, there’€™s a Books section under Entertainment, featuring articles and reviews by various bloggers, and the Libraries section featuring library-related news and articles. In 2012 a a section titled Libraries in Crisis was created to examine the role of libraries in today’s society. The section’€™s first series was titled The Death Of The Public Library?, and it has been somewhat controversial among LIS professionals, with a Hack Library School post noting, “€œI understand that stories of library closures are much sexier than the latest controversies with Overdrive, but if we want to see the libraries as a national tradition continue, we need to step away from the extremism and start proving what we are capable of. Let’s see some library success stories on this page, too.”

Frequency of publication: Updated daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Use the Contact Page to determine the best place to send your post. You can send scoops to the editors, send a blog pitch to the Blog Team, or search current job openings.4

A helpful 2013 article on Digital Media Zone (from Ryerson University in Canada) goes into some detail on becoming a blogger for The Huffington Post, including tips on getting noticed and advice on sending the finished post to the site editors.

Types of contributions accepted: Mostly articles and commentary in the form of blog posts.

Submission and review process: Send an email to the appropriate section you’€™d like to blog for.5

Editorial tone: Very informal and informational at the same time. Writers don’€™t talk down to readers, and readers are encouraged to log in and contribute to content and discussion.6

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Huffington Post is an excellent resource for librarians to reach a wide ranging global and local audience with news from the LIS world. The Libraries section would be a great place to discuss library efforts and updates, technological and otherwise, and news from the LIS sector, with a readership who is truly interested. Also a good place to suggest and write about books for review.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Total digital population of 79 million monthly unique visitors.”7

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based out of the US, the site has local editions such as Huff Post San Francisco and Chicago; as well as international versions covering Canada, France, Italy, Spain and the UK.8 The US versions are written in American English; culturally the site is considered a left-leaning publication, with special attention to U.S. political and entertainment news.

Reader characteristics: The Huffington Post was created in 2005 and became known as a liberal website for commentary/and alternative to more right wing sites such as the Drudge Report & Fox News. Although founder/creator Arianna Huffington is careful to note that the site does not consciously lean in either party direction, the site has a more left-leaning feel.9

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although readers are educated and The Huffington Post has a special library section, this site is more informal information and entertainment, not really the place for LIS jargon. If submitting a query or blog for the Books/Library section, the focus is more on specific voice or activity, not the formal academic jargon commonly found in LIS publications.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are interested in what’s going on with US libraries, and in discussing the most recent books and book news. While articles are not scholarly in tone, this site would most likely welcome posts written by LIS students as long as the topic is interesting and appealing to Huffington Post readers.

Last updated: November 25, 2016


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “Huffington Post,” Advertising.AOL.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://advertising.aol.com/properties#huffington-post
  2. Michael Calderone, “Huffington Post Awarded Pulitzer Prize.” The Huffington Post, January 14, 2013. Accessed November 25, 2016, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/16/huffington-post-pulitzer-prize-2012_n_1429169.html
  3. “The Huffington Post,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1414718214018/716779
  4. “Contact us,” HuffingtonPost.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/contact/
  5. Contact us.”
  6. “Frequenty Asked Questions,” HuffingtonPost.com, accessed November 25, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/p/frequently-asked-question.html#moderation
  7. Huffington Post.”
  8. “Huffington Post,” Wikipedia.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Huffington_Post
  9. Huffington Post.”
Continue Reading

mental_floss

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: mental_floss

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “mental_floss is the international media brand that gives smart, curious knowledge junkies their fix with upbeat, witty explorations of everything from science to pop culture to tech to history.”1

Target audience: “Busy people who love to feel smart.”2 The audience might be similar to anyone frequenting a library.

Publisher: Mental Floss, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Online.4

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects, including the “hidden sides of topics in the news you thought you already knew all about.”5

Frequency of publication: New stories posted daily.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for lists and Big Questions to fill out those two sections of the site, but if you know a great story from history, a strange science phenomenon, or anything else fascinating that we need to cover, we’d love to hear it.”7

Submission and review process: Send pitches to webpitches [at] mentalfloss.com.8

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The website receives 20 million unique visitors per month.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information about audience location is not provided, but content is written in English. Readers have a high degree of knowledge in pop culture, trivia, and current events.

Reader characteristics: According to the website, readers are “brainy millennials.”10 In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: December 11, 2016


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “What is mental_floss?,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  2. “Advertise,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/advertise
  3. What is mental_floss?
  4. “This is Our Last Print Issue!,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, https://service.mentalfloss.com/servlet/Show?WESPAGE=csp-dp/login.jsp&MSRSMAG=LF
  5. What is mental_floss?
  6. This is Our Last Print Issue!
  7. “Freelance Help Wanted,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted
  8. Freelance Help Wanted.”
  9. What is mental_floss?
  10. What is mental_floss?
Continue Reading

La Opinión

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: La Opinión

Website: http://www.laopinion.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission:La Opinión is the leading Spanish-language daily newspaper in the country, reaching 2 million monthly readers in print and online. La Opinión was founded in 1926 in Los Angeles to provide daily news and information to a Hispanic population that has grown to become the nation’s largest, its audience is active, involved and engaged.1

Target audience: Latino communities of Southern California and beyond.

Publisher: ImpreMedia, LLC.2

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian newspaper.

Medium: Print and online.3

Content: General information relevant to Latino citizens of the Southern California area. Includes varied content such as: sports, entertainment, business, lifestyles, Latin American news, U.S. news, world news, and special sections. This newspaper further includes information at the global, national, state, and local levels.

Frequency of publication: Daily.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: There are no submission or author guidelines. Editors at La Opinión are responsible for accepting outside content for individual sections, for all but the Main News section, which does not generally accept guest author contributions. Sections that do accept contributions are Sports, Entertainment, and Op-Ed (which might be the sole place for LIS content in this publication).

Types of contributions accepted: Community event announcements and information relating to the specific section of the paper you’d like to contribute to.

Submission and review process: Check the website or print publication to find the name of the editor for the specific section you’d like to write for. Email addresses are usually firstname.lastname@laopinion.com. Writers are paid for their contribution, with pay determined on a case by case basis. Articles are generally submitted in Spanish; they can be submitted in English, with translation services for the final published article.

Editorial tone: Informational and informative, with focus on issues that affect the Los Angeles Latino community.

Style guide used: Not available.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This newspaper lends itself to publishing local LIS related issues. LIS practitioners and students living in the covered area should consider including local library events.

Library-themed articles or letters may be published in this newspaper; however, they must be focused on local library issues and should be void of technical library jargon in order to fully reach Latinos in the Los Angeles area.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The publication reaches 2 million readers monthly.5

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: La Opinión reaches the Los Angeles area market, which has a total population of about 18 million, per the 2011 census.This newspaper is written in Spanish and offers information with a Latino perspective.

Reader characteristics: Readership is split fairly evenly between men and women, and readers have an average household income of $59,191.6 Since the paper is written in Spanish and targeted toward Hispanic communities, it is safe to assume that readers are Hispanic or Latino.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This is a civilian newspaper and a knowledge of LIS subject matter should not be assumed. Avoid technical jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Authors must provide readers information relevant to Latinos. Articles about library programs and issues that affect Latino communities would be welcome in this publication.

Last updated: December 11, 2016


References

Show 6 footnotes

  1. La Opinión,” impreMedia.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://www.impremedia.com/#la-opinion
  2. La Opinión,” LaOpinion.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://laopinion.com/
  3. La Opinión.
  4. La Opinión.
  5. La Opinión.
  6. “Our Audience,” impreMedia.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://www.impremedia.com/#audience
Continue Reading

First Monday

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: First Monday

Website: http://www.firstmonday.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “First Monday is one of the first openly accessible, peer-€“reviewed journals on the Internet, solely devoted to research about the Internet.”1 First Monday believes the impact of digitization on society is universal and ubiquitous, and seeks articles about how digitization is changing our understanding of society.2

Target audience: First Monday’€™s target audience includes intelligent, independent-thinking people located in more than 180 countries. Because readers’€™ cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly, readership is diverse. The journal is not geared toward those in academia, and many readers do not speak English as a first language.3

Publisher: First Monday Editorial Group at the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library4 First Monday was originally designed in Copenhagen and published by Munksgard, a Danish publisher.5

Peer reviewed? Yes6

Type: Computers and Internet, scholarly7 (First Monday is published in conjunction with the university library at the University of Illinois-Chicago, which indicates that the LIS community has a vested interest in the publication and represents a large proportion of its readership. Due to its diverse readership, we have categorized First Monday as both a “scholarly” and a “civilian” publication.)8

Medium: Online9

Content: First Monday publishes original interdisciplinary research papers about the Internet and related technologies. Articles emphasize subjects that are particularly interesting or groundbreaking. This publication’€™s strength lies in its diversity of content centered around the influence of the Internet and related technologies.10

Frequency of publication: Monthly11

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Types of contributions accepted: First Monday publishes articles on interesting and novel ideas related to the history, present, and future of the Internet.12 Published topics of interest to LIS authors include: knowledge management, trends and standards, information-seeking behavior, emerging electronic classification frameworks, digital copyright, social networks, education, information society, the internet’s technological and commercial development, technical issues, and the political and social implications of the Internet. Research surveys, studies, exploratory and critical theory articles tied to the internet and related technologies would be welcome here.13 The publication also provides detailed Guidelines for Authors. These guidelines include writing tips; citation, reference, and abstract guidelines; submission format; formatting templates; and a final checklist for use in preparing manuscript submissions.14

Submission and review process: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions. Papers are subject to a double-blind peer review for originality and timeliness in the context of related research.15

Editorial tone: Articles published in First Monday are as diverse as its readership. All articles are written in an academic tone, though style varies in complexity. Many are written in an easy-to-read style, while others employ more sophisticated language. In either case, writers maintain the active voice and employ short sentences and paragraphs.16

Style guide used: First Monday provides its own style guide.17

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

First Monday publishes interdisciplinary research articles on all aspects of the internet, from highly-specialized technical issues to the internet’€™s social and political impact. Given the increasing digitization of information, this journal holds tremendous promise for LIS authors.

Because this audience is not academic, writing standards are not rigid, and an international distribution creates the potential to reach many readers. This publication’€™s diverse readership allows for writing from a variety of disciplines–LIS authors with backgrounds in engineering, literature, or history would be equally at home here. First Monday would be an excellent place to publish a thesis, or research on emerging Web technologies or trends. Additionally, the fact that the journal is peer reviewed makes it an attractive choice for those who wish to add a published article to their curriculum vitae.

Started in 1996, the journal has published 1,381 papers in 218 issues written by 1,888 authors. The journal is also abstracted in Communication Abstracts, Computer & Communication Security Abstracts, DoIS, eGranary Digital Library, INSPEC, Information Science & Technology Abstracts, LISA, PAIS.18

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 314,559 per month.19

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readers are located in over 180 countries, concentrated in western Europe, North America, and the Pacific Rim. First Monday is published by the University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, where its server is also located.20 Due to the publication’€™s international scope, many readers’€™ first language is not English. Additionally, many readers are not academics. Authors should avoid using specific cultural references or idioms unless these are explained. Simple explanations, active voice, and less complex sentences will help this diverse audience better understand your message.21

Reader characteristics: Because First Monday‘€™s focus is international and its scope is interdisciplinary, the cultures, educational backgrounds, and fields of study vary greatly among First Monday readers. Cultural, educational, and professional interests vary greatly among readers, and this publication’€™s interdisciplinary scope is larger than library information science alone. That said, the publication’€™s focus is salient to the discipline. This, combined with the fact that it is published by a university library, makes it reasonable to presume that many readers are LIS professionals with shared professional interests and workplaces. The articles published in First Monday represent a wide variety of standpoints and approaches. The articles do not show overt bias or attitude toward any particular view, which seems indicative of the audience’s diversity.22

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many articles published in First Monday are not directly related to LIS, so it is reasonable to presume that many readers are involved in other aspects of Internet technology. In view of this, authors should cautiously employ LIS jargon and explain any specialized terms they use.23

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

First Monday prides itself on its interdisciplinary scope, and publishes a wide variety of articles from multiple perspectives. Demographic information about readers’€™ professional affiliations could not be obtained, and nothing in this publication’™s submission guidelines indicates a preference toward LIS authors or topics. However, First Monday‘€™s publisher indicates that librarians have a vested interest in this publication and may represent a large proportion of its readers. First Monday’™s Audience Profile stresses that many readers are not academics, but one might conclude that many are librarians.24

Library science is an interdisciplinary field, and LIS students and professionals possess specialized knowledge of digital information collection, organization, and dissemination. This uniquely positions them as potential authors for First Monday. When writing for this publication, explain any professional terminology that would be unfamiliar to those outside the LIS field. For example, a study of library cataloging standards and information-seeking behavior on the web should explain terms like MARC21 or RDA. To be well-suited for First Monday, such an article might focus on digitization’€™s broad affects on LIS cataloging and how these are shaping practices.

While First Monday’€™s readership is not primarily academic, the content of articles is often sophisticated and complex. This may be why the editors stress simplicity and brevity in style; readers from different backgrounds will better understand a complex message through simple explanations and short sentences.

Last updated: April 26, 2017


References

Show 24 footnotes

  1. First Monday, University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 25, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  2. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017,  http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  3. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  4. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  5. “Editorial Policies,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  6. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  7. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  8. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  9. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  10. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  11. First Monday, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed April 26, 2017, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1406051013757/247412
  12. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  13. “Archives,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/archive
  14. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  15. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  16. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  17. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  18. First Monday,  University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/index
  19. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  20. E. Valauskas, personal communication, 2 March 2011
  21. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  22. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  23. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
  24. “Submissions,” University of Illinois at Chicago University Library, accessed April 26, 2017, http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions
Continue Reading

Book Riot

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Book Riot

Website: http://www.bookriot.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: “€œWe create news, reviews, and commentary on books and reading, except, you know, fun. We do this by being at the leading edge of social reading and looking for new ways to engage with what we are reading.”1 Book Riot believes that “writing about books and reading should be just as diverse as books and readers are.”2

Book Riot, while for profit, gives 2% of their gross revenue to organizations like Open Books, which “serve(s) over 5,000 K-12 students through innovative instruction, including one-on-one reading with struggling elementary school students and creative writing workshops for middle and high school students.”3

Target audience: People who love books and reading about books. Book Riot strives to be an inclusive, welcoming space.4

Publisher: Riot New Media.5

Peer reviewed? No.6

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.7

Content: Humor, reviews, lists, commentary, and news on all things book related, along with editorials on topics related to literature and the reading experience in the 21st Century.8 No mode or genre is favored: “We think you can like both J.K. Rowling and J.M. Coetzee and that there are smart, funny, and informative things to say about both and that you shouldn’t have to choose.”9

Frequency of publication: New content is posted daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://bookriot.com/join-us/

Types of contributions accepted: “Your samples should be things you think could go up on Book Riot just as they are. We recommend that one be an entry for the Our Reading Lives series, and the other on any topic of your choosing. Please don’t submit book reviews you’ve written for your blog or other publications (you’ll notice we don’t do too many straight book reviews around here) or links to your reviews at Goodreads, LibraryThing, Amazon, etc. Also, please do not submit image-heavy pieces (like our Book Fetish or Literary Tourism series, or a collection of 10 awesome bookish t-shirts); we want to get a feel for your voice and writing style. Your samples should show us that you understand how we do things here at the Riot and that you can do it too.”10

Submission and review process: Complete the form and provide links to two writing samples. Use Google Docs or Dropbox for pieces that have not been published elsewhere online. If using a sample that has been published elsewhere (including on your blog), it must not be older than six months. Emailed applications and attachments will not be read.11

Editorial tone: Sometimes serious, sometimes silly, but never stuffy or boring.

Style guide used: None given.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you love books and have blogging experience, this is a great place to submit writing. The pieces are fun, cover a wide range of books, and aren’€™t limited to just reviews: the site loves top 10 lists of all flavors, introductions to authors you’ve never read, giveaways, and posts about current events like Amazon acquiring Goodreads and how that will affect readers.12 The site isn’t peer reviewed and might not help you gain tenure, but it’€™s a wonderful community of book lovers who will most likely appreciate an LIS writer’s perspective on reading.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: One million monthly visitors to the website13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: While Book Riot is visited by people all over the globe, the majority of readers are located in North America.14 Content is written in English. This is a site that would appreciate pop cultural references, tweets, and a media savvy writer. Book Riot values diversity, so a range of cultural perspectives would be welcome here.

Reader characteristics: Book Riot readers are generally women with “above average” household incomes. The majority of readers do not have children, and 74% are under the age of 45, with 51% under 35. About half of Book Riot’s audience attended college. In addition to books, readers are also interested in crafts, humor, science, and politics.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers will most likely will have some knowledge, but this is strictly a civilian publication that doesn’t want to be too stuffy, so keep the LIS jargon out of your submissions.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

If you have blogging experience and a good social media presence, this would be an ideal site to pitch ideas. Think beyond mere book reviews; Book Riot is the place for more thoughtful, interesting, or just plain fun commentary around reading or books. Readers will be receptive to a librarian’s perspective and insight, and the field is wide open for LIS-related ideas that can appeal to a lay reader.

Last updated: September 14, 2016


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Join Us,” BookRiot.com, accessed September 14, 2016, http://bookriot.com/join-us/
  2. “About Book Riot,” BookRiot.com, accessed September 14, 2016, http://bookriot.com/about/
  3. “Book Riot Store: About Book Riot,” BookRiot.com, accessed September 14, 2016, http://store.bookriot.com/pages/about-us
  4. “Riot New Media Media Kit,” BookRiot.com, accessed September 14, 2016, https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3KOPg34FpQCM3N5d0J2N1RvZjQ/view
  5.  “About Book Riot.”
  6. About Book Riot.”
  7. About Book Riot.”
  8. “Advertise With Us,” BookRiot.com, accessed September 14, 2016, http://bookriot.com/advertise/
  9. About Book Riot.”
  10. Join Us.”
  11. Join Us.”
  12. Riot New Media. (2014). About. Book Riot. Retrieved from http://bookriot.com/about/
  13. Riot New Media Media Kit.”
  14. Riot New Media Media Kit.”
  15. Riot New Media Media Kit.”
Continue Reading

GOOD

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: GOOD

Website: http://www.good.is

Purpose, objective, or mission: From the website: “GOOD is a global media brand and social impact company. Our collective mission is to help people and organizations be forces for good. Through award-winning media and creative partnerships, we connect deeply and authentically with this generation’s desire for purpose.”1 The magazine and website cover stories on business, environment, politics, culture, technology, education, etc.

Target audience: Millennials who want to make a difference in the world.2

Publisher: GOOD Worldwide, LLC.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Website and print magazine.5

Content: Current events; national and international news; political pieces; profiles of activists, community projects and organizations; fundraising campaigns; initiatives for change; social justice; and technology updates and uses. GOOD runs many articles about libraries in various sections of the publication. Potential authors can search the site for “libraries” and find hundreds of examples.

Frequency of publication: Website updated frequently; print magazine is published quarterly.6

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.good.is/about/faq

Types of contributions accepted: According to the site’s FAQ, “We work with artists, designers, photographers and writers on a freelance basis.”7

Submission and review process: Send your story pitch to submissions@goodinc.com to be considered for publication in the magazine or on the website. Due to the high volume of submissions, editors will only respond to pitches they are considering for publication. Allow two weeks for review.8

Editorial tone: Smart, hip, media/tech-savvy, polished writing.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

GOOD€™’s audience is one that would appreciate writing about LIS activities, projects, initiatives, technologies, etc. Examples include an article regarding crowd-sourced design initiatives in the Los Angeles Library system, and a recent piece on the future of public libraries.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: 50,000 for the print magazine, 10 million monthly unique visits to the website.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: GOOD has a global audience, though seventy percent of readers are based in the United States. Content is written in English.10

Reader characteristics: According to the 2016 media kit, GOOD‘s audience is sixty-three percent female and thirty-seven percent male. Most readers have a four-year college degree and are under the age of thirty-five. Readers are cultured, well read, technologically savvy, and care about social and environmental issues.11

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The group is not made of LIS professionals, but as they are social activists, community organizers, and tech savvy,12 they will most likely respond favorably to LIS-related articles, particularly concerning support for libraries, LIS initiatives, and technology. As is generally best with civilian publications, keep the jargon to a minimum.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

GOOD has a built-in, excellent audience for LIS articles, opinion pieces, and profiles. Readers are people shaping the communities we live in, who would want to know how they can help or better understand what’€™s going on in the LIS community, and how they can be a part of the bigger picture.

Last updated: September 28, 2016


References

Show 12 footnotes

  1. “About,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/about
  2. “Audience,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, http://www.goodinc.com/community/audience
  3. About.”
  4. About.”
  5. About.”
  6. About.”
  7. “General Inquiries,” Good.is, accessed September 27, https://www.good.is/about/faq#general-questions
  8. “GOOD Magazine (print),” Good.is, accessed September 27, 2016, https://www.good.is/about/faq#print-questions
  9. “GOOD Media Kit 2016,” GoodInc.com, accessed September 27, 2016, https://assets.goodstatic.com/s3/magazine/updatable/about/GOOD-Media-Kit-2016.pdf
  10. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  11. GOOD Media Kit 2016.”
  12. GOOD Worldwide, Inc. (2014). About Us. GOOD. Retrieved from http://community.good.is/about
Continue Reading

Chronicle of Philanthropy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Website: http://www.philanthropy.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Per their website, “The Chronicle of Philanthropy is an independent news organization that has been serving leaders, fundraisers, grant makers, and others involved in the philanthropic enterprise for more than 25 years. It offers a robust advice section to help nonprofit workers do their jobs as well as one of the biggest listings of career opportunities.”1

Target audience: Fundraisers, grant makers, and other nonprofit and philanthropy-based professionals.2

Publisher: Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.5

Medium: Print and online.6

Content: News stories, opinion pieces, tips and advice, people and awards. 7

Frequency of publication: The print edition is published twelve times a year, while the website is updated daily.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.philanthropy.com/page/Pitching-Stories-to-the/607/

Types of contributions accepted: “Stories about best or innovative practices in fundraising and managing organizations. Profiles of interesting (and especially effective but lesser-known) charity leaders, fundraisers, and donors. New trends in giving or fundraising. Anything that our readers can learn from and adapt to make them more effective.”9

Submission and review process: Submit pitches to the appropriate editor or reporterthey recommend becoming a subscriber to get an idea of who covers what.10

Editorial tone: Official and straightforward. Tone of a business section in a metro newspaper.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

While information on LIS issues would certainly do well in a publication of this type, it is better for LIS readers than authors.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The website receives 226,000 unique visitors each month, while more than 270 organizations have purchased The Chronicle’s site license program, which makes the website “available to entire organizations and extends its reach to nonprofit leaders across the nation and around the world.”11

Audience location: The Chronicle writes primarily for a national audience12, though their reach extends across the globe.13 All articles are written in English.

Reader characteristics: Individual philanthropists and other interested parties will garner information from the articles and news presented, but those working in the nonprofit sector will garner the most useful information from the various levels of publication.

The readers of this publication are likely more progressive than conservative. The increasing diversity of the nonprofit and philanthropy world has led to more varying biases as far as charity work and the focuses of nonprofits, but the values of most who will read this publication are similar. Improvement of life for those less fortunate both domestically and abroad and the continuation of those organizations that do so are the main goals of the organizations whose past, present, and future members subscribe to this publication.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: The majority of the subject matter does not deal with LIS information. While it is better that LIS jargon is not used, the information that any LIS writer wished to share with the readers of this publication would be common between both LIS and philanthropy readers.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

It is obvious from recently published articles that all writings presented to the editors of this publication should have a forward spin on them. Articles should focus on the needs or interests of the reader. An article on black men in nonprofit organizationsor lack thereofnot only gives numbers and explains why there are fewer in this demographic working non-profit, but also discusses solutions. Any LIS related article must look at the LIS world from the eyes of that world’s grant writers and fundraisers.

Last updated: September 26, 2016


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. “About the Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Philanthropy.com, accessed September 23, 2016, https://www.philanthropy.com/page/about-the-chronicle-of/531?cid=cpf_abt
  2. About the Chronicle of Philanthropy.”
  3. “Chronicle of Philanthropy’s Publisher Appoints New CEO,” Philanthropy.com, accessed September 26, 2016, https://www.philanthropy.com/article/Chronicle-of-Philanthropy-s/155013
  4. “Pitching Stories to the Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Philanthropy.com, accessed September 23, 2016, https://www.philanthropy.com/page/Pitching-Stories-to-the/607/
  5. About the Chronicle of Philanthropy.”
  6. About the Chronicle of Philanthropy.”
  7. “The Chronicle of Philanthropy,” Philanthropy.com, accessed September 23, 2016, https://www.philanthropy.com/
  8. About the Chronicle of Philanthropy.”
  9. Pitching Stories to the Chronicle of Philanthropy.”
  10. Pitching Stories to the Chronicle of Philanthropy.”
  11. “Email, Newsletter, Banner Advertising,” Philanthropy.com, accessed September 26, 2016, https://www.philanthropy.com/items/biz/pdf/COPENewsletters2015a.pdf
  12. Pitching Stories to the Chronicle of Philanthropy.”
  13. Email, Newsletter, Banner Advertising.”
Continue Reading