Wiki Categories Archives: Civilian Publications

The Conversation

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Conversation

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://theconversation.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Begun as a project in 2014, The Conversation publishes articles written by PhD candidates and university-affiliated researchers. Their aim is to promote access to high-quality information and to strive for a better understanding of current affairs and complex issues.1

For more in depth information, take a look at their charter.

While this wiki profile is for The Conversation‘s U.S.-based website, there are additional sites specific to audiences all around the globe.

Target audience: Members of the general public interested in reading high-quality based on academic research. Much of this research may not otherwise be accessible to the general public because it may be published in scholarly journals with limited circulation.

Publisher: The Conversation US, Inc.

Peer reviewed? No. Authors work with editors, who are professional journalists, to craft their articles.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles based on academic studies of varying topics—arts, culture, science, technology, medicine, and many more.

Frequency of publication: New articles published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://theconversation.com/us/pitches

Types of contributions accepted: The Conversation focuses on three priority areas:

  • “Timely, evidence-based analysis of issues making the news
  • Articles explaining new research and its significance for a non-expert audience
  • Timeless, plain English ‘explainers’ of complex issues”2

Submission and review process: There are three steps to becoming published: verification of institute, educational history/qualifications and the creation of a website account.3

Editorial tone:  “Plain English” (for “a non-expert audience”) and “evidence based.” 4

The writing style must be professional yet accessible to general readers who are not subject matter experts. A scholarly or academic tone could be off-putting for lay readers.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For authors who are are LIS researchers affiliated with an academic institution (MLIS students should keep in mind that they do not qualify), this could be a great outlet for translating scholarly work research for lay audiences and for providing well-informed content on current issues in libraries, online privacy, intellectual freedom, the digital divide, media literacy, and other LIS-oriented topics that would be significant to a nonexpert audience. A four-minute video on the benefits of writing for The Conversation is available here.

Before proposing an article, The Conversation‘s editors ask that you do a keyword search to see what has already been published on your topic.5 (Of course this is good advice for any publication you might hope to write for!) A list of articles on libraries can be found here.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: This profile is geared towards readers of the U.S.-based site, but The Conversation has websites for readers in Australia, Africa, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Indonesia, as well as an additional “global perspectives” site.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The Conversation has a global audience. Specific editions are geared toward readers in specific geographies, but all editions are accessible worldwide.

Reader characteristics: All published articles feature a comments section with lively debates among readers. Thoughtful, well developed comments are the norm. Anyone can sign up to comment on articles, but full names are required to help maintain a transparent forum. Click here to read about The Conversation’s community standards for readers and commenters.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied. Authors would need to assume that readers would not be part of the LIS world and would not be familiar with LIS jargon.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

From glancing over the reader characteristics mentioned above, you can guarantee that, if published by The Conversation, your article could very well invite a lively debate among commenters from all over the world. Authors will find a higher level of engagement with readers, and will be able to see how their audience responds to their work–a feature not usually seen with publication of scholarly articles.

Last updated: April 9, 2018


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “Who We Are,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 14, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/who-we-are
  2. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  3. “Become an author,” TheConversation.com, accessed March 29, 2018, https://theconversation.com/become-an-author
  4. “Pitch an article idea, TheConversation.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://theconversation.com/us/pitches
  5. “Pitch an article.”
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Medium

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Medium

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://medium.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Medium is a free, open platform for people to read, write and share posts easily online. Posts can be organized into publications, which anyone can set up.”1

“Medium taps into the brains of the world’s most insightful writers, thinkers, and storytellers to bring you the smartest takes on topics that matter. So whatever your interest, you can always find fresh thinking and unique perspectives.”2

Target audience: Inquiring minds on the web. Medium publishes content across a vast array of topics to interest all sorts of readers.

Publisher: A Medium Corporation.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: Articles of varying lengths.

Frequency of publication: Daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Medium’s Write page has information on posting, editing, importing articles and more.

Types of contributions accepted: Articles on a plethora of topics, grouped into broad categories such as Technology, Culture, Entrepreneurship, Creativity and more. Anyone and everyone can post articles, granted they create an account on the website.

Submission and review process: This page directs authors to information on creating an account and writing and posting stories.

Editorial tone: Professional, yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

See “Medium for Nonprofits, Explained” for suggestions. See also the SJSU iSchool’s Medium site. And you can search Medium for “libraries” and “librarians” to find lots of examples from other sources.

Given the sheer number of daily users on Medium, it could be a great place to submit writing, especially if you have never been published before. However, there are plenty of articles out there about how it can be difficult to get your work seen since there are so many postings per day, as well as how you can increase your viewer traffic.

The following articles may be helpful for those interested in posting on Medium:

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Anyone can read articles for free, but monthly subscribers get access to more content and curated collections.3

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Published in English, but read worldwide. The majority of readers are in the United States.4

Reader characteristics: According to statistics, the majority of Medium’s readers are college educated.5 The sheer amount of topics covered and the breadth of articles published shows that Medium readers are curious information seekers who have many interests.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied. There are certainly articles written by LIS professionals, but they are often geared towards the general public. Examples: Three Lessons I’ve Learned About People from Being a Librarian and Google’s Slow Fade with librarians.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Medium is a unique platform for writers in many ways, but its ‘clapping’ feature allows for readers to respond to articles, and in turn directly shows authors how widely read their work is. It can be difficult to increase readership across Medium, but there are plenty of third party websites that give you tips and tricks to improve visibility.

Last updated: April 4, 2018


References

Show 5 footnotes

  1. “What is Medium?” Medium.com, accessed March 20, 2018, https://help.medium.com/hc/en-us/articles/225168028-What-is-Medium-
  2. “About,” Medium.com, accessed Marc 19, 2018, https://medium.com/about
  3. “Membership,” Medium.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://medium.com/membership
  4. “Medium.com Traffic Statistics,” Alexa.com, accessed April 2, 2018, https://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/medium.com
  5. “Medium.com Traffic Statistics.”
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I Need a Library Job (INALJ)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: I Need A Library Job (INALJ)

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://inalj.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: INALJ was started in 2010 by Naomi House as a way for librarians to find jobs in the LIS field.1 In its seventh year now, Naomi and volunteers strive to find and share jobs that are traditional and outside the box for LIS professionals, staff and students.2

Target audience: LIS professionals and students.

Publisher: The website and its LinkedIn and social media pages are run by Naomi House, Elizabeth Leonard and many other volunteers.3

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Electronic / online.

Content: INALJ is not just for job postings, the site also features interviews, job hunting tips, articles and blog posts within the LIS field.4

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Information on guest blogging: http://inalj.com/?page_id=65207

Types of contributions accepted: Articles or interviews of any length (but at least 550 words) on all sorts of topics—archives, volunteering, diversity, resumes etc.5

Submission and review process: You must provide proof of identity in order to post an article or blog—use a professional work email address or have a LinkedIn connection or colleague vouch for you. A landscape orientation jpeg photo is required, as well as a personal bio. The bio can also be a link to your own site.

Submit photos, Word document of your article, bio and proof of identity to: articles@inalj.com.6

Editorial tone: Professional yet casual.

Style guide used: No style guide is used.7

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

INALJ publishes articles across a broad array of LIS topics. Its casual, straightforward, “no BS” approach to all aspects of the LIS field may be refreshing and helpful for many potential authors looking for an outlet for their writing. Naomi states that she does not publish any articles that are holiday related, since she has a back log to work through.8

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: INALJ covers all fifty states, Canada and features international jobs, as well.9

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: INALJ‘s audience is primarily in the United States, but it does feature coverage for Canada and some international jobs.

Reader characteristics: Readers come to INALJ for all sorts of reasons other than job hunting. Articles published in the past year span a broad range of topics–networking for reluctant networkers, the importance of saying “no” in the workplace and a q & a with Dr. Sandra Hirsch from SJSU’s iSchool. LIS students and professionals come to INALJ for career advice and ever changing, relevant information about the field.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied–INALJ is used by both professionals and students.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Considering the wide coverage of topics and issues that INALJ covers, potential authors can expect readers to be eager for new voices in the LIS field, no matter what area you are writing about.

Last updated: March 12, 2018


References

Show 9 footnotes

  1. “About INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed March 12, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=10653
  2. “Mission Statement,” INALJ.com, accessed March 13, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=79518
  3. “About INALJ”
  4. “Mission Statement.”

    Frequency of publication: INALJ is usually updated Monday-Friday.[4. “About INALJ.”

  5. “Write for INALJ,” INALJ.com, accessed March 12, 2018, http://inalj.com/?page_id=65207
  6. “Write for INALJ.”
  7. “Write for INALJ.”
  8. Write for INALJ.”
  9. “About INALJ.”
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No Shelf Required

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: No Shelf Required

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.noshelfrequired.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: NSR started as a blog run by Sue Polanka, an academic librarian at Wright State University. For librarians from all fields, it quickly became a go-to source for new information on ebooks in libraries–a burgeoning concept at the time. Sue and the current editor, Mirela Roncevic, joined forces on all sorts of writing endeavors and the blog eventually grew into its own site with regular columnists and contributors from all over the world.1

From NSR’s About page: “In 2016, NSR expanded its mission to inspire professionals inside the book industry to do more with ebooks and econtent and embarked on groundbreaking projects that challenge what we think is possible with ebooks.”2

Target audience: Publishers, writers, editors, LIS students and professionals.3

Publisher: Currently, NSR’s editor is Mirela Roncevic.4

Peer reviewed? Unknown.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online.

Content: NSR features articles on all sorts of topics–academic libraries, apps, ebook readers, piracy and many more. They have recently expanded to include reviews and opinion pieces from writers in all areas of digital content.5

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/

Types of contributions accepted: Reviews and opinion pieces, news posts.6

Submission and review process: Send proposals to Editorial Director, Mirela Roncevic at mirelaronevic@gmail.com. Review process unknown.

Editorial tone: Professional, but casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Given the breadth of information and the scope of topics that are covered, NSR could be a great fit for all sorts of LIS authors. Published pieces are written “by industry insiders of all walks of life: writers, editors, librarians, educators, publishers, vendors, independent authors, and tech entrepreneurs, to name a few. Some creatively draw our attention to the issues, while others offer perspectives on what various statistics tell us about the state of the larger book industry.”7

Authors covering topics regarding ebooks and the digital or technological aspects of the LIS fields may particularly be interested in looking more into NSR.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Readers and writers are primarily in the United States, though they feature contributors from all over the world.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Though NSR began as a blog out of Wright State University in Ohio, its audience is found all over North America, with an additional global presence. Articles are published in English, but the website offers Google translation on all pages.8

Reader characteristics: NSR readers are students and professionals in many different areas–LIS, publishing, education and more.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Many readers of NSR may have a library science background, but given the wide range of readers and topics covered, LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

NSR strives to publish the latest news and information on the ever growing fields of ebooks and epublishing. Readers interested in these fields are advocates for improving technology and tech usage in the LIS fields and beyond. NSR has a fantastic, comprehensive list of articles and essays related to emerging trends and issues in the ebook/epublishing fields for researchers and inquiring minds. To see if their work would be a good fit, potential authors should check out Learn with NSR to read some the latest publishings.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/about/
  2. “About.”
  3. “Home,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/
  4. “About.”
  5. “Write for NSR,” NoShelfRequired.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.noshelfrequired.com/writefornsr/
  6. “Write for NSR.”
  7. “Write for NSR.”
  8. “About.”
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Slate

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

TitleSlate

ISSN: 1091-2339 (Online)1

Website: http://www.slate.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Founded in 1996, Slate is a “general-interest publication offering analysis and commentary about politics, news, business, technology, and culture.”2

Target audience: Internet news seekers interested in current events and contemporary topics with a unique perspective and sharp commentary.

Publisher: The Slate Group, a Graham Holdings Company.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication / online magazine.

Medium: Online.

Content: Current events, political commentary, culture–all sorts of topics within the United States. Slate has a self-proclaimed liberal slant.3

Frequency of publication: New content published daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: How to pitch Slate

Types of contributions accepted: Slate asks that you read over their website and get familiar with the types of work they accept before you send in a pitch. They’re known for making strong statements, so if your piece falls under opinion or analysis, be sure to make a compelling argument. Scroll towards the bottom of How to pitch Slate to read a successful pitch example, a particularly funny take on food featured on the Game of Thrones TV show.

Submission and review process: Send short pitches stating the general content of your article, or the argument you intend to make. Do not send complete drafts of your piece.4

Slate asks that you please Google the topic of your article to see what as already been written on the subject–they strive for fresh content and new perspectives. Be sure to include the section of the site in which you would like your article to be featured–Brow Beat, Health/Science, Human Interest, etc. Include a short bio on yourself. Slate asks that you please refrain from emailing multiple editors. Due to the high volume of submissions that they receive, if you do not hear back from an editor in a few days, your article was not accepted.5

Editorial tone: Informative yet casual.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Slate could be a great option to look into for those writing about push-button topics in the LIS field. Recently published articles regarding library and information science include The Library of Congress Will Stop Archiving Every Tweet. Good., from 2017, and Who Is in Control of Your Library’s Data? from 2015.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to Quantcast, Slate.com reaches over 20 million people every month. 77% of which are in the United States.6

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Slate has headquarters in New York and Washington, D.C., and the majority of its readers are in the United States.7

Reader characteristics: According to an older article published by Slate, their general demographic is comprised of (mostly) college educated readers between the ages of 25-54.8

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Varied, as Slate is read by the general public.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

With 70 million viewers a month, you can guarantee that readers of Slate have a wide range of knowledge. Recent articles on a David Lynch typing game and the dubiousness of octopus intelligence show potential authors that Slate could be a good outlet for more offbeat LIS writing. All articles feature a lively readers’ commentary section, so be prepared for (potentially) heavy debate about your content.

Last updated: March 2, 2018


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1.  Slate, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 27, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1522203227097/248045
  2. “About Us,” Slate.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/slate_fare/2006/08/about_us.html
  3. “Slate Isn’t Too Liberal. But…,” Slate.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.slate.com/articles/slate_plus/slate_fare/2014/09/is_slate_magazine_too_liberal_or_conservative_what_members_said_about_the.html
  4. “How to pitch Slate,” Slate.com, accessed February 27, 2018, http://www.slate.com/articles/briefing/slate_fare/2017/10/how_to_pitch_slate.html
  5. “How to pitch Slate.”
  6. “Slate.com Audience Insights,” Quantcast.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://www.quantcast.com/slate.com#trafficCard
  7. “Slate.com Audience Insights.”
  8. “Media Kit,” Slate.com, accessed February 28, 2018, http://www.slate.com/articles/briefing/media_kit/2000/12/_14.html
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Information for Social Change

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Information for Social Change

ISSN: 1364-694X (Print) and 1756-901X (Online)1

Website: http://libr.org/isc/

Purpose, objective, or mission: An activist librarian organization that “examines the issues of censorship, freedom and ethics amongst library and information workers.”2

Target audience: LIS workers and practitioners.3

Publisher: Information for Social Change.4

Peer reviewed? No5

Type: LIS professional. The topics and informal style of the content may also appeal to civilian readers.6

Medium: Online7

Content: Documenting the control of information globally and also alternatives to the control of information.8

Frequency of publication: Semi-annually.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://libr.org/isc/call-for-authors/

Types of contributions accepted: Articles between 500 and 2500 words. Longer articles may be excerpted with the full text made available from the author, according to the guidelines. Letters, review articles and poems are also accepted for publication.10

Submission and review process: Send an email to the editor at isc-journal@libr.org.11

Editorial tone: Simple and clear English. Views are radical and thought-provoking themes that promote debate.12

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

For LIS authors who are interested in radical librarianship that examines censorship, ethics and freedom, this journal would be a good choice. The journal suggests potential authors review past and current issues in order to gauge the interest.13

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Not stated.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Not stated but British English style of writing is used.14 Website is in British English but it’s not stated as to whether that is the only acceptable version. This journal addresses global issues so it is safe to assume their readers are international. The organization holds events in association with progressive groups such as Third World Book Fair.15

Reader characteristics: Readers are most likely progressive in their viewpoints. Readers are LIS professionals with progressive and radical views16 who are interested in finding channels in which to allow “unfettered and unmediated ideas” to circulate.17

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Knowledge of LIS terms and the profession is helpful.

Last updated: May 14, 2016

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers of this journal most likely hold progressive viewpoints and feel strongly about the issues presented such as freedom of information and radical changes to the way information is controlled and disseminated. Authors who wish to submit to this publication should hold similar views or at least be extremely open to new ideas.18


References

Show 18 footnotes

  1.  Information for Social Change, Information for Social Change, accessed March 21, 2018, http://libr.org/isc/
  2. Information for Social Change. (2016). Welcome. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/
  3. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  4. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  5. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  6. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  7. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  8. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  9. ProQuest. (2016). Information for Social Change. Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory. Retrieved from http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1412095953890/304020
  10. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  11. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  12. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  13. Information for Social Change. (2016). Journal Information. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/journal-information/
  14. Information for Social Change. (2016). Table of Contents/Current Issue. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/table-of-contents-current-issue/
  15. Information for Social Change. (2016). Events. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/events/
  16. Information for Social Change. (2016). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
  17. Information for Social Change. (2016). Policies. Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/policies-submission-guide/#1
  18. Information for Social Change. (2013). Who Are We? Information for Social Change. Retrieved from http://libr.org/isc/who-are-we/
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Shelf Unbound

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Shelf Unbound

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.shelfmediagroup.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Shelf Unbound book review magazine […] features the best of small press and independent books.”1

Target audience: “Avid readers.”2

Publisher: Shelf Media Group.3

Peer reviewed? No.4

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Online Magazine.5

Content: Book reviews and author interviews.6

Frequency of publication: Bimonthly.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://useast.mymarkettoolkit.com/shelf_media_group_mymarkettoolkit_com/pdf/shelf_submission_guidelines_2010.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: From the submission guidelines: “At this time, we are only accepting courtesy essays and reviews for publication.”8

Submission and review process: “If you would like to submit an indie book review or essay for consideration (up to 1,500 words), e-mail the text to edit [at] shelfmediagroup.com. Please indicate in your e-mail that you are making a courtesy submission and identify the blog or website address you would like the published piece to be linked to, if appropriate.”9

Editorial tone: Informal and engaging.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Shelf Unbound publishes book reviews and author interviews in the fiction/non-fiction field. As such, this publication does not apply directly to LIS authors but it may be a fun way to gain some publication experience. This publication may appeal to those wishing to write book reviews on books that interest them, or who want to flex their readers’ advisory skills.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: According to the website, this online magazine is distributed to more than 125,000 readers in 70 countries.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based in the United States but distributed globally via online subscriptions and website. American English and content appears to be geared towards a US audience.

Reader characteristics: As this site is directed towards small and indie publishers, books and authors selected will come from these publishers.

According to the 2012 media kit, readers of Shelf Unbound are:

  • 75% are between the ages of 31 and 65
  • 96% describe themselves as regular or fanatic readers
  • 60% have annual household income over $50,000
  • 17% have annual household income over $100,000
  • 48 % have purchased and/or read a book they discovered in Shelf Unbound
  • 30% are in book clubs
  • 85% have recommended Shelf Unbound to a friend or say they are likely to do so.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: None can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Avid readers are always searching for the next good book and tend to read on a variety of subjects. This site appears to be a fun place in which to explore indie books on just about any topic.

Last updated: October 24, 2018


References

Show 10 footnotes

  1. “2016 Media Kit,” ShelfMediaGroup.com, accessed November 14, 2016, http://useast.mymarkettoolkit.com/108/pdf/2016-media-kit_2016-02-03_14-08-14.pdf
  2. 2016 Media Kit.”
  3. 2016 Media Kit.”
  4. “About,” ShelfMediaGroup.com, accessed November 14, 2016, http://www.shelfmediagroup.com/pages/about.html
  5. “Subscribe,” ShelfMediaGroup.com, accessed November 14, 2016, http://www.shelfmediagroup.com/pages/subscribe.html
  6. About.”
  7. 2016 Media Kit.”
  8. “Submission Guidelines,” ShelfMediaGroup.com, accessed November 14, 2016, http://useast.mymarkettoolkit.com/shelf_media_group_mymarkettoolkit_com/pdf/shelf_submission_guidelines_2010.pdf
  9. Submission Guidelines.”
  10. About.”
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Los Angeles Times

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Los Angeles Times (LA Times)

ISSN: 0458-30351

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Los Angeles Times is the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country, with a daily readership of 1.4 million and 2.4 million on Sunday, more than 39 million unique latimes.com visitors monthly and a combined print and online local weekly audience of 4.3 millionThe Pulitzer Prize-winning Times has been covering Southern California for more than 134 years.”2

Website: http://www.latimes.com/

Target audience: Residents of Southern California.3

Publisher: Los Angeles Times Media Group.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian publication. It is a newspaper geared toward the general public.

Medium: Print and online. Archives are available online from the founding of the paper in 1881.5

Content: News reports, investigative journalism, editorials, reviews, and various columns. The website’s sections include Local, Nation, World, Business, Sports, Entertainment, Health, Lifestyle, Travel, and Opinion.6

Of interest to LIS writers, there is a special Books sub-section under Entertainment, including fiction and nonfiction book reviews and features. There’s also Jacket Copy, a section on “Books, authors and all things bookish,” hosted by Books staff writer Carolyn Kellogg.7

Frequency of publication: Daily.8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/oe-howtosubmitoped,0,5238591.story

Types of contributions accepted: Op-ed articles are welcome on any subject. Per the website, “Most articles are about 750 words in length, though some are shorter, and on Sundays we can sometimes run pieces as long as 1,200 words […] We make every effort to read manuscripts promptly. If the article is accepted for publication, you will hear from a Times editor within five days. We regret that the volume of submissions we receive means that we cannot respond individually to each article, nor can we provide feedback to proposals or queries.”9

Letters to the Editor are another option10, as is Blowback, “The Times’ forum for full-length responses to our articles, editorials and Op-Eds.”11 Send 700 word submissions to blowback@latimes.com.12

Submission and review process: Email op-ed submissions to oped@latimes.com.13 For more information on op-ed pieces, see former editor Nicholas Goldberg’s explanation of op-ed processes and goals.14

Los Angeles Times has a staff of editors and writers for each section of the newspaper, as well as freelance writers, who are the primary contributors to the newspaper. You can contact the Editorial Staff by checking the directory for the relevant editor and emailing them at Firstname.Lastname@latimes.com.15

Editorial tone: Journalistic.

Style guide used: None specified.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Los Angeles Times is read by a general audience (not necessarily confined to Southern California) who wants to be ahead of the local and world news. Op-ed pieces about new digital collections, expanded library services, or opening of a new library branch would benefit LIS authors. You might also consider submitting a press release or event listing regarding a library event.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Daily readership is 1.4 million; Sunday readership is 2.4 million.16

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Los Angeles Times reaches one out of three adults in the Los Angeles area and is seen by tens of millions nationally.17

Reader characteristics: The majority of readers are affluent, college-educated adults, 90% of whom voted in the last presidential election.18 The newspaper’s market is also heavily Hispanic.19

The LA Times addresses bias via an Ethics Guidelines blog, noting that “a robust, ongoing discussion of ethics at all levels of the newsroom is essential to producing a first-rate newspaper.”20 A key goal of of “news and feature reporting -apart from editorials, columns, criticism and other content that is expressly opinionated -is to be non-ideological.”21

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Being a lay publication, Los Angeles Times will require LIS jargon-free contributions. While readers may be familiar with library issues, like Deleting Online Predators Act (DOPA) and Dewey call numbers, generally authors should avoid writing on heavily specialized library topics such as OpenURL link resolver software technology or collection management.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The newspaper’s readers are spread all over the world. They are everyday patrons and potential donors, suggesting they may wish to keep their submissions LIS jargon free and stay away from highly specialized topics.

Last updated: October 23, 2018


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.  Los Angeles Times, WorldCat, accessed March 24, 2018, https://www.worldcat.org/title/los-angeles-times/oclc/474112039
  2. “About Us,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-about-us-storygallery.html
  3. “Audience,” Mediakit.LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://mediakit.latimes.com/audience
  4. “Executive Team,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/executives/
  5. “Archives,” LATimes.com, accessed October 23, 2018, https://latimes.newspapers.com/
  6. “Site Map,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-sitemap-htmlstory.html
  7. “Books,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/books/
  8. About Us.”
  9. “Submitting an article to Op-Ed,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/oe-howtosubmitoped-story.html
  10. “Submit a Letter to the Editor,” LATimes,com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-letter-to-the-editor-htmlstory.html
  11. “About Blowback: The Opinion section’s online response forum,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/opinion/letters/la-op-blowback-about-story.html
  12. About Blowback: The Opinion section’s online response forum.”
  13. Submitting an article to Op-Ed.”
  14. “Op-Ed, Explained,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/news/la-oe-pages23oct23-story.html
  15. “Editorial Staff Directory,” LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://www.latimes.com/about/la-editorial-staff-directory-htmlstory.html
  16. About Us.”
  17. “National,” Mediakit.LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://mediakit.latimes.com/
  18. “Why Los Angeles Times,” Mediakit.LATimes.com, accessed October 3, 2016, http://mediakit.latimes.com/Media/LosAngelesTimesMediaKit/Toolkit/Why%20Los%20Angeles%20Times.pdf
  19. Audience.”
  20. “L.A. Times Ethics Guidelines,” Readers’ Representative Journal, July 20, 2007, http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/readers/2007/07/los-angeles-tim.html
  21. L.A. Times Ethics Guidelines.”
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The Huffington Post

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: The Huffington Post

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “HuffPost is for the people — not the powerful. We are empathetic reporters and observers. We hold power accountable. We entertain without guilt. We share what people need to know to live their best lives. If something matters to our audience, it matters to us. We are the original internet newspaper, founded in 2005. Now we have newsrooms and editions in 16 countries. We’re truly global, but still feel local. We tell stories in text, video, audio and pictures, and bring them to our audiences wherever they are. We’re fast, fun and inclusive. And we’ll always make sure you know what’s real.”1

In 2012, it won a Pulitzer prize for reporting on wounded veterans”.2

Target audience: A politically-engaged audience seeking the latest news in entertainment, politics, and world affairs.

Publisher: The Huffington Post Media Group.3

Peer reviewed? No. Most articles posted on the site are in the form of blog posts.

Type: Civilian publication; online news site.

Medium: Online.

Content: A roundup of political, entertainment, and news from around the globe.

Of special interest to LIS writers, there’s a Books section under Entertainment, featuring articles and reviews by various bloggers, and the Libraries section featuring library-related news and articles. In 2012 a a section titled Libraries in Crisis was created to examine the role of libraries in today’s society. The section’s first series was titled The Death Of The Public Library?, and it has been somewhat controversial among LIS professionals, with a Hack Library School post noting, “I understand that stories of library closures are much sexier than the latest controversies with Overdrive, but if we want to see the libraries as a national tradition continue, we need to step away from the extremism and start proving what we are capable of. Let’s see some library success stories on this page, too.”

Frequency of publication: Updated daily.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/how-to-pitch-huffpost-opinion-personal_us_5a5e0726e4b0fcbc3a1388f0?section=us_opinion

Types of contributions accepted: “At HuffPost, we believe that op-eds and personal stories can change the world. We want to help our readers better understand the news and the world around them, and we know smart analysis and storytelling are essential to our mission. So we’re launching HuffPost Opinion and HuffPost Personal. If you want to be a part of them, here’s how you can pitch to us. All published contributions to these new sections are paid.”4

Submission and review process: See “How to Pitch to HuffPost” for detailed description and tips.5

Editorial tone: Informal and informational at the same time.

Style guide used: None referenced.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Huffington Post is an excellent resource for librarians to reach a wide ranging global and local audience with news from the LIS world. The Libraries section would be a great place to discuss library efforts and updates, technological and otherwise, and news from the LIS sector, with a readership who is truly interested. Also a good place to suggest and write about books for review.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “Total digital population of 79 million monthly unique visitors.”6

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Based out of the US, the site has local editions such as Huff Post San Francisco and Chicago; as well as international versions covering Canada, France, Italy, Spain and the UK.7 The US versions are written in American English; culturally the site is considered a left-leaning publication, with special attention to U.S. political and entertainment news.

Reader characteristics: The Huffington Post was created in 2005 and became known as a liberal website for commentary/and alternative to more right wing sites such as the Drudge Report & Fox News. Although founder/creator Arianna Huffington is careful to note that the site does not consciously lean in either party direction, the site has a more left-leaning feel.8

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although readers are educated and The Huffington Post has a special library section, this site is more informal information and entertainment, not really the place for LIS jargon. If submitting a query or blog for the Books/Library section, the focus is more on specific voice or activity, not the formal academic jargon commonly found in LIS publications.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers are interested in what’s going on with US libraries, and in discussing the most recent books and book news. While articles are not scholarly in tone, this site would most likely welcome posts written by LIS students as long as the topic is interesting and appealing to Huffington Post readers.

Last updated: November 25, 2016


References

Show 8 footnotes

  1. “About Us,” huffingtonpost.com, accessed October 18, 2018, https://www.huffingtonpost.com/static/about-us
  2. Michael Calderone, “Huffington Post Awarded Pulitzer Prize.” The Huffington Post, January 14, 2013. Accessed November 25, 2016, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/04/16/huffington-post-pulitzer-prize-2012_n_1429169.html
  3. “The Huffington Post,” Ulrichsweb.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1414718214018/716779
  4. “How to Pitch to HuffPost,” huffingtonpost.com, accessed October 18, 2018, https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/how-to-pitch-huffpost-opinion-personal_us_5a5e0726e4b0fcbc3a1388f0?section=us_opinion
  5. “How to Pitch to HuffPost,” huffingtonpost.com, accessed October 18, 2018, https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/how-to-pitch-huffpost-opinion-personal_us_5a5e0726e4b0fcbc3a1388f0?section=us_opinion
  6. Huffington Post.”
  7. “Huffington Post,” Wikipedia.com, accessed November 25, 2016, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Huffington_Post
  8. Huffington Post.”
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mental_floss

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: mental_floss

ISSN: 1543-4702 (Print)1

Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Mental Floss delivers smart, fun and shareable content in an upbeat and witty environment. An encyclopedia of everything, we answer life’s big questions and uncover stories so interesting our readers absolutely must share them.”2

Target audience: Millennials.3

Publisher: Minute Media.4

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: Civilian magazine.

Medium: Online.5

Content: Fun and informative pieces on a wide variety of subjects with a focus on shareability.6

Frequency of publication: New stories posted daily.7

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted

Types of contributions accepted: “We’re always looking for lists and Big Questions to fill out those two sections of the site, but if you know a great story from history, a strange science phenomenon, or anything else fascinating that we need to cover, we’d love to hear it.”8

Submission and review process: Send pitches to webpitches [at] mentalfloss.com.9

Editorial tone: Informal and conversational. Witty, humorous, and informative.

Style guide used: None stated.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

This would be an excellent publication for LIS authors. Librarians are knowledge and information brokers and are often referred to as Renaissance people because of their vast array of knowledge. This type of website caters to that deep storehouse of information. And this website in particular might provide a nice respite from the regular scholarly articlesa way to showcase not only your knowledge but your sense of humor.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: The website receives 11.9 million unique visitors per month.10

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information about audience location is not provided, but content is written in English. Readers have a high degree of knowledge in pop culture, trivia, and current events.

Reader characteristics: According to the website, readers are “brainy millennials.”11 In general, readers want to expand their knowledge in easily digested tidbits without having to read a whole book on a subject. For example, a past issue boiled down complex theories such as chaos theory, string theory, evolution, game theory, and artificial intelligence into one-to-two-page summaries that mix facts with wit and humor. There are no particular biases in the readership of this publication, except a propensity for trivia and Jeopardy-like knowledge.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Readers’ LIS knowledge would vary depending on their interest and work environment. It would be safe to assume a number of librarians read and enjoy this publication, but as the focus is on providing intelligent, humorous articles, use of LIS jargon should be avoided.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Potential authors should keep in mind that readers already have a vast amount of information and wish to add to that knowledge in an enjoyable way. When writing articles for this publication, try to mix education with entertainment. No topic is off limits if you can approach it with new or interesting information presented in a fun way.

Last updated: October 17, 2018


References

Show 11 footnotes

  1.  Mental Floss, Ulrichsweb Global Serials Directory, accessed March 24, 2018, http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com.libaccess.sjlibrary.org/title/1521935574828/407043
  2. “About Us,” mentalfloss.com, accessed October 17, 2018, http://mentalfloss.com/about-us
  3. “About Us,”  minutemedia.com, accessed October 17, 2018, https://www.minutemedia.com/about-us
  4. “About Us,”  minutemedia.com, accessed October 17, 2018, https://www.minutemedia.com/about-us
  5. “This is Our Last Print Issue!,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, https://service.mentalfloss.com/servlet/Show?WESPAGE=csp-dp/login.jsp&MSRSMAG=LF
  6. About Us
  7. This is Our Last Print Issue!
  8. “Freelance Help Wanted,” mentalfloss.com, accessed December 11, 2016, http://mentalfloss.com/article/66292/freelance-help-wanted
  9. Freelance Help Wanted.”
  10. About Us
  11. What is mental_floss?
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