Wikis Archive

Vox

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Vox

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: https://www.vox.com

Purpose, objective, or mission: Information goes here.

Target audience: Information goes here.

Publisher: Information goes here.

Peer reviewed? Information goes here.

Type: Civilian publication.

Medium: Information goes here.

Content: Information goes here.

Frequency of publication: Information goes here.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: Information goes here.

Types of contributions accepted: Information goes here. First Person section (https://www.vox.com/first-person) is “Vox’s home for compelling, provocative narrative essays.” Lots of info on First Person here: https://www.vox.com/2015/6/12/8767221/vox-first-person-explained. Here’s one example of a First Person article related to libraries (and there are probably more): https://www.vox.com/first-person/2018/7/26/17616516/amazon-silicon-valley-libraries-forbes. [Check to see if other kinds of submissions are accepted as well.]

Submission and review process: Information goes here.

Editorial tone: Information goes here.

Style guide used: Information goes here.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information goes here.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Information goes here.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information goes here.

Reader characteristics: Information goes here.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Information goes here.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information goes here.

Last updated: Date goes here


References

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Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL

ISSN: XXXX-XXXX

Website: http://codex.acrlla.org

Purpose, objective, or mission: Information goes here.

Target audience: Information goes here.

Publisher: Information goes here.

Peer reviewed? Information goes here.

Type: Information goes here. Choose from: LIS scholarly journal, LIS professional or trade publication, or civilian publication.

Medium: Information goes here.

Content: Information goes here.

Frequency of publication: Information goes here.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://journal.acrlla.org/index.php/codex/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Types of contributions accepted: Information goes here.

Submission and review process: Information goes here.

Editorial tone: Information goes here.

Style guide used: Information goes here.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Information goes here… According to a fall 2018 call for submissions from editor Megan Lowe, “You don’t have to be a librarian, work in Louisiana, or even be a member of ACRL or ACRL-LA to submit. We welcome submissions from staff and LIS students as well! We’re all in this together!” [Megan might be able to provide a link to this call… sorry I didn’t keep original post and don’t remember which listserv it appeared on.–LP]

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Information goes here.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Information goes here.

Reader characteristics: Information goes here.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Information goes here.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information goes here.

Last updated: Date goes here


References

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Online Searcher

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Online Searcher: Information Discovery, Technology, Strategies  

ISSN: 2324-96841

Website: http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Online Searcher is the definitive voice for information professionals in academic, corporate, government, law, medical, public library, knowledge management, web development, and freelance environments.”2

Target audience: “Online Searcher is the go-to publication for dedicated web researchers, database professionals, librarians in academic, corporate, public, and government work settings, and purchasers/licensees of information resources.”3

Publisher: Information Today, Inc.4

Peer reviewed? No.5

Type: LIS professional or trade publication6

Medium: Print and online.7

Content: “Online Searcher provides subscribers with the information they need to:

  • Effectively manage online research projects
  • Conduct successful internet and database searches
  • Determine utility of new technologies
  • Build innovative services within their organizations
  • Assess the worth of new and changed resources
  • Discover trends affecting information professionals
  • Strategize services to boost the value of information departments and libraries”8

Frequency of publication: Six times per year.9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml

Types of contributions accepted: “Online Searcher covers the entire range of electronic information topics, including industry trends; new products and technologies; professional, business and consumer online services; the internet; enterprise-wide information management; practical search and information management techniques; information professional roles and responsibilities, electronic content; quality issues; web design from an information professional perspective; enterprise search; intranet creation and promotion; and search engines.”10

Submission and review process: Contact the editor with your proposal. “If you’d like to write for Online Searcher, please contact me (Marydee Ojala) to discuss an idea. I’d also be happy to review an outline or draft proposal. Author Guidelines are provided hereMarydee Ojala Online Searcher • P.O. 78225 • Indianapolis, IN 46278 • 317-876-8100 • Fax: 317-876-8300 marydee@xmission.com11

Editorial tone: Per the Author Guidelines, “Write in simple, straightforward English. Short, pithy, fact-filled articles are much better than long, wordy pieces. Write tersely, in popular magazine style, not in verbose, academic prose.”12

Style guide used: See the Author Guidelines for specific information.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Online Searcher is widely read by library and information science professionals, guaranteeing authors a substantial amount of exposure. There are numerous publication opportunities for LIS authors, as this journal touches on a diverse assortment of topics from book/product reviews, conference coverage, and technologies such as website design and user experience. Most information professionals will be able to find an appropriate angle to pitch to this publication.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: “The Information Today, Inc. website is now averaging more than 50,000 visitors each month.”13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is printed in English out of Medford, New Jersey. There is no audience location data readily available, but it should be assumed that the majority of its readership resides in North America.14

Reader characteristics: Most of this publication’s readership consists of working information professionals. Readers of Online Searcher (along with readers of its sister publications, Information Today and Computers in Libraries) are 27% academic librarians, 24% special librarians, 21% public librarians.15

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: This readership will have a solid knowledge of LIS subject matter, but as a this is not a scholarly publication, academic jargon should be left out.12

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Since much of the audience for this publication are information professionals, this is a great opportunity to turn practical experience and knowledge into an article that will reach an engaged and informed readership. Readers will, however, prefer concise, magazine-style writing that makes clear and fast points. As over 70% of its readers are librarians, this publication is a great opportunity to connect to one’s peers and showcase relevant information that others in the profession will benefit from.

Last updated: October 30, 2018


References

Show 16 footnotes

  1. “Online Searcher,” OCLC WorldCat, accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/online-searcher/oclc/812038505
  2. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  3. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  4. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  5. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  6. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  7. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  8. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  9. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  10. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  11. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  12. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
  13. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  14. “Online Searcher,” Information Today,Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/onlinesearcher/
  15. “Media Kit,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 30, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/advert/2019/2019-ITI-Combined-Media-Kit.pdf
  16. “Author Guidelines,” Information Today, Inc., accessed October 10, 2018, http://www.infotoday.com/OnlineSearcher/Author-Guidelines.shtml
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Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (JALIA)

ISSN: 2475-0158 (Print) 2475-0166 (Online)1

Website: https://www.alia.org.au/jalia

Purpose, objective, or mission: “The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is the flagship journal of the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA).”2. “The Journal aims to stimulate discussion and inform practice by showcasing original peer reviewed research articles and other scholarly papers about, or relevant to, the Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions.”3

Target audience: “It is a quarterly publication for information science researchers, information professionals, related disciplines and industries.”4

Publisher: Routledge/Taylor and Francis5

Peer reviewed? Yes. “All Research and Research-in-Practice articles in JALIA have undergone double-blind peer review. Information-in-practice papers will undergo editorial screening.”6

Type: LIS scholarly journal

Medium: Print and Online7

Content: According to their website, this journal publishes, research papers; research-in-practice papers; information-in-practice papers; and book reviews.8 Research papers and book reviews make up the majority of the publication. Book reviews are accepted for any library related topic or resource and can range from personal digital archiving, marketing, genealogy, youth resources, and much more. If it is a topic a librarian might find useful, it has a chance of being published here. Research-in-practice and information-in-practice papers appear to be research papers that focus on practical applications. Examples can be seen by viewing the journal’s table of contents.

Frequency of publication: Quarterly9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=ualj21&page=instructions

Types of contributions accepted: “This journal accepts the following article types: Research papers; Research-in-practice papers; Information-in-practice papers; Book reviews.”10

Submission and review process: “Please ensure your manuscript is anonymised for peer review. A minimum of two files should be prepared for submission: 1) Title page (including title, author names and details, acknowledgements as well as funding and grant-awarding bodies) 2) Manuscript – anonymised (including title, abstract and keywords on first page; main text; references; appendices (as appropriate); table(s) with caption(s) (on individual pages); figure caption(s) (as a list). If you are including tables and/or figures in your manuscript, please submit these as additional files headed ‘Tables’ or ‘Figures’. Please include a word count for your paper. A typical peer reviewed research paper for this journal should be more than 5000 and no more than 8000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical peer reviewed research-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2500 and no more than 5000 words; this limit does not include tables, references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. A typical information-in-practice paper for this journal should be more than 2000 and no more than 2500 words; this limit does not include tables, references, footnotes, figure captions, endnotes. For other types of submissions, please contact the editors.”11

Editorial tone: Scholarly

Style guide used: “Please refer to these quick style guidelines when preparing your paper, rather than any published articles or a sample copy. Please use British (-ise) spelling style consistently throughout your manuscript. Please use single quotation marks, except where ‘a quotation is “within” a quotation’. Please note that long quotations should be indented without quotation marks.”12

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association offers a variety of publishing opportunities for LIS authors. Whether it’s original research, advancements in professional practice, or book reviews, there are many different writing avenues to explore. As this journal focuses on Australian library and information research, potential authors should tailor their writing to this geographical area and take care to submit works that will be relevant to Australia and Southern Asia Pacific regions. That said, this journal also invites contributions from around the world. For the North American LIS researcher and author, this journal provides an opportunity to showcase original research to a global community. Additionally, this publication also publishes a wealth of book reviews.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not readily available for this journal. However, as the flagship publication for the ALIA, the journal is available to 5000 institutional members of the professional organization and therefore should be assumed has a wide audience.13

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: A majority of readership will be information professionals from Australia, however, “ALIA welcomes anyone with an interest in libraries and information management,”14 so readership is likely diverse both in profession and location. This publication prints in English and requests British English style spellings be used.15

Reader characteristics: Readers of this publication will have a strong interests in library and information science research and many will be ALIA members. They are an educated and diverse group interested in staying on top of the latest research and resources for LIS fields.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although some readers may not be information science professionals, the majority work in LIS fields and would therefore be very knowledgeable about LIS subjects.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association is an internationally recognized publication that holds high standards for its published works. This journal reaches a wide audience of library and information professionals who are interested in current research in the field as well as relevant issues in their workplaces. Focus on LIS topics relevant to Australian and Southern Asia Pacific regions will be prevalent but there is also opportunity for broader library science articles as well as reviews of a variety of LIS related books/resources.

Last updated: October 4, 2018


References

Show 15 footnotes

  1. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  2. “Journals,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 3, 2018,  https://www.alia.org.au/jalia
  3. Journals
  4. Journals
  5. Journals
  6. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  7. Journals
  8. Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  9. Journals
  10.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  11.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  12.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  13. “About ALIA,” Australian Library and Information Association, accessed October 4, 2018  https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia
  14.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
  15.  “Journal of the Australian Library and Information Association,” Taylor and Francis Online, accessed October 3, 2018 https://tandfonline.com/action/journalInformation?show=aimsScope&journalCode=ualj21
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Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

ISSN: 2474-7459 1

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy is the official journal of the Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF), an office of the American Library Association.”2 Our goal is to have JIFP at the center of discourse on intellectual freedom and privacy issues in libraries.”3

Website: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/index

Target audience: Librarians, scholars, and researchers.

Publisher: American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 606114

Peer reviewed? This publication welcomes both peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed articles.5

Type: LIS scholarly journal.

Medium: Online.6

Content:  “Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy (JIFP) will incorporate many of the features of the Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom. Readers will still read in each issue about the latest incidents of book banning in “censorship dateline,” the latest court rulings in “from the bench,” legal controversies in “is it legal?” and, of course, “success stories.” New ALA intellectual freedom policies and reports to the ALA Council from the Intellectual Freedom Committee and the Freedom to Read Foundation will also continue to appear. In addition, the journal will include refereed essays and peer-reviewed articles on intellectual freedom and privacy, as well as book reviews, legal briefs and opinion pieces.”7

Frequency of publication: Quarterly. “Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy is published quarterly (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter) by the American Library Association, 50 E. Huron St., Chicago, IL 60611.”8

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions

Types of contributions accepted: “The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy welcomes submissions related to intellectual freedom and privacy, both in libraries and in the wider world. Submissions can include:

  • research articles (peer reviewed)
  • non-peer reviewed articles and essays discussing or describing policies, practices, projects, law, and scholarship related to intellectual freedom and privacy
  • personal accounts of censorship and intellectual freedom challenges
  • opinion pieces and essays on current and topical issues
  • book and publication reviews

Features: Original research articles submitted for peer review. Submissions should be 4,000-8,000 words (references included), formatted in Chicago Style (author-date), and anonymized for double-blind peer review.

Commentaries: Shorter essays, think pieces, or general commentary on topical issues, controversies and emerging questions for the field. Commentaries are typically 500-1000 words (references included) and formatted in Chicago Style (author-date). Commentaries will be reviewed by the editorial staff.

Book Reviews: Reviews of recent books relevant to the field are welcome. Reviews should be 800-1000 words (references included), and formatted in Chicago Style (author-date), and will be reviewed by the editorial staff.”9

Submission and review process: Queries can be sent to Managing Editor Deborah Caldwell-Stone (dstone@ala.org) or Editor Shannon Oltmann (shannon.oltmann@uky.edu).10

Editorial tone: Peer-reviewed feature articles are expected to be scholarly, while commentaries, book reviews, and news items might take on a more conversational tone as long as their content is well researched and arguments are well supported.

Style guide used: Chicago Manual of Style.11

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy provides much potential to LIS authors. Since this journal publishes both peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed articles, professionals with diverse backgrounds and various publishing goals will find  this a suitable journal to submit to. Intellectual freedom and privacy are some of the core principles libraries are built on, therefore, librarians of all areas are likely to have much to contribute to this publication. As a fairly recent publication, The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy is actively seeking submissions and enjoys working with new authors. This is an excellent opportunity for LIS professionals to gain publishing credentials and be published in a scholarly journal.

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation statistics are not available for this publication, however, as a journal of the American Library Association, it can be assumed that a large portion of its 58,000 members are potential readers.12

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: This publication is international in scope and published in English.13

Reader characteristics: Readers of this publication are likely librarians, scholars, researchers, and other LIS professionals interested in intellectual freedom, privacy, and related topics.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: As a scholarly journal of the American Library Association, strong knowledge of LIS subject matter can be assumed.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

The Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy’s readers will be eager and open to learning about the most recent research and concerns regarding intellectual freedom and privacy, both in libraries and around the world. Readers are educated professionals and advocates of libraries and their core principles.

Last updated: 11/08/2018


References

Show 13 footnotes

  1. Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, OCLC World Cat, accessed November 6, 2018, http://www.worldcat.org/title/journal-of-intellectual-freedom-privacy/oclc/953205347
  2. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  3. “Editorial Policies,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  4. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  5. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  6. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
  7. “Editorial Policies,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#custom-0
  8. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/editorialPolicies#focusAndScope
  9. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  10. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  11. “Submissions,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about/submissions
  12. “ALA Annual Membership Statistics,” AlA.org, accessed November 8, 2018, http://www.ala.org/membership/membershipstats_files/annual_memb_stats
  13. “About,” Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy, ALA.org, accessed November 6, 2018, https://journals.ala.org/index.php/jifp/about
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Libraries: Culture, History, and Society


About the publication

TitleLibraries: Culture, History, and Society

ISSN: 2473-0343 (Print) and 2473-036X (Online)1

Websitehttp://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html

Purpose, objective, or mission: “Libraries: Culture, History, and Society aims to study libraries within their broader historical, humanistic, and social contexts.”2

Target audience: LHRT members and library historians (both professional historians and hobbyists)3

Publisher: The Pennsylvania State University Press4

Peer reviewed? Yes5

Type: LIS scholarly6

Medium: Print and online7

Content: “In addition to Library Science, the journal welcomes contributors from History, English, Literary Studies, Sociology, Education, Gender/Women’s Studies, Race/Ethnic Studies, Political Science, Architecture, Anthropology, Philosophy, Geography, Economics, and other disciplines. The only journal in the United States devoted to library history, LCHS positions library history as its own field of scholarship, while promoting innovative cross-disciplinary research on libraries’ relationships with their unique environments.”8

Frequency of publication: Twice a year9

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelineshttp://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf

Types of contributions accepted: “Libraries: Culture, History, and Society welcomes submissions of research papers. Manuscripts that offer interdisciplinary perspectives are strongly encouraged, as are authors from outside library science. LCHS also publishes evaluative reviews of books that complement our journal’s mission to situate libraries within their broader historical context.”10

Submission and review process: The Submission Guidelines page has a very detailed list of requirements for submissions. As is standard, the journal only accepts unpublished articles and articles that aren’t currently under review elsewhere.11 Authors are asked to create an account through Editorial Manager and submit their manuscripts there.

As for the review process, manuscripts undergo a double-blind peer review after passing the initial editorial screening.12

Editorial tone: Scholarly but very readable13

Style guide usedChicago Manual of Style, notes system14

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is an excellent publication for LIS scholars interested in a wide variety of topics pertaining to LIS history. In addition to U.S. history, the journal’s third and fourth issues will cover libraries in the Jewish settlements of Argentina, 100 years of libraries and the library profession in Catalonia, and the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard a library user in Copenhagen.15 Additionally, the journal was just launched in 2017 16, providing LIS authors with a unique opportunity to guide the journal’s formative years.

Additionally, despite the journal’s youth, it’s the official journal of the Library History Round Table, a respected organization that dates back to 1947.17

Thus,  authors can take pride in the knowledge that they’re contributing to the mission of a well-established organization with a storied history.

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Circulation numbers are not available.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: The journal is written using standard American spelling,18 and the majority of its editorial board members live in the U.S.19 Despite this majority, the editors are eager to receive contributions from authors all over the globe to show the enormous diversity in libraries.20

Reader characteristics: Readers are likely to be well-versed in LIS history. In keeping with the scholarly nature of this journal, readers will likely have a bachelor’s degree (at minimum). Additionally, they will be fluent in English.

Reader knowledge of LIS subject matter: Although readers should still be familiar with basic LIS terminology, Libraries: Culture, History, and Society is not as technical as, say, Journal of Library MetadataThis characteristic is largely influenced by the journal’s broad historical focus, meaning that its articles are more concerned with the broader sociological factors (e.g., fiscal crises)21 and how said factors shaped various libraries than the finer technical operations of libraries.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Readers will expect authors to be well-versed in LIS history and ideally, have a background in sociology, history, etc. Furthermore, readers will appreciate readable, yet well-researched articles that define unfamiliar terms where necessary and favor facts over opinion.

Last updated: August 31, 2018


References

Show 21 footnotes

  1.   Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  2.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  3.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  4.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  5.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  6.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  7.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  8.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  9.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  10.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  11. “Manuscript Format for Articles,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf
  12.  “Manuscript Format for Articles,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf
  13.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  14. “Manuscript Format for Articles,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf
  15. Eric Novotny and Bernadette Lear, email message to author, August 31, 2018.
  16.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed July 21, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  17. “Library History Round Table (LHRT) The American Library Association Archives,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed August 2, 2018, https://archives.library.illinois.edu/alaarchon/?p=creators/creator&id=3499
  18. Libraries: Culture, History, and Society Submission Guidelines for Authors,” Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed August 2, 2018, http://www.editorialmanager.com/LCHS/account/LCHS%20Author%20Submission%20Guidelines.pdf
  19.  Libraries: Culture, History, and Society, Library History Round Table of the American Library Association, accessed August 2, 2018, http://www.psupress.org/Journals/jnls_LCHS.html
  20.  Eric Novotny and Bernadette Lear, email message to author, August 31, 2018.
  21.  Jeffrey A. Kroessler, “One Staff, Two Branches: The Queens Borough Public Library and New York City’s Fiscal Crisis of the 1970s,” Libraries: Culture, History, and Society 2, no. 1 (2018): 72, accessed August 2, 2018, https://doi.org/10.5325/libraries.2.1.0072
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Purdue University Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: Purdue University Press

Website: http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/

Purpose, objective, or mission: 

Target audience: 

Owner: 

Are published books peer reviewed? 

Types of books published: 

Medium: 

Topics covered: 

Number of titles published per year: 

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: 

Types of submissions accepted: 

Submission and review process: 

Editorial tone: 

Style guide used: 

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Information goes here.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:

Reader characteristics:

Knowledge of LIS subject matter:

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information goes here.

Last updated: Date goes here


References

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MIT Press

 

Publisher analysis


About the publisher

Name: MIT Press

Website: http://mitpress.mit.edu/

Purpose, objective, or mission: 

Target audience: 

Owner: 

Are published books peer reviewed? 

Types of books published: 

Medium: 

Topics covered: 

Number of titles published per year: 

About the publisher’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: 

Types of submissions accepted: 

Submission and review process: 

Editorial tone: 

Style guide used: 

Conclusion: Evaluation of publisher’s potential for LIS authors

Information goes here.

 

Audience analysis


About the publisher’s audience

Size (as measured by average number of copies per title published)

Audience location and language or cultural considerations:

Reader characteristics:

Knowledge of LIS subject matter:

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Information goes here.

Last updated: Date goes here


References

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Tame the Web

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Tame the Web (TTW)

ISSN: N/A

Website: https://tametheweb.com/

Purpose, objective, or mission: From TTW‘s About page: “Tame the Web (TTW) endeavors to provide information and discussion, through blogging, on emerging technology, socio-technological trends, the evolving hyperlinked library, LIS education, and human-centered services for LIS students and information professionals in the field.”1

Target audience: LIS students and professionals.

Publisher: TTW is a WordPress site + blog created and run by Dr. Michael Stephens, an associate professor at San Jose State University’s School of Information.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog featuring guest posts by students and contributors at the invitation of Dr. Stephens.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts and articles, book reviews. Take a look at the list of categories on the left hand side of the site. Topics include engaging users, gaming, libraries/web 2.0, participatory culture and many others.

Frequency of publication: Several new articles and posts each month.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: All submissions are by invitation only.

Types of contributions accepted: Guest blog posts.

Editorial tone: Casual, but informative.

Style guide used: Unknown.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

Contributing authors of TTW are SJSU School of Information students and colleagues of Dr. Stephens.

The site is geared towards, but certainly not limited to, public librarianship. Recent guest posts include the unwritten, daily tasks of a user-centric library director and an introspective look at a librarian’s career throughout her thirties.

The Stephen Barnes quote within the header of the site gives readers and potential authors a good idea of the theme of TTW‘s content: “We must never forget that the human heart is at the center of the technological maze.”2

 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Tame the Web‘s content is freely available on the web. If you are interested in Dr. Stephens’ published works, check out his publications page.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: Readership is primarily in the U.S. and Canada, with articles published in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are LIS students and professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship and information science.

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but varied. Most posts are relatively LIS jargon-free.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

Tame the Web‘s readership is unique in that readers enjoy posts on TTW but also interact with Dr. Stephens via webinars and presentations. Readers come to TTW for its variety of guest posts and straightforward, earnest writing. As a potential author, you will find a varied audience of LIS students and seasoned professionals from across the spectrum of librarianship.

Last updated: May 5, 2018


References

Show 2 footnotes

  1. “About Tame the Web,” TameTheWeb.com, accessed February 28, 2018, https://tametheweb.com/about-tame-the-web/
  2. “Tame the Web Home Page”
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Independent Ideas

 

Publication analysis


About the publication

Title: Independent Ideas

ISSN: N/A

Website: http://aislnews.org/

Purpose, objective, or mission: Independent Ideas is the blog of AISL, the Association of Independent School Librarians.

Created in 1987, the founders of AISL “envisioned an apolitical and affordable association – complementary to other library associations – that would provide a means of exchanging information, ideas and best practices among a network of independent school librarians.”1

Target audience: School librarians and members of AISL.

Publisher: The blog is run and maintained by AISL members.

Peer reviewed? No.

Type: LIS professional blog.

Medium: Online.

Content: Blog posts of varying lengths, usually complete with photos or videos. There’s a group of frequently used tags on the right hand side of the blog that show some of the most frequently written about topics: collaboration, information literacy, research, school librarians and technology are some of the tags used most often.2

Frequency of publication: New posts are published a few times a week.

About the publication’s submission guidelines

Location of submission guidelines: If you are an AISL member and you would like to write a blog post, send an email to Barbara Share: bshare@ransoneverglades.org.3

Types of contributions accepted: Book reviews, ideas for children’s programming and more.

Submission and review process: Unknown, send inquiries to Barbara Share at the email posted above.

Editorial tone: Casual, yet professional.

Style guide used: None.

Conclusion: Evaluation of publication’s potential for LIS authors

If you are a member of AISL and you have written a short, informal piece that would be useful to your peers, this blog may be a viable publication option. Topics are varied and tied to school librarianship of students in all grades. Recent posts have been about topics such as are librarians actually theater people? and high schoolers acting out Google searches. Humor and creativity are found all throughout this blog, so think outside of the box!
 

Audience analysis


About the publication’s readers

Publication circulation: Though the blog is geared towards members of AISL, anyone can access and read all posts.

Audience location and language or cultural considerations: AISL members are in the U.S. and Canada, and blog posts are in English.

Reader characteristics: Readers are like-minded librarians looking to exchange information and ideas about their field. There are approximately 700 members of AISL.4

Knowledge of LIS subject matter: Strong, but focused on children and school librarianship.

Conclusion: Analysis of reader characteristics and their potential impact on authors

AISL is a unique, close-knitted community of independent school librarians, and readers of its blog are eager to learn and collaborate. Working with children of all ages requires fresh ideas and innovation, so you can be sure readers of Independent Ideas are eager for new voices in the field of school librarianship.

Last updated: May 3, 2018


References

Show 4 footnotes

  1. “About AISL,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/, accessed April 30, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/
  2. “Independent Ideas Home page,” http://aislnews.org/, accessed May 2, 2018, http://aislnews.org/
  3. “AISL Blog,” https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog, accessed May 1, 2018, https://aisl.wildapricot.org/aislblog
  4. “About AISL.”
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